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Equipment list and opinions from recent camino

2020 Camino Guides

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
I have seen a young woman wearing jeans, she almost never washed them, because they took ages to dry. If you can cope with the unwashed state it is ok I guess, but when it rains they get very heavy when wet, stay wet on your body, so that's not a great feeling. If you decide not to wear them for a day and put them in your pack they are quite a load to carry. I find the quick drying materials by companies like Columbia, Royal Robins or Godzwana really fantastic and the pants are super comfortable. I washed my pants every day and they were dry within an hour or so. Regards, Gitti
 
timothyd said:
Has anyone walked in jeans? Would it be crazy? I don't own anything more comfortable than jeans.
I'd agree - not great things to wear. When they get wet - and they will - they'll rub and chafe as well as everything else. Cotton holds four times its own weight in water and doesn't give it up easily. Next time you wash your jeans put them in a warm room over a chair and see how long they take to dry.

Its not just that though, you'll lose heat faster in wet clothes which could be a problem (depends when you go of course).

If you really want to wear jeans you could look at Alpkit.com for some outdoorsy jeans that aremade to be more water resistant but I'd still say either proper outdoor trousers - they don't have to be expensive - or lightweight army trousers. The key things are: Light, durable, quick drying.

I used north face trousers last time - they cost a bit more than i'd usually pay but i got caught in rain..they got soaked...and oncethe rain stopped they were dry in about 30 minutes even though it was still drizzling. Well worth it I thought. Don't forget its not just the rain you need to think about - even if it's fairly cool weather when you go you'll be sweating quite a bit on some stretches.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
A lot depends on what trail you walk, and when. I wore jeans last March when I very stupidly walked over the mountain section of the Camino Salvador. (the snow was too deep, I was alone, it was dangerous, I was foolhardy.) I was wearing an old pair of Levi´s, and I was very glad I had them instead of anything lighter or thinner. Thorns, ice-crusted snow, barbed wire, etc. Royal Robbins would not have taken that punishment. And the jeans dried overnight draped over a radiator.

You won´t face those conditions on the Frances (god willing). But never say never.
Plenty of people are out there on the Frances in jeans and sneakers and regular street clothes. But if you have the money and the inclination, the zippy travel wear is the way to go.

Reb.
 

Bridget and Peter

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Home to Reims 2007
Reims to Limoges 2008
Camino Ingles 2009
Limoges to Gernica 2009
Gernica to San Vicente de la Barquera 2010
San Vicente to La Isla 2012
La Isla to Santiago Sept/Oct 2014
DylanRomero said:
The zipper didn't work, but otherwise they were perfect!
Did you wear long shirts?
 

DylanRomero

Member
Haha, no long shirts. The pants had a bit of an overlapping flap in front of the zipper, so it wasn't too risque.

At least I hope it wasn't... :p
 

revrenjen

Member
I'm curious what folk think about using a water bladder as opposed to water bottles. I love the bladder when I'm hiking, but I only do day hikes and weight isn't near as important. On the other hand, you can fill up in the morning in the albergue where you can trust the water. I'm planning my first walk for next May-June, so I'm a total newbie.
 

Nandy61

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2010 CF StJPP to Santiago
2014 CF Leon to Santiago
2015 Primitivo
I had a huge bladder inside my backpack, and it turns out I only used it once and then just resorted to a sports bottle that I kept in an outside side pocket. I just filled it up at every fountain. I kept a small amount of water in the bladder (maybe half a liter?) to have just in case. I used that just once. There are so many fountains on the Camino. Well...not so many after Sarria (oddly) but it still wasn't an issue. My friend used her bladder all the time. She didn't pack as much, so it was much easier to access her camelbak whenever she needed to refill it. Personal preference really.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
I have a 3-liter water bladder that I have been using for several months on daily training walks (normally half full); I must say it is a delightful item and I am glad to have it. I don't know whether it's just me, but I find my shoulders aren't quite limber enough to comfortably reach back to retrieve water bottles stashed in the side pockets of my pack. So I have to stop, remove the pack, drink the water, re-shoulder the pack ... all of which inconvenience leads one to drink rather less water than one really ought to be drinking.

