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Foot Problems Post Camino - What Did You Deal With?

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MichaelF4

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese Coastal 2017
Camino Frances 2018
Camino Frances, Camino Invierno 2019
I am curious if anyone has experienced and been diagnosed with any foot problems post Camino. More specifically plantar fasciitis, forms of tendonitis or any other muscular or connective tissue ailments from overuse. My feet have been hurting since finishing a long Camino in early July. An Xray was negative so stress fractures are ruled out. I have had chiropractic and physiotherapy treatments and they have told me that my feet are beat up from all the walking and be patient and gentle with them. Haven't gone to a podiatrist since there would be a waiting period to see a specialist. Please understand I am not seeking medical advice here, only curious about the experiences of others.
 

Theo59

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2022
I am curious if anyone has experienced and been diagnosed with any foot problems post Camino. More specifically plantar fasciitis, forms of tendonitis or any other muscular or connective tissue ailments from overuse. My feet have been hurting since finishing a long Camino in early July. An Xray was negative so stress fractures are ruled out. I have had chiropractic and physiotherapy treatments and they have told me that my feet are beat up from all the walking and be patient and gentle with them. Haven't gone to a podiatrist since there would be a waiting period to see a specialist. Please understand I am not seeking medical advice here, only curious about the experiences of others.
I have never walked in Camino yet - I am planning it. But I am walking paths on mount Athos the last 20 years. I had never serious problems there. I had problems during training in my town , because of wrong shoes and hard pavement.
 

nickpellatt

Member
Camino(s) past & future
French 2015 Portuguese 2018 Norte May 2019 Finesterre and Muxia April 2019
In 2017 I started the Portugues from Lisbon one week after running my first marathon, (from couch to Marathon too), and I started with foot problems, that actually seems to pass the further along the route I got. After the Camino, and back to running, I had a lot of calf injury problems that I couldnt quite identify.

This years Camino ... 50 days on the Norte, I had foot pain across the top of my foot for the last two weeks, it continued for a month after my trip ended too .... and the running problems have come back.

I'm pretty sure I know what it is, achilles tendonosis, which is a thickening of the achilles, due to age related deterioration, or ... OVER-USE. Probably a mix of running and walking that has caused it.
 

MichaelF4

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese Coastal 2017
Camino Frances 2018
Camino Frances, Camino Invierno 2019
In 2017 I started the Portugues from Lisbon one week after running my first marathon, (from couch to Marathon too), and I started with foot problems, that actually seems to pass the further along the route I got. After the Camino, and back to running, I had a lot of calf injury problems that I couldnt quite identify.

This years Camino ... 50 days on the Norte, I had foot pain across the top of my foot for the last two weeks, it continued for a month after my trip ended too .... and the running problems have come back.

I'm pretty sure I know what it is, achilles tendonosis, which is a thickening of the achilles, due to age related deterioration, or ... OVER-USE. Probably a mix of running and walking that has caused it.
I have very tight over developed calf muscles too and do a lot of stretching to keep them from pulling on my Achilles.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
An Xray was negative so stress fractures are ruled out.
As I understand it, many stress fractures are not detected by regular xrays. I have had a metatarsal stress fracture that was never extremely painful, but wouldn't let me walk more than 6-8 km without significant pain. I tried staying off it for up to 4 weeks, but it did not get better. The stress fracture was eventually confirmed by a bone scan (not regular x-ray). I did not wear a "boot" but I rigorously stayed off it for the recommended 6 weeks. (Virtually no walking more than the distance to the car. I wore soft crocs around the house.) It was hard to be patient - after 4 weeks, it was clearly not healed; after 5 weeks, it was improving but not there yet, after 6 weeks it was magically healed! Then I started training gradually over a couple of weeks, and a month later I started in SJPP and walked to Santiago with no problem. The secret with a stress fracture is to stay off it for 6 weeks!

