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Feeling overwhelmed planning our first Camino?

JessicaC

One foot in Front of the other
Camino(s) past & future
April 2019
Hello there,

I was wondering if anyone could advise me, myself and a friend have decided we wish to complete a Camino, however we cannot take off more then 2 weeks (much to our annoyance, but hey that’s life). We would love to complete the full French Camino in one go, but it’s looking unlikely. I’m thinking about breaking it up into segements to fly back over again, but there’s a part of me that doesn’t want to leave the Camino unfinished.
We are reasonably in shape, both in our 20s, and are use to being on our feet most of the day due to our lines of work.
If we were to break up the Camino what would be the best way to do it , or should we start further back , would it be possible to make it to Santiago from there in 2 weeks ? Or should we consider a different route ? It’s a small bit over whelming looking at it, as we don’t know anyone who’s completed it or where to start/plan logically.
Any tips of advice would be greatly appreciated.

Regards from a slightly confused first time piligrim...
 

JessicaC

One foot in Front of the other
Camino(s) past & future
April 2019
Hi there, thank you for your reply :)
We will be travelling from Ireland, so we are flexible in what airport , most likely Dublin or Cork. We were thinking around April, May or sept. :cool:
 

Finisterre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria 2001,
Porto 2006,
Valenca 2008,
Finisterre 2010,
SJdPP 2012,
Tui 2014.

No plans to return, yet.
Then the Irish contingent will probably be the best bet for info.
I'd expect them to be here soon.

April and May, pretty flowers, Sept, fresh grapes. Tricky choice.
 

JessicaC

One foot in Front of the other
Camino(s) past & future
April 2019
Thank you :) yeah it is hard to chose or what way to go about it all. I kinda wish we could blink and just be on the Camino haha
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
Lots of options. Start somewhere closer on the Frances - Ponferrada or Astorga perhaps? Or walk the much shorter Ingles and use your extra time to go on to Muxia and Finisterre? Or the Portugues from Porto? If you pick up the pace a little you might even walk all the Primitivo :)
 

jefferyonthecamino

http://www.barrerabooks.com/ - Guidebooks
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (1994)
Camino Francés (2013 - 2018)
Camino Portugués (2015 - 2018)
Hello there,

I was wondering if anyone could advise me, myself and a friend have decided we wish to complete a Camino, however we cannot take off more then 2 weeks (much to our annoyance, but hey that’s life). We would love to complete the full French Camino in one go, but it’s looking unlikely. I’m thinking about breaking it up into segements to fly back over again, but there’s a part of me that doesn’t want to leave the Camino unfinished.
We are reasonably in shape, both in our 20s, and are use to being on our feet most of the day due to our lines of work.
If we were to break up the Camino what would be the best way to do it , or should we start further back , would it be possible to make it to Santiago from there in 2 weeks ? Or should we consider a different route ? It’s a small bit over whelming looking at it, as we don’t know anyone who’s completed it or where to start/plan logically.
Any tips of advice would be greatly appreciated.

Regards from a slightly confused first time piligrim...
walking into Santiago if it's your first time almost feels compulsory, in my opinion. león is roughly 300 kms from Santiago so this should be viable in two weeks. start in ponferrada for a slower pace. that's on the Camino Francés. Two weeks on the Portugués takes you to Porto.
Buen Camino
 

scruffy1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Holy Year from Pamplona 2010, SJPP 2011, Lisbon 2012, Le Puy 2013, Vezelay (partial watch this space!) 2014; 2015 Toulouse-Puenta la Reina (Arles)

Br. Dick Tandy ofm

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
El Ingles - Finisterre . 2017
Bueno Camino peregrines,
I also going cuckoo...My plan is to walk the Camino Primitivo in July. ( only time to get off.) Okay here's the deal. I'm coming from Lyon France to Oviedo. How in the heck to get there listen then two or threes days? That would cost an arm and leg. Any wisdom, insight would most helpful.

