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Gear report II, from the perspective of a 60 yr old woman

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature line for links to daily posts to blogs from many caminos
Following the enthusiastic reception of @Jo Jo 's report on gear, I thought I would post mine.

This comes from the perspective of a mature woman who had no previous hiking experience. Before I walked the Camino Frances in 2013 I did lots of research on this and other forums, drinking in the knowledge from experienced pilgrims. I came from a point of absolutely no experience and had to buy every piece of clothing and equipment I needed to take with me. I ended up with a very successful pack list, and with the experience I gained walking from SJPP to Santiago and on to Muxia and Finisterre, I was able to make various tweaks for last year's Camino Portuguese, which I walked from Lisbon, commencing 2 May 2014.

I published the following Assessment of clothes and walking gear 2014 in my blog in June 2014 after completing the CP. I was expecting warm weather and packed accordingly. The Camino Frances at the same time of year is likely to be rather cooler. My original assessment of items taken on the CF in April/May 2013 can be seen here.

Weights are not included in this report but can be seen in my packing list (link below). So, here goes - I hope it is useful - and I welcome any questions or comments.....

The report below is rather long and detailed. I have been asked so many questions about clothes and gear that I thought I would be a bit thorough. My updated 2014 packing list (including all weights) can be seen here

As an overview, I have reported on the following items, and will make a separate post on technology.

1 Boots and insoles
2 Rain jacket
3 Hiking pants
4 Fleece
5 Visor and Buff
6 Gloves
7 T-shirts
8 Socks
9 Underwear
10 Relaxing / down time clothes
11 Backpack
12 Pack rain cover / cape
13 Walking poles
14 Hydration system
15 Bum bag / waist pack
16 Sleeping stuff

1 New bootsMerrell Moab[/U] ventilators.
My Mammut boots from last year felt like a great fit (although I had blisters), but the soles and heels wore down considerably during the camino Frances. The Merrells gave me no problems in training and were comfortable straight from the box, even though they feel a bit wide for my feet and I feel my feet slip about a bit in them. I purchased some replacement insoles from Decathlon, to give me a bit more padding under the balls of my feet.



The first few days were fine, but I picked up a blister during day 6, a 36 km day, which I believe was due to the ridges of padding on the insole being in the wrong place for my foot. I got an identical blister on the other foot towards the end of my walk. The only other foot problems I had were a small blister on the side of each heel, deep blisters which formed under the skin and are difficult to manage because the sack of fluid is below the surface and can’t be reached without some very uncomfortable deep prodding with a needle. I think these must be caused by compression rather than friction – from all the pounding on hard surfaces, but they weren’t big so I just left them alone until they started to cause considerable discomfort during the last couple of days when I applied compeed plasters which stayed in place until I returned home. All in all a much less painful blister experience than last year. I would use replacement insoles in future, but a style without separate areas of padding.

2 New rain jacket – Berghaus
Purely for cosmetic reasons. I was going through a turquoise phase last year and I couldn’t face another journey blending with the sky. My new jacket is a ‘Berghaus Arkleton Shell’ gortex and I love it. It is a very discrete cream colour, looks smart and washes beautifully. It hardly saw the light of day until I reached Porto and then I wore it for some part of every day and all day on a few occasions. It doesn’t have the long ‘pit zips’ that my North Face jacket has, but I discovered that if I pulled up the sleeves to above my elbows, so that my bare forearms were exposed, this regulated my body temperature and I didn’t overheat with my jacket on. I employed this trick most of the time, it didn’t matter if my arms got wet, it was rather refreshing.



I also made a slight adjustment to the jacket – by cutting a small hole in each pocket so that I could thread my backpack waist straps through to fasten inside my jacket, which, in conjunction with my adjusted backpack rain cover, meant that there were no areas of my jacket where pack straps were exposed to the rain. It is my theory that where straps sit on an otherwise waterproof jacket they will rub against the fabric and somehow allow the ingress of water, as was my experience last year.

3 New hiking pants
One of my two bargain basement pairs of trousers from last year is very practical but a bit heavy. The other pair was awful and has been relegated to gardening duties. This year I found a fab pair of Ex Officio zip off pants (BugsAway Convertible Ziwa Pant) that are really light weight with all pockets in the right places.