After my last camino, I developed a mild but nagging soreness on the side of my arch that was different. Again I tried various rest periods, higher arch support, lower arch support, no arch support, sandals, different shoes, etc. The soreness remained for almost a year and I was worried about what would happen on my next camino. Finally I went to the podiatrist who thought I needed new orthotics with more support. I was skeptical, especially when I saw what a tiny difference there was in the shape of the arch support.. However, I have now been using them for 6 weeks and there is a significant improvement.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
My daughter in law, age 38, walked all of the Camino Frances in 2017 and developed plantar fasciitis near the end. She struggled with pain for a full year afterward if she did other hiking. She saw a foot doctor, used special insoles and tried different shoes to help, all with minimal results. She is now doing much better, finally.
 

Mycroft

Member
I am curious if anyone has experienced and been diagnosed with any foot problems post Camino. More specifically plantar fasciitis, forms of tendonitis or any other muscular or connective tissue ailments from overuse. My feet have been hurting since finishing a long Camino in early July. An Xray was negative so stress fractures are ruled out. I have had chiropractic and physiotherapy treatments and they have told me that my feet are beat up from all the walking and be patient and gentle with them. Haven't gone to a podiatrist since there would be a waiting period to see a specialist. Please understand I am not seeking medical advice here, only curious about the experiences of others.
Thankfully I've never had anything worse than the nails of one or both great toes loosening.
Which reminds me, do folk do morning stretches before starting back out on their Camino? I don't remember reading anything--just comments by some about getting up early and getting going. Over the years I don't recall seeing anyone stretching before they leave the albergues, but that could be because I wasn't around where they were stretching. Any special quickie stretches people recommend? I've been planning on doing some every morning.
 

Annemiek

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2005)
Camino Portugues (2019)
I am curious if anyone has experienced and been diagnosed with any foot problems post Camino. More specifically plantar fasciitis, forms of tendonitis or any other muscular or connective tissue ailments from overuse. My feet have been hurting since finishing a long Camino in early July. An Xray was negative so stress fractures are ruled out. I have had chiropractic and physiotherapy treatments and they have told me that my feet are beat up from all the walking and be patient and gentle with them. Haven't gone to a podiatrist since there would be a waiting period to see a specialist. Please understand I am not seeking medical advice here, only curious about the experiences of others.
After the Camino Frances from SJPP my feet hurt for months. During those months my feet shrunk back to their ‘normal’ size. The pain finally disappeared, slowly but gradually.
 

Deana

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning my first
2 months 5new pairs of shoes 2 trips to podiatrist massage With dr bronzers arnica just starting to come good after walking the Frances
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (July 2016), Primitivo (July 2018), Portuguese (March 2019)
I am curious if anyone has experienced and been diagnosed with any foot problems post Camino. More specifically plantar fasciitis, forms of tendonitis or any other muscular or connective tissue ailments from overuse. My feet have been hurting since finishing a long Camino in early July. An Xray was negative so stress fractures are ruled out. I have had chiropractic and physiotherapy treatments and they have told me that my feet are beat up from all the walking and be patient and gentle with them. Haven't gone to a podiatrist since there would be a waiting period to see a specialist. Please understand I am not seeking medical advice here, only curious about the experiences of others.
I finished the Camino Frances in April 2018 after messing up my distance calculations (in my head, I’m now a somewhat less arrogant mathematician) leaving my wife and I to complete an average of 32km per day from León. We walked through deep snow over O Cebreiro, stopped at Fonfria and my antics caused great amusement as I desperately tried to make it to dinner without touching the floor; the pain was impressive. We made it to Santiago on schedule but on returning to the UK I had a serious attack of gout followed by nearly six months of investigations to see what bones were broken (none), ligaments ripped (also none) and tendons torn (yet again, none). No plantar fasciitis, but I suspect lots and lots of deep tissue damage caused by walking 32km daily, much of which was on tarmac in boots. I’ve since walked many hundreds of miles on the Primitivo, on the Portuguese and on the Norte in beautifully padded running shoes and have had absolutely no problems whatsoever. Lesson learned. The moral : don’t walk in boots, don’t walk too far each day and it’ll all be fine given enough time to recuperate.
 

