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Fall 2021 Via de la Plata Camino

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Kev&Kath

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Thomas...no I haven't, but considering it closely. Busy with research at present. If I might recommend a YouTube video on the Via.....have a look at a gentleman called Nalutia. HIs video 'Silent Struggle - Via de la Plata & Camino Sanabres' is particularly interesting, and gives a fantastic perspective of the Via. Good luck with your research!
 
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Dodger

Lone Walker, Camino Frances 2018 VdlP 2021/22
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
I have planned for Spring, but most likely will start late Aug or the start of Sept.
 

murraydv

Via de la Plata / Sanabres / Camino de Levante
Year of past OR future Camino
Completed Via de la Plata (2018).
Started Camino de Levante (2019).
I have done the VdLP in April / May. The one advantage of October / November is the you should avoid intense heat. July / August could be almost impossible on that particular Camino.
Somebody has already mentioned the possibility of snow in November and I couldn't comment further. I did a section on the Levante in October 2019 and it was lovely weather, cold mornings but fine.

My only concern about doing the Camino at any time in 2021 would be the status of Covid and any restrictions that might prevail both in Spain and on return to your home country. The vaccine program is underway, but it is slow and particularly slow in Spain I understand.

I myself had planned on April 21, but I pushed that back to October 21, and now I am resigned to 2022. I really don't expect to be able to do it safely and with any degree of certainty about travel and facilities during 2021.You might also want to do some research on which albergies will be open in 2021.

Very Good planning website at: https://www.pilgrim.es/en/the-silver-route/

It's a great Camino, no matter when you get to go. Enjoy.

Buen Camino
Dave
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Lovely time to walk the Plata and Sanabrés! I've walked the Plata twice and the Sanabrés three times during various seasons but my walk from Salamanca to Santiago through Ourense in the fall arriving in Santiago November 3rd was most enjoyable. Apples and chestnuts were handed to me by many townspeople, often too much to carry. I was quite lucky with the weather, it only started to rain the day after I arrived but continued for days after that.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
I too am planning for a mid October start. Can’t wait but who knows about the virus. I have met people who started in mid September and the heat was brutal. You can’t predict weather year to year for sure. But I would take walking in 30F/-2C any day over 95F/35C or even a lot higher any day. I will definitely watch that video
But after all is said and done at the end of the day in today’s world we just have to hope for the best, dream and wait.
But it sure would be great to meet some of your people out there in October.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
I have done the VdLP in April / May. The one advantage of October / November is the you should avoid intense heat. July / August could be almost impossible on that particular Camino.
Somebody has already mentioned the possibility of snow in November and I couldn't comment further. I did a section on the Levante in October 2019 and it was lovely weather, cold mornings but fine.

My only concern about doing the Camino at any time in 2021 would be the status of Covid and any restrictions that might prevail both in Spain and on return to your home country. The vaccine program is underway, but it is slow and particularly slow in Spain I understand.

I myself had planned on April 21, but I pushed that back to October 21, and now I am resigned to 2022. I really don't expect to be able to do it safely and with any degree of certainty about travel and facilities during 2021.You might also want to do some research on which albergies will be open in 2021.

Very Good planning website at: https://www.pilgrim.es/en/the-silver-route/

It's a great Camino, no matter when you get to go. Enjoy.

Buen Camino
Dave
Thanks Dave there are a few of these websites out there. Once we can walk again who knows what damage the pandemic has caused albergues. I am sad just thinking about how badly people have been hurt economically, let alone physically and emotionally.
Having a few resources to find as many options as possible to lay your head at night is really important especially on a Camino with less infrastructure.
 
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Plataman

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances: (2009), (2013), Via de la Plata; (2016)
Anybody ever walk Via de la Plato in Oct Nov time frame?
Yes, in 2018 started out from Seville mid Sept, arrived Santiago end of October. Weather was generally good, got cooler and a some wet days as we got into Galicia. I have also done the VDLP in the spring ( April/May 2016) and would choose the fall over the spring if I did it again. Spring had muddy tracks, flooded waterways, and a lot of very wet days. There was also no apples to pick along the route, no grapes to sample, no figs, no plums.....
 

