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Food on the Camino, what do you miss?

The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
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It look just like the one I had in Betanzos. The runny center, IMHO, makes it all the better.

I too had one of those with the runny center in Betanzos, very delicious! Did you have it in the restaurant with the big garden in the outskirts of the town?
 
I too had one of those with the runny center in Betanzos, very delicious! Did you have it in the restaurant with the big garden in the outskirts of the town?
No, we ate in the center of town at Casa Miranda. I’d love to be going there for dinner tonight!
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
During my first Camino I was introduced to the scrumptious tortilla. You know that thing that looked like a pie made with eggs and potatoes. Well today, the Mrs. (@J Willhaus )made one for breakfast. What a delight!

What Camino food do you miss?

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I will assume any tortilla with a runny center is made fresh daily right at the bar. All the ones I ate were firm and cold, so I'm thinking they are possibly made in big batches at a bakery and delivered daily like most bread.
 
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I will assume any tortilla with a runny center is made fresh daily right at the bar. All the ones I ate were firm and cold, so I'm thinking they are possibly made in big batches at a bakery and delivered daily like most bread.
I always pictured an abuela in the back cooking those up. I have seen the production version in the store here in the US periodically. Looks like a little Frisbee in a vacuum wrapped package. Can't imagine that it would be as tasty as a fresh one.
 
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Room temperature is doable, but mine were always cold.
I'm fine with cold tortilla too.
But runny tortilla doesn't appeal to me at all.

I have seen the production version in the store here in the US periodically. Looks like a little Frisbee in a vacuum wrapped package. Can't imagine that it would be as tasty as a fresh one.

I bought a packaged tortilla at Lidl in Portugal - it was practically inedible. I don't know how they ruined potatoes, onions, and eggs, but they did.
 
I'm fine with cold tortilla too.
But runny tortilla doesn't appeal to me at all.



I bought a packaged tortilla at Lidl in Portugal - it was practically inedible. I don't know how they ruined potatoes, onions, and eggs, but they did.
The only cold eggs I like are hard boiled with a bit of S&P.
I've never seen pre-packaged tortillas. They must be like the "Frisbees" mentioned above, so if I ever see them I'll be sure to steer clear.😅
 
I've never seen pre-packaged tortillas. They must be like the "Frisbees" mentioned above, so if I ever see them I'll be sure to steer clear.😅
I have. And quite recently too. If all the local bars and restaurants are closed in the morning then a slice or two of prepacked tortilla warmed in the albergue microwave along with yesterday's pan is a lot better than nothing at all :)
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I miss the raixo! So good after a long day of hiking.

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I prefer my eggs non-runny. I ate many of those tortillas in Spain for breakfast. Although delicious they were served cold😝. The bars always had a microwave, so I'd usually request they heat mine. They often looked at me as if I'd asked them to bake me a potato.
I too would ask for them to heat the tortilla especially if I ordered one later in the morning. They often do look at you funny and never, ever have they heated it long enough in the microwave. As I wrote this I do remember a few times the bar owner would heat it without asking. PS we are perfect tortilla companions as I don't like my eggs runny either. As Felix Unger would say on the Odd Couple, "let me tighten those eggs up"! ;)
 
I have. And quite recently too. If all the local bars and restaurants are closed in the morning then a slice or two of prepacked tortilla warmed in the albergue microwave along with yesterday's pan is a lot better than nothing at all :)
I have seen them in many grocery stores also.
 
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I will assume any tortilla with a runny center is made fresh daily right at the bar. All the ones I ate were firm and cold, so I'm thinking they are possibly made in big batches at a bakery and delivered daily like most bread.
No necessarily. Different people have different taste on tortilla: with or without onion, with very runny egg, a bit runny in the centre or not runny at all... So, it depends on who is making it.
There are industrial made tortillas (you can find them in supermarkets), but they're not as good. I would expect bars to make their own and I would be very disappointed to find out that a bar was serving pre-packaged tortilla. Reason enough to not go back there... 😅
 
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Without a doubt, from the Portuguese (seaside) the Francesinha.
Francesinha is a Portuguese sandwich that originates from Porto. The literal translation for its name is 'Little French Girl', however, the only thing little about it, is the name. It's a rather large sandwich filled with layers of beef steak, cured meat, fresh sausages, topped with cheese, covered with a beer sauce, and surrounded by French fries.
 