Mucho gracias!
 

Jennifer Perdue

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Started 06/02/2016
Hello there,

I was wondering if anyone could advise me, myself and a friend have decided we wish to complete a Camino, however we cannot take off more then 2 weeks (much to our annoyance, but hey that’s life). We would love to complete the full French Camino in one go, but it’s looking unlikely. I’m thinking about breaking it up into segements to fly back over again, but there’s a part of me that doesn’t want to leave the Camino unfinished.
We are reasonably in shape, both in our 20s, and are use to being on our feet most of the day due to our lines of work.
If we were to break up the Camino what would be the best way to do it , or should we start further back , would it be possible to make it to Santiago from there in 2 weeks ? Or should we consider a different route ? It’s a small bit over whelming looking at it, as we don’t know anyone who’s completed it or where to start/plan logically.
Any tips of advice would be greatly appreciated.

Regards from a slightly confused first time piligrim...
I did Leon to Santiago 3 years ago it took 14 walking days. That’s was averaging 12 to 18 miles a day. Hope that helps
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Hello there,

I was wondering if anyone could advise me, myself and a friend have decided we wish to complete a Camino, however we cannot take off more then 2 weeks (much to our annoyance, but hey that’s life). We would love to complete the full French Camino in one go, but it’s looking unlikely. I’m thinking about breaking it up into segements to fly back over again, but there’s a part of me that doesn’t want to leave the Camino unfinished.
We are reasonably in shape, both in our 20s, and are use to being on our feet most of the day due to our lines of work.
If we were to break up the Camino what would be the best way to do it , or should we start further back , would it be possible to make it to Santiago from there in 2 weeks ? Or should we consider a different route ? It’s a small bit over whelming looking at it, as we don’t know anyone who’s completed it or where to start/plan logically.
Any tips of advice would be greatly appreciated.

Regards from a slightly confused first time piligrim...
If you are in your 20s, you have lots of time and opportunity to finish it on future trip(s) if you want to do like many Europeans do and break it into stages. Just be sure to keep your credencial (the "passport" where you collect stamps to show in Santiago and get your Compostela certificate) and start again with a second stamp in the place you stopped when you resume the Camino on your next trip, if you are choosing this option. If I were going to break it in stages on multiple trips, I think I would start in Le Puy or Saint Jean Pied de Port in France.

If you only have two weeks and want to walk a complete Camino ending in Santiago and receiving a Compostela this trip, I would recommend the Camino Portugues from Porto and leave the Camino Frances for a later trip. If you really want to walk the Frances, start in Leon.
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
I did Porto-Santiago in 2017 in 11 days, left me enough time to enjoy porto AND Santiago :)

Do not worry about doing "a full thing", because there is no such thing as "full camino frances" - a camino starts at the person´s door. It just happened that some cities became famous starting points, such as Pamplona, Saint Jean, Burgos, etc, etc :)

Once you decide where do you wanna start, check the closest airport, book tickets and the first night of accomodation. Everything else works well once you are there. You can always book your accomodation for the next day once you reach a place to sleep each night, in case you like some planning. If not, you can just walk and stop whenever you feel like.

Buen Camino!
 
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Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
Bueno Camino peregrines,
I also going cuckoo...My plan is to walk the Camino Primitivo in July. ( only time to get off.) Okay here's the deal. I'm coming from Lyon France to Oviedo. How in the heck to get there listen then two or threes days? That would cost an arm and leg. Any wisdom, insight would most helpful.

Mucho gracias!
https://www.rome2rio.com/map/Lyon/Oviedo. Though be warned Oviedo airport is near Oviedo like Stanstead is near London...
 

andywild

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
april '2018'
I'd say do the Portuguese and stick finisterra/muxia on the end.. I guess loads of people pick bits of the Frances but personally I enjoyed doing the sjpdp-santiago in one go..
Of you did some of the Frances You'll probably end up in or near a great group of people and leaving before the end would be a downer.. (that's just my opinion obviously).. (and to be fair I'm usually wrong)...(not that it ever stops me from commenting)..(did I mention I enjoy using brackets)
Andy.
 