Dodger

Lone Walker, Camino Frances 2018 VdlP 2021/22
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
I have done the VdLP in April / May. The one advantage of October / November is the you should avoid intense heat. July / August could be almost impossible on that particular Camino.
Somebody has already mentioned the possibility of snow in November and I couldn't comment further. I did a section on the Levante in October 2019 and it was lovely weather, cold mornings but fine.

My only concern about doing the Camino at any time in 2021 would be the status of Covid and any restrictions that might prevail both in Spain and on return to your home country. The vaccine program is underway, but it is slow and particularly slow in Spain I understand.

I myself had planned on April 21, but I pushed that back to October 21, and now I am resigned to 2022. I really don't expect to be able to do it safely and with any degree of certainty about travel and facilities during 2021.You might also want to do some research on which albergies will be open in 2021.

Very Good planning website at: https://www.pilgrim.es/en/the-silver-route/

It's a great Camino, no matter when you get to go. Enjoy.

Buen Camino
Dave
Dave, I am from Australia, used to walking in 30+, not that I like it much. My preference is for April/May 2021, but does not look like it will happen. Next best option is Sept 2021start for me, I will attempt to start as late as possible. I received Gerald Kellys guide to the route today and have a rough plan which I will modify now. One can only plan and hope, if not I can always go next year.
 

Dodger

Lone Walker, Camino Frances 2018 VdlP 2021/22
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
Thanks Dave there are a few of these websites out there. Once we can walk again who knows what damage the pandemic has caused albergues. I am sad just thinking about how badly people have been hurt economically, let alone physically and emotionally.
Having a few resources to find as many options as possible to lay your head at night is really important especially on a Camino with less infrastructure.
Ivar spoke with a pilgrim who completed the VDLP about a month ago he walked during the pandemic, may be of interest.
 

Thomas Yingst

Tom ... “the kid”
Year of past OR future Camino
Portugal. May 2019
Thomas...no I haven't, but considering it closely. Busy with research at present. If I might recommend a YouTube video on the Via.....have a look at a gentleman called Nalutia. HIs video 'Silent Struggle - Via de la Plata & Camino Sanabres' is particularly interesting, and gives a fantastic perspective of the Via. Good luck with your research!
I just finished watching this video ... I loved it ... thanks for letting me know about it.
 
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geraldkelly

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francés, Vía de la Plata / Camino Sanabrés, Camino del Baztán, Camino Aragonés, Chemin du Puy
I walked from Salamanca starting in late September 2019. We had nice weather at first but getting close to Galicia it deteriorated. We had about 5 days of heavy, persistent rain, the rest of the time it was grey and cold with showers. Some snow at higher altitudes (above 1000m).

Also, in November the days will be getting very short.

Starting in Seville you'll need to pack for everything from 30 degrees C down to freezing.

There's no reason not to walk at that time of year but you will really need to be prepared for every kind of weather possible.

Gerald
 

Via2010

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
06/07 & 12 Camino Francés, 08-10 Via de la Plata, 13/14 & 17 Camino Portugués, 18 Camino Primitivo
I had a look at this planning-tool and from my experience on the VdP I can not recommend it.
Worst is stage 7 on the Sanabrés section (titeled: "Grandas de Salime to A Fonsagrada"). The length - roughly 35 km - is ok, but it is A Gudina to Laza (the other towns are on the Camino Primitivo). Also, in my memories, the descriptions do not really reflect the difficulties of the stages. E. g. Granja de Moreruela to Tabara is not easy, but certainly not the most difficult stage. I would say average, whereas Zamora to Granja ist fairly easy and Puebla de Sanabría to Lubián is one of the longest and most difficult stages and so is A Gudina to Laza.

Good planning-tools are the following:
RutasASantiago (here you have also to switch to the Sanabrés if you want to continue via Ourense) and Godesalco

Both allow you to vary the daily distances depending on accomodation available and on your needs.

I walked various sections of the VdP, some in May/June, some in September/October. The later in the year the colder it will be round Salamanca and in the mountains entering Galicia. Even in May they were covered with snow and the paths were very wet an slippery. Temperatures may fall below zero and many albergues do not have adequate heating. Another problem are the short days. Some days you will have to walk 30 km plus which means you have to hurry if you do not want to walk until it is dark.

