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EW....that's disgusting!

crhutch

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
(2010) March/April SJPP to Santiago and hence to Finisterre
(2016) Hospitalero Grañón 15-31 March
(2016) April Logroño to Santiago
(2017) Hospitalero Zamora 15-31 March
(2017) Hospilatero Emaus, Burgos 1-14 April
Food: Fried blood and onions

Why: Everything on the menu were “farm” specialties. My friend recommended it. I believe it was congealed blood, fried with onions. Served with crusty bread and a salad.

Where on the Camino did you try it?: My wife and I were visiting a Spanish couple we had met on the Camino and they took us for a ride into the Picos de Europa in Cantabria. We stopped at a farm for lunch.

Does it have a local name? Don’t remember. If someone knows please chime in!

What motivated you to try it? It was one of specialties of this farm restaurant and my Spanish friend convinced me to try it. I had recently learned to like morcilla so why not?

Have you changed your mind? It actually was quite good so yes I’d try it again.
 
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Felicia V

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Portuguese 2017 Porto to SdC
Return to Camino Portuguese 2018 Tui To SdC
Now, before you go off into LaLa Land, this thread is about FOOD.

When I was growing up many decades ago, I'll bet we can agree that there was a time your mother put something in front of you to eat and, if your response wasn't a simple NO, EW...that's disgusting is a close second.

As we mature, our tastes can change, but we still refuse to try some foods. In my case, it was a favorite of my dad's Creamed Cherry Herring. My grandparents tried, without success, to introduce me to SCHWEINSHAXE (GERMAN PORK KNUCKLE).

This thread isn't about your aversion to some foods at home; it's about meeting that food demon on the Camino and possibly beating it back. To keep us on track, here's an example of a response:

Food: Blood pudding (Served alongside British RM...they tried...unsuccessfully)

Why: It looks gross. I know how they make it, and it's disgusting.

Where on the Camino did you try it?: Casa Ojeda, Burgos

Does it have a local name? Morcilla

What motivated you to try it? Pilgrim pressure. I gave in.

Have you changed your mind now? Yes. It's rather tasty, and I have it every chance I get.

Well, there you have it. Let's keep the ball moving.

Buen "Please, Sir, I want some more." Camino

Arn
I am a half-assed vegetarian so I try to maintain that.... however, I have to admit in my travels ( not Camino related) I tried a bite of spleen in Sicily ( fabulous) and various bugs in Vietnam. I drew the line at chicken embryos
 

Moorwalker

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
The Saint's Way, Cornwall
Best avoid Spain's sidra natural then. Although I prefer sweet cider I liked the sidra. I would have had it more often than I did except I had to put up with Peg's looks and expressions of disgust.
But is it vinegary or just very dry? I come from Somerset and our "rough" cider there definitely has a real bite to it, but that's mostly from tannins.
 

crhutch

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
(2010) March/April SJPP to Santiago and hence to Finisterre
(2016) Hospitalero Grañón 15-31 March
(2016) April Logroño to Santiago
(2017) Hospitalero Zamora 15-31 March
(2017) Hospilatero Emaus, Burgos 1-14 April
Those are "crestas de gallo." Not so commonly seen.
Right down there with Castilian pig noses, ears, and face. I will try anything once, and I won't go back for more of those facial features. Lamb's tails are also a "no."
If you like bacon I’d bet you’d go back for seconds for “face bacon” aka pig jowls/guanciale.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Mayonnaise is made with the the yolks of the freshest eggs (keeping hens helps here) a little dijon mustard (the smooth sort) white wine vinegar and cold pressed sunflower or grapeseed oil. Not olive oil usually as the flavour is too strong. Just a little, maybe 20% olive oil if you are going to use garlic in the finished recipe. A pinch of salt and if you want it to have a lighter texture a teaspoon of boiling water at the end. You might consider using walnut or hazlenut oil depending on what else is going in your salad.
Mayo is not the same thing at all. Salad cream is disgusting.
 
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crhutch

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
(2010) March/April SJPP to Santiago and hence to Finisterre
(2016) Hospitalero Grañón 15-31 March
(2016) April Logroño to Santiago
(2017) Hospitalero Zamora 15-31 March
(2017) Hospilatero Emaus, Burgos 1-14 April

CarolamS

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
This ranks as the funniest thread I've read, thank you.