Peadarmac

Irlandes Pedro
Camino(s) past & future
Astorga-Santiago '11 & '18
St Jean-Belorado '13 & '17
Belorado-Astorga '15
Fisterra-Muxia '11 & '18
Hello there,

I was wondering if anyone could advise me, myself and a friend have decided we wish to complete a Camino, however we cannot take off more then 2 weeks (much to our annoyance, but hey that’s life). We would love to complete the full French Camino in one go, but it’s looking unlikely. I’m thinking about breaking it up into segements to fly back over again, but there’s a part of me that doesn’t want to leave the Camino unfinished.
We are reasonably in shape, both in our 20s, and are use to being on our feet most of the day due to our lines of work.
If we were to break up the Camino what would be the best way to do it , or should we start further back , would it be possible to make it to Santiago from there in 2 weeks ? Or should we consider a different route ? It’s a small bit over whelming looking at it, as we don’t know anyone who’s completed it or where to start/plan logically.
Any tips of advice would be greatly appreciated.

Regards from a slightly confused first time piligrim...

Hi Jessica,
As an Irish pilgrim I would heartily recommend the last section of the Camino Frances from Astorga to Santiago. A beautiful section that can be comfortably covered in 12 days walking with the option of adding on a special two day walk from Finisterre to Muxia.

Below is an example of the schedule I have covered twice in the past (most recently in October 2018).



FLY : Dublin to Mardid : arrive Madrid 9.55am (1.45pm bus to Astorga : arrive 6pm)
Astorga - Rabanal del Camino
Rabanal del Camino - Molinaseca
Molinaseca - Cacabelos
Cacabelos - Vega de Valcarce
Vega de Valcarce - Fonfría
Fonfría - Samos
Samos - Barbadelo
Barbadelo - Portomarin
Portomarin - Palas de Rei
Palas de Rei - Ribadiso da Baxio
Ribadiso da Baxio - O'Pedrouzo
O Pedrouzo - Santiago de Compostela
Bus from Santiago to Finisterre (9am) : walk to Lires
Walk from Lires to Muxia
Bus from Muxia to Santiago (6.45am) : Fly Santiago to Dublin

You can fly from Dublin to Madrid any day of the week and the best flight to get is the 6.30am flight however Aer Lingus flights from Santiago to Dublin fly ONLY on Tuesdays,Thursdays and Saturdays.

I hope this helps.If you want you can send me a 'pm' and I can send you a detailed list of Albergues/Pensions/Hostals I have used over the years.

Buen Camino y Ultreia !!
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2015) Frances
(2018) Portuguese
(2019) VdP Seville to Salamanca
(2020) VdP Salamanca to Santiago
With only two weeks, I'd concentrate first on what you want to accomplish. If it's just the fact that you want to say you did it, then pick a route that is doable and about two weeks (as others have pointed out). On the other hand, you might want to concentrate on particular aspect (i.e. more mountainous, more villages, more churches, more history) which would dictate which subsection of one of the main routes you want.

Time should be a limit but not a determiner. The last thing of importance other than just the limit is to try to walk as much as you can in two weeks (unless it's just the walking that your after).

Decide based on what will complement or extend your thinking, experience, or spirituality (if that's your style).

And perhaps, more importantly, if you're going to end up like most of us, you'll be going back, so any decision you make is probably not wrong or right. It's just another step along the way.
 