There was only one pair in the (outlet) shop so I did something I never do (ie buy trousers without trying them on) and ordered the same make, same size, but slightly different style over the phone. Unfortunately, as you may have guessed, they are not the same fit. They are a bit low waisted, and to be honest, a bit tight. And to make things worse, they have a press stud fastening. Now we all know that a tight fit and press studs are not happy bedfellows and as I didn’t want to be popping all the way along the camino, I left them behind. So just one pair of hiking pants this year, although I have brought a comfortable stretch skirt and a pair of cargo pants that I can also wear for walking if necessary. In my opinion the most important thing about hiking pants is the placement of pockets – wrist height side pockets are all I really use – one side for sunglasses when not in use, and the other side for my phone (before I smashed it). I used the waist pocket to keep a tissue, but thankfully I wasn’t blowing my nose every five minutes as I was last year.

These pants were great, they dried in no time and were washed fairly frequently for the first couple of weeks – before the rain. But I dont think I actually washed them at all once it started raining. Whenever they got a bit muddy around the ankles and I thought I would have to give them a scrub, they miraculously seemed to self clean by the time I arrived at my destination, so I didn’t bother. They also got drenched a few times in the rain, but seemed to dry instantly once the rain stopped.

4 Fleece
For a mid layer last year I took a ultra lightweight down body warmer and sleeves cut from a fleece that I tucked up into my t-shirt sleeves. The sleeves worked really well – I put them on most mornings and could remove them when the temperature rose without having to take off my pack. The body warmer was slightly less of a success. I didn’t wear it a great deal for walking because I don’t need much warmth on my torso, but on the occasions when I did wear it under my raincoat I found that duck down was not great, it did not wick moisture and quickly became damp or wet. But the system in general of separate sleeves and body warmer worked well for me.

So this year I searched the internet and finally sourced a lightweight fleece with zip off sleeves. It wasn’t quite perfect because I couldn’t manage to unzip the sleeves whilst I was wearing the garment, but this wasn’t really an issue because I hardly wore the complete garment whilst walking, I simply used the sleeves as I had last year, tucked into my t-shirt, and either with or without my raincoat, I could pull them off when the time was right and tuck them into the side pocket of my pack or hang them from my waist pack.



In the evenings I wore the complete garment many times and was very pleased with it, very cosy and lightweight. I purchased it over the internet after talking at length with the very helpful customer service staff who not only weighed the item for me, but tried the garment on to give me a good idea of the fit. This is a useful item that will get lots of wear.

5 Visor and Buff infinity
I used the same home made visor every step of the way, brilliant for keeping my hair off my face, shielding my eyes and face from the sun and mopping my brow.

I also used my ‘infinity’ buff to keep the sun off my neck. Last year I used the long buff to tuck under my backpack shoulder straps where they bruised my collar bones. This year I copied an idea I had seen and purchased a couple of bath sponges, popped them into the feet of a pair of tights, cut and tied the ends and pinned them under the straps to alleviate the pressure. It worked a treat – no bruises – hurrah!



The buff was fabulous when it was very hot. I soaked it in water, wrapped it around my head to protect my scalp from the sun, and around the back of my neck to act as an instant cooling system. It gives an instant pick-me-up and puts the spring back in my step. Very highly recommended.

6 Gloves
I carried a thin pair of liner gloves and left the warmer fleece gloves at home. I used the gloves several times, in the early morning when it could be a bit chilly. I think it is useful to have a pair of lightweight gloves whatever time of year you are walking, especially if you use hiking poles and your hands are constantly exposed to the weather.

7 T-shirts
These have remained the same. Merino wool short sleeved x 2, and long sleeved x 1. At the last minute I decided to leave the long sleeve shirt at home, and didn’t regret it. I could have made good use of a sleeveless merino vest top during the hotter early days and will consider this if/when I walk again. Merino wool is brilliant – it can be worn for days without getting whiffy and dries surprisingly quickly. They did get washed regularly, but I knew that if drying was not an option I could wear one for several days without offending anyone!

8 Socks
Last year I followed advice and wore thin merino wool liners and thicker Merino hiking socks. I got blisters! I stopped wearing two pairs about half way through my walk and didn’t get any more blisters. Who knows! I think probably my feet had acclimatised by then and if I had continued to wear two pairs I would still have been blister-free. However I started this year’s training with just hiking socks and continued throughout the camino. I bought two new pairs of socks, 70% merino smartwool mini style, that just come to my ankle. I did not like the bulk of mid socks that I always turn down anyway.



I bought these new socks a size smaller and they are a comfortable but snug fit and I have not felt the ‘bunching’ under my toes that I felt last year. I did take a pair of liner socks, but didn’t use them, and also a pair of plain black ankle socks for evening wear if required.