If I were free to choose, I would start from Seville in early May and aim to reach Santiago by the end of June.

BC
Alexandra
 
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lt56ny

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
Link to the video if needed. Surprisingly high production values for one taken on a Samsung Galaxy S4 phone.

It is a good video. It is long but it gives you a good taste. It was the first VDLP video I watched when I first thought of walking this route
 
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murraydv

Via de la Plata / Sanabres / Camino de Levante
Year of past OR future Camino
Completed Via de la Plata (2018).
Started Camino de Levante (2019).
Dave, I am from Australia, used to walking in 30+, not that I like it much. My preference is for April/May 2021, but does not look like it will happen. Next best option is Sept 2021start for me, I will attempt to start as late as possible. I received Gerald Kellys guide to the route today and have a rough plan which I will modify now. One can only plan and hope, if not I can always go next year.
That's a long trip Dodger from Australia. Have they allowed international travel yet to / from Australia. I was speaking to somebody in Spain today who told me that resturants are open in the morning for a couple of hours and the same in the afternoon, largely closed by 3.00pm in many places. I am sure that will improve later in the year. I hope that your dream happens but it absolutely will at some point. The VdLP is an amazing Camino.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I walked the VdlP in Oct.-Nov., 2017, leaving Seville on Oct. 3 and arriving in Santiago on Nov. 21, with only one day off. For the first half of the walk, the temperatures were in the mid-30's, from Seville the 500 kms to Salamanca. After that, it was comfortable for me, with only one morning of frosty weather leaving Albergue Rehoboth on the Sanabres, after Villar de Farfon. There was no snow, but the days were getting shorter as I approached Santiago. I would not, personally, consider walking the VdlP earlier than October. I had only one day's walk longer than 30 kms, from Casar de Caceres to Canaveral (32 km), because the albergue at the Embalse was, as usual, closed when I walked through. My most difficult day was the 28 km from Fuenterroble to San Pedro de Rozados: long, hot, with a bit of route finding and a fair bit of road walking. By the time that I was a couple of kms away from San Pedro and hiding in a ditch from the heat, I would happily have joined a couple of monstrous pigs which I saw running across the field and leaping into a pond. This was a day short of Salamanca, where the temperature finally fell.
The few longer days on the VdlP can mostly be shortened, if you care to do so, by taking the occasional taxi. I did not care to do so, and I don't know whether I could have found a taxi to take me from the Embalse to Canaveral, not having chosen to book one in advance. I was 69 at the time and not in great shape, but a stubborn and experienced walker.
 

RNC

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2015; Via Podiensis 2018; Camino Portuguese 2018; Via de La Plata 2019
We walked the VDLP (Seville to Santiago) via the Sanabres in October/November 2019. It was absolutely scorching for the first ten days or so.

While weather varies from year to year, be aware that October can still be dangerously hot - 35 degrees by 10.30am. Pilgrims have to manage the challenges of long distances between any food/water/shelter and limited facilities in many sections. In particular, watch out for the 28km section on the third day from Castillblanco del Arroy to Almaden De a Plata, with no facilities at all.

There were definitely not regular or always reliable water points. With temperatures reaching up to forty degrees, no shade and stretches of more than 20 kilometres between towns, we carried up to four litres of water each, rationed it carefully and still almost ran out on occasion. There are long distances between villages, bars were frequently closed and fountains often not working. One pilgrim told us he had had to go off the path to a farmhouse because he was desperate for water. You also need to carry enough food to cover a couple of meals because there’s no guarantee of villages or open shops each day.

Plan each day carefully, consider the temperature, the distance and have a spare bladder or platypus available to carry extra water as required, plus food.

Also, make sure you are prepared for cold and wet weather as you progress. We met rain and sleet. We walked with a Lithuanian man who’d started the previous November and had to abandon his Camino because he found himself having to swim across freezing waterways and was unable to get dry and warm. (The most generous way to describe the albergue heating we found in November would be “variable”.)

All that aside, it’s a wonderful, uncrowded path with incredible historic towns such as Merida, Salamanca and Ourense.
 