Food chickpea stew with tripe.

Why I was really hoping it was just a vegetable stew as I don't eat meat.

Where on the Camino did you try it? In a bar facing the marina in Ferrol, where the Ingles starts. The afternoon I arrived in Ferrol and had time on my hands.

Does it have a local name? I expect so but I wasn't even asked if I wanted it.

What motivated you to try it? Having been given it for free with a soft drink that I did order, I didn't like to leave it. Being on my own there was no one I could pass it to. I really really hoped it was a vegetable stew. Then when I came to some pale lumps at the bottom I really really hoped it was chicken. Iffy but I thought I could swallow chicken. It was definitely tripe. I did swallow one lump and the rest I tried (unsuccessfully) to hide under my spoon. I can't honestly complain about the flavour, but I'm not 'sin carne' because of flavour.

Have you changed your mind? No. I was very wary of buying a drink in a bar after that.

This thread has made me even more grateful I don't eat meat. A Chinese friend cooked us supper and offered me something that looked odd. When asked she told us it was jellyfish. I quickly said it wasn't vegetarian. My friends had no such good excuse, it was later described as tasting like salty rubber bands.
 

Felicia V

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Portuguese 2017 Porto to SdC
Return to Camino Portuguese 2018 Tui To SdC
When I visited my son in South Korea he tried to get me to eat this - silkworm pupa, which was set out at a bar in the same manner as we would have peanuts in the US or olives in Spain.

I declined.

8747465354_22bf87dfdd_o.jpg
Had them in Vietnam, excellent
 
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Lurch

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
looking at 2018-2019
Food: Pig's Ears

Why: Little hairs still on 'em, and …They're EARS

Where on the Camino did you try it? Naverette, Villares de Orbigo, Ponferrada

Does it have a local name? Oreja de Cerdo

What motivated you to try it? First Time: novelty, Second Time: starving, Third Time: actually chose them off a menu, couldn't get enough.

Have you changed your mind now? YES. 1/2 way through the 2nd time, I was hooked.
As an aside my son's wife's parents live in Mexico and their visits have been memorable. No fancy meals and the chicaronnes come equipped with pig hair.
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2013)
Arn it's called Marmite here in South Africa .
I don’t understand all the jokes about North Americans and marmite/vegemite. Do North Americans try to eat it straight out of the jar, as we do peanut butter? My mother used to mix a tiny bit of marmite with butter and spread it on crackers for us. We didn’t particularly like it but it wasn’t awful. I also knew a South African fellow who‘d use a minuscule bit of marmite to darken his gravy.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Arn it's called Marmite here in South Africa .
It's a marketing thing. Vegemite appeals to vegetarians because it made from vegetables. Marmite is for the carnivores. It is made from marmots.

Not really. And I say Ew to the 'mites.
I don’t understand all the jokes about North Americans and marmite/vegemite. Do North Americans try to eat it straight out of the jar, as we do peanut butter?

I spent some time in vegemite country. The natives tell Yankees that it is spread "like peanut butter" knowing what will happen. Hilarity ensues.
 
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Everything that has white beans in the recipe. So Fabada is not my first choice.
It is the texture and the outlook of white beans that does not appeal to me.
I will eat it of course when someone make it. Politeness. But I will never order it myself when it is on a menu.
Those were one of the few things I did eat. Didn't like most of the food on the Camino. I ended up eating salads and soups.
 

Doughnut NZ

From Aotearoa New Zealand
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
It's a marketing thing. Vegemite appeals to vegetarians because it made from vegetables. Marmite is for the carnivores. It is made from marmots.

Not really. And I say Ew to the 'mites.


I spent some time in vegemite country. The natives tell Yankees that it is spread "like peanut butter" knowing what will happen. Hilarity ensues.
Careful with the Marmot thing 🐇, both mites are strictly vegetarian. 😁

In NZ the Marmite is made by the Seven Day Eventists and from what little I know of them they are very definitely and very strictly vegetarian.
 