9 Underwear
My trusty merino wool knickers kept me comfortable every day. Like all merino wool they wick away any sweat and remain odourless, no matter how hot or long the walk has been. I bought two pairs of these pants last year from a uk company, appropriately called Finisterre, and they were worn every day on the Frances, are called into service every time I ride my horse (3 or 4 times a week) and have now kept me comfortable along the camino Portuguese. There is little sign of wear, other than the waist elastic has stretched a bit, but I can see them lasting a whole lot longer. What I considered a complete extravagance when I bought them have turned out to be a sound investment.



I also bought new this year two ‘tri-action’ sports bras by Truimph. One black and one white. Two black would have been more useful (hand washing doesn’t keep whites very white!) They were very comfortable but didn’t dry very quickly. They will also get plenty of use throughout the year when I ride and walk locally.

10 Relaxing clothes
A new pair of black crocs, the same style as I wore last year. I hadn’t experienced crocs before I bought these last year – it was a revelation – so very comfortable, and this style is acceptable for every day wear, in fact I have worn them practically every day throughout the year. My original pair were multi coloured and quite pretty (I get lots of compliments about them), but they didn’t look quite so pretty when I had to wear them with socks because it was unexpectedly cold in the evenings. So this year I treated myself to a plain black pair which were just about acceptable if I had to don a pair of black socks.



Other downtime items consisted of
– lightweight 3/4 length cargo pants that I could have worn for walking if necessary.
– Ancient knee length skirt, very comfortable, and worn most evenings
– Vest tops x 2, one worn for sleeping. On a couple of occasions worn for hiking on hot days.
– Cardigan, very lightweight
– Knickers x 1 (next time I will take at least two pairs, they weigh virtually nothing and one pair just isn’t enough)
– Two pairs of short lightweight socks, little worn, as it was generally warm enough for bare feet in the evenings.
– Footless tights, worn just a couple of times with skirt for a little extra warmth, but could have been worn for sleeping or under hiking pants on cold days if necessary.
– Bag for evenings, extra lightweight, waterproof shoulder bag. Used for valuables in the evening, for shopping bag, for clothes and valuables when showering. Folds up into tiny pouch. Very useful.

Overall I was very pleased with my choice of down-time clothes, they were perfect for the weather, but could have been layered up for colder weather if necessary. It was very nice to get out of trousers and wear a skirt in the evenings.

11 Backpack
remains the same – osprey Exos 34 litre, but with the addition this year of the padding for my collar bones as described above. It works – it ain’t broke – so I didn’t fix it!



12 Backpack rain cover
Ok, so I have explained my theory that pack straps on waterproof jacket cause that area not to be waterproof. This theory was developed through personal experience of walking in the rain in a waterproof jacket and getting soaked inside the jacket. I had decided to take a poncho this year, although I hate the look and the thought of them. But they serve their purpose, they completely cover the backpack (straps included) and therefore you should stay dry inside, except that they are normally not very breathable and so a lot of humidity is caused through sweat and some people prefer to be wet through rain rather than through sweat.

I then began to think about making a mini poncho that I could attach to the backpack rain cover and extend over my shoulders to cover the straps and tuck in somewhere at the front. Meanwhile I purchased a rain cover because I had borrowed my daughter’s last year and had returned it to her. When I took the cover out of its integral stuff sack I could immediately see that it was way too big for my pack – I had mistakenly picked up a cover for an 80 litre pack rather than the 34 litre pack that I would be carrying. Brain cells began to activate :idea: and I thought that I could make something good out of this mistake rather than returning the cover to the shop.

I had a willing assistant because Ella was visiting at the time and between us we fashioned the ‘super-duper Maggie shoulder cape’. I was tempted to trial it at home when it poured with rain a week or so before I left for my camino, but nobody actually chooses to walk in the rain, and in the end I chose to trust to luck rather than take part in soggy research, so it wasn’t until I left Porto that I discovered I was on to a winner – my SDMSC functioned perfectly, and was put to good use many times during the last part of my camino Portuguese! (And I didn’t look quite so daft as the ‘full poncho pilgrims’ – unless you tell me differently, of course!)



13 Walking poles
I need say no more than ‘Pacer Poles‘. They are so comfortable to use. I don’t have experience of any other type, and don’t feel the need to try.



14 Hydration system
Last year, after researching, I purchased water bladder – a bag made from some sort of plastic/rubber material that sits in a special compartment of the backpack and has a tube that threads through and sits somewhere near your shoulder with a bite valve at the end of the tube through which you suck water as and when required. I don’t like this system for various reasons……
The extra weight in the backpack – one kilo per litre
The need to remove and undo the pack to refill
Not being able to see how much you have drunk and how much remains



















But on the plus side the suction tube is good because it is convenient to use.