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Tostados in Astorga (toast with ham, tomato salsa, olive oil), pork shanks, white asparagus salad, bocadillos (atun con tomate as well well as ham and cheese), a lovely draft beer at the end of each day's hike, and cafe con leche to begin the day! I should also mention the vegetal sandwich I had in Sahagun. It was just perfect, although considering the above comments about runny eggs, not all of you would think so. It was just soft enough to coat the various vegetables in the sandwich, without making a total mess. Oh, and also the bread. Did I mention the desserts? And, of course, the wine. I guess it sounds like eating was one of my favorite activities on the Camino! :)
 
I've been making my own tortillas for a while now I have two pans that slot together to make the flipping all the easier. I eat them at any temperature, but the rest of the family prefers them heated. I also makes paellas and bocadillos. Sometimes lentejas con chorizo.

I've never had success making pulpo a feira, though. Padron peppers aren't easy to come by here. And churros con chocolate are sorely missed. You can sometmes find churros here, but never with that thick and rich hot chocolate.
 
I've been making my own tortillas for a while now I have two pans that slot together to make the flipping all the easier.
Yes, I just got a set of these pans a few weeks ago. Testing out the cook time and the temperature settings on my electric stove so I can perfect the result. I tried to make tortilla in my cast iron skillet a few years ago and it was way too heavy for me to flip properly. The two pans are great because you can cook your onions (if you use them) while you are also cooking your potatoes in another pan. Non-stick and easy to clean.
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Yes, I just got a set of these pans a few weeks ago. Testing out the cook time and the temperature settings on my electric stove so I can perfect the result. I tried to make tortilla in my cast iron skillet a few years ago and it was way too heavy for me to flip properly. The two pans are great because you can cook your onions (if you use them) while you are also cooking your potatoes in another pan. Non-stick and easy to clean.
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Interesting. I always cook the onions with the potatoes. What's the advantage of cooking them separately?
 
The onions are caramelized in a little bit of oil instead of the lot of oil it takes to cook the potatoes I guess. The recipe I followed was to caramelize the onions in a little oil (which takes a bit of time). Cook the sliced potatoes in olive oil to cover making sure they just bubble and don't turn crisp. Then drain the oil from the potatoes when they are tender and mix with the onions. Let them cool slightly so as not to cook the eggs and then add the mixed eggs. Mix in 2 tsps on salt and some pepper and let the "batter" sit in a bowl for 15 minutes or so before putting it in the pan to cook. Cook until the middle is still runny, but the outside edge is cooked and you can run a spatula around and under it. Put on the top pan and then flip it and cook the other side. My recipe said it can still be runny in the middle, but I think I will cook mine a bit longer next time for a firmer middle.

I have several recipes to choose from from cookbooks and online. Not sure why I chose this one, but maybe it was because I now have two pans to cook in at the same time? I am using Yukon gold potatoes as they hold their shape pretty well and a half a yellow onion. I may try it without the onion next time to see if we like that better?
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Tostados in Astorga (toast with ham, tomato salsa, olive oil), pork shanks, white asparagus salad, bocadillos (atun con tomate as well well as ham and cheese), a lovely draft beer at the end of each day's hike, and cafe con leche to begin the day! I should also mention the vegetal sandwich I had in Sahagun. It was just perfect, although considering the above comments about runny eggs, not all of you would think so. It was just soft enough to coat the various vegetables in the sandwich, without making a total mess. Oh, and also the bread. Did I mention the desserts? And, of course, the wine. I guess it sounds like eating was one of my favorite activities on the Camino! :)
In spite of diabetes, I plan to eat on the Camino de Arles all the way to Puente la Reina and then on the Camino Frances all the way.
 
I've been making my own tortillas for a while now I have two pans that slot together to make the flipping all the easier.
I have a set of those pans too, but I prefer to use the microwave cooker since it's so fast and easy, and I don't have to use tons of oil. Plus they taste great!
 
