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Exactly 30 days...where to start?

2020 Camino Guides

kelaina

New Member
I know Saint Jean is considered one of the starting points unofficially. But if I only have 30 days AND I'm determined to make it to Finisterre (that's where I really want to go), where would you recommend I start, assuming I'm walking in Sept/October?

Thanks!
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
Assuming 4 days to go from Santiago to Finisterre, and another 3 days for emergencies, rest, taking in the sights, getting back for your flight, you're left with three weeks or 21 days.
21 days x 15 miles (25km) = 525km. 21 days x 20 miles (30km near enough) = 630km.
Then take a look at the gronze site, click on the different maps and work backwards from Santiago about 550-600km until one of the options takes your fancy!

Or throw a dart at the map and start where it lands.
 
N

NoQ

Guest
Hi

I completed the Camino in 30 days in July and August this summer and started from Roncesvalles. Some days were quite far and blisters can become an issue, but it was a comfortable pace and I never had problems with accommodation, although I did see others in 2 places who had nowhere (not even the church porch) to sleep in. So start your days early. I only walked to Santiago and to be honest, in 30 days the extra walk onwards to Finisterre would have been impossible for me.

At the pace you are aiming for, it might be better if you start at Burgos and take it easy. Starting from St Jean would be impossible for 15 - 20 kms in 30 days.
 
D

Deleted member 12253

Guest
15/20 miles a day. Start in Pamplona. Easy. Buen camino
 
N

NoQ

Guest
Doh!
I should have noticed you were using miles and not kilometres. That's quite a pace, but still a bit much for SJPDP. Maybe you could start in SJPDP and then see how it's going once you get past Burgos and then maybe take a bus for a bit, missing the long straight flat stretches between Sahagun and Hospital De Orbigo.
 

piogaw

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances (05/06 2012) sjpdp-sdc; vdlp/camino sanabrea (02/03 2013) sevilla-sdc; hospitalero sdc june 2013, august-september 2013; caminho portugues (03 2014) lisboa-sdc
15/20 miles a day. Start in Pamplona. Easy. Buen camino
that is still quite a bit of walking with no contingency plan for rest days and emergency.
 

piogaw

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances (05/06 2012) sjpdp-sdc; vdlp/camino sanabrea (02/03 2013) sevilla-sdc; hospitalero sdc june 2013, august-september 2013; caminho portugues (03 2014) lisboa-sdc
I know Saint Jean is considered one of the starting points unofficially. But if I only have 30 days AND I'm determined to make it to Finisterre (that's where I really want to go), where would you recommend I start, assuming I'm walking in Sept/October?

Thanks!
Hello kelaina,

First of all, welcome to the forum.

As you have only 30 days to do the camino frances from saint jean (i assumed this is your plan) to finisterre, and you can do 15-20 miles maybe more each day (24-32 kilometres). I would like to make the following comment.

Santiago to finisterre will take 3 days of walking and i assume you will take the bus back to santiago. Or are going to walk to muxia also? This will take another day. Then you will take the bus back to santiago. You will need to allocate 4-5 days for this segment.

When you reached santiago, you will probably need another day to rest.

So in total you will have used up 5-6 days. This will leave you 24 days to walk from wherever your starting point is with no rest days or for emergency.

Now assuming you can walk 32 kilometres/day, the distance from sjpp to sdc is approximately 800 kilometres. You will need 25 days to complete your walk. Now in my experience and in mho, this is an impossibility. By doing this you will not enjoy the camino. You are also assuming that you will be walking a long distance everyday for 25-30 days. Not all the veteran peregrinos will agree with me. But i am speaking from experience of covering only 2 caminos-one of 800 kilometres, the other 1000 kilometres.

As suggested by other experienced peregrinos, you can start from pamplona, this will save you 3 days. There is no such thing as a starting point for the camino. Your starting point is where you wanted it to be. This is your camino. You might also skip some of the section between burgos and leon if your time is limited. In this way you will attain your goal of reaching finisterre.