Kev&Kath

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I walked the VdlP in Oct.-Nov., 2017, leaving Seville on Oct. 3 and arriving in Santiago on Nov. 21, with only one day off. For the first half of the walk, the temperatures were in the mid-30's, from Seville the 500 kms to Salamanca. After that, it was comfortable for me, with only one morning of frosty weather leaving Albergue Rehoboth on the Sanabres, after Villar de Farfon. There was no snow, but the days were getting shorter as I approached Santiago. I would not, personally, consider walking the VdlP earlier than October. I had only one day's walk longer than 30 kms, from Casar de Caceres to Canaveral (32 km), because the albergue at the Embalse was, as usual, closed when I walked through. My most difficult day was the 28 km from Fuenterroble to San Pedro de Rozados: long, hot, with a bit of route finding and a fair bit of road walking. By the time that I was a couple of kms away from San Pedro and hiding in a ditch from the heat, I would happily have joined a couple of monstrous pigs which I saw running across the field and leaping into a pond. This was a day short of Salamanca, where the temperature finally fell.
The few longer days on the VdlP can mostly be shortened, if you care to do so, by taking the occasional taxi. I did not care to do so, and I don't know whether I could have found a taxi to take me from the Embalse to Canaveral, not having chosen to book one in advance. I was 69 at the time and not in great shape, but a stubborn and experienced walker.
I kinda like stubborn walkers!! Thanks for your insights..sounds like an amazing walk.
 

Thomas Yingst

Tom ... “the kid”
Year of past OR future Camino
Portugal. May 2019
I walked the VdlP in Oct.-Nov., 2017, leaving Seville on Oct. 3 and arriving in Santiago on Nov. 21, with only one day off. For the first half of the walk, the temperatures were in the mid-30's, from Seville the 500 kms to Salamanca. After that, it was comfortable for me, with only one morning of frosty weather leaving Albergue Rehoboth on the Sanabres, after Villar de Farfon. There was no snow, but the days were getting shorter as I approached Santiago. I would not, personally, consider walking the VdlP earlier than October. I had only one day's walk longer than 30 kms, from Casar de Caceres to Canaveral (32 km), because the albergue at the Embalse was, as usual, closed when I walked through. My most difficult day was the 28 km from Fuenterroble to San Pedro de Rozados: long, hot, with a bit of route finding and a fair bit of road walking. By the time that I was a couple of kms away from San Pedro and hiding in a ditch from the heat, I would happily have joined a couple of monstrous pigs which I saw running across the field and leaping into a pond. This was a day short of Salamanca, where the temperature finally fell.
The few longer days on the VdlP can mostly be shortened, if you care to do so, by taking the occasional taxi. I did not care to do so, and I don't know whether I could have found a taxi to take me from the Embalse to Canaveral, not having chosen to book one in advance. I was 69 at the time and not in great shape, but a stubborn and experienced walker.
Stubborn = tenacity
 
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Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
Very true. Tom...it also equals commitment. To complete a 1000km....indeed....a whole lot of commitment on your part.
That is why I got a Distance Certificate after walking this route. I may get another if I can walk the Levante this fall.
 

