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Exercise That Can Help Prevent Plantar Fasciitis

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Given that many are looking at a Springtime Camino, I wanted to do re-posts of information I put together on both Plantar Fasciitis and Shin Splints. There will be a separate thread for the Shin Splints information.

Top Exercises to Help Avoid Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is a common type of chronic heel pain. It seems to affect young male athletes and middle-aged obese women more than any other group, but that does not mean other groups are immune to it. The inflamed tissue around the heel seems to cause a stabbing-like sensation, which is worse in the morning. This condition may be prevented, and the following exercises will help you do that.

Arch Stretching
Stretching your arch muscles is not too difficult, but the exercise is a little peculiar. The first thing you need to do is take off your shoes and get barefoot, and then place a towel on the floor. Now, simply place your foot on the towel, and curl your toes to clench the towel. Pull the towel toward you, and that is it. Place the towel in front of you again, and repeat. Be sure to do the same for your other foot.

This exercise is typically suggested by professionals for those who actually have plantar fasciitis already, but it can definitely be helpful to everyone. You should try and do this several times a week, but make sure to not overstretch your feet while you’re doing it.

Calf Strengthening
The calf and the tendons surrounding your heel need to be strengthened. A simple exercise that may help you do this is calf raises. What you want to do is stand straight on level ground. You should be barefooted for best traction, but it is not absolutely necessary. Now, all you have to do is lift your heels off the ground so that you are standing on your toes. Stay in this position as long as you can before returning your heels to the ground, and just repeat this at least nine more times.

Another way to do this exercise that works great is to stand at the edge of a stair or curb. You want your toes to be what keeps you on the stair or curb. Then, raise your heels up so that you are on your “tippy toes” and then back down again, but allow your heels to go lower than your toes past the edge of the stair or curb. This exercise allows for a fuller stretch.

Alleviate Pronation
Pronation is a natural part of your foot’s movement. This refers to how the foot rolls and applies pressure when the heel finally hits the ground. Pronation may be normal, but that does not mean the constant shock it receives when you walk or run does not have an effect on it. One way you can alleviate the pressure is to try doming. To do this, just place your foot flat on the ground, and then press your toes on the ground while keeping your heels firmly on the floor. This should create a dome between your heel and toes. Maintain this position for 10 seconds, straighten your foot, and then just start again.

Work the Interossei
The Interossei muscles help support your arch muscles thus preventing this issue. All you have to do is place a large rubber band around your toes for resistance. Then, stretch your toes and hold for 10 seconds. Squeeze your toes for another 10 seconds, and repeat these steps about five to 10 times.

What to Do When Your Feet Are Hurting?
Whether or not you’re at risk of getting Plantar Fasciitis, you’re going to come across a time where you’re feet are going to hurt. Maybe you were standing all day at work, ran a marathon, or whatever. If your feet are hurting, take a break and rest, stretch, and recover. Get off your feet for a little bit and either ice or heat your feet. If you notice any swelling or severe pain, then ice it. If it’s just sore, then apply heat with a hot bath. Then, make sure to rub out the tension and to do some basic exercises. You can try the ones above or do some other types. One popular one is to roll a tennis ball underneath the feet. This helps to preserve the arch and massage it at the same time
 

Wendy Werneth

Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés from St Jean Pied de Port (2017)
Camino Primitivo (2018)
Camino de Madrid (2019)
Thank you for this. I developed plantar fasciitis on my first Camino two years ago and have been living with it ever since. It only really bothers me when I walk long distances, but I am planning another Camino this April and am a bit apprehensive.
 

Martyduc

Hunter Valley,Australia
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 15,Portuguese 16,Finisterre Muxia 16,Ingles16,, Almeria to Muxia,Finesterre 18,,Via Serrana
I also had this problem,,found that innersoles designed for helping with PF have virtually got rid of it,,,
 

OzAnnie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
'Portuguese,Frances,Norte,Salvador/primitivo,Le puy, Inglés, CDM, Invierno, Fin/Mux, VDLP spring19
I also had this problem,,found that innersoles designed for helping with PF have virtually got rid of it,,,
Hi Marty
Do you have a pic or link with ones that worked for you ?
 