The important thing is to be able to drink water comfortably several times an hour (more if walking on hot days). So if water bottles are comfortable for you - great! If not, the bladders are certainly convenient and functional.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
I have just bought the Aarn Liquid Agility Pack with front balance pockets, there are two options, one is to use the bladder compartment of the pack for a bladder, the other to put 2 waterbottles into the front mesh compartments of the balance pockets. I decided on the bottles as it balances the weight better and since the pack is small 26 ltr, I needed to use the hydration pocket for my poncho and other things. It all works well and I can fit everything in perfectly. No room to spare though. Gitti
p.s.I use two 750 mls waterbottles now instead of the Platypus bottles, as these are too large for the mesh pockets.
 

Attachments

Camino(s) past & future
Frances x5, Portuguese VdlP12, Sanabres, Aragones, Norte,Salvador,Primitivo, VdlP 17,Madrid18Norte
Dear Gitteharre
How on earth do you manage to get all the stuff on your list into a 26 or 32 lit pack?
I take almost the same things but my pack is a 50lit and ends up weighing approx 10 kilos.
please tell me ? I start from Lisbon on 1st Sept to walk the Portuguese Way and I am determined not to suffer the many blisters I had last year walking the Camino Frances. Admittedly I have new wider shoes which should help but need everything in my pack.
Heather from West Australia
 

CaroleH

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdlP 2006, Portugues 2007;Madrid 2009, Finisterre 2009; Sur and VdlP 2011,2013; Manchego and Madrid 2014; VdlP (parts) 2016; Hospitalero plan 2017.
Hi Gitti,
My hubby has bought the Aarn Liquid Agility pack and I've just picked up his front Balance Pockets, 12l. (There are 3 sizes . . . 15 ltr, 12 ltr and 6 ltr.) I'm wondering what size pockets you bought, as I feel these may be too big and not necessary, please? Cheers Carole
 

chris m

New Member
Great list , very wise. I [69 years - help!] had come around to similar conclusions , am starting out this March /April. Encouraging for you to say you got use to the weight ! I am down to 7 . 5 Kg .But please someone advise me . Boot polish and brush ? Army aluminium mess tin ? [5 ozs.] instead of mug.[For drinks and food.] Two shirts , two vests , two trousers , one jumper BUT I could bring also a marino sleeveless OR an all wool vest.Sleeping mat ? Sun cream ? Vasaline ? Foot powder ? I am 63 kilos weight so am still over 10%.
What to do ?
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
LePuy, Frances, Aragones, Ingles, Vezelay, Toulosana, Muxia, Fisterra, Portugues, Sanabres
What to do ?
Ignore the rule of thumb.

Pack what you need. Take nothing that you "might need." If it is too much, you have at least two options.

1) Start the Camino, and throw things away if you pack is too uncomfortable.

2) Pretend that you are on the Camino, and have decided that your pack is too heavy. Throw things out while you are still at home.

Bingo! In both cases you have the right amount of stuff for the Camino. :wink:
 

chris m

New Member
Many thanks for that.You confirm what I think. Don't think I can get below 7 kg without experience . Will just have to dump if necessary.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2015 Camino Portuguese, Appalachian Trail SoBo 2014 ME/GA
Waterproof pants get so hot though. I have found it easier to keep a dry change of clothing when I hike, and just accept the fact that I will get wet.


Waterpoof Overtrousers

It was me that mentioned the waterproof overtrousers.

I took them thinking I would probably ditch them quite soon but we had such bad wet weather this May in France that they proved invaluable for keeping me not so much dry as warm. There was one day when we walked acroos the Aubrac plateau (1,300 metres high) in freezing wind and rain and I hadn't put them on - my legs were soon soaking and so cold in the wind. My companion was in a similar state and could barely speak.