Dodger

Lone Walker, Camino Frances 2018 VdlP 2021/22
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
That's a long trip Dodger from Australia. Have they allowed international travel yet to / from Australia. I was speaking to somebody in Spain today who told me that resturants are open in the morning for a couple of hours and the same in the afternoon, largely closed by 3.00pm in many places. I am sure that will improve later in the year. I hope that your dream happens but it absolutely will at some point. The VdLP is an amazing Camino.
Yep a long way, I walked the CF in 2018, need a rest day prior to starting. We are not allowed to leave Australia yet. I had planned for a spring walk, however now looking at the fall. travel will all depend on how the CoviD19 vax goes and international travel. Check out a video by Ivar he interviewed a pilgrim who recently finished the VDLP in early Dec last year I think.
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances, 2009, Camino Finisterre, 2009, Camino Portuguese, 2009, Via de La Plata, 2011. Pending: VdlP April-May 2014
Anybody ever walk Via de la Plato in Oct Nov time frame?
Yes, I walked it in September-October 2011. The weather was great the whole time, although pretty hot at the beginning. I left Seville on September 12 and the temperature that day was 39 C. The next day it was 40. Arrived at Santiago around October 24. Met some great people along the way and never had a problem finding accommodation. But...alas...that has probably changed.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
Yes, I walked it in September-October 2011. The weather was great the whole time, although pretty hot at the beginning. I left Seville on September 12 and the temperature that day was 39 C. The next day it was 40. Arrived at Santiago around October 24. Met some great people along the way and never had a problem finding accommodation. But...alas...that has probably changed.
I am glad you said the weather and the temperature. As in so many things in life and discussing the Camino all opinions are subjective. You wrote the weather was great the whole time. 39 and 40° for me is a nightmare. I probably would’ve left at five in the morning at the latest. Temperatures like that for me would be dangerous and thoroughly unenjoyable. But for others like yourself it’s not a problem. It’s all subjective. Thanks for including that information because it truly does make for a clearer picture for someone to decide especially when to walk because of conditions.
 
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JamesGeier

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF Spring 2016
CF Autumn 2017
VdlP Spring 2021
Thomas...no I haven't, but considering it closely. Busy with research at present. If I might recommend a YouTube video on the Via.....have a look at a gentleman called Nalutia. HIs video 'Silent Struggle - Via de la Plata & Camino Sanabres' is particularly interesting, and gives a fantastic perspective of the Via. Good luck with your research!
This is one really well-made documentary. I loved it. It is slow, but seems to be deliberately so, and captures the more realistic pace of a walking pilgrimage. This video pushed the Via de la Plata to the top of my list for my next Camino walk.
Buen Camino!
--james--
 

Kev&Kath

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
This is one really well-made documentary. I loved it. It is slow, but seems to be deliberately so, and captures the more realistic pace of a walking pilgrimage. This video pushed the Via de la Plata to the top of my list for my next Camino walk.
Buen Camino!
--james--
James...glad you liked it. I think I’m on my third or fourth viewing. I think Chris (Nalutia) did a fantastic job of filming, but having watched it now a number of times...I’m even more drawn to his thoughtful dialogue/perspective of his pilgrimage. A definite favorite of mine.
 

murraydv

Via de la Plata / Sanabres / Camino de Levante
Year of past OR future Camino
Completed Via de la Plata (2018).
Started Camino de Levante (2019).
I hope to make Levante my next camino after my VDLP this fall. If I can walk hopefully!!!!
I started the Levante in 2019 and was due to resume on Spring 2020. Looking forward to getting back. A very quiet Camino. I covered 300 klm without meeting another Pilgrim.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
I have a feeling just based on observations from posts here and a few other places that if interested in Camino grows again after we have brought this pandemic under control that some of the less traveled caminos may begin to see a little rise in popularity. As the CF and CP and even the Norte get more pilgrims and repeat pilgrims gain more confidence in pilgrimage and seek more solitary routes they will look to the south of Spain and maybe France or Italy for their caminos. Having walked a late fall Camino on the Norte and even on the CF camino experiences become quite different. Walking like you did (and I to a lesser extent especially on the second part of the CN, presents a completely different set of challenges and experiences. I look forward to a solitary VDLP in late October, November and December.
I think there may be a small and growing cadre of fellow pilgrims who may be seeking a more tranquil Camino experience.
 
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Grousedoctor

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I can tell you that the two times that I’ve been on the CF, it has been busy. However, by walking early spring on other routes, we’ve been able to avoid the larger numbers of pilgrims. My wife and I did both the Portugúes (from Porto) and the Inglés in the mid-March, early-April timeframes. Both Caminos were relatively quite. Sometimes, we were the only pilgrims in the albergues. So, although the Portúgues can be crowded, we only saw a handful of pilgrims by walking it in March and the weather turned out to be spectacular. My April bike trek on the VDLP was similar. Very few pilgrims were walking this route when I traveled it making it quite peaceful especially on some very lovely country paths. I’m optimistic that if we can get into Spain this fall, choosing the Primitivo will again give us more of that tranquil experience that we greatly value.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Thomas...no I haven't, but considering it closely. Busy with research at present. If I might recommend a YouTube video on the Via.....have a look at a gentleman called Nalutia. HIs video 'Silent Struggle - Via de la Plata & Camino Sanabres' is particularly interesting, and gives a fantastic perspective of the Via. Good luck with your research!