Martyduc

Hunter Valley,Australia
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 15,Portuguese 16,Finisterre Muxia 16,Ingles16,, Almeria to Muxia,Finesterre 18,,Via Serrana
Hi Marty
Do you have a pic or link with ones that worked for you ?
Hi,,,,from my local chemist,,,here in the Hunter,,,brand name Footlogic,,their plantar faciitis innersoles ,,,they have other sorts too,,,,and they last well too,,did 1500 kms on my last Camino on one pair !!
 

OzAnnie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
'Portuguese,Frances,Norte,Salvador/primitivo,Le puy, Inglés, CDM, Invierno, Fin/Mux, VDLP spring19
Hi,,,,from my local chemist,,,here in the Hunter,,,brand name Footlogic,,their plantar faciitis innersoles ,,,they have other sorts too,,,,and they last well too,,did 1500 kms on my last Camino on one pair !!
Oh ta. Just saw you are fairly local to me so I should be able to see similar stuff in Chemist here.
Good to hear positive feedback- thanks.
 

Delphinoula

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C Franconia 2019
Camino desde Algeciras Sevillia (2019)
Thank you Dave,
Having walked a lot on my job I developed PF. So a combination helped me.
Rest , take weight off your feet.
Pain reliever Ibu. Rub in feet with wicks.
Alternating shoes , a MTB shoe to help my feet moving differently, insoles and calf stretches., realignment of hips and vertebra and a lot patients.
But that’s me.
Talk to a specialist. For me I find best to know about my gait and feet so I know how to support them. Maybe train with a physiotherapist to walk right. It paid out for me.
Remember the kids song Dem Bones dry bones....
 

Lindsay53

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to walk April /May 19
I devloped PF a few years back. The physio had me run a frozen water bottle or rolling pin under my feet when sitting in addition to the heel raises mentioned in the first post.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
Given that many are looking at a Springtime Camino, I wanted to do re-posts of information I put together on both Plantar Fasciitis and Shin Splints. There will be a separate thread for the Shin Splints information.

Top Exercises to Help Avoid Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is a common type of chronic heel pain. It seems to affect young male athletes and middle-aged obese women more than any other group, but that does not mean other groups are immune to it. The inflamed tissue around the heel seems to cause a stabbing-like sensation, which is worse in the morning. This condition may be prevented, and the following exercises will help you do that.

Arch Stretching
Stretching your arch muscles is not too difficult, but the exercise is a little peculiar. The first thing you need to do is take off your shoes and get barefoot, and then place a towel on the floor. Now, simply place your foot on the towel, and curl your toes to clench the towel. Pull the towel toward you, and that is it. Place the towel in front of you again, and repeat. Be sure to do the same for your other foot.

This exercise is typically suggested by professionals for those who actually have plantar fasciitis already, but it can definitely be helpful to everyone. You should try and do this several times a week, but make sure to not overstretch your feet while you’re doing it.

Calf Strengthening
The calf and the tendons surrounding your heel need to be strengthened. A simple exercise that may help you do this is calf raises. What you want to do is stand straight on level ground. You should be barefooted for best traction, but it is not absolutely necessary. Now, all you have to do is lift your heels off the ground so that you are standing on your toes. Stay in this position as long as you can before returning your heels to the ground, and just repeat this at least nine more times.

Another way to do this exercise that works great is to stand at the edge of a stair or curb. You want your toes to be what keeps you on the stair or curb. Then, raise your heels up so that you are on your “tippy toes” and then back down again, but allow your heels to go lower than your toes past the edge of the stair or curb. This exercise allows for a fuller stretch.