Rover

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis, Fall 2016
Hello there,

I was wondering if anyone could advise me, myself and a friend have decided we wish to complete a Camino, however we cannot take off more then 2 weeks (much to our annoyance, but hey that’s life). We would love to complete the full French Camino in one go, but it’s looking unlikely. I’m thinking about breaking it up into segements to fly back over again, but there’s a part of me that doesn’t want to leave the Camino unfinished.
We are reasonably in shape, both in our 20s, and are use to being on our feet most of the day due to our lines of work.
If we were to break up the Camino what would be the best way to do it , or should we start further back , would it be possible to make it to Santiago from there in 2 weeks ? Or should we consider a different route ? It’s a small bit over whelming looking at it, as we don’t know anyone who’s completed it or where to start/plan logically.
Any tips of advice would be greatly appreciated.

Regards from a slightly confused first time piligrim...
Sorry to be a naysayer but I strongly recommend waiting until you can find sufficient time to do the complete Camino. It's an extraordinary, transformational experience that you will miss if you break it up into segments. No doubt many will disagree but you are seeking opinions to help shape your decision. Good luck.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2015) Frances
(2018) Portuguese
(2019) VdP Seville to Salamanca
(2020) VdP Salamanca to Santiago
I would agree that it is preferable to try to do the Camino in one go, but very few people (usually the retired) have the option of spending a month doing so. Rather than wait until you can (which may never happen) ro worse trying to jam a longer route into too short of time, do what you can. The experience is not lessened by shorter segments. The only thing I would advise is not to do the Sarria Santiago leg as the first and only. It's a nice walk but not really indicative. Others have suggested other short routes which are better options.
 

Traa

Member
Camino(s) past & future
I want to walk Camino in Sept/Oct 2017
Hey jessica, I'm another Irish chick!
Just want to say, do not feel one bit overwhelmed.... the Camino is unreal! I walked the Camino Frances in Sept/Oct of 2017. Best experience of my life. I had just handed in my notice in a permanent nursing post and I headed off with very little planning!! I had the luxury of no limit on my time...i met people who did have a time limit, just did part of the camino, and got as much out of it as I did. I completely appreciate the viewpoint of trying to do it on one go but for most people that's totally unrealistic...
I would recommend you think about the journey and what you want out of it.... I think if it were me, I'd start at St Jean Pied de Port in south France, which is the starting point of the C.Frances, and walk as much as ur time will allow you...again, thats up to you and how much you want to walk per day without putting yourself under too much pressure, then go back and finish to Santiago when you have more time.... honestly it's the day to day experience of just walking and only having to worry about where you eat/sleep, the people you meet, the gorgeous villages and countryside you pass along the way is amazing, I think start from the start is best but of course it's a very personal journey so, though advice is good, its totally up 2 u!
 

robproct

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Lisbon
My recommendation would be to fly into Porto and do the Portuguese from there which takes about 12 days. Its a beautiful walk except for the first 10km out of Porto along the highway out of the city. If you still had enough energy you could go on to Finisterre and Muxia.
 

Camino Chris

One step forward...
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Many recommendations...all of them worthy of your consideration. Any choice you make has the potential to give you an exceptional experience and you will most likely want to come back for more!
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
Sorry to be a naysayer but I strongly recommend waiting until you can find sufficient time to do the complete Camino. It's an extraordinary, transformational experience that you will miss if you break it up into segments. No doubt many will disagree but you are seeking opinions to help shape your decision. Good luck.
Yes it would be nice but not everyone has that time available to them in one chunk.
One thing I have learnt is that you can never take anything for granted. You may have your health now, but anything can happen, you could get sick or injured, and no longer be capable of walking. Or someone you love can get sick, and you need to look after them.
I worked with a man who dreaming of retiring at 65 and having the time to pursue all his dreams. He died less than a year after finishing work. Really sad.
And last year I worked with a young guy of 27, who suffered two concussions a week apart with catastrophic consequences.
My view, live your life now - you have no idea how long you can continue to do anything.
If you have a couple of weeks, then take them- you will have a great time. In two weeks you can get a long way. And you will likely be back, and back - just like the rest of us. The Camino is a special place.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
Hello there,