I just watched his video. Really good!
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
James...glad you liked it. I think I’m on my third or fourth viewing. I think Chris (Nalutia) did a fantastic job of filming, but having watched it now a number of times...I’m even more drawn to his thoughtful dialogue/perspective of his pilgrimage. A definite favorite of mine.

Have you watched his one on the Norte?
Again a great video.
Though it put me off the Norte.
85% road walking according to him.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
I'd like to watch the Via one, but for some reason it won't download and play.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
Have you watched his one on the Norte?
Again a great video.
Though it put me off the Norte.
85% road walking according to him.
There is another good video about the Norte that I think is really beautifully done. It is set to music.


I have done the Norte. There is alot of road walking but no where near 85% in my opinion. There are numerous vairants you can take especially along the coast to avoid roads. It is absolutely beautiful. It is much more difficult, in my opinion than the CF. It is similar in difficulty to the Le Puy camino. It gets easier as you go of course. I walked the whole of the Norte. Most people when I walked split and took the Primitivo. When I met them in Santiago they all said it was harder than the Norte but in many respects as or more beautiful. Of course a different landscape. I am sure younger people would say that the Norte is not difficult at all. I walked it at 64.The first couple of weeks almost every day it is up a long hill and every afternoon down. With lots of ups and downs in between. Many of the villages that you sleep in are on the ocean and really lovely. Alot of the walking is up on cliffs and plateaus. I walked in October and November. It was pretty mellow. Not alot of pilgrims especially after Santander. At that time of year, at least when I walked a good percentage of pilgrims walked only a week or two. After the split in Villaviciosa there were really very few pilgrims until the last 100K. There were many days I saw no more than a few pilgrims and sometimes none. At night I think the most people I met in an albergue was 4 or 5 and some nights I was alone.
Looking forward to doing the VDLP this year (I know we have exchanged messages about this). I am making plans for an October start. Have had my Pfizer vaccine and my fingers are crossed.

 
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Thomas Yingst

Tom ... “the kid”
Year of past OR future Camino
Portugal. May 2019
There is another good video about the Norte that I think is really beautifully done. It is set to music.


I have done the Norte. There is alot of road walking but no where near 85% in my opinion. There are numerous vairants you can take especially along the coast to avoid roads. It is absolutely beautiful. It is much more difficult, in my opinion than the CF. It is similar in difficulty to the Le Puy camino. It gets easier as you go of course. I walked the whole of the Norte. Most people when I walked split and took the Primitivo. When I met them in Santiago they all said it was harder than the Norte but in many respects as or more beautiful. Of course a different landscape. I am sure younger people would say that the Norte is not difficult at all. I walked it at 64.The first couple of weeks almost every day it is up a long hill and every afternoon down. With lots of ups and downs in between. Many of the villages that you sleep in are on the ocean and really lovely. Alot of the walking is up on cliffs and plateaus. I walked in October and November. It was pretty mellow. Not alot of pilgrims especially after Santander. At that time of year, at least when I walked a good percentage of pilgrims walked only a week or two. After the split in Villaviciosa there were really very few pilgrims until the last 100K. There were many days I saw no more than a few pilgrims and sometimes none. At night I think the most people I met in an albergue was 4 or 5 and some nights I was alone.
Looking forward to doing the VDLP this year (I know we have exchanged messages about this). I am making plans for an October start. Have had my Pfizer vaccine and my fingers are crossed.

I plan on starting VDLP on 15 Sep. Finish on 2 Nov. Taking the Sansbres route. Concerned about the one 40 km day ... that will be a challenge.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I plan on starting VDLP on 15 Sep. Finish on 2 Nov. Taking the Sansbres route. Concerned about the one 40 km day ... that will be a challenge.
Hi, Thomas,
There are several good ways to avoid that distance if it is too long for you.