Alleviate Pronation
Pronation is a natural part of your foot’s movement. This refers to how the foot rolls and applies pressure when the heel finally hits the ground. Pronation may be normal, but that does not mean the constant shock it receives when you walk or run does not have an effect on it. One way you can alleviate the pressure is to try doming. To do this, just place your foot flat on the ground, and then press your toes on the ground while keeping your heels firmly on the floor. This should create a dome between your heel and toes. Maintain this position for 10 seconds, straighten your foot, and then just start again.

Work the Interossei
The Interossei muscles help support your arch muscles thus preventing this issue. All you have to do is place a large rubber band around your toes for resistance. Then, stretch your toes and hold for 10 seconds. Squeeze your toes for another 10 seconds, and repeat these steps about five to 10 times.

What to Do When Your Feet Are Hurting?
Whether or not you’re at risk of getting Plantar Fasciitis, you’re going to come across a time where you’re feet are going to hurt. Maybe you were standing all day at work, ran a marathon, or whatever. If your feet are hurting, take a break and rest, stretch, and recover. Get off your feet for a little bit and either ice or heat your feet. If you notice any swelling or severe pain, then ice it. If it’s just sore, then apply heat with a hot bath. Then, make sure to rub out the tension and to do some basic exercises. You can try the ones above or do some other types. One popular one is to roll a tennis ball underneath the feet. This helps to preserve the arch and massage it at the same time
Thanks. As before, before the bump in the road last year, you provide great information and advice. :)
 

Chrisp

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: 2014
EPW: 2015
Portuguese Camino: 2016
TMB: 2016
Rota Vicentina: 2017
VF: 2018
Given that many are looking at a Springtime Camino, I wanted to do re-posts of information I put together on both Plantar Fasciitis and Shin Splints. There will be a separate thread for the Shin Splints information.

Top Exercises to Help Avoid Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is a common type of chronic heel pain. It seems to affect young male athletes and middle-aged obese women more than any other group, but that does not mean other groups are immune to it. The inflamed tissue around the heel seems to cause a stabbing-like sensation, which is worse in the morning. This condition may be prevented, and the following exercises will help you do that.

Arch Stretching
Stretching your arch muscles is not too difficult, but the exercise is a little peculiar. The first thing you need to do is take off your shoes and get barefoot, and then place a towel on the floor. Now, simply place your foot on the towel, and curl your toes to clench the towel. Pull the towel toward you, and that is it. Place the towel in front of you again, and repeat. Be sure to do the same for your other foot.

This exercise is typically suggested by professionals for those who actually have plantar fasciitis already, but it can definitely be helpful to everyone. You should try and do this several times a week, but make sure to not overstretch your feet while you’re doing it.

Calf Strengthening
The calf and the tendons surrounding your heel need to be strengthened. A simple exercise that may help you do this is calf raises. What you want to do is stand straight on level ground. You should be barefooted for best traction, but it is not absolutely necessary. Now, all you have to do is lift your heels off the ground so that you are standing on your toes. Stay in this position as long as you can before returning your heels to the ground, and just repeat this at least nine more times.

Another way to do this exercise that works great is to stand at the edge of a stair or curb. You want your toes to be what keeps you on the stair or curb. Then, raise your heels up so that you are on your “tippy toes” and then back down again, but allow your heels to go lower than your toes past the edge of the stair or curb. This exercise allows for a fuller stretch.

Alleviate Pronation
Pronation is a natural part of your foot’s movement. This refers to how the foot rolls and applies pressure when the heel finally hits the ground. Pronation may be normal, but that does not mean the constant shock it receives when you walk or run does not have an effect on it. One way you can alleviate the pressure is to try doming. To do this, just place your foot flat on the ground, and then press your toes on the ground while keeping your heels firmly on the floor. This should create a dome between your heel and toes. Maintain this position for 10 seconds, straighten your foot, and then just start again.

Work the Interossei
The Interossei muscles help support your arch muscles thus preventing this issue. All you have to do is place a large rubber band around your toes for resistance. Then, stretch your toes and hold for 10 seconds. Squeeze your toes for another 10 seconds, and repeat these steps about five to 10 times.