I was wondering if anyone could advise me, myself and a friend have decided we wish to complete a Camino, however we cannot take off more then 2 weeks (much to our annoyance, but hey that’s life). We would love to complete the full French Camino in one go, but it’s looking unlikely. I’m thinking about breaking it up into segements to fly back over again, but there’s a part of me that doesn’t want to leave the Camino unfinished.
We are reasonably in shape, both in our 20s, and are use to being on our feet most of the day due to our lines of work.
If we were to break up the Camino what would be the best way to do it , or should we start further back , would it be possible to make it to Santiago from there in 2 weeks ? Or should we consider a different route ? It’s a small bit over whelming looking at it, as we don’t know anyone who’s completed it or where to start/plan logically.
Any tips of advice would be greatly appreciated.

Regards from a slightly confused first time piligrim...
Jessica, you have tons of advice and suggestions here. If you can make it to St James’ Church in Dublin during office hours, there are people only dying to help aspiring pilgrims with information. I attach a screenshot of some contact details. I suggest an email will help as it is unclear if the office is open all the time in winter. If that doesn’t work and you would like to talk to someone who has walked a few caminos, pm me and we could meet to chat in town. Pm is private message, by the way.
forgot to add the photo, so here is another one. You can follow the link in the photo and see where it takes you...
Screenshot 2019-01-15 at 13.34.33.png
 
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Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
My view, live your life now - you have no idea how long you can continue to do anything.
If you have a couple of weeks, then take them- you will have a great time.
I couldn't agree more, Anamiri. My first Camino Frances was only 2 weeks, so I did a mix of train/walk/bus to main cities in the early stages and walked the last 200km.

At the moment I have barely 10 days of leave from work. Takes me almost 2 days each way from Australia to Spain. I just decided to use the remaining six days to walk the Lebaniego and enjoy my time in Cantabria. Who knows when I will have the chance to go again, so better short camino than non-existant camino! :)
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
I couldn't agree more, Anamiri. My first Camino Frances was only 2 weeks, so I did a mix of train/walk/bus to main cities in the early stages and walked the last 200km.

At the moment I have barely 10 days of leave from work. Takes me almost 2 days each way from Australia to Spain. I just decided to use the remaining six days to walk the Lebaniego and enjoy my time in Cantabria. Who knows when I will have the chance to go again, so better short camino than non-existant camino! :)
Im like you, coming from New Zealand its quite a lengthy trip. I'm almost envious of those who love in Europe and can get there and back without using up 4 days.
 

Rhun Leeding

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leon to Santiago - Sept/Oct 2015
Camino Ingles & Santiago to Finisterre & Muxia Sept/Oct 2016
Hi Jessica,

I have been like you on my previous caminos, only having around two weeks that I could get off work. If you have 14 days without the travel time there and back (one day each way was enough from Wales, I'd expect the same from Ireland), I walked Leon to Santiago in 14 days.

If your time is a little shorter, then Astorga is a couple of days further along the Camino Frances and you could do it comfortably with a day to spend in Santiago on top. As others have suggested though, the Camino Ingles is a quieter option for 4-5 days, before joining the busier path to Finisterre and Muxia (5 days).

Don't over-plan it - book the flights and have a broad idea, but its so easy to be too rigid and not enjoy the journey.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
I have been like you on my previous caminos, only having around two weeks that I could get off work. If you have 14 days without the travel time there and back (one day each way was enough from Wales, I'd expect the same from Ireland), I walked Leon to Santiago in 14 days.
I love living in west Wales - not far from Swansea and Carmarthen. But the cost and travel time to get to an airport to fly to Spain or most other foreign parts are usually more than the air journey itself :( Can't win them all I suppose :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
@JessicaC , gidday from the "uttermost end of the earth".

I have quite a different suggestion, recognising both your relative closeness to very long distance walking routes and that you have 14 days to travel to and fro.