I hope this helps. Good luck on your planning and buen camino. God bless.
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
15-20 miles a day, maybe more.
At that pace you can start in SJPdP and reach Fisterra in thirty days. Example, one day to Roncesvalles on the Camino Navarra, then:

From Roncesvalles to Santiago de Compostela through the Camino de Santiago
The table shows stages, partial and cumulative distances, and lodgings.
Summary
Longest stage: Arzúa - Santiago de Compostela: 38.6 km.
Shortest stage: Roncesvalles - Larrasoaña: 27.7 km.
Total distance: 750.3 km.
Stages: 24.
Average: 31.3 km per walking day.
Stage Partial (km) Cumulative (km) Lodging
1) Roncesvalles - Larrasoaña 27.7 27.7 R, H
2) Larrasoaña - Uterga 31.7 59.4 P
3) Uterga - Estella 28.8 88.2 3R, A, C, H
4) Estella - Torres del Río 28.8 117 3P
5) Torres del Río - Navarrete 32.7 149.7 R, 2P, C, H
6) Navarrete - Ciriñuela (FR 200 m) 30.6 180.3 P
7) Ciriñuela (FR 200 m) - Belorado 30 210.3 R, 3P, H
8) Belorado - Atapuerca 30 240.3 2P, H
9) Atapuerca - Rabé de las Calzadas 32.1 272.4 P, H
10) Rabé de las Calzadas - Castrojeriz 27.7 300.1 2R, 2P, C, H
11) Castrojeriz - Villarmentero de Campos 33.9 334 P
12) Villarmentero de Campos - Lédigos 32.9 366.9 P
13) Lédigos - El Burgo Ranero 33.4 400.3 R, 3P, H
14) El Burgo Ranero - León 37.3 437.6 2R, A, C, H
15) León - Hospital de Órbigo 32 469.6 2R, P, C, H
16) Hospital de Órbigo - El Ganso 29.6 499.2 P
17) El Ganso - Molinaseca 31.9 531.1 R, P, H
18) Molinaseca - Villafranca del Bierzo 30.3 561.4 R, 2P, C, H
19) Villafranca del Bierzo - O Cebreiro 28.5 589.9 R, H
20) O Cebreiro - Samos 30.8 620.7 R, 2P
21) Samos - Mercadoiro 31.6 652.3 P
22) Mercadoiro - Palas de Rei 30.5 682.8 2R, 2P, C, H
23) Palas de Rei - Arzúa 28.9 711.7 R, 6P, H

Then three days on to Fisterra.
 

jpflavin1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(10,11,17), Vasco(12), Salvador(13), CP(13), CN(14), Madrid (16), Mozarabe (18), VdlP(19)
I know Saint Jean is considered one of the starting points unofficially. But if I only have 30 days AND I'm determined to make it to Finisterre (that's where I really want to go), where would you recommend I start, assuming I'm walking in Sept/October?

Thanks!
Kelaina:

Your post makes it clear to me that it is important you make it all the way to Finisterre and you only have 30 days. It also states you are not fixated on a specific starting point. Your next post states you expect to walk 15 to 20 miles a day.

If you average 15 miles or 25km's per day you can not reach Finisterre in 30 days from SJPdP. If you average 20 miles or 33km's a day you can reach Finisterre from SJPdP?

Since starting point is not critical and end point is, I would recommend you start in Pamplona to give yourself a little more flexibility. Pamplona is easily accessible from Madrid or Barcelona and a common starting point.

Ultreya,
Joe
 

scruffy1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Holy Year from Pamplona 2010, SJPP 2011, Lisbon 2012, Le Puy 2013, Vezelay (partial watch this space!) 2014; 2015 Toulouse-Puenta la Reina (Arles)
Trying not to put a stick in your spokes - thirty days plus Fistera plus Santiago plus a restday here or there plus you may fall on a place which totally enchants you for another half day off plus a day to arrive in Spain maybe more plus another day to get back home - you have turned the Camino into a marathon footrace. Ask yourself why am I doing this? The dreaded "been there done that" syndrom? Everyone builds his/her own Camino and each is real for the person walking. More than 200,000 pilgrims arrived in Santiago de Compostela in 2012-true some walked only the requied 100k others began as far away as Le Puy or Vezelay all learned that the Camino is much much more than kilometers passed each day, or lighthouses observed. My recommendation? Start from someplace interesting say Pamplona or Burgos, walk slowly for a few days, absorb the atmosphere, interact with the people you will be walking with, enjoy the art the architecture, marvel at the scenery, enjoy the camaraderie of new found friends sharing food wine and experiences. You are not convinced? Why go ahead after the experiment and turn on the speed you will still be able to achieve your goals. You may miss so much that the Camino can offer and find yourself only concerned with blisters, hamstring, and the distance to the next albergue-your choice.
 