What to Do When Your Feet Are Hurting?
Whether or not you’re at risk of getting Plantar Fasciitis, you’re going to come across a time where you’re feet are going to hurt. Maybe you were standing all day at work, ran a marathon, or whatever. If your feet are hurting, take a break and rest, stretch, and recover. Get off your feet for a little bit and either ice or heat your feet. If you notice any swelling or severe pain, then ice it. If it’s just sore, then apply heat with a hot bath. Then, make sure to rub out the tension and to do some basic exercises. You can try the ones above or do some other types. One popular one is to roll a tennis ball underneath the feet. This helps to preserve the arch and massage it at the same time
Thanks Dave. Good timing for me too. I’m working with a physio doing some of exercises you suggest but so far not a huge success so feeling worried for next walk! By the way, I’m not a fit young male athlete but didn’t think I was an obese middle age woman either 😂😂
 

Raggy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
I also had this problem,,found that innersoles designed for helping with PF have virtually got rid of it,,,
I had similar experiences. Custom formed insoles gave me some relief. Then, on the advice of a foot doctor 10 years ago, I started buying longer, narrower, shoes and paying attention to where the shoe flexes (determined by the position of the shank inside the soles). If the shank is too short, the shoe flexes near the middle, it seems to put more repetitive strain on the fascia and cause me problems.
Since then I haven’t had a recurrence of PF but I’ve occasionally felt a sensation that I take as a “warning” to rest up.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Ponferrada - Santiago (2013)
Porto to Santiago (2015)
Lugo to Finisterre (2017)
Thank you, Dave for that well written article on Plantar Fasciitis. I suffered with that near the end of my first Camino. The pain was even more, when I stopped walking. At that time, I didn't know what it was.
Last year the Plantar Fasciitis surfaced again and lasted for months and eventually received a Steroid injection.
Now the Plantar Fasciitis, is beginning to niggle again. We are walking the Portuguese Coastal Camino at the end of April. So I have been doing lots of the stretching exercises.
So your article has been me lots of great advice to follow.
Thanks again.
 

omar504

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016,2017,2018
Tried everything..injections,exercises,ball under foot,stretching,physio etc but nothing worked so 4 weeks ago had the op
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Tried everything..injections,exercises,ball under foot,stretching,physio etc but nothing worked so 4 weeks ago had the op
I am keeping my fingers crossed for you; My best wishes as you continue with your recover
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Although these exercises may provide some help with established Plantar Fasciitis, they are ideally designed to help prevent an occurrence and perhaps to keep a new incident from continuing to progress as quickly or severely.

Please keep in mind that the only real cure for a severe case of Plantar's is rest and recovery, much like any other musculoskeletal injury. Fortunately, spontaneous recovery with adequate rest has a high rate of success.
 

omar504

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016,2017,2018
I am keeping my fingers crossed for you; My best wishes as you continue with your recover
Many thanks..got a couple of months before off to Europe again so I'm hopeful
 

omar504

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016,2017,2018
@omar504 you may have my problem - a complete tear (9cm). What fixed it was rest and time.
I tried rest for over a year..apparently ive got scar tissue etc so no flexibility. .chopping up the fascia will ho pefully fix it!
 

Jackieduda

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF September (2018)
Given that many are looking at a Springtime Camino, I wanted to do re-posts of information I put together on both Plantar Fasciitis and Shin Splints. There will be a separate thread for the Shin Splints information.

Top Exercises to Help Avoid Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is a common type of chronic heel pain. It seems to affect young male athletes and middle-aged obese women more than any other group, but that does not mean other groups are immune to it. The inflamed tissue around the heel seems to cause a stabbing-like sensation, which is worse in the morning. This condition may be prevented, and the following exercises will help you do that.

Arch Stretching
Stretching your arch muscles is not too difficult, but the exercise is a little peculiar. The first thing you need to do is take off your shoes and get barefoot, and then place a towel on the floor. Now, simply place your foot on the towel, and curl your toes to clench the towel. Pull the towel toward you, and that is it. Place the towel in front of you again, and repeat. Be sure to do the same for your other foot.