When I walked in France I met many singles, couples and groups who walked for about one or two weeks, returned home and next time returned to where they stopped last time and carried on.

My suggestion is to start at Le Puy (bout 2 hours by local train from Lyon, itself about 2 hours by fast train from Paris) and walk to either Cahors or Moissac. Both are on train routes.

The Le Puy route is similar to that from Saint-Jean with a good range and frequency of accomodation and food options.

Then, if you find that suits you, then return and do some more.

A second fortnight would restart at Moissac (possibly omitting the two days from Cahors) to Arthez-de-Bearn and divert to Orthez for a train.

A third fortnight would restart at Orthez and continue to Logrono.

A fourth to Leon

And final session to Compostella.

I have many guides for that 1,600 km. The two I carry en rute are Michelin 161 Chemin de Compostelle and the equivalent for Spain. They are uncomplicated with no text. For each section an elevation profile, a selection of accomodation, a topo map and a thumbnail showing where this section fits into the big picture.

I note you have a good level of fitness. I suggest you include several training trips, wearing the clothes, pack etc you will take with you.

For two weeks, and knowing you will encounter shops in the larger towns, I suggest minimal gear: light weight sleeping bag, at most two changes of quick dry tops, socks and underwear, one coverall (including pack) wet weather outer*. For colder weather think layers rather than a suite of special purpose stuff. So you can just fly along I suggest you aim for a total pack and stuff weight, including tech and water, of around 6 kg.

And so I wish you kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)

* for example Altus coat or zPacks poncho
 

Finisterre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria 2001,
Porto 2006,
Valenca 2008,
Finisterre 2010,
SJdPP 2012,
Tui 2014.

No plans to return, yet.
Alwyn's suggestion, to be ambitious, to turn a short walking holiday into real achievement over some years.
That would be my choice if I had my time over.
(oh to be young and strong again) :(
 

Rhun Leeding

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leon to Santiago - Sept/Oct 2015
Camino Ingles & Santiago to Finisterre & Muxia Sept/Oct 2016
I love living in west Wales - not far from Swansea and Carmarthen. But the cost and travel time to get to an airport to fly to Spain or most other foreign parts are usually more than the air journey itself :( Can't win them all I suppose :)
I'm just up the valley from Swansea....and the National Express to the London airports isn't too bad as I remember (I booked well ahead, but I think it was under £20). And if I'm out early enough and the flights align, I think I can still make it to St Jean in one (loooong) day! Not too expensive, but once you start hitting the trains it piles up quick!
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
@Rhun Leeding I don't mind the cost of the coach fares as much as the time it takes. 7 hours or so to get to the airport for a 2 hour flight :( But at least flying is much cheaper than it used to be and there are far more regional flights too.
 

Rhun Leeding

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leon to Santiago - Sept/Oct 2015
Camino Ingles & Santiago to Finisterre & Muxia Sept/Oct 2016
@Rhun Leeding I don't mind the cost of the coach fares as much as the time it takes. 7 hours or so to get to the airport for a 2 hour flight :( But at least flying is much cheaper than it used to be and there are far more regional flights too.
I'm a Cardi from mid Wales originally, so cheap and time consuming is more palatable than quick and expensive!!!
Plus, I just put on some music and fall asleep for most of the way, so it isn't too much of a problem.
 
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
That would be my choice if I had my time over.
(oh to be young and strong again)
@Finisterre , from your avatar you don't seem particulalry old. Although I appreciate you may tell me that is an image of your grandson!!

It's more being realistically bloody-minded about what you want to do. I started training (and getting my gear together) just after my 70th. I was not fit and I was very overweight. But I had been given a mission: and I was not going to fall over on my first day. My first training trip was just after my 70th birthday and I started in Le Puy a few months after I turned 74.

All in all, to prevent falling down at any time, I've walked about 3,000 km en route and about 4,000 km in training.

So I say to you, kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going).
 