Anik2001

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: Camino Frances (2017), future: Frances again (2020)
Thankfully I've never had anything worse than the nails of one or both great toes loosening.
Which reminds me, do folk do morning stretches before starting back out on their Camino? I don't remember reading anything--just comments by some about getting up early and getting going. Over the years I don't recall seeing anyone stretching before they leave the albergues, but that could be because I wasn't around where they were stretching. Any special quickie stretches people recommend? I've been planning on doing some every morning.
After having plantar fasciitis while training for my first camino, I started to stretch every morning, even at home, not only on camino. My massage therapist and chiropractor both gave me exercises to do in the morning so I can walk without any problem. Each night on camino, I had to massage my calves and Achilles to be able to walk the next day.
 

jennysa

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino F 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 C Aragones 2012, 2017 2018 Via Francigena 2016 & 17 Primitivo 2018
I am curious if anyone has experienced and been diagnosed with any foot problems post Camino. More specifically plantar fasciitis, forms of tendonitis or any other muscular or connective tissue ailments from overuse. My feet have been hurting since finishing a long Camino in early July. An Xray was negative so stress fractures are ruled out. I have had chiropractic and physiotherapy treatments and they have told me that my feet are beat up from all the walking and be patient and gentle with them. Haven't gone to a podiatrist since there would be a waiting period to see a specialist. Please understand I am not seeking medical advice here, only curious about the experiences of others.
I got the tendonitis on the last 150 kms of my first Camino from going too fast. It started going up O'Cebreiro and I literally hobbled into Santiago as I was not going to give up at that stage. I went to a sports doctor on my return, and had a cortisone injection after a scan, then sent to a biokineticist for exercises to do. It took about 3 months to heal but I have never looked back.
 

JAO

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept 2018
I am curious if anyone has experienced and been diagnosed with any foot problems post Camino. More specifically plantar fasciitis, forms of tendonitis or any other muscular or connective tissue ailments from overuse. My feet have been hurting since finishing a long Camino in early July. An Xray was negative so stress fractures are ruled out. I have had chiropractic and physiotherapy treatments and they have told me that my feet are beat up from all the walking and be patient and gentle with them. Haven't gone to a podiatrist since there would be a waiting period to see a specialist. Please understand I am not seeking medical advice here, only curious about the experiences of others.
I walked the entire Camino Frances last Sept-Oct. I developed plantar facisitisBEFORE my walk, during training. My podiatrist helped me treat it ( physical therapy, first NSAIDs, then steroids, orthotics. I took 2 pairs of orthotics with me and switched them out halfway... they do get compressed! During the walk, physio taping my foot ( a helpful fellow Peregrina nurse from Melbourne showed me how) was a lifesaver. Any Farmacia in Spain carries it, and steroids are OTC too, but you need to be careful of these. My feet remained swollen, a good shoe size bigger, for 6-7 months afterwards. It took multiple pedicures to deal with the calluses. I can finally fit into my hiking boots again... just in time to start training for next year!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 2015
Pilgrims Way 2018
Via Francigena #1 Canterbury-Dover 2018
It’s late at night and I’m house/dog/horse sitting for a friend in the Adelaide Hills and the power has just gone off! so... plenty of time to post on my phone.

It was my Healing Camino (read all about it when you’ve an hour or so to spare) that brought me to the Forum in the first place - recovering from a navicular stress fracture suffered just before Orisson on day 1 of 44. Yes I walked the whole Way NOT recommended with this type of injury. I just got a lot slower :rolleyes:

Advice that xrays don’t show stress fractures is correct you’ll need more detailed imaging and a practioner who is experienced with this type of injury. This was 2015.

Moving on... in 2017, strong and fully rehabilitated after a year of shorter hikes, I walked Wainwright’s Coast to Coast. Wonderful walk, brilliant weather. Home 6 weeks walking across a park to the shops and I feel my other foot go :oops:!!!!@*#%!

Long story short and many weeks and treatments and puzzling symptoms and scans later - it would be another looonng thread 😬 - my fantastic Foot Doctor finally diagnosed Transient Regional Migratory Osteoporosis (TRMO) - a self-limiting, self-healing clinical entity of unknown cause.

Lots of research, many opinions, treatment consists of supporting affected joint until bone density re-establishes.

I recovered after 6 months and have gone on to successfully complete other long treks since.

Both my experiences taught me the importance of finding a practitioner experienced in sports injuries and, more importantly, to champion your own perceptions of your injury and challenge diagnosis that don’t sit right. Specialists were leaning towards Regional Pain Syndrome and it would have been a very dark and different journey if I had accepted that.

