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Etiquette using cPAP machines

Time of past OR future Camino
(2017)
So a friend of mine is hesitant of walking the Camino because along with a host of other issues he's a user of a cPAP machine. He's not sure if he would be allowed to use it in a dorm setting and his budget would not allow him to have private rooms.

I've personally heard the machine and I would not be able to sleep with it operating in close vicinity but that varies from person to person.

So the question is should he wait till he is able to afford private accommodations or chance being in the group lodgings where he could face some unpleasant situations from sleepless pilgrims?
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
I walked for a bit with a guy who used cPAP machine at night. He was booking private accommodations because he was using a luggage transfer service for the machine AND because he needed to be sure that there would be an electrical outlet. Public albergues usually have a policy of not accepting luggage transfers (although you might be able to send your bag to a private albergue just for pickup). Not all public albergues have an outlet for each bed.

Apparently there are battery-powered travel cPAPs that are quiet enough to sleep in a shared room (see https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/weight-heat-humidity.87802/#post-1273070 )
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Both my husband and I use travel machines, but there are plenty of people who use full sized machines. Before we could speak much Spanish, my husband carried a card explaining his condition and asking to be near an electrical outlet. He carried the card in his credential and always showed it to the hospitalero. He has used his machine on the Camino for 8 years now and never had a problem being accomodated. Often people want to sleep nearby as they know you won't snore. I started using mine about 3 years ago without difficulty. I carry a double euro plug extension cord so we can both use one outlet.
 
I walked for a bit with a guy who used cPAP machine at night. He was booking private accommodations because he was using a luggage transfer service for the machine AND because he needed to be sure that there would be an electrical outlet. Public albergues usually have a policy of not accepting luggage transfers (although you might be able to send your bag to a private albergue just for pickup). Not all public albergues have an outlet for each bed.

Apparently there are battery-powered travel cPAPs that are quiet enough to sleep in a shared room (see https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/weight-heat-humidity.87802/#post-1273070 )
The batteries are quite heavy. We used them for car camping or for our travel trailer, but are heavier than my machine so too heavy for the Camino. I would not send my machine with luggage transfer. I carry it with me as I do my medications.
 
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Hola = great question.
I have a CPAP device, in fact I have two of them. One that uses a hydration tank - that one stays at home. The other uses hydration tablets to moisten the air I breath. Except when the device is not supplying air(to my nose) it is virtually silent. As I need the best sleep possible - whether on camino or simply travelling - I intend to take the "portable" one with me on my next camino. Whilst it is "portable" it does require mains power. Thus I will try to get a bed away from other pilgrims, but near a power point.
I have not seen any battery operated devices and agree the weight of the batteries would out-way the benefits.
One question which noise do you prefer - deafening snoring or the soft purr of a CPAP device.?
 
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At the risk of being contrarian and not going along with the typical group think, I would advise saving $$ to afford private rooms that for sure will accommodate CPAP machine users and not impose on the sleep and enjoyment of many other people situated in albergues. You will likely sleep better as well.
 
So a friend of mine is hesitant of walking the Camino because along with a host of other issues he's a user of a cPAP machine. He's not sure if he would be allowed to use it in a dorm setting and his budget would not allow him to have private rooms.

I've personally heard the machine and I would not be able to sleep with it operating in close vicinity but that varies from person to person.

So the question is should he wait till he is able to afford private accommodations or chance being in the group lodgings where he could face some unpleasant situations from sleepless pilgrims?
Anyone who expects an even reasonable level of privacy in a dorm . . . to be as kind as possible, realign your brain cells.
Life is not designed to cater around a single individual. Use the cPAP machine as often as possible, of course picking out the most remote bed in the complex.
As for those who are suffering . . . suffering is good for you; take it as well as life in stride.
Waiting until one can afford private accommodations . . . why entertain such an insane thought in the first place; instead, support your friend 1,000% come hell or high water. Chuck
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
I did some research on this and my plan was to carry a ResMed Mini travel CPAP and a battery capable of powering even the full sized machine through one night. This was insurance for the nights when I would not have a bedside outlet. I calculated that the full rig would weigh about 1kg of which the battery was 500g. The same battery would charge my phone as I walked along. There was a machine by Breas that required less voltage and could be powered by a smaller battery but it seems to be unavailable, possibly discontinued.

In the end, I have decided to walk without any CPAP. Reasons include my local ResMed agent charges twice the on-line price and does not even have a demonstration machine, while my consultant refused the prescription to buy one on-line because she would have no control over it! (Whose body is it anyway!)