What about a nice big dish of squid and seafood in a Coruña or Vigo? I remember a restaurant in Vigo, second or third floor with a fantastic view on the Atlantic. I remember it because of a child that was playing hide and seek with customers, and I called her out..the whole place became silent because it is unheard of to scold a child in some countries…in a public space..children are often allowed to do what they want…
 
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Not a Camino food as such, but the only time I ate it was on the Camino.
I miss those fantastic Dutch pancakes from Juntos Alberque in Boadilla.
I got mine with Nutella. Some pilgrims got them to go to eat later in the day.
Delicious!
 
Cook the sliced potatoes in olive oil to cover making sure they just bubble and don't turn crisp. Then drain the oil from the potatoes when they are tender and mix with the onions.
We just got an air fryer (actually they are small electric convection ovens) and it seems to me the potatoes could be cooked in it with just a coating of oil on each. Would this work well with the rest of the recipe?
 
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We just got an air fryer (actually they are small electric convection ovens) and it seems to me the potatoes could be cooked in it with just a coating of oil on each. Would this work well with the rest of the recipe?
I don't know. Probably half the yumminess comes from all the oil though. It does not seem oily when you eat it, but it certainly takes a lot of oil for the recipe I used this time. You can reuse the oil drained away for other cooking so you aren't wasting a lot of good olive oil though. @trecile 's microwave cooker did not look like it took much oil either. You don't want to "fry" the potatoes. You are really just boiling the slices in the oil on a lower heat until they are cooked through, but don't have a crunchy surface. I am wondering if you could boil the potato slices to cook them? Might break them up too much though.
 
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There are industrial made tortillas (you can find them in supermarkets), but they're not as good. I would expect bars to make their own and I would be very disappointed to find out that a bar was serving pre-packaged tortilla.
Be prepared to be disappointed then much of the time. Nearly every one I had from bars were identical and cookie cutter versions of home-made. The same goes for empanadas and paellas. When you get the home-made fresh ones you can really taste the difference.😋
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
During my first Camino I was introduced to the scrumptious tortilla. You know that thing that looked like a pie made with eggs and potatoes. Well today, the Mrs. (@J Willhaus )made one for breakfast. What a delight!

What Camino food do you miss?

View attachment 140506View attachment 140507
My wife and I stop at a supermarket and get precooked corn on the cob, vacuum sealed.
So good. Doesn’t need butter.
Doing the Via Plata in April.
Can’t wait!
 
I found a bar, I think it was Bar La Tita, on Rua Nova 39, in SdC that was overflowing with people on a chilly October Saturday afternoon. Everyone was eating their runny tortillas. I'm not one for runny eggs, but these were delicious.

You can't forget the incredible seafood and shellfish, especially razor clams...yum. Does anyone know a good place to get percebes (barnacles)?
 
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Folks: you are alil talking about food on the various caminos. Do any of you ever find good food in France?
Ahhh, all along the Via Podiensis the food was always excellent. We mostly ate at the Gites and the home-made dinners were always outstanding! One interesting thing was that they always served a platter of various local cheeses after the hot main dishes, right before the final course of dessert.
The only thing I didn't like was the rather sub-standard coffee they served in the morning in large "cereal bowls" with no handle. We rarely ate at restaurants though; only occasionally if we passed through a larger town at lunch time.
 
Ahhh, all along the Via Podiensis the food was a treat. We mostly ate at the Gites and the home-made dinners were outstanding!
The only thing I didn't like was the rather sub-standard coffee they served in the morning in large "cereal bowls" with no handle. We rarely ate at restaurants though; only occasionally if we passed through a larger town at lunch time.
The coffee that you mention is typically served in France, a lot of it is chicory, and prefer a ristretto or un corto for breakfast..make that 2x!
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Do any of you ever find good food in France?
On the Voie de Vézeley and Voie de Tours, fabulous food and wine, particularly as one gets further south near Limoges and Périgueux on the former and Bordeaux on the latter. And superb food throughout the Chemin d'Arles. But I was very disappointed in the Upper Loire Region at the start of the Voie du Puy. In a few smaller places the food was very good, but meals were greatly overpriced in the larger towns, unless one is content with fast food. I found things a lot better from around Figeac and Moissac. All a matter of taste, of course, but that it my experience, for what it is worth. The one element I miss most is potato dauphinoise, but even in much France that seems to be superseded in most places by chips, chips and more chips!
 
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Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

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Of course! But happy to be either, as long as there is no implication of over-fussiness or over indulgence!
 