W

whariwharangi

Guest
I'd suggest a pace of 20km per day. (aka 12.5 miles). 30 days @ 20km = 600 km.

Santiago to Finisterre is 80 km (50 miles) . Burgos is 500 km (315 miles) from Santiago. Burgos is better connected transportation wise than the village 520 km out.

If you do accomplish the 20 miles per day then you have time to continue on to Muxia and perhaps even walk back to Santiago.

Is your purpose to walk as far and as fast as possible or is it to experience the culture along the way?
 

kelaina

New Member
I don't care where I start. Pamplona sounds lovely but my goal is to go to Finnisterre and enjoy my Camino. I don't want to rush, but I do walk long distances, usually in a good state, with additional weight (up to 15 pounds though I want my pack to be closer to 12 or 13/7kg).
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
For me it would be a Burgos start. Should give you plenty time to get to the coast.
 

shefollowsshells

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several alone and with children
I'd suggest a pace of 20km per day. (aka 12.5 miles). 30 days @ 20km = 600 km.



Is your purpose to walk as far and as fast as possible or is it to experience the culture along the way?
I have to say I think you can do both!!!
I think I will always remember someone posting in response to a fast and long distance walker, " but did you go into the chapels and stop and eat berries".... The difference I saw in those that didn't walk as fast or as long as myself was simply that they were sitting outside of their auberge already with drink of choice in hand waving me down to say, " this is a great place, stop for the night". That was the difference that I saw. I start later than most but finish way later than most. To each his own...I just want to stress that I am not convinced that slow walkers or those that prefer shorter walks ( which I TOTALLY respect) are getting any more culture than I did. Many walked in the dark for two hours each morning not seeing a thing....then at 1pm I see them at their place for the night....
No one can convince me they are seeing more of Spain's culture than I did when I am lingering in a town with the sun up cafe con leche in my hands, croissant on my plate and street cleaners cleaning the streets and locals eating breakfast beside me BEFORE I take off knowing I won't settle into my auberge till dinner time.

To each his own BUT just want to assure those who have to walk the Camino and MUST put in long days to do so that I am not convinced they are going to miss any culture....

I am about to do the Norte in three months, auberges don't appear to open till 4pm ... I wonder if auberges on the Frances opened this late if many more people could pull off longer days.

...just saying...
 

shefollowsshells

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several alone and with children
I know Saint Jean is considered one of the starting points unofficially. But if I only have 30 days AND I'm determined to make it to Finisterre (that's where I really want to go), where would you recommend I start, assuming I'm walking in Sept/October?

Thanks!
Keep in mind thirty days can mean different things.
Is that 30 walking days, or thirty days to fit in travel etc...
I come from the States....so if i fly out on march 26 I am spending march 27th getting to my start town and not walking till March 28th.
Kind of the same situation coming home....stayed in Muxia, caught 0600 bus to. Santiago flew to london where I had to spend the night and not home till day after. SO four days not walking.

Thirty days of walking vs twenty six is a huge difference, so think about that.
Like you the coast HAD to be done for me...was willing to bus it, but didn't want to.
Thankfully didn't have to....
 

piogaw

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances (05/06 2012) sjpdp-sdc; vdlp/camino sanabrea (02/03 2013) sevilla-sdc; hospitalero sdc june 2013, august-september 2013; caminho portugues (03 2014) lisboa-sdc
Hello shefollowsshell,

I am just speaking from my experience as a first time peregrino in may/june of 2012 walking the camino frances alone. I finished the camino in 31 days from sjpp to santiago, including getting lost a few times costing me probably another 50 kilometres.

Imho i do not believe you can do sjpp to finisterre in 30 days.

In my second camino on the vdlp starting in sevilla on the 3rd of february of this past winter, i covered a little over 1000 kilometres in 36 days again walking alone. Someone may be a regular hiker in the day-to-day life of hiking, it is not the same as walking everyday toting a rucksack that weighs on average 6-9 kilos for 30 kiloetres for 30 days.

I know everybody is different. But let us be realistic. There is a good chance you might damaged your body by trying to get to your destination at the expense of your health. I have seen enough of this happening at the end of the camino at the large albergue in santiago where i volunteered as a hospitalero for 2 1/2 months in the last half of this year.