After all it’s you inhabiting your body so best placed to know when something is wrong.

All the best for your healing. Listen to your body, be patient and gentle with yourself and seek out the best medical help that is available.
 

MarkyD

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 31/08/2018 - 20/10/2018
Thankfully I've never had anything worse than the nails of one or both great toes loosening.
Which reminds me, do folk do morning stretches before starting back out on their Camino? I don't remember reading anything--just comments by some about getting up early and getting going. Over the years I don't recall seeing anyone stretching before they leave the albergues, but that could be because I wasn't around where they were stretching. Any special quickie stretches people recommend? I've been planning on doing some every morning.
I did some basic Chi Gung type exercises before setting out from the albergue each morning - the eight pieces of brocade. It takes about 12 mins to complete. It helped my back, waist, arms and legs. Then after walking for about 15 mins, or when I felt my legs were warmed up, I would do some basic stretching for another 5 to 10 mins: the usual stuff, calfs, hamstrings, groin - nothing strenuous or forced, just light stretching, plus some gentle ankle, knee and hip rotations.
What I didn't do at first, was to warm up my legs, especially calfs and shins after stopping for a break for more than 15 mins. I think this contributed to shin splint injury the first 15 days - that and walking too quickly and too far at the beginning. I learnt my lesson the hard way, the Camino Way I suppose.
By the time I hobbled into León and took a 3 day break I was starting to get better. Once I got started again I included the break time warm ups and never got shin splints again.
Keep well hydrated and maintain electrolyte levels to aid muscle recovery each day. It's only walking, but it's day after day, carrying a load, often in the heat; so go steady and don't rush to keep up with anyone - go at your own pace. Wherever you're heading each day, it isn't going anywhere. So, if you don't make it there, then you'll be somewhere else instead, which will be where you're meant to be.
Buen Camino Peregrin@
 

Micah26

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France's (2018)
Hi all,

I walked my first camino last year. Midway, I developed pain on top of my left foot which the pharmacists said was common. I took anti-inflammatories and rested for 5 days but it really didn’t feel any better. So I stumbled in and finished. When I got back home I did have an MRI result extensor tendinitis. Took almost a year to be totally healed.
 

Sho

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés, 2019
I did everything right, but the descent from Roncesvalles caused blisters under two toenails. Despite draining and bandaging, I did lose both nails en route. I have one loose nail on the other foot. Other than that, my toes would sometimes get sore across the top where they meet the foot after 15+ km walking. Ibuprofen helped. The edges of both soles developed numb calluses from the seam where my boots and my insoles met. After a week at home, my feet are still a bit numb in places, but softening back up. We shall learn tonight whether I can do Zumba with missing nails.
 

brambles

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Inca (2018)
Camino Frances (June/July 2019)
I am curious if anyone has experienced and been diagnosed with any foot problems post Camino. More specifically plantar fasciitis, forms of tendonitis or any other muscular or connective tissue ailments from overuse. My feet have been hurting since finishing a long Camino in early July. An Xray was negative so stress fractures are ruled out. I have had chiropractic and physiotherapy treatments and they have told me that my feet are beat up from all the walking and be patient and gentle with them. Haven't gone to a podiatrist since there would be a waiting period to see a specialist. Please understand I am not seeking medical advice here, only curious about the experiences of others.
Returned from the CF on 8/1 and I finally saw a podiatrist yesterday and he gave me an injection in my right foot and a brace to wear at night to keep my plantar extended. I had a pretty bad case of plantar fasciitis and tendonitis? In my right foot and ankle about the time I got to Leon. I honestly can hardly believe I made it to Santiago and now I still feel like I'm walking around with Camino war wounds or something. It is a bit depressing to be honest not to mention a bit expensive to treat.
 