If you are walking in warm weather then they won't be necessary but if you are up high in less than summer temperatures then they make a lot of difference - especially if you are old and a bit rheumatic. Mine only weighed 200 grams and were absolutely waterproof. But I have since bought another pair that weigh only 110 grams - untested as yet.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2015 Camino Portuguese, Appalachian Trail SoBo 2014 ME/GA
For a trek like the Camino I don't think you need such an extensive med kit. I will have ibuprofen and maybe some anti-bacterial ointment. I thru hiked the Appalachian Trail in 2014, and used my bandages and ointment one time (after I gouged my arm jumping away from a falling tree). Leukotape and/or moleskin should be all you need for blisters. After a few days you should have callouses and can ditch all the moleskin.

I work in healthcare and will be carrying a fully stocked first aid kit as well. My plan is to administer aid if needed. I also am using the Camino as a starting point for an around the world trip, so there may be things in here not needed for the Camino per se. I am still in the process of putting it together, but it will include:

Meds
Ibuprofen
Tylenol
Immodium
Sudafed
Claritin
Vicodin
Cipro
Z-Pack

Bandages/Etc
Assorted Bandaids
Steri-Strips of various sizes w/adhesive
Coban (1 in/3 in)
2X2 Gauze Pads
4X4 Gauze Pads
Abd Pads
Kerlix (2 in/4 in)
Antibiotic Ointment
Alcohol Wipes
Betadyne (small bottle)
Moleskin/Blister Management Tools (I have some special wound care stuff for this)
Suture Kit (http://www.rei.com/product/784611) w/extras from work
CPR Mask (http://www.redcrossstore.org/Shopper/Pr ... ItemId=522)
Nitrile Gloves

Again, this is a starting point for me. I will put it all together, then probably scale it down. Once I get all of my stuff together, I will post pictures and lists before I leave. I like to be prepared which is why keeping my pack light is such a problem for me! :)
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
If you plan to administer medical aid, and looking at your list, this means not only first and emergency aid, I would make sure you know the legal situation in the countries you are travelling through regarding this. You only write "I work in healthcare" but don't specify as what. In general in many European countries the "Samaritan Law" is applied, meaning everybody that gives first aid to the best of their abilities is protected from persecution if things go wrong BUT if you are a certified health care professional that doesn't apply and you will be held responsible for all what you administer like you would at home in your professional life.

Also looking at your list, only trying to import f.e. Vicodin to Europe, unless you can proof that you need it, can get you in legal trouble here.

Buen Camino, SY

PS The health/emergency system in Spain is first class and response times on the Camino are fast ...

I work in healthcare and will be carrying a fully stocked first aid kit as well. My plan is to administer aid if needed. I also am using the Camino as a starting point for an around the world trip, so there may be things in here not needed for the Camino per se. I am still in the process of putting it together, but it will include:

Meds
Ibuprofen
Tylenol
Immodium
Sudafed
Claritin
Vicodin
Cipro
Z-Pack

Bandages/Etc
Assorted Bandaids
Steri-Strips of various sizes w/adhesive
Coban (1 in/3 in)
2X2 Gauze Pads
4X4 Gauze Pads
Abd Pads
Kerlix (2 in/4 in)
Antibiotic Ointment
Alcohol Wipes
Betadyne (small bottle)
Moleskin/Blister Management Tools (I have some special wound care stuff for this)
Suture Kit (http://www.rei.com/product/784611) w/extras from work
CPR Mask (http://www.redcrossstore.org/Shopper/Pr ... ItemId=522)
Nitrile Gloves

Again, this is a starting point for me. I will put it all together, then probably scale it down. Once I get all of my stuff together, I will post pictures and lists before I leave. I like to be prepared which is why keeping my pack light is such a problem for me! :)
 

lady danglebury

Louise Edinburgh
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015; finnesterre 2015; CP from porto 2016; Frances 2017; Mozarabe Feb 2018; CP Sept 2018
Re: Equipent list and opinions from recent camino

Hi
I have been searching for a lightweight kilt for a while now,does anybody know of one.
Idealy a plain black one ( goth style)
Ian
My friends did camino last year in lightweight Stewart kilts they got in lidl around burns day. They both said they would wear them again. I did my camino in a dress (took 3 dresses )
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2014), CF (2015), CP (2016)
Greetings one and all,

I keep seeing posts about people taking whistles. If you own an Osprey (and experience says that many of you do), please note that the funky buckle on your chest strap IS a whistle.

