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Energy crisis in Europe?

SomeGirl

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Autumn 2022
Hey everyone,
I've been reading about the energy crisis and cost of living crisis hitting Europe, and the fears that things might get even worse this winter. How is that affecting the Caminos? Have the prices for room and board gone up? Would rooms be unheated if I was walking in late autumn? I was planning (or not planning!) a very last minute walk, doing the Le Puy route starting in mid October. Is that too late in the year? Any guidance or advice would be greatly appreciated, because I feel quite clueless.
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.
Hi, @SomeGirl . Welcome to the forum.

Prices have gone up in Spain like everywhere else. Energy has always been more expensive in Europe than in North America, so heating has always been less "reliable" in rooms on the Camino. Even in years past, some albergues closed in the autumn because of the cost of heating made them unviable. I expect that albergue and hostal operators will be even more concerned this year, and they will need to conserve electricity and reduce the heat, and/or recover some of the costs from us. We should respect their efforts to keep the costs down - for example by carrying our own sleeping bags and warm clothes (e.g. down jackets), and not using hair dryers to dry our clothes.

Here are some threads on the subject:
You can also browse the threads tagged with money/banking/budget for some cost and budget discussions.
 
Hey everyone,
I've been reading about the energy crisis and cost of living crisis hitting Europe, and the fears that things might get even worse this winter. How is that affecting the Caminos? Have the prices for room and board gone up? Would rooms be unheated if I was walking in late autumn? I was planning (or not planning!) a very last minute walk, doing the Le Puy route starting in mid October. Is that too late in the year? Any guidance or advice would be greatly appreciated, because I feel quite clueless.

You'll find the price of pretty much everything in euros has gone up recently; however, as you're from the US you'll find that you're currently getting a significantly better exchange rate to the USD. It touched parity (one-for-one) in the last week or so.
 
Setting aside the half tonne minimum of kerosene you will personally burn crossing the atlantic, fuel costs in Europe are rising alarmingly and we are told to expect it to reach a crisis point this coming winter, it already has for many of us.You may find many albergues are unheated and should plan accordingly with warm layers and a good sleeping bag if you plan to walk beyond October..
 
Setting aside the half tonne minimum of kerosene you will personally burn crossing the atlantic, fuel costs in Europe are rising alarmingly and we are told to expect it to reach a crisis point this coming winter, it already has for many of us.You may find many albergues are unheated and should plan accordingly with warm layers and a good sleeping bag if you plan to walk beyond October..
I had initially been planning to do the Appalachian Trail next spring, but unfortunately it's not working out with my schedule, so this is plan B. But, on the plus side, I can actually use my French and Spanish, so that will be fun. I've already bought a sleeping bag and tent for the AT, but it sounds like the tent probably won't be very practical here, since there doesn't seem to be much free camping along the Caminos. I've got hiking clothes and plenty of layers. I did tea house trekking in Nepal and froze at night, and I don't really want to repeat that!
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.
I had initially been planning to do the Appalachian Trail next spring, but unfortunately it's not working out with my schedule, so this is plan B. But, on the plus side, I can actually use my French and Spanish, so that will be fun. I've already bought a sleeping bag and tent for the AT, but it sounds like the tent probably won't be very practical here, since there doesn't seem to be much free camping along the Caminos. I've got hiking clothes and plenty of layers. I did tea house trekking in Nepal and froze at night, and I don't really want to repeat that!
Perhaps something like this has already been designed: a skinny, noiseless material that takes up 'no' space or weight and doesn't cost the earth - a kind of survival blanket. If not yet designed, go to it, inventors. Meantime, what about something like this?
0072D1EA-DF62-4719-BF76-BFC68BB32F56.jpeg
 
@SomeGirl as you are talking about the Le Puy, I think a tent is entirely possible as there are far more camp grounds along that route than the Camino Francés in Spain. This is a website by two Australians - see down the page to "Is accommodation difficult to find on the Le Puy".

September is a very popular month for walking in France (not just on the Chemin, but on all the GR routes) but by mid October it will be getting colder and things will be quieter. Getting into November it is often rainy, as well as cold. Snow on the Aubrac is a possibility, and that is one area where we managed to lose the trail, even without snow. So take care. If you have walked in Nepal you are well prepared!

One particular difference between the Le Puy and walking in Spain is that you will nearly always have to ring ahead and not "walk up" to your accommodation - with campsites to check they are actually open, with gites that they are open and to let them know if you want a meal. Many of the villages no longer have supermarkets or restaurants or even a bakery or cafe - inhabitants drive to larger centres to shop - and even in larger towns things are closed on Sundays and Mondays. So you need to know what is available and to think ahead about provisions.

Having said all that, it really is a beautiful, beautiful route. Glorious countryside, pretty villages, and the river towns on the Lot are stunning. Fabulous food and wine. Good access by train to Le Puy, Figeac, Moissac, Cahors.
 

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