Anyway, to all future peregrinos, this is your camino, nobody can tell you what to do. We can only speak from experience. I do not considered myself to be a veteran peregrinos, only 2 long distance caminos. I am 70 and hopefully in good health and will continue to do at least a camino each year. Next camino - caminho portugues from lisboa in february.

Good luck to you all. Buen camino and god blessing on all of you.

Que tengas un buen dia y un buen camino a todos los peregrinos. Que dios os bendigas. FELIZ NAVIDAD A TODOS.
 

shefollowsshells

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several alone and with children
Piogaw you are to be commended, I can only hope that at age 70 I could consider to continue on the wonderful Camino. My parents in their 80s camp thru Europe for a month each year traveling over the Ocean with their gear so I only hope to have a bit of what they have given me to possibly pull off the same.

I certainly would not encourage anyone to think they could do the Camino in 30 days...BUT we all know it can be done, it has been done. That does not mean I would encourage it, nor would I bet one penny to assure anyone that they can. Honestly there are tons of people in my life who I think can but I would not assure anyone on this planet that they could. You never know what game changer can happen on the Camino.

My post was simply this, and I stand by it I think people can walk fast, cover long distances and still enjoy their Camino by popping into churches, drinking their beverage of choice with the locals, watching soccer at night between two heated sides AND take two thousand pictures. I think it can be done! That is my point.

Waking up at 0500 and ending the walking day at 1300 gives you about five hours of covering distance in sunlight.
Waking as I did at 0800 and finishing my days around 1800 at night (sometimes later) gave me 8-10 hours of"enjoying".

Agree 100% no one can tell you what you could pull off on the Camino, gosh I don't even know what I can do each day. It's such a personal journey and much of it is out of our hands.
 

abel carrion

abel & Vicky
Camino(s) past & future
i will plan to walk the camino at the end of april 2014 God willing
WOW SR. PIOGAW that is very extraordinary what you did congratulations !!!!!
 

fraluchi

RIP 2019
Camino(s) past & future
One every year since 2007
[...]I only have 30 days AND I'm determined to make it to Finisterre (that's where I really want to go), where would you recommend I start, assuming I'm walking in Sept/October?
Start from Burgos. As you get into October the days get shorter and weather patterns change. Some albergues and other facilities in smaller villages may be closing for the winter. Keep a few days in "reserve".;)
 

piogaw

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances (05/06 2012) sjpdp-sdc; vdlp/camino sanabrea (02/03 2013) sevilla-sdc; hospitalero sdc june 2013, august-september 2013; caminho portugues (03 2014) lisboa-sdc
WOW SR. PIOGAW that is very extraordinary what you did congratulations !!!!!
Hello abel,

Thank you for your compliment.

You should see the ones that are over 75 and even 80 years of age that walked into my albergue from as far as germany, holland, etc. and they don't shown sign of their ages, and still doing the caminos regularly.

Buen camino to you.
 
Last edited:

julie

Active Member
if I only have 30 days AND I'm determined to make it to Finisterre (that's where I really want to go), where would you recommend I start, assuming I'm walking in Sept/October?
This is really one of those questions that has no definitive answer. What we think is going to happen before we set out often bears little resemblance to the reality of our pilgrimage. Is it possible for you to walk to Finisterre in 30 days? Yes, it is. Will you want to when the time comes? You won't know that until you're there.

Few of us have previously walked every day for a month so have no real knowledge of how we are going to cope with that. I factored in a base rate of 31 days from SJPdP to Santiago, added rest days, possible foot recovery days and a few days in Santiago at the end. Thus I started out with an allocation of 39 days. Along the way I discovered that my preferred style of walking was not to take rest days and I arrived in Santiago 28 days after leaving St Jean. At no time did I feel like I was rushing - because I wasn't! The simple fact of having ample time gave me the freedom to walk at my own pace. Perversely if I had allowed a leaner time frame, the whole feeling of my pilgrimage would have changed. I still allow extra days when I'm walking because it's different every time you go and I like to enjoy the freedom of stopping where and when the mood takes me. Some days you feel as if you could walk forever and others are a plod. In my experience, rather than being due to fitness or the terrain, the difference is a psychological one.

In order to allow your pilgrimage to unfold at its own pace, I would recommend you start no further than Pamplona. Burgos would be an even better starting place for someone with limited time.
 