Just thought I would share, as we did not discover this until our 2nd Camino. LOL!

Buen Camino!
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Hi Gitti,
My hubby has bought the Aarn Liquid Agility pack and I've just picked up his front Balance Pockets, 12l. (There are 3 sizes . . . 15 ltr, 12 ltr and 6 ltr.) I'm wondering what size pockets you bought, as I feel these may be too big and not necessary, please? Cheers Carole
Goodness, I just seemed to notice that I missed a whole lot of posts and I feel terrible. I am so sorry if I did not respond to you...
My list has remained pretty much the same as before, but I did get rid of the Aarn. I now use a Deuter Groeden 30 ltr pack for women and fit everything in. I loved the Aarn, but somehow it did not feel ok with my shoulders ( had frozen shoulders at the time) and my back. The Deuter works better for me, but I still love the Aarn concept.
When I did use the Aarn pockets, I used the small ones.
 

Michael Caleigh

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Primitivo September 2016
Hi all

This is the list I found somewhere on the net and what I use for packing:

Main equipment
Rucksack: 35 – 60 litres
Water-Resistant liner bag for your rucksack.
Lightweight sturdy boots or walking shoes.
Sleeping bag and/or liner
Good waterproof gear – light poncho or rainjacket for the summer
Stick or walking poles.
Reflective vest
Clothing
2- 4 pairs walking socks, or 2 pairs thick socks, 4 liner socks
3 sets pants (boxer shorts can chafe, best avoided).
2 pairs walking trousers or shorts (lightweight zip-off trousers give you plenty of options).
3 shirts or t-shirts (lightweight long-sleeved shirts protect against the sun).
1 long-sleeve fleece jersey
Broad-brimmed hat
1 pair lightweight flip flops for showering and crocs or lightweight sandals for evenings.
Lightweight down jacket for keeping warm when not walking.
Miscellaneous
Passport, EHIC card or its equivalent, travel insurance documents, travel tickets, pilgrim record/credencial, credit cards, money
Mobile phone
Guide book (essential on less-frequented routes).
Compass (if you are walking alone and/or on one of the less-frequented routes or in winter).
Whistle (if you are walking alone and/or on one of the less-frequented routes or in winter).
Basic toiletries to suit your own needs :Shower gel, deodorant, toothpaste, toothbrush, shampoo, comb or brush, tissues, disposable razors, nail file, nail clippers, alcohol hand cleaning gel, lip balm).
Roll of toilet paper.
Towel (preferably a light-weight sports or travel towel).
Universal bath/basin plug.
Water bottle, min 1lt (consider the value of an aluminium one, which can double as a hot-water bottle, if walking in cooler seasons).
A length of string or paracord (clothes-line; emergency boot-lace; etc).
6 large safety pins (much safer than clothes-pegs, especially if you need to dry your socks etc. on your rucksack as you walk along).
Needle and thread for running repairs.
12″-18″ square of bubble wrap (weighs nothing and provides a miniature ground sheet for when you have to sit on wet ground).
Wax for your boots (if you are wearing leather footwear).
Very small torch .
Notebook/diary.
Ballpoint pen.
Chargers for electronic devices and plug adapter.
Plastic spoon or spork for picnic lunches or albergue cold suppers.
Thin pillowcase (some albergues may provide pillows which aren’t always as clean as you would like, some don’t provide any pillows, just stuff the case with your clothes).
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances in 2016, Portuguese in 2017, and Frances again in 2018. Planning Madrid to Santiago 4/19.
I have always used a waterproof poncho with a fleece under it for cold rains, but I recall someone posting that they couldn't have survived without their waterproof pants. I usually tucked my pants into my socks or wore shorts if it was too muddy, but I wonder what you think of waterproof pants? We had so much rain on this last Camino that I kind of think they might have been of benefit. I haven't investigated them thoroughly, and I think they are quite heavy, which might keep them off my packing list.