This exercise is typically suggested by professionals for those who actually have plantar fasciitis already, but it can definitely be helpful to everyone. You should try and do this several times a week, but make sure to not overstretch your feet while you’re doing it.

Calf Strengthening
The calf and the tendons surrounding your heel need to be strengthened. A simple exercise that may help you do this is calf raises. What you want to do is stand straight on level ground. You should be barefooted for best traction, but it is not absolutely necessary. Now, all you have to do is lift your heels off the ground so that you are standing on your toes. Stay in this position as long as you can before returning your heels to the ground, and just repeat this at least nine more times.

Another way to do this exercise that works great is to stand at the edge of a stair or curb. You want your toes to be what keeps you on the stair or curb. Then, raise your heels up so that you are on your “tippy toes” and then back down again, but allow your heels to go lower than your toes past the edge of the stair or curb. This exercise allows for a fuller stretch.

Alleviate Pronation
Pronation is a natural part of your foot’s movement. This refers to how the foot rolls and applies pressure when the heel finally hits the ground. Pronation may be normal, but that does not mean the constant shock it receives when you walk or run does not have an effect on it. One way you can alleviate the pressure is to try doming. To do this, just place your foot flat on the ground, and then press your toes on the ground while keeping your heels firmly on the floor. This should create a dome between your heel and toes. Maintain this position for 10 seconds, straighten your foot, and then just start again.

Work the Interossei
The Interossei muscles help support your arch muscles thus preventing this issue. All you have to do is place a large rubber band around your toes for resistance. Then, stretch your toes and hold for 10 seconds. Squeeze your toes for another 10 seconds, and repeat these steps about five to 10 times.

What to Do When Your Feet Are Hurting?
Whether or not you’re at risk of getting Plantar Fasciitis, you’re going to come across a time where you’re feet are going to hurt. Maybe you were standing all day at work, ran a marathon, or whatever. If your feet are hurting, take a break and rest, stretch, and recover. Get off your feet for a little bit and either ice or heat your feet. If you notice any swelling or severe pain, then ice it. If it’s just sore, then apply heat with a hot bath. Then, make sure to rub out the tension and to do some basic exercises. You can try the ones above or do some other types. One popular one is to roll a tennis ball underneath the feet. This helps to preserve the arch and massage it at the same time
Great info Dave. I had this problem a few years ago, began taking vitamin B12 at the advice of a friend, never had symptoms again, even when i walked 18 miles in a day, though my feet did hurt from the long hike.
Jackie d.
(Jacscamino.wordpress.com)
 

Redvespablur

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte/Primitivo April/May 2016
Voie Littorale May 2020
A strassburg sock is the only thing that helped me when I had a bad plantar episode

 

twh

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances May/June, 2018
Porto-Muxia-Finisterre Oct (2019)
Dave, what is your opinion on using insoles for preventing or treating PF - Plantar Fasciitis? It developed about 2 weeks into my 2018 Camino Frances. I had the heel sensitivity but that was minor compared to the discomfort on the bottom of my feet between the heel and toes while walking. It felt like I was stepping on marbles while barefoot on a hard floor. Whenever possible I sought out "softer" ground to walk on. I had both Solomon hiking boots and Solomon trail runners with me. The boots provided so much more comfort than the trail runners regarding the PF symptoms. I presumed that was due to a stiffer sole but I don't know.