If anybody complained about me using a CPAP, I would have given them the choice of listening to my machine or my snoring (or paying the extra for a private room for themselves - or for me).

I actually bought the battery but haven’t yet tested it on my home machine. This was it: https://amzn.eu/d/0ay01kYw
 
I walked for a bit with a guy who used cPAP machine at night. He was booking private accommodations because he was using a luggage transfer service for the machine AND because he needed to be sure that there would be an electrical outlet. Public albergues usually have a policy of not accepting luggage transfers (although you might be able to send your bag to a private albergue just for pickup). Not all public albergues have an outlet for each bed.

Apparently there are battery-powered travel cPAPs that are quiet enough to sleep in a shared room (see https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/weight-heat-humidity.87802/#post-1273070 )
I believe there us a bit of misunderstanding
I think when OP refers to private accomodations he means private rooms not Private vs. Public Albergues
I've stayed through all private albergues precisely because I was transferring luggage and if I didn't book a private room I was in the same "communal" bunk beds dorm society as the Pilgrim in Public Albergues.
All one has to do us let the hospitalero/a know the situation and need via email or WhatsApp and request if possible to have a bunk near the electrical plug.
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
At the risk of being contrarian and not going along with the typical group think, I would advise saving $$ to afford private rooms that for sure will accommodate CPAP machine users and not impose on the sleep and enjoyment of many other people situated in albergues. You will likely sleep better as well.

One question which noise do you prefer - deafening snoring or the soft purr of a CPAP device.?

The Albergue is full - there are good 20-30 pilgrims in there. Not a ONE CPAP machine
"to impose on the sleep and enjoyment (? 🤔) of many other people..."

Everyone snores, 10% are the loudest boarding on a Midnight Spécial and 50% also f***s. For the good measure 20% make other sounds in their sleep (and I won't even mention the guy who sleepwalking or the one that went to the bathroom and coming back accidentally tried to get into a bunk of a 19yo female)...

...And not a single CPAP...
....now what would I prefer? 😉😁🤔😴
 
I believe there us a bit of misunderstanding
I think when OP refers to private accomodations he means private rooms not Private vs. Public Albergues
I've stayed through all private albergues precisely because I was transferring luggage and if I didn't book a private room I was in the same "communal" bunk beds dorm society as the Pilgrim in Public Albergues.
All one has to do us let the hospitalero/a know the situation and need via email or WhatsApp and request if possible to have a bunk near the electrical plug.
Precisely, my friend thought that by him paying for a single room he wouldn't disturb anyone. He's a considerate fellow and he really wouldn't be the kind of guy to say he has the right to keep others awake because he has a medical need. I think for him this stems from comments from family members who have not been pleased in family gatherings so he is hyper alert to what may happen with strangers who are sleep deprived over several days.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Both my husband and I use travel machines, but there are plenty of people who use full sized machines. Before we could speak much Spanish, my husband carried a card explaining his condition and asking to be near an electrical outlet. He carried the card in his credential and always showed it to the hospitalero. He has used his machine on the Camino for 8 years now and never had a problem being accomodated. Often people want to sleep nearby as they know you won't snore. I started using mine about 3 years ago without difficulty. I carry a double euro plug extension cord so we can both use one outlet.
Do you use a luggage transfer service or carry it in your backpack? I have a bipap I have been using for a year and I think it will be a hassle on the walk. Thoughts?
 
Precisely, my friend thought that by him paying for a single room he wouldn't disturb anyone. He's a considerate fellow and he really wouldn't be the kind of guy to say he has the right to keep others awake because he has a medical need. I think for him this stems from comments from family members who have not been pleased in family gatherings so he is hyper alert to what may happen with strangers who are sleep deprived over several days.
It is very nice of your friend to be considerate if others. No doubt in my mind that if all of us were considerate and friendly to each other the world would be a better place.
Life however does not work this way ( see my other post ad an example - nobody did anything "on purpose to displease " and yet the situation is there)
By no mean I'm saying for your friend to wave his hand off and "disregard". All I am saying that in the situation of communal living too many things can and will happen so some thought must be given to not beating oneself too hard as to what kind of "nuisance" one may be to others
Good luck to your friend and Buen Camino
 
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Personally, I prefer the sound of snoring to the sound of these machines - - having said that, if a pilgrim needs one for more serious sleep apnaea than just snoring, then I will always prefer the sound of the machine to whatever medical issues might arise without it.