Here is a very recent thread that is essentially a deep dive planning thread on the Vdlp. I think that if you click on the blue highlighted words above, it will take you to the approximate spot in the thread where the “problem stage” is addressed. The entire thread is really a gold mine (for planners, that is) with lots of information on stages, accommodation, what to see, etc. It starts in Sevilla and carries on through the Sanabrés to Santiago. (I see that you seem to have changed your mind about walking to Astorga, which you asked about on another thread).

If that thread doesn’t clear things up, let me know and threre are lots of us who can try to help straighten things out.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
@Thomas Yingst
From Carcaboso, I walked to Oliva de Plasencia via the pleasant route delineated by @isabelle304, stayed at the private albergue there, then walked the next day on to Aldeanueva del Camino via a direct route through Capara. Here are @isabelle304 's calculations of the distances for the two days:

1. Carcaboso to Oliva de Plasencia: 19.5km + 5km detour: 24.5km total
2. Oliva de Plasencia to Aldeanueva del Camino: 5km detour + 18.5km = 23.5km total

This worked for me because Isabelle's directions, diagrams, and photos of the route to Oliva de Plasencia are very clear, the day's walk was pleasant, as was the return walk on the next day, I walked all but 100 metres or so of the regular marked camino route, aside from the detour to Oliva de Plasencia and I did not telephone Hostal Asturias for pickup, but continued on foot for the whole camino, which is my personal preference.
Post number 8 in this thread is very clear and has a schematic map of some of these options.
Above is @peregrina2000 's link to Isabelle's post about this alternate route, which worked for me. But if you are happy to call from the Arca de Capara for pickup by Hostal Asturias, that should work as well. I fully understand the feeling of panic that the apparent necessity of a 40 km day can arouse. Buen camino, however you go.
 
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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I would also add just one little tidbit to @Albertagirl’s wonderful explanation — if you walk this way, you will reach the Arco de Cáparra on your walk from Carcaboso after 19.5 km. That gives you plenty of time to explore the site (which is much more than the arch, and contains a small museum plus many information plaques throughout the ongoing excavations of the larger city). The 4.5 km walk from the arch to Oliva takes you past bull farms — I remember it as off-road and pleasant. And you don’t have to worry about not getting a bed, because you can reserve in the albergue ahead of time. It is an albergue turístico, which is geared towards, but not exclusively for, peregrinos.

The next day, you retrace those 4.5 km and will arrive at the Arch in early morning. If you are lucky, the rising sun will turn the arch to gold.

There are (or were, pre-pandemic) two options for sleeping in Oliva de Plasencia — the albergue, where I stayed, and a more recent addition of a casa rural.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I would also add just one little tidbit to @Albertagirl’s wonderful explanation — if you walk this way, you will reach the Arco de Cáparra on your walk from Carcaboso after 19.5 km. That gives you plenty of time to explore the site (which is much more than the arch, and contains a small museum plus many information plaques throughout the ongoing excavations of the larger city). The 4.5 km walk from the arch to Oliva takes you past bull farms — I remember it as off-road and pleasant. And you don’t have to worry about not getting a bed, because you can reserve in the albergue ahead of time. It is an albergue turístico, which is geared towards, but not exclusively for, peregrinos.

The next day, you retrace those 4.5 km and will arrive at the Arch in early morning. If you are lucky, the rising sun will turn the arch to gold.

There are (or were, pre-pandemic) two options for sleeping in Oliva de Plasencia — the albergue, where I stayed, and a more recent addition of a casa rural.
As I remember this route, and renewing my memories from @isabelle304 's post, I did not walk the same routes going to and from Oliva de Plasencia. Isabelle provides a photo showing a marked right turn within view of the Arca, and that is the route which I took to Oliva, returning by the direct route the next morning.
 
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Kev&Kath

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I just finished watching this video ... I loved it ... thanks for letting me know about it.
Yep...I think it's an amazing recording of the VdlP. I think I'm onto my third viewing....I seem to see/learn something each time I check it out. Glad you enjoyed Thomas.
 