I've never seen pre-packaged tortillas.
They are readily available at most Spanish supermarkets and make for an excellent picnic lunch along the way. My preference is to seek the ones containing onion, an essential component in my view. Don't hesitate to try one, you might be pleasantly surprised!
 
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They are readily available at most Spanish supermarkets and make for an excellent picnic lunch along the way. My preference is to seek the ones containing onion, an essential component in my view. Don't hesitate to try one, you might be pleasantly surprised!
Just skip the ones at Lidl!
 
One more....I don't know why but potato chips in Spain are deee-licious. My favorite activity after a day of walking is: shower, do laundry, then go to a local bar and munch on a bag of patatas fritas with a nice glass of vino tinto.
 
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Without a doubt, from the Portuguese (seaside) the Francesinha.
Francesinha is a Portuguese sandwich that originates from Porto. The literal translation for its name is 'Little French Girl', however, the only thing little about it, is the name. It's a rather large sandwich filled with layers of beef steak, cured meat, fresh sausages, topped with cheese, covered with a beer sauce, and surrounded by French fries.
Hmmmm... kinda puts a totally different spin on What are little girls made of 😂🤣
 
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Perfect sugar rush for half way through that 35k slog! 😋
 

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I still remember my first experience of Spanish tortilla. I had just arrived in Spain for the first time and had zero Spanish. This was the 80s and English was not common on menus. I had no idea what the words on the menu meant. But, coming from North America, when I saw the word tortilla, at least it was a familiar word. I could order that and know what I was going to get.

Imagine my surprise.
 
Without a doubt, from the Portuguese (seaside) the Francesinha.
Francesinha is a Portuguese sandwich that originates from Porto. The literal translation for its name is 'Little French Girl', however, the only thing little about it, is the name. It's a rather large sandwich filled with layers of beef steak, cured meat, fresh sausages, topped with cheese, covered with a beer sauce, and surrounded by French fries.
I had to try this when I was in Porto to start my CP. It takes our local poutine and leaves it in the dust in terms of artery attack.
 
I had to try this when I was in Porto to start my CP. It takes our local poutine and leaves it in the dust in terms of artery attack.
I had this wet "sandwich" in Portugal, too. Mine was literally a humongous 6+ inch square on a huge platter, with all the frills mentioned. I didn't really enjoy it much...too rich, heavy and a "heart attack on a plate".
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
All this talk of tortillas had me trying once again to make one. I caramelized the onion (red onion, as that’s what I had on hand), and cooked the sliced potato separately in the microwave with just a touch of water and olive oil. Then I layered the potatoes and caramelized onions in the pan with a goodly grinding of Himalayan Rose Pink Salt Crystals (good salt makes a huge difference IMHO) and black pepper, then poured on the egg in which I had also added some salt crystals. Oh, and a touch of milk in the egg. I won’t tell you what the finished product looked like but it was delicious. And with ketchup - oh, the horror of it! - absolutely divine. 😁
 
I don't know. Probably half the yumminess comes from all the oil though. It does not seem oily when you eat it, but it certainly takes a lot of oil for the recipe I used this time. You can reuse the oil drained away for other cooking so you aren't wasting a lot of good olive oil though. @trecile 's microwave cooker did not look like it took much oil either. You don't want to "fry" the potatoes. You are really just boiling the slices in the oil on a lower heat until they are cooked through, but don't have a crunchy surface. I am wondering if you could boil the potato slices to cook them? Might break them up too much though.
The secret to crisp potatoes that I learned in a chippy is to cook them twice. First time at a lower heat to get them almost cooked then the second time cook them at a very high heat to get the crispness and nice brown colour.

You could, of course, cook them once, in the same pan using two different heats but the chippy method saves time when customers are waiting. You cook them the first time when you aren't busy then allow them to drain and cool off, then when you get a rush of orders you can finish them quickly at the higher temperature. McDonald's does something similar but they use a pressure cooker for the first cook to save time and to reduce the oil on the chips. At lower temperatures they absorb more oil.
 
During my first Camino I was introduced to the scrumptious tortilla. You know that thing that looked like a pie made with eggs and potatoes. Well today, the Mrs. (@J Willhaus )made one for breakfast. What a delight!

What Camino food do you miss?