So my take on the protocol is - - if you actually do need it, then use it. But if it's just for snoring, well : spoiler alert Everybody Snores.
 
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Do you use a luggage transfer service or carry it in your backpack? I have a bipap I have been using for a year and I think it will be a hassle on the walk. Thoughts?
The question was not addressed to me but I will give you my thought:
Not in a 10000000000 years am I entrusting my 2 bottles of medication I need to take every morning to a baggage transfer company and I don't mean or imply anything derogatory towards them; just simply things do happen and I need my medicine.
Yes the machine may be heavy but it is not going into THAT pack/bag/suitcase etc.
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
So a friend of mine is hesitant of walking the Camino because along with a host of other issues he's a user of a cPAP machine. He's not sure if he would be allowed to use it in a dorm setting and his budget would not allow him to have private rooms.

I've personally heard the machine and I would not be able to sleep with it operating in close vicinity but that varies from person to person.

So the question is should he wait till he is able to afford private accommodations or chance being in the group lodgings where he could face some unpleasant situations from sleepless pilgrims?
I use a c pap machine. I don't snore. One night we lost electricity and my wife claims She couldn't sleep. I snored like a chainsaw.
 
At the risk of being contrarian and not going along with the typical group think, I would advise saving $$ to afford private rooms that for sure will accommodate CPAP machine users and not impose on the sleep and enjoyment of many other people situated in albergues. You will likely sleep better as well.

Let me get this straight. You are saying that a person who requires a medical device which is offensive to you, should not be allowed in an albergue. The "noise" of the machine is not that loud and if ear plugs don't work for you and your nights are ruined, perhaps you are suggesting that the wrong person save up and get a private room.
 
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Personally, I prefer the sound of snoring to the sound of these machines - - having said that, if a pilgrim needs one for more serious sleep apnaea than just snoring, then I will always prefer the sound of the machine to whatever medical issues might arise without it.

So my take on the protocol is - - if you actually do need it, then use it. But if it's just for snoring, well : spoiler alert Everybody Snores.
Most people do not lug around all of that extra weight just to prevent snoring. I would suggest that the reason is that the machine prevents them from stopping breathing periodically to the point that others wonder if they will start to breathe again. A demonstrated need don't you think?
 
I use a travel CPAP in dorm settings and have had no complaints. When I tell nearby bunkmates that it stops me from storing the response is usually gratitude. I usually call ahead to where I plan to sleep that night and ask for a bunk with access to an electrical plug. I have always been accommodated.
 
My husband has a CPAP machine. He has it for sleep apnea, not snoring, but snoring is a symptom of sleep apnea. He no longer snores, so I am on the side of the CPAP machine being welcomed into the albergue. I would suggest bringing along an extension cord and alerting the hospitalero of your requirements (mentioned already).

Maybe we should hand out CPAPs to the snorers?
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
So a friend of mine is hesitant of walking the Camino because along with a host of other issues he's a user of a cPAP machine. He's not sure if he would be allowed to use it in a dorm setting and his budget would not allow him to have private rooms.

I've personally heard the machine and I would not be able to sleep with it operating in close vicinity but that varies from person to person.

So the question is should he wait till he is able to afford private accommodations or chance being in the group lodgings where he could face some unpleasant situations from sleepless pilgrims?
He is a pilgrim as well as anyone of us. I have a friend who used one and for the better part of we found in the same dormitory. It did not bother me, if anything the smorers bothered me more but then I put my ear plugs and I was fine with it
 
So the question is should he wait till he is able to afford private accommodations or chance being in the group lodgings where he could face some unpleasant situations from sleepless pilgrims?
I have used mine in dorms when I have stayed in albergues since 2018, and only once has anyone complained. Coincidentally, the same person who had made it difficult for others in the room to fall asleep with his snoring the previous evening.

I don't think your friend should wait. But it might be worthwhile your friend having a strategy for explaining to those near him in a dorm why he uses a CPAP machine and how it works to stop his apnoea.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Personally, I prefer the sound of snoring to the sound of these machines - - having said that, if a pilgrim needs one for more serious sleep apnaea than just snoring, then I will always prefer the sound of the machine to whatever medical issues might arise without it.

