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Ferrol to Finisterra .... (and beyond?)

Discussion in 'Camino Ingles' started by Rhun Leeding, Aug 23, 2016.

  1. Rhun Leeding

    Rhun Leeding Member

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    Camino(s) past & future:
    Leon to Santiago - Sept/Oct 2015
    Camino Ingles & Santiago to Finisterre & Muxia Sept/Oct 2016
    Hi guys,

    I'll be starting off my second Camino experience (I did Leon to Santiago around this time last year) on 7 September, flying in to A Coruna the day before, then catching the 7am train over to Ferrol on Wednesday morning to pick up a sello, a desayuno (hopefully!) and get these legs working.

    Sadly my dad, who did the whole of the Frances from SJPP last year, has had some lung problems and won't be joining me, but I thought I'd throw out a couple of questions if I may.

    1) Are the trails on the Ingles as good as those on the Frances, or in other words, do I need my walking boots or will a pair of walking trainers do the job as the would on the section of the Frances I walked last year?
    2) I understand that I might need to take food supplies for the longest leg into Hospital de Bruma, or are there enough places along the way to keep one going?
    3) As it'll just be me, rather than having the old stager with me, is it easy to get lost? Navigation may not be my strongest point!

    Anyhow, I'm hoping to make it into Santiago in five days, and then head on to Finisterra. The final day on to Muxia is an option if everything goes well and my legs are feeling good in Finisterra, but as its a long day I may just catch the bus back to Santiago for an extra day of refreshment and exploring the sights!

    As I'm starting mid-week, I imagine I may get a little quieter Camino as this one fits in well into being walked weekend to weekend, but anyone likely to be around - give a wave to the rather tired looking sweaty fella giving the beer taps longing glances!
     
  2. miguel_gp

    miguel_gp Veteran Member Donating Member

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    Hi,
    Trainers should suffice unless you have particularly susceptible ankles. The paths are good.
    On the Bruma leg, assuming starting at Betanzos, then the last bar/restaurant is at about 18km and then there is a further 10 approx. until Bruma. I guess it depends how hungry you tend to get on route but certainly a water top up at the 18km mark (Cass Julia) would be worthwhile.
    Waymarking on the route is very good but if you haven't already, download Johnnie Walker's guide to the route from the resources section of the forum.
    Buen Camino.
     
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  3. Rhun Leeding

    Rhun Leeding Member

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    Camino Ingles & Santiago to Finisterre & Muxia Sept/Oct 2016
    Thanks Miguel, that's reassuring. My boots gave me some nasty blisters along the way last time, so trainers are definitely the way to go for me. I'm picking up a printed copy of the guide, along with my credencial from my father's house this weekend. I suppose another challenge for me is trying to leave as many digital devices as possible at home! The obsession with the Wi-fi password along the Camino Frances was another interesting aspect!
     
  4. Pelegrin

    Pelegrin Veteran Member Donating Member

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    On the stage Betanzos- Bruma , there is also a Bar-Restaurant in Presedo (km 12) I think that they give Menú del Peregrino. In Presedo there is also an albergue.
     
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  5. madrid12

    madrid12 member

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    I usually have some food and water with me just in case the bars on the way are closed. Last year they were all closed on the stretch from Bruma to Sigueiro. I have walked the Ingles a few times and think this may have been a one off though.
     
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  6. Rhun Leeding

    Rhun Leeding Member

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    Camino Ingles & Santiago to Finisterre & Muxia Sept/Oct 2016
    Thanks both, I had heard someone else mention about the bars they saw being closed, and I suppose September isn't fully peak season, so I may take a few snacks in the bag to see me through just in case. I'm not going to fall apart if I miss the occasional lunch, but forewarned is forearmed as they say.
     
  7. Dennis M

    Dennis M Member

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    The challenge in Hospital de Bruma if you're staying at the albergue is access to food if you arrive late in the afternoon. At least that's when I was there in May 2015. However, i saw lately in this forum that there's a newly opened restaurant near the albergue.
     