Mycroft

Member
I did some basic Chi Gung type exercises before setting out from the albergue each morning - the eight pieces of brocade. It takes about 12 mins to complete. It helped my back, waist, arms and legs. Then after walking for about 15 mins, or when I felt my legs were warmed up, I would do some basic stretching for another 5 to 10 mins: the usual stuff, calfs, hamstrings, groin - nothing strenuous or forced, just light stretching, plus some gentle ankle, knee and hip rotations.
What I didn't do at first, was to warm up my legs, especially calfs and shins after stopping for a break for more than 15 mins. I think this contributed to shin splint injury the first 15 days - that and walking too quickly and too far at the beginning. I learnt my lesson the hard way, the Camino Way I suppose.
By the time I hobbled into León and took a 3 day break I was starting to get better. Once I got started again I included the break time warm ups and never got shin splints again.
Keep well hydrated and maintain electrolyte levels to aid muscle recovery each day. It's only walking, but it's day after day, carrying a load, often in the heat; so go steady and don't rush to keep up with anyone - go at your own pace. Wherever you're heading each day, it isn't going anywhere. So, if you don't make it there, then you'll be somewhere else instead, which will be where you're meant to be.
Buen Camino Peregrin@
Well said, MarkyD. Thanks.
 

Montana Jayne

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2015 - Camino Frances
? Camino Ingles
On the CF in 2015 I developed plantar fasciitis after Castrojeriz and it was so painful! I took buses and my husband was able to finish on foot. We walked into SdC together, we just had different caminos. When I returned home (US) I bought a FUTURO Night Foot support. I wore it every night for 5 weeks and it was amazingly effective. I used it because a lady who suffered from PF told me it was a "magic cure" for her. Might work for others.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013)
San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
.

It was my Healing Camino (read all about it when you’ve an hour or so to spare) that brought me to the Forum in the first place - recovering from a navicular stress fracture suffered just before Orisson on day 1 of 44. Yes I walked the whole Way NOT recommended with this type of injury. I just got a lot slower :rolleyes:

Advice that xrays don’t show stress fractures is correct you’ll need more detailed imaging and a practioner who is experienced with this type of injury. This was 2015.

Moving on... in 2017, strong and fully rehabilitated after a year of shorter hikes, I walked Wainwright’s Coast to Coast. Wonderful walk, brilliant weather. Home 6 weeks walking across a park to the shops and I feel my other foot go :oops:!!!!@*#%!

Long story short and many weeks and treatments and puzzling symptoms and scans later - it would be another looonng thread 😬 - my fantastic Foot Doctor finally diagnosed Transient Regional Migratory Osteoporosis (TRMO) - a self-limiting, self-healing clinical entity of unknown cause.

Lots of research, many opinions, treatment consists of supporting affected joint until bone density re-establishes.

I recovered after 6 months and have gone on to successfully complete other long treks since.

Both my experiences taught me the importance of finding a practitioner experienced in sports injuries and, more importantly, to champion your own perceptions of your injury and challenge diagnosis that don’t sit right. Specialists were leaning towards Regional Pain Syndrome and it would have been a very dark and different journey if I had accepted that.

After all it’s you inhabiting your body so best placed to know when something is wrong.

All the best for your healing. Listen to your body, be patient and gentle with yourself and seek out the best medical help that is available.
[/QUOTE]
It did not take me an hour, but you sure went through the wringer! Apart from the long story of your journey back to healing, I see that you probably travelled to Australia on the £10.00.00 Assisted Passage deal from UK! That was my plan, but I didn’t make it... still over here off the Continent. I hope you have many more kms to walk in the present and future...
 

akula415

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Fraces, Sarria to Santiago de Compostela, July 2019
I had a lot of things to begin with. Back issues etc. I brought a mini foam roller to use on the back and calves. Everyone tends to talk about the blisters on the feet, which my travelling friend did have (several in fact). We had to make stops at the local pharmacist to get the appropriate things for relief. One thing that I myself did experience were pains and blisters in the hand. Obviously it was from gripping the trekking poles while walking. Silly American, it took me three days into the walk to figure out that the cushions right under the hand part of the poles could be used when your hands got blisters. I never looked. Boy did I feel silly.
 

MichaelF4

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese Coastal 2017
Camino Frances 2018
Camino Frances, Camino Invierno 2019
Returned from the CF on 8/1 and I finally saw a podiatrist yesterday and he gave me an injection in my right foot and a brace to wear at night to keep my plantar extended. I had a pretty bad case of plantar fasciitis and tendonitis? In my right foot and ankle about the time I got to Leon. I honestly can hardly believe I made it to Santiago and now I still feel like I'm walking around with Camino war wounds or something. It is a bit depressing to be honest not to mention a bit expensive to treat.
I understand those sentiments exactly. The frustration of feeling like you're dealing with 'war wounds', the healing time and yes the expense.
 

