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Energy please!

Jakke

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues (2016)
Via de la Plata / Sanabrés (2017)
Barcelona - Fisterra (2018)
#1
I have been walking from Montserrat and I am still on the way.
This was today rather typical:
- toasted bread 3 peaces (useless white bread)
- 2 cups of marmelade - sugar (I have diabetis)
- 2 cakes (sugar, white flour)
-2 cups of coffee

My fellow pilgrims, I believe that I am not the only one loosing weight for the wrong reasons. Pilgrims need energy! Now I often have to buy cafe con leche and tortillas after eating at the aubergue.

Could someone please suggest that the hospitaleros investigate the alternatives? Scandinavian or German rye bread, eggs, peanutbutter w/o extra sugar etc. I would pay for a more substantial breakfast.
Bananas are appearing more often now. Excellent!
 

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SabineP

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
#2
I have been walking from Montserrat and I am still on the way.
This was today rather typical:
- toasted bread 3 peaces (useless white bread)
- 2 cups of marmelade - sugar (I have diabetis)
- 2 cakes (sugar, white flour)
-2 cups of coffee

My fellow pilgrims, I believe that I am not the only one loosing weight for the wrong reasons. Pilgrims need energy! Now I often have to buy cafe con leche and tortillas after eating at the aubergue.

Could someone please suggest that the hospitaleros investigate the alternatives? Scandinavian or German rye bread, eggs, peanutbutter w/o extra sugar etc. I would pay for a more substantial breakfast.
Bananas are appearing more often now. Excellent!
Sorry to hear you do not seem to find the right food for your dietary needs on this Camino.
I can understand though that hospitaleros don't want to invest in more breakfast products especially not on a lesser travelled Camino.
And of course prepacked cakes have a longer shelf life than fresh bread.
And stopping in a cafe or small tienda for a coffee or buying fresh produce helps the local economy.
Don't forget the local markets either.
 

David Tallan

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - central from Oporto (2018 - planned)
#4
We also often did not breakfast at the albergue. My breakfast of choice was a bocadillo de tortilla (de patatas) and a cafe con leche and a fresh squeezed orange juice. Sometimes a chocolate pastry, too.
 

Anamiri

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
#5
I found that albergue breakfasts were a lottery. Sometimes good,mostly not - I feel cheated to be handed slices of cheap processed bread, when I know how wonderful their bread can be. I preferred stopping an hour in, getting coffee, and breakfast in the next village.
 

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TMcA

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona to Santiago (2013)
Le Puy to Pamplona in segments (2013 - 2016)
Pamplona to León
#6
Most albergues do not offer huevos fritos maybe with patatas fritas, bacon or jamon, and/or tostas. But you can order in many places along the route. Or maybe more easily on the Camino Frances where I just walked. I had mostly local eggs, very fresh. The tostas will be the same toasted white bread you complained about.

Good luck with your desayuo.

Tom
 

RJM

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#7
Yes, the standard (it seems) breakfast of toast and jam, coffee and perhaps some type of sugary pastry is pure shite when it comes to nutrition. I never depended upon it for energy and never took it to be a healthy. Whenever possible I purchased the day before something more robust and substantial to have in the morning. Just a simple bag of salted nuts and a banana will fuel your body better.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#8
I had mostly local eggs, very fresh.
However, insist that they are well-cooked. Revuelta is a good way to have them prepared. I have seen two cases first hand of food poisoning from the very tasty looking sunnyside up eggs. Local production, which is almost universal except for chain food stores, can lead to salmonella. :)
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2017
#9
I recently discovered that SOME pharmacies in Spain now offer protein powder and protein bar dietary supplements. It may be worth investigating.

The brand I saw was called "biManan Subsitutive." They had flavored powder and at least chocolate protein bars. Typically non-sugar sweeteners are used to produce these products.

I have a bariatric lap-band and have to supplement my diet with additional protein each day. Presently, I carry extra packets of powder with me, adding water to reconstitute it. If I can establish a reliable supply this way, I can reduce my pack weight by nearly 2 kg. Since returning from Santiago three weeks ago, I have been looking into where in Spain these products are sold.

FYI, here is the home page for the company I mentioned:

https://www.bimanan.com/productos/sustitutive/

Logically, there may be others. But this is the one I saw featured in several Santiago pharmacies.

Hope this helps.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept 2016
Camino Portuguse Oct (2018)
#10
We too grew tired of white bread. Many days our first stop, even before coffee, would be a market. Fresh fruit was often out breakfast along with what ever cheese was available.