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  8. alansykes

    alansykes Veteran Member Donating Member

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    I had an excellent lunch at Casa Julia (aka La Pequeñita), about 10km from Bruma. It was heaving with workmen enjoying rich filling food in a nice glass covered terrace looking over green Galicia.

    There is a well equipped kitchen in the albergue in Bruma, in case the new restaurant, which hadn't opened when I was there last November, is closed. Most bars were open, even in November, but it was a long way to the first coffee next morning.
     
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  9. Magwood

    Magwood Veteran Member

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    The new restaurant in Bruma is excellent, used by locals and pilgrims. Good reasonably priced food, served from 13:00 to 20:00.

    Definitely worth a stop around 12.5 kms out of Betanzos is the fabulous bar/restaurant called Meson Museo in the village of Presedo.
     
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  10. Pelegrin

    Pelegrin Veteran Member Donating Member

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    Yes I definitely agree. It is worth a stop at Meson Museo Xente no Camiño in Presedo and particularly for Galician history lovers. His owner Alfredo Erias is a doctor in medieval Galician history. He paints paintings about medieval Galician people based on statues in churches. His paintings are exposed at the museum and is free.
     
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  11. Rhun Leeding

    Rhun Leeding Member

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    Sounds like the food situation is definitely a little brighter than it was a few years ago. That's very reassuring, and really looking forward to drag myself on to the plane next Tuesday. Did a pre-camino training walk today with a fairly laden pack, pace and stamina not too bad, just over ten miles in around four hours with around 2,000 feet of ascent.

    Thanks both for the recommendations, that guy in Presedo sound particularly worth seeking out. Picked up my credencial and the guide today, everything coming together nicely, but I'm sure there will be one or two more hiccups before I sip that first cool beer in Finisterre.
     
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  12. Rhun Leeding

    Rhun Leeding Member

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    Camino Ingles & Santiago to Finisterre & Muxia Sept/Oct 2016
    The training run was reassuring in letting me know that I do have another Camino in my legs, and I'm certainly in better shape than I was last time out!

    Little bit anxious as I'll be going solo this time, and have to do all the looking for signs myself, as well as the inevitable sections of plodding when I'm tired. Nonetheless, looking forward to it, hope all my transport connections work out, and fingers crossed for a good pace and plenty of beds!
     
  13. Pelegrin

    Pelegrin Veteran Member Donating Member

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    The Camino Ingles is very well marked. The only point that I felt a bit confused was in Xubia (Narón). After the bridge, the Camino turns right troughout a park directly towards the Neda albergue. But when I got there (end of last July) there were works in the park and the way was shut. So, finally I arrived at Carretera de Castilla, a wide street that also leads to Neda albergue. So no problem.
     
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  14. Rhun Leeding

    Rhun Leeding Member

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    Thanks guys. Although I'm hoping to avoid any bed blocking in the albergues by getting there fairly early, whatever will be will be. I've also downloaded some musicals ready to enjoy along the way. For that reason, I apologise if you hear somebody singing (badly....really badly!) and think they can't sing. Anxiety at 98% and excitement, or is it Excitement at 98% and anxiety at 2%. What will be will be....if I spend a night under the stars, I'm pretty sure I'm resilient enough to handle it!
     
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  15. Rhun Leeding

    Rhun Leeding Member

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    Got back in from Spain late last night, and I have to say I very much recommend the Camino Ingles as a route to choose. It has some wonderful sections of walking and lovely towns along the way. Generally it is well waymarked, and although I kept the guide at the top of the pack, I was more often referring to it to find where the fuentes and water sources were rather than trying to use it for navigation. I ended up going on to Muxia and catching the bus to Finisterre, rather than walking to Finisterre, as after walking the Ingles I found the number of people walking on beyond Santiago to be quite large. Muxia also seemed to be a much nicer and more appropriate destination in my view, the Church provides a better climax than what is on offer in Finisterre.