Juspassinthrough

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, May-June (2017)
Ingles, June (2019
Leon-Sarria, June (2019)
Le Puy-Santiago (2023)
Sorry to hear about your foot pain, after doing the CF, I did have some numb toes for a while but other than that, no problem. Hope you find some relief.
 

MarkyD

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 31/08/2018 - 20/10/2018
I am curious if anyone has experienced and been diagnosed with any foot problems post Camino. More specifically plantar fasciitis, forms of tendonitis or any other muscular or connective tissue ailments from overuse. My feet have been hurting since finishing a long Camino in early July. An Xray was negative so stress fractures are ruled out. I have had chiropractic and physiotherapy treatments and they have told me that my feet are beat up from all the walking and be patient and gentle with them. Haven't gone to a podiatrist since there would be a waiting period to see a specialist. Please understand I am not seeking medical advice here, only curious about the experiences of others.
No problems, fortunately, although the soles of my feet felt tender whenever I walked anywhere. But after about a month or so it became less and less noticeable. I think it was partly due to walking in a city again on hard concrete, even though I walked much less than on the Camino.
 

JohnMcM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some, and with luck, some more.
I am curious if anyone has experienced and been diagnosed with any foot problems post Camino. More specifically plantar fasciitis, forms of tendonitis or any other muscular or connective tissue ailments from overuse. My feet have been hurting since finishing a long Camino in early July. An Xray was negative so stress fractures are ruled out. I have had chiropractic and physiotherapy treatments and they have told me that my feet are beat up from all the walking and be patient and gentle with them. Haven't gone to a podiatrist since there would be a waiting period to see a specialist. Please understand I am not seeking medical advice here, only curious about the experiences of others.
Yep!
Finished first half of the VdlP at the start of June this year.
No problems walking.
On return home some dull pain in right heel.
Gradually got worse and most painful first thing in the morning ,obviously it's plantar fasciitis.
Still have it, no change despite exercises, rest and all the potential remedies short of injections and surgery.
Can't go for a walk and feeling sad.

Hope it gets better soon.
 

MichaelF4

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese Coastal 2017
Camino Frances 2018
Camino Frances, Camino Invierno 2019
Yep!
Finished first half of the VdlP at the start of June this year.
No problems walking.
On return home some dull pain in right heel.
Gradually got worse and most painful first thing in the morning ,obviously it's plantar fasciitis.
Still have it, no change despite exercises, rest and all the potential remedies short of injections and surgery.
Can't go for a walk and feeling sad.

Hope it gets better soon.
I have had achilles tendonitis and bursitis issues. Sometimes the bursitis almost acted like plantar fasciitis in pain surrounding the heal because the achilles bursa was inflamed by tight plantar fascia and tight calf muscles. Good luck with yours.
 

MichaelF4

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese Coastal 2017
Camino Frances 2018
Camino Frances, Camino Invierno 2019
I am curious if anyone has experienced and been diagnosed with any foot problems post Camino. More specifically plantar fasciitis, forms of tendonitis or any other muscular or connective tissue ailments from overuse. My feet have been hurting since finishing a long Camino in early July. An Xray was negative so stress fractures are ruled out. I have had chiropractic and physiotherapy treatments and they have told me that my feet are beat up from all the walking and be patient and gentle with them. Haven't gone to a podiatrist since there would be a waiting period to see a specialist. Please understand I am not seeking medical advice here, only curious about the experiences of others.
Thank you everyone for your replies. It has certainly given me some perspective and context about my own foot problems post Camino. I was quite concerned I had done serious and possibly irreversible damage to my feet walking almost 1200 kms on one rest day. This Camino has taught me some lessons about caring for myself, the importance of rest and the importance of not pushing yourself or letting others influence your decisions.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 2015
Pilgrims Way 2018
Via Francigena #1 Canterbury-Dover 2018
.