Buen Camino
 

Dorpie

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia 2013
Camino Frances May 2015
Camino Frances July 2017
#11
I regard Albergues very much as a bed, not a bed and breakfast. That they provide any food at all given the prices is impressive to me. In two CFs I've maybe had albergue breakfast three times. Like others above I like to get a good bit of walking, an hour, maybe two in first before I stop for breakfast.
 
#12
I didn't eat the alberque breakfasts very often - even they were offered. I carried nuts and dried fruit, so I would snack on that first thing and drink a bunch of water to hydrate - sometimes I'd eat fresh fruit, cheese, or cured meats too if I had it. Then an hour or two into my walk, I would stop for 2nd breakfast at a bar or cafe along the way.
 

Jakke

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues (2016)
Via de la Plata / Sanabrés (2017)
Barcelona - Fisterra (2018)
#13
I didn't eat the alberque breakfasts very often - even they were offered. I carried nuts and dried fruit, so I would snack on that first thing and drink a bunch of water to hydrate - sometimes I'd eat fresh fruit, cheese, or cured meats too if I had it. Then an hour or two into my walk, I would stop for 2nd breakfast at a bar or cafe along the way.
Yes. We are more or less forced to that strategy. More to carry and sometimes extra time lost. Pauses are of course necessary. Still, so much sugar as is on offer is downright poisenous for anyone.
 

Jakke

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues (2016)
Via de la Plata / Sanabrés (2017)
Barcelona - Fisterra (2018)
#14
I regard Albergues very much as a bed, not a bed and breakfast. That they provide any food at all given the prices is impressive to me. In two CFs I've maybe had albergue breakfast three times. Like others above I like to get a good bit of walking, an hour, maybe two in first before I stop for breakfast.
True, but the aubergues are missing a chance. It hardly is an industrial business secret anymore how bad sugar is for all of us. Not only for diabetics. Time for a statement!
 

Jakke

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues (2016)
Via de la Plata / Sanabrés (2017)
Barcelona - Fisterra (2018)
#15
I recently discovered that SOME pharmacies in Spain now offer protein powder and protein bar dietary supplements. It may be worth investigating.

The brand I saw was called "biManan Subsitutive." They had flavored powder and at least chocolate protein bars. Typically non-sugar sweeteners are used to produce these products.

I have a bariatric lap-band and have to supplement my diet with additional protein each day. Presently, I carry extra packets of powder with me, adding water to reconstitute it. If I can establish a reliable supply this way, I can reduce my pack weight by nearly 2 kg. Since returning from Santiago three weeks ago, I have been looking into where in Spain these products are sold.

FYI, here is the home page for the company I mentioned:

https://www.bimanan.com/productos/sustitutive/

Logically, there may be others. But this is the one I saw featured in several Santiago pharmacies.

Hope this helps.
Thanks! It depends on the sweeteners used whether that is actually just as bad (or worse) than sugar. I steer away from sweeteners. Good tip!
 

SabineP

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
#16
True, but the aubergues are missing a chance. It hardly is an industrial business secret anymore how bad sugar is for all of us. Not only for diabetics. Time for a statement!
Sorry but it is still we ourselves that choose to eat sugary stuff.
Of course the big companies try to influence us but as a consumer we have a choice!
There are healthy alternatives and they are available.Now we just have to say no to the sugar advertisements.
 

Jakke

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues (2016)
Via de la Plata / Sanabrés (2017)
Barcelona - Fisterra (2018)
#17
Sorry to hear you do not seem to find the right food for your dietary needs on this Camino.
I can understand though that hospitaleros don't want to invest in more breakfast products especially not on a lesser travelled Camino.
And of course prepacked cakes have a longer shelf life than fresh bread.
And stopping in a cafe or small tienda for a coffee or buying fresh produce helps the local economy.
Don't forget the local markets either.
Thanks. Good thoughts. Still, much better products have similar shell lives (peanut butter, Scandinavian-type knäkebröd, etc.)
 

Jakke

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues (2016)
Via de la Plata / Sanabrés (2017)
Barcelona - Fisterra (2018)
#18
Sorry but it is still we ourselves that choose to eat sugary stuff.
Of course the big companies try to influence us but as a consumer we have a choice!
There are healthy alternatives and they are available.Now we just have to say no to the sugar advertisements.
Say that again so every pilgrim hears it! Also those, who are ”only” on the way to diabetis 2!
 