So my take on the protocol is - - if you actually do need it, then use it. But if it's just for snoring, well : spoiler alert Everybody Snores.
As a user, c-pap machines are necessary for your basic health. The snoring is annoying but more alarming is when you stop breathing which affects your brain and your heart. During the course of the night you can have apnea more than 30 times depending on the severity of the sleep apnea. I always travel with my machine. When my machine broke down in the course of our travels in England I had to sleep sitting up so I would not stop breathing. Believe me if I didn’t need it I would gladly go without one.

Perhaps, those who snore loudly should be evaluated for sleep apnea with a sleep study. Snoring can be an indication of sleep apnea.
 
I have used my travel CPAP on several Caminos. No one complained and it's actually very, very quiet. I have apnea (don't snore).
 
Tell your friend to come and walk without, concern: a CPAP machine is vastly quieter than the snoring that can happen without it.

My worst sleep on any camino (hands down) was a night when I had a bunk near someone with loud sleep apnea. He was a super-nice guy, and I was on tenterhooks for many hours, waiting for him to take the next breath. 😬
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
I’d much prefer to sleep next to someone using a CPAP machine, over a loud snorer. The gentle hum of a CPAP machine lulls me into a gentle sleep, and keeps me there, but relentless snoring either doesn’t let me fall asleep, or wakes me if I’m already asleep.
As a general rule I would highly recommend pilgrims planning to sleep in communal settings, wear earplugs if they’re going to be bothered by snoring or those getting up before dawn and rustling around as they start their day early, or those who get up in the night to use the washroom.
 
I have used mine in dorms when I have stayed in albergues since 2018, and only once has anyone complained. Coincidentally, the same person who had made it difficult for others in the room to fall asleep with his snoring the previous evening.
Precisely! Nothing to do with the subject of the thread but to punctuate the point:
The Pilgrim who went off at me and another Peregrina in O Pedrouso around 9:00 pm (so, well before the 'lights out' time) for "talking too loud " locked himself out of the dorm going to the bathroom and was banging on ghe door to get back in at 2:00 am

Anytime I heard someone (and sometimes quite smugly) say that they don't snore AT ALL they were the loudest snorer in the room
 
Any time I heard someone (and sometimes quite smugly) say that they don't snore AT ALL they were the loudest snorer in the room
I usually don't, but sometimes I do ; and on occasion it can be fairly loud.

But usually I don't.

I do know when I have snored as the back of my throat feels irritated in the morning.

Only once have I been woken up by the noise of my own snores !! Thank heavens I was not in a Camino dorm that particular night ...
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
So a friend of mine is hesitant of walking the Camino because along with a host of other issues he's a user of a cPAP machine. He's not sure if he would be allowed to use it in a dorm setting and his budget would not allow him to have private rooms.

I've personally heard the machine and I would not be able to sleep with it operating in close vicinity but that varies from person to person.

So the question is should he wait till he is able to afford private accommodations or chance being in the group lodgings where he could face some unpleasant situations from sleepless pilgrims?
I have a cpap machine and it is silent once its on my face properly. This is better than my snoring any day andI wish many of my fellow pilgrims had done the same. I always pack an extension cord to, not just for cpap but also charging whatever you may want to charge when you aren't by the outlet.
 
Slept on top bunk w several cpaps and have voluntaryily chose this closeness, and yet had never been bothered in my sleep, to me it is like white noise... walking and red wine has that effect on me...
As a rule it is the responsibility of the light sleeper to use earplugs, as a snorer will more likely give you trouble..
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
So many people don’t understand that using a CPAP nightly is not a choice, it’s a necessity. It was prescribed to me not as a snore control device (although that is a welcome consequence), but rather to keep me from having my airway close up while I sleep. There is no mouth splint, special pillow, or nose thingie that can substitute for the machine, quietly blowing air into me all night. I cannot afford the lightweight (but slightly noisier) travel machine, so I lug my full-size ResMed 11 everywhere. With the machine packed in its case, the majority of space in my giant backpack is full. So I found a smaller case (designed for a large camera) that fits the machine, water chamber, hose, and adapter plug. Still, that poundage and volume was too much for my physical limitations and I packed it into a small hard-side suitcase and shipped it ahead each day. Nobody ever complained about the low whoooosh sound. But they probably would complain if I woke up choking or had a medical emergency in the night. Your friend needs to explain that the CPAP is a necessary medical device, like glasses or crutches.
PS: I also have extra earplugs that I offer in case people think my machine might be too noisy for them.
 