Olivares

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 1997 (Leon to Santiago); Sections Camino Frances: May 2011, May 2012, May 2013, October 2013, June-July 2014 (Sahagun to Santiago).
Start at SJPDP and speed ahead whenever you feel like it, either considering weather, physical conditions, emotional, get away from somebody (;)), time constraints, or simply skip uninteresting sections. This plan will give you the flexibility to do do just that; be flexible.
 

mytiturk

New Member
Keep your toenails clipped close or you'll lose them on the steep downhills, no matter how fit you are.

If you do start in Burgos keep your eyes closed or it will seduce you by its beauty and pizazz and you will end up missing your deadline for Fisterra. Also avoid reading James Michener's Iberia. It will make you want to travel all over Spain and you may never come back.

My wife and I, both 68 with some physical limitations, walked and public bused it from SJPDP beginning on April 25 and arriving in Santiago May 16, but we enjoyed the special places we had researched. Favorites were St. Jean, the walk from St. Jean to Roncesvalles, The Hotel Roncesvalles after a scary walk in fog, snow, ice pellets and rain from Orisson, Pamplona, Eunate, Estella, Burgos, the walk Órbigo Bridge to Astorga, the walk from Foncebadón past the Cruz de Ferro to Molinaseca, Santiago, the bacalao in Fisterra, the crashing sea and "ruins of Mary's ship" at Muxía and the special people we met along the way with whom we're still in contact. That was our camino and we are proud of what we did and how we did it.

Details and carefully prepared photos of our trip are in this post called Our Detailed Camino Itinerary on my website:
http://mightyturk.wordpress.com/2013/06/01/our-camino-santiago-itinerary-april-and-may-2013/

It was ideal for us. Yours will be ideal for you. Everyone comes back with something valuable from the Camino.
 

RENSHAW

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks every year on CF reaching Burgos or Leon. Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
At that pace you can start in SJPdP and reach Fisterra in thirty days. Example, one day to Roncesvalles on the Camino Navarra, then:

From Roncesvalles to Santiago de Compostela through the Camino de Santiago
The table shows stages, partial and cumulative distances, and lodgings.
Summary
Longest stage: Arzúa - Santiago de Compostela: 38.6 km.
Shortest stage: Roncesvalles - Larrasoaña: 27.7 km.
Total distance: 750.3 km.
Stages: 24.
Average: 31.3 km per walking day.
Stage Partial (km) Cumulative (km) Lodging
1) Roncesvalles - Larrasoaña 27.7 27.7 R, H
2) Larrasoaña - Uterga 31.7 59.4 P
3) Uterga - Estella 28.8 88.2 3R, A, C, H
4) Estella - Torres del Río 28.8 117 3P
5) Torres del Río - Navarrete 32.7 149.7 R, 2P, C, H
6) Navarrete - Ciriñuela (FR 200 m) 30.6 180.3 P
7) Ciriñuela (FR 200 m) - Belorado 30 210.3 R, 3P, H
8) Belorado - Atapuerca 30 240.3 2P, H
9) Atapuerca - Rabé de las Calzadas 32.1 272.4 P, H
10) Rabé de las Calzadas - Castrojeriz 27.7 300.1 2R, 2P, C, H
11) Castrojeriz - Villarmentero de Campos 33.9 334 P
12) Villarmentero de Campos - Lédigos 32.9 366.9 P
13) Lédigos - El Burgo Ranero 33.4 400.3 R, 3P, H
14) El Burgo Ranero - León 37.3 437.6 2R, A, C, H
15) León - Hospital de Órbigo 32 469.6 2R, P, C, H
16) Hospital de Órbigo - El Ganso 29.6 499.2 P
17) El Ganso - Molinaseca 31.9 531.1 R, P, H
18) Molinaseca - Villafranca del Bierzo 30.3 561.4 R, 2P, C, H
19) Villafranca del Bierzo - O Cebreiro 28.5 589.9 R, H
20) O Cebreiro - Samos 30.8 620.7 R, 2P
21) Samos - Mercadoiro 31.6 652.3 P
22) Mercadoiro - Palas de Rei 30.5 682.8 2R, 2P, C, H
23) Palas de Rei - Arzúa 28.9 711.7 R, 6P, H

Then three days on to Fisterra.
This about as good as it gets , Falcon is a master at these routes - take a bus for a day here and there if you do start falling behind, the distances per day will be testing if you are not fit.
 

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