SabineP

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
#19
Thanks. Good thoughts. Still, much better products have similar shell lives (peanut butter, Scandinavian-type knäkebröd, etc.)
Again...more costly for those albergues on lesser travelled Caminos.
And if you want healthy and balanced breakfast on a Camino you will have to buy it from a shop beforehand. Or go to a posh hotel with breakfast buffet.
 

Jakke

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues (2016)
Via de la Plata / Sanabrés (2017)
Barcelona - Fisterra (2018)
#20
Again...more costly for those albergues on lesser travelled Caminos.
And if you want healthy and balanced breakfast on a Camino you will have to buy it from a shop beforehand. Or go to a posh hotel with breakfast buffet.
I have to disagree: e.g., oatmeal with some berries cannot be much more expensive. Many would love to pay a little more. The great thing is that an effort is made, but we need to think together, suggest alternatives and not let the hospitaleros’ efforts go to waste (or worse in case of sugar). Thanks for all the good efforts, but we need constructive criticism.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#22
Breakfast habits are changing in Spain, but you wouldn't know it in the albergues. Frequently if you ask for tostada in a café, the default is with tomato, not with jam and butter/margarine. That would have been unheard of outside of Catalunya as recently as 10 years ago, I think. True, it's still white bread, but I had some tostadas on the Mozárabe this year that were amazing -- fresh tomato with garlic and oil, and cheese or jamón serrano draped on top.

If you stay in private accommodations that offer breakfast, you are much more likely to get something more nutritious, but If I stay in an albergue I make sure to have fruit, yoghurt, and nuts in my pack for the morning meal. I think the cost of an albergue just doesn't have much wiggle room for increasing the cost of breakfast. And to think pilgrims would willingly pay more is probably more wishful thinking than reality -- just ask the people who run donativo places!

The weight of the things I mentioned is well worth it for me!
 

Peter Fransiscus

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
All that we are is the result of what we have thought.
#23
I have to disagree: e.g., oatmeal with some berries cannot be much more expensive. Many would love to pay a little more. The great thing is that an effort is made, but we need to think together, suggest alternatives and not let the hospitaleros’ efforts go to waste (or worse in case of sugar). Thanks for all the good efforts, but we need constructive criticism.
Sorry that you disagree , but in my opinion is breakfast not a thing for the albergue . As already stated before they provide a bed and some times breakfast asswell . When not we have to provide breakfast ourselfs .
 

Jakke

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues (2016)
Via de la Plata / Sanabrés (2017)
Barcelona - Fisterra (2018)
#24
Breakfast habits are changing in Spain, but you wouldn't know it in the albergues. Frequently if you ask for tostada in a café, the default is with tomato, not with jam and butter/margarine. That would have been unheard of outside of Catalunya as recently as 10 years ago, I think. True, it's still white bread, but I had some tostadas on the Mozárabe this year that were amazing -- fresh tomato with garlic and oil, and cheese or jamón serrano draped on top.

If you stay in private accommodations that offer breakfast, you are much more likely to get something more nutritious, but If I stay in an albergue I make sure to have fruit, yoghurt, and nuts in my pack for the morning meal. I think the cost of an albergue just doesn't have much wiggle room for increasing the cost of breakfast. And to think pilgrims would willingly pay more is probably more wishful thinking than reality -- just ask the people who run donativo places!

The weight of the things I mentioned is well worth it
Sorry that you disagree , but in my opinion is breakfast not a thing for the albergue . As already stated before they provide a bed and some times breakfast asswell . When not we have to provide breakfast ourselfs .
.

In part I agree. Of course each albergue decides whether they want to / can / are situated well enough to offer a breakfast. The fact is anyway that some do offer it. I would think it a pity if there were to be a reduction of services based on the thinking that it should not be their role. We cannot generalize. The pilgrims tend to be an idealistic lot and some of us will hopefully speak up now and then to achieve improvements. Again, no generalizations, but plenty of those I asked would actually pay more for healthier food when food is offered
 

RJM

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#26
I never expected anything besides a clean bunk and bathroom from an albergue I was spending 5-10 euros on for the night. Any food set out the next morning for me to consume I looked at as an extra and if the food lacked in nutrition, oh well. I am quite capable of feeding myself healthier later at the first opportunity. Besides the other pilgrims always looked to me to enjoy what was set out, and I'd always take time to at least make myself a coffee and socialize.
If fellow pilgrims want to eat badly (or smoke cigarettes and use foul language ☺) that is their choice.
 