While use of CPAP is desirable and a necessity for some people, imposing yourself and equipment needs into relatively close sleeping quarters such as found in albergues is NOT a necessity in order to enjoy a Camino. I, myself would not in good conscience put myself into an environment whereby my health condition/behaviors are disruptive to the sleep needs of others especially on an arduous activity such as long distance walking. There are plenty of other options available to pilgrims who find themselves in this situation. Just because something CAN be done doesn’t mean it SHOULD be.
 
While use of CPAP is desirable and a necessity for some people, imposing yourself and equipment needs into relatively close sleeping quarters such as found in albergues is NOT a necessity in order to enjoy a Camino. I, myself would not in good conscience put myself into an environment whereby my health condition/behaviors are disruptive to the sleep needs of others especially on an arduous activity such as long distance walking. There are plenty of other options available to pilgrims who find themselves in this situation. Just because something CAN be done doesn’t mean it SHOULD be.
Curious. Have you ever heard a CPAP at night? And if you follow your logic, then snorers or those who rustle plastics bags at 4:30 AM should also book private rooms.
 
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Maybe sleep disruption/deprivation are one of those sought after albergue experiences to make the journey somehow seem more authentic. Not for me.
 
As a rule it is the responsibility of the light sleeper to use earplugs, as a snorer will more likely give you trouble..
I have learned over time that a self-discipline of breathing in and out at the same rhythm as the snorers gets you to sleep despite them. As to now, this has become second nature for me, and it does generally work.

Some extraordinarily loud snorers excepted ... o_O
 
While use of CPAP is desirable and a necessity for some people, imposing yourself and equipment needs into relatively close sleeping quarters such as found in albergues is NOT a necessity in order to enjoy a Camino. I, myself would not in good conscience put myself into an environment whereby my health condition/behaviors are disruptive to the sleep needs of others especially on an arduous activity such as long distance walking. There are plenty of other options available to pilgrims who find themselves in this situation. Just because something CAN be done doesn’t mean it SHOULD be.
It's the people who feel their sleep might be disrupted by the ordinary behaviour of others who need to seek more private accommodation. Neither snoring nor CPAP use is anything out of the ordinary.
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
Maybe sleep disruption/deprivation are one of those sought after albergue experiences to make the journey somehow seem more authentic. Not for me.
Perhaps this comment is an indication that you shouldn't be sleeping in albergues
 
While use of CPAP is desirable and a necessity for some people, imposing yourself and equipment needs into relatively close sleeping quarters such as found in albergues is NOT a necessity in order to enjoy a Camino. I, myself would not in good conscience put myself into an environment whereby my health condition/behaviors are disruptive to the sleep needs of others especially on an arduous activity such as long distance walking. There are plenty of other options available to pilgrims who find themselves in this situation. Just because something CAN be done doesn’t mean it SHOULD be.
Please search out this thread for my response to your 1st post along the same line
to with a room full of sleeping people 50% of whom snores and 50 farts and 50 is doing something else God knows what
and not a single CPAP!

I will repeat _ I am a snorer and I usually warn people (esp whose bunk is close to mine) and apologize. But I will NOT! in my good conscience start looking around for some "specific types of accomodations" because of it. Maybe you are better person than me and even quite a number of us. My (pilgrim) hat is off to you!
Go - do - boldly - ULTREIA!

And one more thing. snorer as I am a numerous number of times I was literally JOLTED by a snore that came from someone in the same dorm as me and it did sound like that person was truly gasping for air! It was unnerving and scary! if by any chance that person was a CPAP user but decided not to bring it on his Camino for the fear of being "disruptive to the sleep needs of others" well guess what?!

Once more I will repeat something that i have stated many times - by putting ourselves into the situation of the 'communal living' we should all understand and accept that there are many aspects of said communal living that may not appeal to us but then we in turn may be causing some of those aspects ourselves! If one cannot accept THAT - perhaps this person should re-evaluate the whole idea to begin with.
In a weird way - its like folks who buy a house next to the airport and then complain that the sound of the planes is disruptive to their lives (and then DEMAND! that the airport be shut down....)

P.S. as to the last line of the quote - just imagine! What can be, unburdened by what has been. :rolleyes:😇

P.P.S.Gees maybe St James was a snorer? Or dare I say.... JESUS!