I knew nothing about PF before the Camino. My PF lasted for 4 - 6 months after returning home. During month 5 and 6 it was still there but getting better all the time so I no longer noticed it after becoming accustomed to the ever-present feeling/annoyance/pain. I stopped walking as exercise and only walked when I absolutely needed to do so. Since I was sitting a lot more than usual I assembled a collection of golf balls and tennis balls under the table and worked my feet over them intensely for several hours a day. The tennis balls were the most "comfortable" to use but it felt like they were not doing anything. So I moved to the less comfortable golf balls which felt like they were doing more due to the level of discomfort, noise and grinding I could feel on the Fascia. I think I was operating from a "no pain, no gain" philosophy which is not necessarily valid but it seemed intuitively correct at the time. As I rolled a golf ball under my feet with lots of pressure while sitting, I could both hear and feel what seemed like a knotted and bumpy Fascia. It did NOT feel knotted and bumpy on my hand/fingers if I pressed and rubbed the bottom of my foot with my hand but when exerting much more pressure per square inch with a golf ball, the sound and feeling from my foot was pretty weird and intense. Did this treatment program extend my problem or shorten it or have no effect...who knows? I do know when researching this topic there are no definitive methods of treatment. There seems to be no definitive specific understanding of the cause but because podiatrists are highly paid experts they need to sound convincing to their patients. And it seems to be the same thing with preventative measures. I started to do the stretching while on the Camino after I had a full blown case of PF and the stretching seemed to have no effect in making anything better. However it may have kept things from getting even worse...there is just no way to know for sure? My backpack was 35 lbs. Since I did not get the PF right away, and I am trying to identify some cause or correlation of the PF with another factor, I've decided to attach the PF with the heavy pack and 32 days of walking. The weight never bothered any other part of my body so that makes the connection suspect. I do know on my next Camino I would really like to avoid the annoyance of dealing with PF again so I will probably do all the exercises before hand and during the Camino and I will pack much lighter leaving the 10 lbs of camera gear and accessories behind.

I think I will try some insoles also. Maybe my supination is related to the PF ? I believe I have a normal/average foot arch but I have EXCESSIVE wear on the outboard side, bottom of my boots, heel area. The picture is of my right boot. The wear is at the outside/outboard heel where I plant my foot. The lug tread depths in the picture are in 64th's of an inch. The "A" and "C" lug depths appear to be high due to a recessed channel surrounding those lugs that adds several 64th's of inch to their apparent height/depth.

Before posting this comment I just now did a quick google search on Supination and PF. I should have done this search 6 months ago. Here is what I found.

"Supination is when, instead of being flat-footed, you have high arches. When your foot strikes the ground, much of the cushion of the foot is lost. The foot doesn’t flatten at all on impact, and there is little shock absorption. The affect is an outward roll and can cause plantar fasciitis, ankle sprains, and other foot and leg injuries."

Well better late than never, maybe this will help someone else...PF is no fun.

52689
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Dave, what is your opinion on using insoles for preventing or treating PF - Plantar Fasciitis? It developed about 2 weeks into my 2018 Camino Frances. I had the heel sensitivity but that was minor compared to the discomfort on the bottom of my feet between the heel and toes while walking. It felt like I was stepping on marbles while barefoot on a hard floor. Whenever possible I sought out "softer" ground to walk on. I had both Solomon hiking boots and Solomon trail runners with me. The boots provided so much more comfort than the trail runners regarding the PF symptoms. I presumed that was due to a stiffer sole but I don't know.