Ricardo Moretti

Rick Camino April-May 2018
Camino(s) past & future
April-May 2018
Hello there,

I was wondering if anyone could advise me, myself and a friend have decided we wish to complete a Camino, however we cannot take off more then 2 weeks (much to our annoyance, but hey that’s life). We would love to complete the full French Camino in one go, but it’s looking unlikely. I’m thinking about breaking it up into segements to fly back over again, but there’s a part of me that doesn’t want to leave the Camino unfinished.
We are reasonably in shape, both in our 20s, and are use to being on our feet most of the day due to our lines of work.
If we were to break up the Camino what would be the best way to do it , or should we start further back , would it be possible to make it to Santiago from there in 2 weeks ? Or should we consider a different route ? It’s a small bit over whelming looking at it, as we don’t know anyone who’s completed it or where to start/plan logically.
Any tips of advice would be greatly appreciated.

Regards from a slightly confused first time piligrim...
Depends on where you are flying from. If from North America, you will lose a day travelling so calculate that in your itinerary. You may also want to add a day of rest after 7 days of walking. Finally, you may want to add an extra day to roam around the bigger cities (Pamplona, Burgos, Leon, etc.) and final destination is wonderful. One guy supposedly did the Camino Frances in 14 days! But if like that individual, you want to walk around 50km every day then stay at home and walk. Most travel guides reccomend anywhere from 15km to 30km per day with an average of 25km per day. Having said all of this, if you want to end up in Santiago de Compestela, look up 11 days (stages) prior (say Astorga) and start there. That way you have 1 day to arrive, 1 day rest and 1 day extra for when you arrive in Santiago de Compostella. Don't forget, you have to travel back home which represents another day.
 

Penny Kingma

M.S. Can't Stop Me !
Camino(s) past & future
May 29th to July 4th 2016
SJPDP to Santiago
And many, many more I pray
I was a lucky one that could take the time I needed to finish in one go.
I did it at the age of 52 with not one blister or injury. I however did see many of all ages forced to quit. Most from just going too hard...too fast. Not taking the time to rest their feet...and minds.
I’ve been asked that by many wanting to go but not having the freedom to leave their lives for the time required....what I’d do in their situation.
I always respond the same. I’d start at SJDP, signing up at the pilgrim office, having them wish you well and tie on your shell. I’d walk over the Pyrenees mountains experiencing everything around me. Not rushing....because there is so much to miss in doing so. I’d walk as far as my time allowed....then leave from there....to return again to that spot to continue again when time allowed.
I just can’t think of one step I would’ve wanted to miss.
Good luck and Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
Cycling the camino de Santiago "2013"
Jessica, everybody's given you some great advice already but I thought I'd add my little bit.

You've mentioned that you're both young and fit so really you have all the time in the world - although you can only take off two week's at a time, nothing says you can't start wherever you want to and just walk as far as you can over the following couple of weeks.

We rode the Camino de Santiago in 2013 and came across a group of amazing French people who took off two weeks every year to complete just one small portion of the Camino. They have probably completed the whole route since then and I bet they're already planning on another Camino.

Always bear in mind, as I'm sure you've been told, that the first day is always the hardest. Tackling the Pyrenees if you're leaving from SJPdP is daunting but, as Penny Kingma above says, just take your time and enjoy the scenery. Before you know it, you're at the top feeling over the world. To be honest, that bit we hardly used the bikes as it was so steep in parts.
 

El Mayordomo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France (Invierno) 2019

cosan

Member
Camino(s) past & future
july 2016
Hello there,

I was wondering if anyone could advise me, myself and a friend have decided we wish to complete a Camino, however we cannot take off more then 2 weeks (much to our annoyance, but hey that’s life). We would love to complete the full French Camino in one go, but it’s looking unlikely. I’m thinking about breaking it up into segements to fly back over again, but there’s a part of me that doesn’t want to leave the Camino unfinished.
We are reasonably in shape, both in our 20s, and are use to being on our feet most of the day due to our lines of work.
If we were to break up the Camino what would be the best way to do it , or should we start further back , would it be possible to make it to Santiago from there in 2 weeks ? Or should we consider a different route ? It’s a small bit over whelming looking at it, as we don’t know anyone who’s completed it or where to start/plan logically.
Any tips of advice would be greatly appreciated.