Doughnut NZ

From Aotearoa New Zealand
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
..... My mother used to mix a tiny bit of marmite with butter and spread it on crackers for us. We didn’t particularly like it but it wasn’t awful.
What an excellent mother! All those B vitamins.
I also knew a South African fellow who‘d use a minuscule bit of marmite to darken his gravy.
Miniscule?

He obviously wasn't a good cook then. I spoon buckets full into gravies, soups, stir frys and anything else that seems even remotely appropriate. Plus, of course, I have it on my toast and occasionally crackers. Either on its own or with fresh ripe tomatoes straight from my garden.
 

Lance Chambers

Lance Chambers
Year of past OR future Camino
Sarria (2015), SJPdP (2016), Burgos (2017), SJPdP (2018), Burgos (2019), SJPdP (2020?).
Now, before you go off into LaLa Land, this thread is about FOOD.

When I was growing up many decades ago, I'll bet we can agree that there was a time your mother put something in front of you to eat and, if your response wasn't a simple NO, EW...that's disgusting is a close second.

As we mature, our tastes can change, but we still refuse to try some foods. In my case, it was a favorite of my dad's Creamed Cherry Herring. My grandparents tried, without success, to introduce me to SCHWEINSHAXE (GERMAN PORK KNUCKLE).

This thread isn't about your aversion to some foods at home; it's about meeting that food demon on the Camino and possibly beating it back. To keep us on track, here's an example of a response:

Food: Blood pudding (Served alongside British RM...they tried...unsuccessfully)

Why: It looks gross. I know how they make it, and it's disgusting.

Where on the Camino did you try it?: Casa Ojeda, Burgos

Does it have a local name? Morcilla

What motivated you to try it? Pilgrim pressure. I gave in.

Have you changed your mind now? Yes. It's rather tasty, and I have it every chance I get.

Well, there you have it. Let's keep the ball moving.

Buen "Please, Sir, I want some more." Camino

Arn

"Please, Sir, I want some more."

Consider yourself well in. Consider yourself part of the family.
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2013)
Miniscule?

He obviously wasn't a good cook then. I spoon buckets full into gravies, soups, stir frys and anything else that seems even remotely appropriate. Plus, of course, I have it on my toast and occasionally crackers. Either on its own or with fresh ripe tomatoes straight from my garden.
🤣 You, sir, are pulling my leg. Well, maybe not about the tomatoes.
 
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Barbara

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Marmite is made from yeast, i think. Now Patum Paperium is interesting. Made from anchovies. Yummy but not too much at a time due to the salt.
 

BedDavid

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances, Portugues, Primativo, Baztán
Food: Maragato Stew

Why: It was a bowl of boiled pork parts.

Where on the Camino did you try it?: Astorga

Does it have a local name? Cocido Maragato

What motivated you to try it? The owner said it was a specialty of Astorga and super specialty in his restaurant

Have you changed your mind now? Nope.

However, Astorga is also the place where we ordered Sol y Sombra at the bar in the Hotel Gaudi. The young bartender didn't know how to make it - so we told her. A shot of brandy and a shot of annisette. She made us a couple with about 3 shots of each served in a large brandy snifter and charged us only 4 euros!
Cocido Maragato, also in Hotel Gaudi in Astorga, was the most disgusting meal I have ever had. First came a plate of boiled meats: various pieces of sausage and black pudding, pig’s ear, pig’s trotter, ham hock, salt pork, beef shank, cecina (dry cured beef, thinly sliced), boiling fowl (hen), and dumpling all piled up on the plate. Then a plate of chickpeas, potatoes, cabbage, and carrots. Then a plate of soup made from the broth the first course was cooked in. Plus bread and a bottle of wine—the only redeeming features. When the first plate came I ate as much of it as I could; I didn’t know then what was to come later. So when the chickpeas and vegetables came I was nearly full already. The chickpeas and vegetables would have been enough on their own. The soup was thickened with thin pasta and was nice enough. I declined the desert and just took coffee, paid the bill quickly and staggered back to the albergue!
On the other hand schweinshaxe, which I had in Leipzig on a Bach-pilgrimage, is wonderful!
 