I knew nothing about PF before the Camino. My PF lasted for 4 - 6 months after returning home. During month 5 and 6 it was still there but getting better all the time so I no longer noticed it after becoming accustomed to the ever-present feeling/annoyance/pain. I stopped walking as exercise and only walked when I absolutely needed to do so. Since I was sitting a lot more than usual I assembled a collection of golf balls and tennis balls under the table and worked my feet over them intensely for several hours a day. The tennis balls were the most "comfortable" to use but it felt like they were not doing anything. So I moved to the less comfortable golf balls which felt like they were doing more due to the level of discomfort, noise and grinding I could feel on the Fascia. I think I was operating from a "no pain, no gain" philosophy which is not necessarily valid but it seemed intuitively correct at the time. As I rolled a golf ball under my feet with lots of pressure while sitting, I could both hear and feel what seemed like a knotted and bumpy Fascia. It did NOT feel knotted and bumpy on my hand/fingers if I pressed and rubbed the bottom of my foot with my hand but when exerting much more pressure per square inch with a golf ball, the sound and feeling from my foot was pretty weird and intense. Did this treatment program extend my problem or shorten it or have no effect...who knows? I do know when researching this topic there are no definitive methods of treatment. There seems to be no definitive specific understanding of the cause but because podiatrists are highly paid experts they need to sound convincing to their patients. And it seems to be the same thing with preventative measures. I started to do the stretching while on the Camino after I had a full blown case of PF and the stretching seemed to have no effect in making anything better. However it may have kept things from getting even worse...there is just no way to know for sure? My backpack was 35 lbs. Since I did not get the PF right away, and I am trying to identify some cause or correlation of the PF with another factor, I've decided to attach the PF with the heavy pack and 32 days of walking. The weight never bothered any other part of my body so that makes the connection suspect. I do know on my next Camino I would really like to avoid the annoyance of dealing with PF again so I will probably do all the exercises before hand and during the Camino and I will pack much lighter leaving the 10 lbs of camera gear and accessories behind.

I think I will try some insoles also. Maybe my supination is related to the PF ? I believe I have a normal/average foot arch but I have EXCESSIVE wear on the outboard side, bottom of my boots, heel area. The picture is of my right boot. The wear is at the outside/outboard heel where I plant my foot. The lug tread depths in the picture are in 64th's of an inch. The "A" and "C" lug depths appear to be high due to a recessed channel surrounding those lugs that adds several 64th's of inch to their apparent height/depth.

Before posting this comment I just now did a quick google search on Supination and PF. I should have done this search 6 months ago. Here is what I found.

"Supination is when, instead of being flat-footed, you have high arches. When your foot strikes the ground, much of the cushion of the foot is lost. The foot doesn’t flatten at all on impact, and there is little shock absorption. The affect is an outward roll and can cause plantar fasciitis, ankle sprains, and other foot and leg injuries."

Well better late than never, maybe this will help someone else...PF is no fun.
Check your PM :)
 
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Camino(s) past & future
(2019)
I had a bout of PF 3 years ago, after stressing my feet climbing up a hillside too fast (I think). It lasted about 6 months. The treatment applied was a combination of stretching of the fascia (leg over knee, hand from same side as leg pulls the toe end of the foot back towards the knee, hold it for 10 sec, repeat) and rolling the foot over a large drink bottle filled with water and stored in the freezer. the cold did seem to help. But the ultimate solution was to go to the podiatrist and get orthotic insoles that made my shoes feel so much more comfortable. No recurrence of the problem since then, and I have kept up the habit of stretching the feet whenever possible.
 

Arctic_Alex

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walking Camino Frances April 2019
Good advice in here. I actually plan to stretch various parts of my body at least twice a day. Might be an entertaining sight for others, but better than various unüleasant problems kicking in over the course of the Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk St Francis May-June (2019)
Brilliant advice Dave et al thanks. I'm starting in May, and my old PF is starting to flare with the training. Now I will counter it with the exercises.
It used to be called policeman's heel. I wonder what treatments the officers got...
 

mguillen

MGuillen
Camino(s) past & future
2019
Brilliant advice Dave et al thanks. I'm starting in May, and my old PF is starting to flare with the training. Now I will counter it with the exercises.
It used to be called policeman's heel. I wonder what treatments the officers got...
Mine is too. Makes me very concerned as my trip is in September.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Mine is too. Makes me very concerned as my trip is in September.
Brilliant advice Dave et al thanks. I'm starting in May, and my old PF is starting to flare with the training. Now I will counter it with the exercises.
It used to be called policeman's heel. I wonder what treatments the officers got...
Hi. . . .
I'd like to offer just a bit of a caution with regard to the exercises. While some of the exercises mentioned can be used to help treat and resolve Plantars Fasciitis (PF), it is important to be cautious in their application so that it doesn't make things worse.