    The notes I would make for anyone thinking of walking the Ingles, who are already familiar with the Camino Frances experience are:

    Despite the name, do not expect to find as many English speakers here as you do on the Frances. However, a little Spanish and perseverance with sign language will go a long way.
    There are also fewer cafes and shops along the way, so don't expect five or six cafe con leche's every day. Personally, as long as I knew where they would be, I could plan and adapt as I went.
    The Menu Del Dia is not so prevalent, particularly as an evening meal, and if you like to eat early, you may not find as many restaurants cooking early as you do on the Frances. (8pm seemed to be when many restaurants would start serving food, as in other parts of Spain).
    The day from Betanzos to Bruma is not an easy 29km, so consider splitting it unless you regularly cover such distances.
    I would definitely recommend the Meson Museo in Presedo for food, and the Hostal Sigueiro for accommodation as my highlights.

    All in all though, a very enjoyable trip, and ideal for those who can't commit for a long time, but want a nice Camino without the crowds of the Frances.
     
  16. Albertinho

    Albertinho Veteran Member

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    The name camino Inglès is from earlier days when pilgrims from the UK ,Ireland,Scandinavia arrived by boat in A Coruña.
    Nowadays there is no ferrylink anymore others than to Santander, far away from The Galicean towns Ferrol and A Coruña.. So peregrinos have to travel from elswhere to Ferrol or A Coruña to start walking.
    However recently I saw scalloped waymarkers on the quai of the town of Poole near Bournemouth in the south of England and I have been told there are waymarkers too in Portmouth and Plymouth (?) but if there is any sealink from there I doubt.

    The menu del dia initialy is a 3 course meal for workers, initiated by law by the former generalissimo Franco. Every worker has the right to obtain this meal in the afternoon for a cheap price.
    Nowadays the price for a menu del dia is between 8 and 10€ inclusive one drink, a coffee ,a beer a soda or a glas of wine.
    The menu del dia regulairy only is served between about 12h30 and 15h00 and only on weekdays. In the evening Spanish have a light meal mostly at home around 21h00 but with nice weather you can find them at local terraces eating,drinking and socialising with others while young children are playing around and babies still away (a different world anyway to our northern European lifestyle :))

    A great alternative for the Bruma albergue is the hostal Méson do Vento in Méson Novo, two kms from Bruma.
    If you walk as far as the bar Julia just before the steep climb to Bruma starts, give them a call and they pick you up and next morning they take you back to barcJulia where you could continue your walk.
     
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  17. Dennis M

    Dennis M Member

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    @Rhun Leeding agree. It was my first camino but i was very happy to have chosen this route. I enjoyed being alone during the walk; it gave me time reflect, enjoy the scenery and then spend night time and chat with other pilgrims at the albergue.
     
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  18. KinkyOne

    KinkyOne Veteran Member

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    I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
    Can only second that!

    And do ask Alfredo to show you his book about romanic churches in Betanzos. Beautiful. Especially if you speak/read some Spanish.

    Alfredo is huge football fan and watching one of this years European Football Championship matches with him was real treat :)

    Also an albergue in Presedo few hundred meters before Meson... on the main road. I remember four Spanish girls came to albergue very late in the evening after the Meson was closed. They got lost and wandered somewhere they couldn't explain for most of that day and they were exhausted and HUNGRY :D Alfredo and his wife opened the Meson, made huge bocadillos and drove two of them back to the albergue.

    Need I say more to encourage you to visit/stop at this wonderful place?
     
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  19. Rhun Leeding

    Rhun Leeding Member

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    To add to the Meson Museo love-in, the food is great, plus, over the road from the museum they are growing the hops for the Christmas Special edition of Estrella Galicia, as when we were in the workers from the farm were over having lunch, and gave us the lowdown on the beer! The waitress was also wonderfully friendly and really funny.
     
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