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Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
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Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
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@BedDavid, my similar experience on the Norte a couple of years ago...
"They had no menus and we knew no Spanish, so we nodded our heads to what the waiter proposed. He literally brought out six courses one at a time, which became very humorous to me. Unfortunately each course became more wonderful than the one before it and we filled up on the early ones, having no clue there were more and more coming. Finally we stood up to pay, worrying how much we were going to be charged for the huge meal. The waiter seemed surprised and said..."What? No flan?" 😂"
 
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dick bird

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
I have wild asparagus growing on my farm. It is as wide as my thumb and when harvested close to the ground absolutely to die for. Every day for three months I harvest a minimum of three pounds. I keep some to chomp on as I walk the fields , or save for supper. I give the remainder away. As I walk through Andalusia I've seen some pilgrims walk into the fields to nip a few stalks. I don't think its a good practice. Now, grapes hovering over the trail are a gift.
Grapes hovering over the trail are a) still someone's property and b) regularly sprayed to kill off the mould. Figs are fair game though.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
I know from experience that they are unlikely to take my advice anyway, so may as well enjoy it.

The only problem is when they pile it on as if it is peanut butter and then I am mentally calculating how much money is going to get thrown away when they gag on the first bite!

That is my cross to bear. ✝️🙁😁
I hosted 2 German exchange students a few years ago.
They were both keen to try just about anything, but balked at Marmite on toast after the first bite. Marmite and cheese toasted sandwiches are the BEST!
They both bought Marmite to take home with them, as they didnt think anyone would believe them otherwise.
 
Last edited:

pepi

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2013, 14, 16, 17, 18
In Galicia and Asturias....so rare (and expensive)...lucky if you get to taste it once in your life: Percebes

 
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Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
In Galicia and Asturias....so rare (and expensive)...lucky if you get to taste it once in your life: Percebes

There was an interesting thread on Percebes a while ago which included a fascinating video about how they are collected during low tide...a bit dangerous, too.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2017), Primitivo (2019)
View attachment 93630
Meson El Oso, Cosgaya, Camino Vadiniense.

Cabrales; aperetivo on the menú especial. As I moved my fork towards it it cowered to the opposite side of the plate and quivered. I think it squeaked when I pierced it.

I have no idea what the rest of the meal tasted like. Five beautifully presented, exciting looking dishes with a variety of colours and textures. All I could taste was that *&)$£!! Cabrales.

The following day, after a warm climb up the Cwm at Fuente De I detected a strong whiff of Cabrales on the breeze, then noted that there wasn't a breeze, then concluded that all my clothes would need as thorough a wash as I would that evening.
You speak this blasphemy about the blue ribbon award winning cheese of Cabrales?!! It DOES overwhelm, in every way... and is not a choice for the tepid. Or, as you say, if you want to know what the rest of the meal tastes like🥴
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
Mayonaise should only be served with frites aka chips. All other options are out of the question... ;)
Belgian frites: the best in the World. Of course served with mayonaise😋
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Grapes hovering over the trail are a) still someone's property and b) regularly sprayed to kill off the mould. Figs are fair game though.
I’m not challenging you, just wondering how you know that. My understanding, though I have not taken any time at all to research this, is that anything hanging over the public right of way is fair game. In France, for instance, on the LePuy route, I remember walking with French people who told us with confidence that we could eat the strawberries that had grown through the fence and were snailing around the grass on the side of the road. Same thing in Spain with cherry tree branches hanging over the road. But I have never bothered to find out the truth of the situation, so I may have been breaking the law without knowing or intending to!

In the US at least, this is becoming more of an issue, because the “urban foragers” want to harvest edible plants on public property.
 

dick bird

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
I’m not challenging you, just wondering how you know that. My understanding, though I have not taken any time at all to research this, is that anything hanging over the public right of way is fair game. In France, for instance, on the LePuy route, I remember walking with French people who told us with confidence that we could eat the strawberries that had grown through the fence and were snailing around the grass on the side of the road. Same thing in Spain with cherry tree branches hanging over the road. But I have never bothered to find out the truth of the situation, so I may have been breaking the law without knowing or intending to!