Kev&Kath

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Have you watched his one on the Norte?
Again a great video.
Though it put me off the Norte.
85% road walking according to him.
Yep...watched and enjoyed that one too; however, there's just something about the VdlP that is attracting me to that particular pilgrimage. I haven't really focused on the Norte as yet, but have seen a number of videos...and yeah.....definitely outstanding vistas, but a bit of ugly stuff as well. Efren Gonzalez's (efrengonzalez.com) depiction is very good (as are all of his videos). Sort of thinking the Norte might be a good walk to couple with the Portuguese at some point (?).
 

Kev&Kath

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I plan on starting VDLP on 15 Sep. Finish on 2 Nov. Taking the Sansbres route. Concerned about the one 40 km day ... that will be a challenge.
Hi Thomas.....I'd be interested in detail on the 40k day. I've drafted an initial itinerary and I'm not getting any days at that high end of the kilometer spectrum. My longest day is Aljucen to Aldea del Cano at 33.9 kilometers (and could shorten this further with a stay in Alcuescar).
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi Thomas.....I'd be interested in detail on the 40k day. I've drafted an initial itinerary and I'm not getting any days at that high end of the kilometer spectrum. My longest day is Aljucen to Aldea del Cano at 33.9 kilometers (and could shorten this further with a stay in Alcuescar).
Hi, Kev&Kath,

The stage is from Carcaboso to Aldeanueva. It´s actually not 40, total is about 38. I’ve attached a Gronze screen shot. If you read the posts immediately after Thomas’ post (that is, posts number 47, 48 and 49 in this thread), you’ll see the ways to shorten it.

You probably have scheduled a stop in Hostal Asturias or Oliva de Plasencia, which shortens the distance considerably. Buen camino, Laurie

88B32A0B-045F-454C-99D2-23C865757A92.png
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Another option for the Caparra area is this. You can also walk from Caracaboso to the Arco (18 km), 8 km more along the VDLP, then a side trip 2 km to Hostal Asturias - that makes a 28 km day. Then the next morning, walk 2 km back to the exact spot on the VDLP where you left off, or you can take a slight short cut onto the VDLP from the Hostal. Either way, the walk to Aldeanueva is less than 15 km.

Taking the Sansbres route. Concerned about the one 40 km day

I'd be interested in detail on the 40k day.
I have detailed planning sheets on the VDLP to Astorga (which I've walked) and the Sanabres (which I plan to do next). I see no 40 km days, except for a problem if certain albergues are closed. (For example, there might be a problem in Alija del Infantado on the Astorga section.(

If Thomas is planning to go the Sanabres route, exactly which section is the concern? All my expected stages on the Sanabres are under 25 km! Many people choose to combine 2 short stages to make 40 km, but they don't need to do that if they have time to break up the stages.
 
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Kev&Kath

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Another option for the Caparra area is this. You can also walk from Caracaboso to the Arco (18 km), 8 km more along the VDLP, then a side trip 2 km to Hostal Asturias - that makes a 28 km day. Then the next morning, walk 2 km back to the exact spot on the VDLP where you left off, or you can take a slight short cut onto the VDLP from the Hostal. Either way, the walk to Aldeanueva is less than 15 km.


I have detailed planning sheets on the VDLP to Astorga (which I've walked) and the Sanabres (which I plan to do next). I see no 40 km days, except for a problem if certain albergues are closed. (For example, there might be a problem in Alija del Infantado on the Astorga section.(

If Thomas is planning to go the Sanabres route, exactly which section is the concern? All my expected stages on the Sanabres are under 25 km! Many people choose to combine 2 short stages to make 40 km, but they don't need to do that if they have time to break up the stages.
I definitely mirror your thoughts on the Sanabres (and the stages on the VdlP). I suppose my planning is based on an 'abundance of time'. I'm thinking 50 days - start to finish - is my expected schedule.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I definitely mirror your thoughts on the Sanabres (and the stages on the VdlP). I suppose my planning is based on an 'abundance of time'. I'm thinking 50 days - start to finish - is my expected schedule.
@Kev&Kath
Fifty days was my exact time to finish the VdlP, and I only took one day off along the route. Some days were long between accommodations and some were short, so I calculated fifty days, most between twenty and twenty-five kms, with one day off. I arrived in Santiago on the fiftieth day, walking the Sanabres route. That worked out perfectly for me.
 

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