Dorpie

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia 2013
Camino Frances May 2015
Camino Frances July 2017
#27
I have to disagree: e.g., oatmeal with some berries cannot be much more expensive. Many would love to pay a little more. The great thing is that an effort is made, but we need to think together, suggest alternatives and not let the hospitaleros’ efforts go to waste (or worse in case of sugar). Thanks for all the good efforts, but we need constructive criticism.
I think you're forgetting that hospitaleros/as are often volunteers working very long hours for nothing and to then expect them to go to wherever the nearest supplier of rye bread and fresh fruit is to provide you with your perfect breakfast is just unreasonable.

Sorry, I don't mean to be rude but I just don't think you're considering that albergues are supposed to be just the most basic of accomodation, I'm overjoyed when they're more than that but I don't expect it. Also while you might have the money to pay extra, for many, maybe six weeks or more on camino is a major investment and even a Euro or two added to accomodation prices each night might prove prohibative.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x3), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham.
2018? CF, again :-)
#28
As long ago as I can remember, Spanish breakfast has always been coffee (or chocolate for children) and a tostada with olive oil (definitely no butter) and if you liked it a raw tomatoe squashed on top.
Different countries, different habits... Bring your own breakfast ingredients if you don't approve of the local fare, there are plenty of shops, markets etc. :)
I don't like Spanish tea for instance (or French for that matter!) after living in the UK for many years....So I make sure my flat in Spain in stocked up with 'proper' tea :D Easy.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#29
I have been walking from Montserrat and I am still on the way.
Hi, Jakke, don't mean to hijack your thread, but I for one would love to hear about the Camino Catalán and how it is going for you, at least after breakfast. ;)

Did you go through Lérida or Huesca? Are you going to join the Aragonés? LT and I met in Montserrat and walked via San Juan de la Paña. It was in June, and the fields were already brown, and I kept thinking it would be SO nice to walk it in spring. Are you enjoying it? Any other peregrinos on the route?

Come to think of it, LT and I stayed in a lot of albergues but I don't remember breakfast ever being included! Buen camino, Laurie
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2017
#30
I expect little or nothing for breakfast, whether in an albergue or hostal (small hotel). I have my protein powder mixed with water... something I must carry and use daily in any event.

Sometimes, I add a single-serving Nescafe coffee tube to the protein powder and use hot water from the tap to get my motor running, just long enough to get me up the route to a cafe / bar and real coffee. If I know this will be the case, I try to purchase a banana or orange and something starchy for a snack first thing the previous day, before I settled in at my accommodation.

Tourists demand, pilgrims are grateful...adapt and overcome.

Hope this helps.
 

Jakke

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues (2016)
Via de la Plata / Sanabrés (2017)
Barcelona - Fisterra (2018)
#31
Hi, Jakke, don't mean to hijack your thread, but I for one would love to hear about the Camino Catalán and how it is going for you, at least after breakfast. ;)

Did you go through Lérida or Huesca? Are you going to join the Aragonés? LT and I met in Montserrat and walked via San Juan de la Paña. It was in June, and the fields were already brown, and I kept thinking it would be SO nice to walk it in spring. Are you enjoying it? Any other peregrinos on the route?

Come to think of it, LT and I stayed in a lot of albergues but I don't remember breakfast ever being included! Buen camino, Laurie
Hi! I have (otherwise) thoroughly enjoyed my camino. I went via Huesca. Generally speaking, I had much luck with the weather. Nature is gorgeous. I’ll break off my camino in Sahagun. I’ll be back to finish it.
 

Jakke

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues (2016)
Via de la Plata / Sanabrés (2017)
Barcelona - Fisterra (2018)
#32
I think you're forgetting that hospitaleros/as are often volunteers working very long hours for nothing and to then expect them to go to wherever the nearest supplier of rye bread and fresh fruit is to provide you with your perfect breakfast is just unreasonable.

Sorry, I don't mean to be rude but I just don't think you're considering that albergues are supposed to be just the most basic of accomodation, I'm overjoyed when they're more than that but I don't expect it. Also while you might have the money to pay extra, for many, maybe six weeks or more on camino is a major investment and even a Euro or two added to accomodation prices each night might prove prohibative.[/QUOTE
While it is true that the breakfast I got was at a „better” aubergue, I see no need to be on the wrong side of history on the sugar issue. I appreciate what hospitaleros and volunteers do. I understand the money issue. I have many caminos ago learned to prepare. All of that does in my eyes not address the issue. Also Scandinavia learned and has improved the offerings. Nobody here should be afraid of upsetting the status quo. There are alternatives. Much appreciated efforts can be used better. I leave this discussion here with the warning that serious diabetics better come prepared.
 


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