View attachment 140506View attachment 140507
Vegetariana bocodilla with olive oil. I cannot eat bread in the US, but could eat all I wanted on Camino! And of course that first cafe con leche of the day!!
 
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Although I wouldn't necessarily miss it on the Camino, once or twice I would like to find a really good hamburger somewhere. I have tried a bunch, and they were just not that good--the beef tough/chewy e.g. Of course, I'm comparing it to burgers I'm used to in the U.S. It makes me wonder if Spain beef is grass fed as opposed to grain fed. This will sound preposterous maybe, and I'm somewhat embarrassed to admit it, but the best burger I have had in Spain was at a Burger King. Spain is somewhat known for its steaks, so one would think the burger meat would be good. Anyone out there find a burger they really liked on the Camino.
 
Although I wouldn't necessarily miss it on the Camino, once or twice I would like to find a really good hamburger somewhere.

I know what you mean about the hamburgers. I think that many places in Spain don't use 100% beef, and sometimes there is ham mixed in.

But, I had the most amazing burger in Estella - it was definitely all beef, had lettuce, tomato and carmelized onions on it. So good!
 
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Generally, just any menú del dia, especially as the only place down here where I live in the South of France, where a not overly expensive French-type menu was available, got sold and became a different restaurant, not so much to my taste or needs. There's Indian and Chinese and so on, Italian, Portuguese too, but not French cuisine, except one brasserie-bar, but they don't do a menu.

But as to individual foods, the Spanish ham (though French charcuteries are overall better) ; and the better type of lentils dishes, simply because I'm too lazy to make my own.

Conversely, on the Camino I missed most those French charcuteries and my own (very basic) cooking for myself, as the ingredients I need are too hard to obtain there in conjunction with a good enough Albergue kitchen.
 
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I know what you mean about the hamburgers. I think that many places in Spain don't use 100% beef, and sometimes there is ham mixed in.

But, I had the most amazing burger in Estella - it was definitely all beef, had lettuce, tomato and carmelized onions on it. So good!
Where in Estella? Was it that at that Happy Days 50's diner on the plaza to the left of the church? Kind of kidding about the diner, but my other guess would be Casa Carmen I think it is, on the right just before the high arched bridge--didn't even notice if they had hamburgers last July because everything else on the menu looked so good, and it was.
 
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Where in Estella? Was it that at that Happy Days 50's diner on the plaza to the left of the church? Kind of kidding about the diner, but my other guess would be Casa Carmen I think it is, on the right just before the high arched bridge--didn't even notice if they had hamburgers last July because everything else on the menu looked so good, and it was.

As I recall, it was near the beginning of town as you entered on the Camino on the main street. The bar/restaurant was on the right, and they have a patio across the street where I ate.

I just checked out Estella on Google Maps, and I think that it might have been Bar Alday. The hamburgers were only available for lunch.
 
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I had to try this when I was in Porto to start my CP. It takes our local poutine and leaves it in the dust in terms of artery attack.
I tried this too. In a highly recommended place. I have to say it is Portugal's Big Mistake. What were they thinking of? Never again. Otherwise I loved the food in Portugal!

Sorry, I should add I am talking about a gastronomic catastrophe called a Francesinha.
 
I'm somewhat embarrassed to admit it, but the best burger I have had in Spain was at a Burger King. Spain is somewhat known for its steaks, so one would think the burger meat would be good. Anyone out there find a burger they really liked on the Camino.
Hi Bob!
I was in Pontevedra had got there quite late!
I was starving,knackered and smelly found my hotel showered and stepped out to find somewhere for food!
Four or five doors down was a Burger King and it was getting dark (i have no night vison) so no brainer really!
Quick service hot food, good burger and a pudding.
I was back in bed in under an hour and slept like a log!
Any food is good food if you enjoy it irrespective of the cost.(ignoring it's health effect )
Taste is personal!
Woody
 
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I tried this too. In a highly recommended place. I have to say it is Portugal's Big Mistake. What were they thinking of? Never again. Otherwise I loved the food in Portugal!

Sorry, I should add I am talking about a gastronomic catastrophe called a Francesinha.
I agree. The Francesinha sandwich was a big mistake. I was glad to be able to share it and still couldn't eat my half; nor did I want to finish it.😝
This is sitting on a full size dinner plate, btw.
Screenshot_20230203-063208~2.png
 

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