I'd be interested in others' opinions and experiences. Thanks.

Peace.

lynne[/Q
The Marmot precip rain pants and jacket are light, compress to almost nothing, have great reviews and they keep your dry.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances in 2016, Portuguese in 2017, and Frances again in 2018. Planning Madrid to Santiago 4/19.
The Marmot precip rain pants and jacket are light, compress to almost nothing and keep you dry.
 

soozansings

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2nd (2016)
Re: Equipent list and opinions from recent camino

I have heard of the need to take something to make hot water in the morning for a cup of tea. Is this something that is worthwhile or is it better just to find a place for a morning cup of tea or coffee?
I don't start my 1st Camino until this June but as of right now. ..I can't imagine starting my day without a cup of hot coffee. That might change as my Walk progresses.
 

Stephen F.

carpintero de Colorado
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho Português 2015
Via de la Plata 2016
Re: Equipent list and opinions from recent camino



For the most part, I am a winter person. When ever I can, I will wear shorts unless I'm going to Church or there's a freezing sleet or rain. On my longest hikes I

A good pair of gaiters come in mid calf or ankle length, can be opened at the side to reduce sweating (a major problem with wet gear) and allow you to use a poncho to best effect.

Arn
I have been searching for a good pair of gaiters. All I have seen seem designed for cold weather and snow. Any recommendations?
 

Mariana Coffee

Rarámuri
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte Irún-Bilbao (May 2016)
I don't start my 1st Camino until this June but as of right now. ..I can't imagine starting my day without a cup of hot coffee. That might change as my Walk progresses.
Hi! I've just walked the first 7 stages of Camino del Norte. Just like you, I can't start my day without a cup of coffee. You can get your coffee everywhere. It depends on the time you want to start early morning. Most of the Albergues offer a cup (or more!) of coffee and a bread roll with marmalade at 6 am, some at 7am but not later because they want to get rid of pilgrims by 8am. and close the Albergue. And you are reading good: ANY time of the day you can get coffee and some finger food at the tavernas or bars. My favorite was "café con leche", kind of cafe latte. The spaniards have really good coffee machines. No worries! Buen camino!
 

Travellingman

Active Member
Rather late in the thread, but FWIW, here's my list for upandcoming Porto - SdC walk (start 2nd April - my 11th camino)
Terranova Laser 20 pack (Yes, 20 litres), Rab down sleeping bag, light slippers, 2 x 380ml bottles, merino baselayer top and underpants,merino T shirt,1 x smartwool socks, light cotton pants for indoors/when zip-offs get soaked.
Wash kit: 2 x metre square muslin towels ,soap , flannel, toothbrush and paste
Misc: ipod ,phone, travel plug ,charger ,mini SA knife, mini led torch, travel washing line ,string , tissue packs. Prescription sunglasses as spares
Medical: blister packs, elastoplasts, savlon , antihistamine cream ,needle and thread, ibuprofen, gehwol footcream, tiger balm.
Brierley maps,credencial,passport,E111,YHA card , tickets etc
Money belt with bulk of cash, change purse with daily requirements
Embroidery hoop, X stitch pattern, needles and silks. Small sketching pads and pencils.
200grm biscuits, 100grm dark chocolate. Thin cloth bag with long straps for evening food shopping
Worn: New Balance GTX trailrunners, merino socks, zip-off pants, merino baselayer, merino T shirt, Berhaus GTX coat.
Total all-up weight including water and snacks: 3.8kgs.
 

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