In the US at least, this is becoming more of an issue, because the “urban foragers” want to harvest edible plants on public property.
I based it on English law, which definitely states that anything that grows on a tree or bush is the property of the person on whose land it grows, unless it falls off, in which case it is the property of the person on whose land it falls. You may cut off a branch if it overhangs your land, but you are required to chuck it back onto the land of the person on whose land it was growing before you cut it off. This is Common Law of course, based on custom, practice, and whatever the judge who first adjudicated the case happened to decide. All of which serves to show that the law is not only an ass, it is a very complicated ass. As for picking fruit off overhanging bushes etc along the camino, I just think it is a bit rude. But you are right that what is law in one country is by no means the law in another country. And I was deadly serious about the spraying. By the lurid blue colour I would guess copper sulphate is a favourite with vine growers, but god knows what was being sprayed by all the tractors and planes I have seen in Spain. As for fruit, we were on the ruta historica of the Norte (bypassing Ribadasella) a coupe of years ago. An old lady spotted us picking figs off her tree. Typically Spanish, she invited us in to her garden, bemoaned the fact that young people nowadays don't properly appreciate fresh produce and entertained us with a detailed lecture on the fig tree (I never knew it had two seasons) and as many figs as we could carry. They were bloody nice figs, too. Cheers.
 
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pepi

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2013, 14, 16, 17, 18
I’m not challenging you, just wondering how you know that. My understanding, though I have not taken any time at all to research this, is that anything hanging over the public right of way is fair game. In France, for instance, on the LePuy route, I remember walking with French people who told us with confidence that we could eat the strawberries that had grown through the fence and were snailing around the grass on the side of the road. Same thing in Spain with cherry tree branches hanging over the road. But I have never bothered to find out the truth of the situation, so I may have been breaking the law without knowing or intending to!

In the US at least, this is becoming more of an issue, because the “urban foragers” want to harvest edible plants on public property.
Frankly, I find it a bit frivolous to debate legal interpretations in this forum. Even professional lawyers rarely agree when discussing the law. Along the Camino, only Spanish law applies; French, British, U.S., and "common" laws are not relevant, and citing them in this context is not only confusing but can potentially lead to problems with local law enforcement. When in doubt, do not guess, but check with the relevant authorities.
Sigue caminando recto en el Camino
 

timr

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Several and counting...
View attachment 93630
Meson El Oso, Cosgaya, Camino Vadiniense.

Cabrales; aperetivo on the menú especial. As I moved my fork towards it it cowered to the opposite side of the plate and quivered. I think it squeaked when I pierced it.

I have no idea what the rest of the meal tasted like. Five beautifully presented, exciting looking dishes with a variety of colours and textures. All I could taste was that *&)$£!! Cabrales.

The following day, after a warm climb up the Cwm at Fuente De I detected a strong whiff of Cabrales on the breeze, then noted that there wasn't a breeze, then concluded that all my clothes would need as thorough a wash as I would that evening.
Long long ago somewhere along the path from Lourdes to St Jean de PdP I bought some sheep's cheese across a farm gate. It was in an area with minimal infrastructure in terms of food and was very welcome. And very very tasty. Years later the (not unpleasant) smell of the cheese still lingers in that rucksack which I no longer use!
 

dick bird

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
Frankly, I find it a bit frivolous to debate legal interpretations in this forum. Even professional lawyers rarely agree when discussing the law. Along the Camino, only Spanish law applies; French, British, U.S., and "common" laws are not relevant, and citing them in this context is not only confusing but can potentially lead to problems with local law enforcement. When in doubt, do not guess, but check with the relevant authorities.
Sigue caminando recto en el Camino
I don't think anyone was trying to be frivolous. I think we were trying to point out as gently as we could that what is legal in one country is often illegal in another, and I'd be very surprised to hear a lawyer disagree with that opinion. Incidentally, both pregrina 2000 and I pointed this out quite explicitly.

Food gathering is obviously a contentious issue in Spain: apart from the ubiquitous 'coto privado' signs, I have seen notices put up by the local council warning people not to gather mushrooms without permission and pointing out (e.g. in As Medulas) that certain chestnut trees are private property and not to gather chestnuts from the trees or the ground around them.

But even if you can do something, it doesn't mean you should. I have known pilgrims to help themselves to tomatoes and corn as they walk along. Snacking off fruit trees in the garden of a derelict house is one thing, helping your self to someone's crop is another. This does not endear us to local people.
 

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