It was my Healing Camino (read all about it when you’ve an hour or so to spare) that brought me to the Forum in the first place - recovering from a navicular stress fracture suffered just before Orisson on day 1 of 44. Yes I walked the whole Way NOT recommended with this type of injury. I just got a lot slower :rolleyes:

Advice that xrays don’t show stress fractures is correct you’ll need more detailed imaging and a practioner who is experienced with this type of injury. This was 2015.

Moving on... in 2017, strong and fully rehabilitated after a year of shorter hikes, I walked Wainwright’s Coast to Coast. Wonderful walk, brilliant weather. Home 6 weeks walking across a park to the shops and I feel my other foot go :oops:!!!!@*#%!

Long story short and many weeks and treatments and puzzling symptoms and scans later - it would be another looonng thread 😬 - my fantastic Foot Doctor finally diagnosed Transient Regional Migratory Osteoporosis (TRMO) - a self-limiting, self-healing clinical entity of unknown cause.

Lots of research, many opinions, treatment consists of supporting affected joint until bone density re-establishes.

I recovered after 6 months and have gone on to successfully complete other long treks since.

Both my experiences taught me the importance of finding a practitioner experienced in sports injuries and, more importantly, to champion your own perceptions of your injury and challenge diagnosis that don’t sit right. Specialists were leaning towards Regional Pain Syndrome and it would have been a very dark and different journey if I had accepted that.

After all it’s you inhabiting your body so best placed to know when something is wrong.

All the best for your healing. Listen to your body, be patient and gentle with yourself and seek out the best medical help that is available.
It did not take me an hour, but you sure went through the wringer! Apart from the long story of your journey back to healing, I see that you probably travelled to Australia on the £10.00.00 Assisted Passage deal from UK! That was my plan, but I didn’t make it... still over here off the Continent. I hope you have many more kms to walk in the present and future...
[/QUOTE]
Thanks lots of kms/miles planned ;)
We did immigrate to Australia in the 60s but paid our own way as my parents had settled in England post war & for several reasons didn’t qualify for assisted passage.
 

Carmel L

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Completed CF Oct 2017. C.Portuguese Sept 2019
Yep MichaelF! I walked my first camino in 2017 with a plantar facititis! ( Just stubborn I guess) and developed knee pain before Sarria ( thank goodness for the trekking poles!). Two years on, lots of physio, acupunture and an arthroscopy with patellar release and very slow walking to build strength, I am about to start my 2nd by the end of this week - the CP from Porto. I guess I will never walk as quickly as I used to, but so what! So the message is .. time will heal it . Be patient. And to this day, every morning when I sit and have my first cup of tea before doing anything else, I roll a spiked ball under each foot to stretch the ligaments. A tennis ball is already in my pack ready to go.. and of course the dreaded stretches. Must be done, a chore no less but necessary. Good luck in the months to come with your healing. Cheers Carmel L
 

Robyn Scott

Robyn
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017 September (2019)
I am curious if anyone has experienced and been diagnosed with any foot problems post Camino. More specifically plantar fasciitis, forms of tendonitis or any other muscular or connective tissue ailments from overuse. My feet have been hurting since finishing a long Camino in early July. An Xray was negative so stress fractures are ruled out. I have had chiropractic and physiotherapy treatments and they have told me that my feet are beat up from all the walking and be patient and gentle with them. Haven't gone to a podiatrist since there would be a waiting period to see a specialist. Please understand I am not seeking medical advice here, only curious about the experiences of others.
The ball of my left foot was swollen for a year (I kid you not) after my Camino. It wasn't painful really, just ached now and then. My foot was xrayed with no bone damage visible so it was assumed that it was deep tissue damage.The swelling
disappeared eventually.
 

PMSLAW

Recovering (retired) Lawyer
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013), Portuguese (2018)
I walked SJPP to Santiago in 2013. I began experiencing ankle pain early on after over extending myself one day. I should have taken a rest day or two but I continued to push hard, took ibuprofen for the pain that would not resolve and used ice when available. I completed the Camino and returned to the States. 5 days later my posterior tibial tendon finally gave out in a complete rupture. Reconstructive surgery and 6 months recovery followed. The ankle will never be 100%... maybe 95%. The moral I learned is to listen to your body, and in my case my wife as well.
 

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