Regards from a slightly confused first time piligrim...
Hi
For my first time on Camino I flew Dublin to Biarritz and flew home to Dublin from Bilbao. You will probably make it to Logrona allowing for a rest day. It is easy to bus from Logrona back to Bilbao. You will love Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
Hello there,

I was wondering if anyone could advise me, myself and a friend have decided we wish to complete a Camino, however we cannot take off more then 2 weeks (much to our annoyance, but hey that’s life). We would love to complete the full French Camino in one go, but it’s looking unlikely. I’m thinking about breaking it up into segements to fly back over again, but there’s a part of me that doesn’t want to leave the Camino unfinished.
We are reasonably in shape, both in our 20s, and are use to being on our feet most of the day due to our lines of work.
If we were to break up the Camino what would be the best way to do it , or should we start further back , would it be possible to make it to Santiago from there in 2 weeks ? Or should we consider a different route ? It’s a small bit over whelming looking at it, as we don’t know anyone who’s completed it or where to start/plan logically.
Any tips of advice would be greatly appreciated.

Regards from a slightly confused first time piligrim...
Hey, Jessica. Are you there? Any ideas from all the help you have been offered?
 
Camino(s) past & future
June 2013, June 2014, Oct 2014, May 2015
Jessica, you have tons of advice and suggestions here. If you can make it to St James’ Church in Dublin during office hours, there are people only dying to help aspiring pilgrims with information. I attach a screenshot of some contact details. I suggest an email will help as it is unclear if the office is open all the time in winter. If that doesn’t work and you would like to talk to someone who has walked a few caminos, pm me and we could meet to chat in town. Pm is private message, by the way.
forgot to add the photo, so here is another one. You can follow the link in the photo and see where it takes you...
View attachment 50710
Hi Jessica, all good advice above. The choice is yours! Kirkie gave you the Camino Society of Ireland contact details. Their website gives winter and spring opening hours also information days that are held around the country. I'd advise calling in or going to an information day. You'll meet real pilgrims with a wealth of knowledge and plenty of encouragement. You can also gent your Irish pilgrim passport at the office or info meeting. Check out websitehttps://www.caminosociety.com

Jessica, you have tons of advice and suggestions here. If you can make it to St James’ Church in Dublin during office hours, there are people only dying to help aspiring pilgrims with information. I attach a screenshot of some contact details. I suggest an email will help as it is unclear if the office is open all the time in winter. If that doesn’t work and you would like to talk to someone who has walked a few caminos, pm me and we could meet to chat in town. Pm is private message, by the way.
forgot to add the photo, so here is another one. You can follow the link in the photo and see where it takes you...
View attachment 50710
 

Traa

Member
Camino(s) past & future
I want to walk Camino in Sept/Oct 2017
I was a lucky one that could take the time I needed to finish in one go.
I did it at the age of 52 with not one blister or injury. I however did see many of all ages forced to quit. Most from just going too hard...too fast. Not taking the time to rest their feet...and minds.
I’ve been asked that by many wanting to go but not having the freedom to leave their lives for the time required....what I’d do in their situation.
I always respond the same. I’d start at SJDP, signing up at the pilgrim office, having them wish you well and tie on your shell. I’d walk over the Pyrenees mountains experiencing everything around me. Not rushing....because there is so much to miss in doing so. I’d walk as far as my time allowed....then leave from there....to return again to that spot to continue again when time allowed.
I just can’t think of one step I would’ve wanted to miss.
Good luck and Buen Camino
Absolutely 100% agree! 😁😁😁
 

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