My OP talked about some various symptoms related PF. Those symptoms let's us know that tissues are becoming inflamed. At it's worse, PF can become debilitating, which is why it is important to deal with PF symptoms earlier rather than later.

When the earliest noticeable symptoms appear, be aggressive in initial treatment.
  • Rest: It is important to get over the initial inflammatory stage by reducing as much activity as you can for a while. This includes training walks, running, treadmills, etc.
  • Ice: Cold helps reduce inflammation.
    • Make an ice pack. A half-dozen bags of frozen peas or corn, rotated with use, works well for this. wrap a thin cloth around the bag and apply it on your heel 3 to 4 times a day for 15 to 20 minutes at a time. If you do not feel much cold, then the wrapping is providing too much insulation. You can do this more frequently if you wish; but do not extend the length of time that the ice pack is applied to the foot.
    • You can fill a shallow dish or pan with water and ice and soak your heel in it for 10 to 15 minutes a few times a day. Keep the toes out of the water.
    • Fill a 16 or 24 ounce juice, pop, or water bottle with water and freeze it. Then rub it over your heel for 5 to 10 minutes. Wear a very thing sock to keep the ice bottle from direct contact with your skin.
  • Medications: Over the counter anti Inflammatory medications like ibuprofen can be helpful in reducing inflammation. If you know that you can safely take these medications, use them according to directions. Simply, they block the production of certain chemicals in the body, which reduces inflammation and pain.
CAUTION: If you have never taken NSAIDs (Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs) or you have problems with them, do NOT take them without calling your provider first.

After 72 hours, if symptoms are continuing to increase then it is a good idea to see your provider.

If symptoms have stayed about the same or have lessened, then you can gently add the exercises twice a day. If things become worse, back off from the exercises and wait 72 more hours. Also check with your provider about continuing Ibuprofen or other NSAIDs, and if s/he would want to see you.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk St Francis May-June (2019)
Hi. . . .
I'd like to offer just a bit of a caution with regard to the exercises. While some of the exercises mentioned can be used to help treat and resolve Plantars Fasciitis (PF), it is important to be cautious in their application so that it doesn't make things worse.

My OP talked about some various symptoms related PF. Those symptoms let's us know that tissues are becoming inflamed. At it's worse, PF can become debilitating, which is why it is important to deal with PF symptoms earlier rather than later.

When the earliest noticeable symptoms appear, be aggressive in initial treatment.
  • Rest: It is important to get over the initial inflammatory stage by reducing as much activity as you can for a while. This includes training walks, running, treadmills, etc.
  • Ice: Cold helps reduce inflammation.
    • Make an ice pack. A half-dozen bags of frozen peas or corn, rotated with use, works well for this. wrap a thin cloth around the bag and apply it on your heel 3 to 4 times a day for 15 to 20 minutes at a time. If you do not feel much cold, then the wrapping is providing too much insulation. You can do this more frequently if you wish; but do not extend the length of time that the ice pack is applied to the foot.
    • You can fill a shallow dish or pan with water and ice and soak your heel in it for 10 to 15 minutes a few times a day. Keep the toes out of the water.
    • Fill a 16 or 24 ounce juice, pop, or water bottle with water and freeze it. Then rub it over your heel for 5 to 10 minutes. Wear a very thing sock to keep the ice bottle from direct contact with your skin.
  • Medications: Over the counter anti Inflammatory medications like ibuprofen can be helpful in reducing inflammation. If you know that you can safely take these medications, use them according to directions. Simply, they block the production of certain chemicals in the body, which reduces inflammation and pain.
CAUTION: If you have never taken NSAIDs (Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs) or you have problems with them, do NOT take them without calling your provider first.

After 72 hours, if symptoms are continuing to increase then it is a good idea to see your provider.

If symptoms have stayed about the same or have lessened, then you can gently add the exercises twice a day. If things become worse, back off from the exercises and wait 72 more hours. Also check with your provider about continuing Ibuprofen or other NSAIDs, and if s/he would want to see you.
Thank you. Great stuff.
 

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