(Crowd)
Hosanna Heysanna Sanna Sanna Ho
Sanna Hey Sanna Ho Sanna
Hey J C, J C won't you snore for me?
Sanna Ho Sanna Hey Superstar


(Caiaphas)
Tell the snorers to be quiet
or we'll start a CPAP riot
This snoring crowd
Is much too loud
Tell the mob who snores your song
That they are fools and they are wrong
They are a curse
They should disperse

😁
 
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This begins to remind me about a thead we had not too long ago when Paul (sorry don't recall the userName) was insisting that a pre-Camino trip to Europe was absolutely essential as a training tool to the subsequent success of then followed Camino. 50+people disagreed with him and yet he (stubbornly) insisted....

Hosanna Heysanna Sanna Sanna Ho....
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
So a friend of mine is hesitant of walking the Camino because along with a host of other issues he's a user of a cPAP machine. He's not sure if he would be allowed to use it in a dorm setting and his budget would not allow him to have private rooms.

I've personally heard the machine and I would not be able to sleep with it operating in close vicinity but that varies from person to person.

So the question is should he wait till he is able to afford private accommodations or chance being in the group lodgings where he could face some unpleasant situations from sleepless pilgrims?
If you're concerned and thank you wouldn't be able to sleep with the noise of a cpap, how in the world would you survive snoring and everything else?
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I have completed for Camino with a travel CPAP and it has never been an issue. The machine itself is very quiet. My roommates have told me it sounds like a quiet white noise, which is a lot better than snoring.
I apologize for the typo…. It should read four Caminos. Frances, Portuguese coastal, Primitivo, and Invierno all with a CPAP. I never received a single complaint.
 
While use of CPAP is desirable and a necessity for some people, imposing yourself and equipment needs into relatively close sleeping quarters such as found in albergues is NOT a necessity in order to enjoy a Camino. I, myself would not in good conscience put myself into an environment whereby my health condition/behaviors are disruptive to the sleep needs of others especially on an arduous activity such as long distance walking. There are plenty of other options available to pilgrims who find themselves in this situation. Just because something CAN be done doesn’t mean it SHOULD be.
They are honestly not loud. About the same as the quiet hum of an air-conditioner or similar.
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
So a friend of mine is hesitant of walking the Camino because along with a host of other issues he's a user of a cPAP machine. He's not sure if he would be allowed to use it in a dorm setting and his budget would not allow him to have private rooms.

I've personally heard the machine and I would not be able to sleep with it operating in close vicinity but that varies from person to person.

So the question is should he wait till he is able to afford private accommodations or chance being in the group lodgings where he could face some unpleasant situations from sleepless pilgrims?

I used a portable C-Pap. I bought the battery pack but left it at home because it was so heavy. The portable machines are RIDICULOUSLY expensive. I always asked to be near an outlet and that usually worked. The best bit of gear I took was a LONG EXTENSION CORD which I sometimes needed to use.
 
It's the people who feel their sleep might be disrupted by the ordinary behaviour of others who need to seek more private accommodation. Neither snoring nor CPAP use is anything out of the ordinary.
Nobody need seek private accommodation, and whatever happened to tolerance ?
 
I used a portable C-Pap. I bought the battery pack but left it at home because it was so heavy. The portable machines are RIDICULOUSLY expensive. I always asked to be near an outlet and that usually worked. The best bit of gear I took was a LONG EXTENSION CORD which I sometimes needed to use.
Yes they are very expensive but I have found it worth it when I have to carry it for several hundred kilometres. An extension cord can alleviate several problems.
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
Nobody need seek private accommodation, and whatever happened to tolerance ?
That would include the people with CPAP and we should be tolerant to them ( as many have pointed out over and over its not a toy on the whim it's a life saving apparatus!) and yet someone keeps on insisting that THEY SHOULD seek private accommodation.

I don't know... we all are entitled to our opinions of course but stuff like this is just mind-boggling

For the sake of an argument-to that person- you just completed yor daily walk, got to an albergue, walked into a dorm and...GASP! see a person with CPAP machine. Are you leaving?
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
That would include the people with CPAP and we should be tolerant to them ( as many have pointed out over and over its not a toy on the whim it's a life saving apparatus!) and yet someone keeps on insisting that THEY SHOULD seek private accommodation.

I don't know... we all are entitled to our opinions of course but stuff like this is just mind-boggling

For the sake of an argument-to that person- you just completed yor daily walk, got to an albergue, walked into a dorm and...GASP! see a person with CPAP machine. Are you leaving?
No, we are all pilgrims🤗
Well... there is always a 5th Camino ;) 🤣😇
I am sure she's already working on that one
 

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