I much prefer to drink from a bottle and carry the weight from my waist pack, and so modified a ‘Raidlight’ bottle intended to be carried on the shoulder strap by substituting a longer suction tube that I could reach from a waist position.

This worked well. I could refill without removing my pack and carried an additional 750 ml bottle in the side pocket of my backpack. It only ceased to work well when it rained and I couldn’t fit the bottle inside my rain jacket along with my waist pack. So for the final stages from Porto when it rained every day I then carried the drinking bottle in the other side pocket of my back pack and could still reach the tube. On reflection I think carrying the bottle via the shoulder strap might be a good idea and will try it on my next camino.

15 [/B]
My faithful friend from the last couple of years has accompanied me on all my ryanair flights where, until recently, no handbag was allowed, and it could be hidden away under a coat or jumper. This leather bag has also been used when horse riding and local trekking to carry all the paraphernalia necessary to keep two animals and one human replenished and safe, ie dog biscuits, snacks, hoof pick, camera, phone, tissues, etc, etc.

Understandably, it was looking a bit sad and worn after so much use, so I treated myself to a new one. I looked long and hard to try to find the perfect combination of pockets and compartments, and finally realised that I already had it. So I ordered an identical replacement.



The sturdy webbing strap is strong enough to carry water bottles, and I sewed on an additional safety strap in case the buckle failed (which it didn’t, as it happens). The phone pocket is not large enough for the new iPhone, but this was not an issue – I used the pocket for tissues and lip salve. The small pocket at the front held my cash, the compartment behind was perfect for my camera, then a larger compartment housed a waterproof wallet for passport, credencial, bank cards and extra cash, with plenty of room left for painkillers, ear phones, hair band and clips, and my iPhone when it was raining and I didn’t want to keep it in my pants pocket. The last compartment at the back of the bag carried my external battery pack and charging leads. So everything I needed was completely accessible at all times.

During the second part of my trip when I was walking alone from Porto to Santiago, I wanted to also keep my iPad mini accessible, and I drilled some holes into the bag with my pen knife and attached two carabiners, from which I hung my ipad carry case (as I had done last year). To do this the case zip had to be open so I kept the ipad in a ziplock bag to keep it safe from moisture and I also carried my map and guide book pages tucked into the carry case, so another multi-tasking item. As mentioned above in the hydration section, I also hung my water bottle from the belt for most of my journey.

The bag was quite heavy, but I don’t seem to feel the weight hanging from my waist as I would do on my shoulders. It suits me very well.

16 Sleeping stuff
Sleeping bag is new. I swapped the synthetic mummy shaped bag weighing 850 grams for a super duper Mont Bell spiral down thermal sheet weighing 430 grams. The new bag completely unzips to be used as a quilt and packs down into a tiny compression sack. The fabric of the new bag is cut on the bias (hence the name ‘spiral’) and so allows for more movement and stretching than a traditional straight cut bag. It was my biggest single expense, I love it. Didn’t need it much during the first couple of weeks when we mostly stayed in hostels that provided bedding (including sheets and towels), but from Porto it was in use most nights and was wonderfully comfortable. Did I say ‘I love it’? I can imagine getting regular use from the bag as a comforter at home, as an extra layer on a cold night – so light weight, but so warm and cosy. I love it!



I also took my silk liner. One night I cut it open at the bottom seam so that my feet are not so restricted and was rewarded with instant freedom. Both items were treated with permethrin before leaving. I also took a pre-treated under sheet[/U] which I bought last year. If I was buying this item with the knowledge I now have, I would have purchased the double as opposed to the rather undersized single. It gives an extra layer of security against the dreaded bed bugs (which I have yet to see).

I bought an inflatable pillow for this camino. I only used it once. It wasn’t comfortable. Don’t bother!
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
“It’s your road, and yours alone. Others may walk it with you, but no one can walk it for you.” Rumi
Very nice! I like your backpack cover, smart thinking. What is the total weight of your backpack? Just curious since I'm trying to keep my backpack to a minimum weight.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
Really appreciate the time and effort it took to put this together. Thanks for sharing!
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
Following the enthusiastic reception of @Jo Jo 's report on gear, I thought I would post mine.

This comes from the perspective of a mature woman who had no previous hiking experience. Before I walked the Camino Frances in 2013 I did lots of research on this and other forums, drinking in the knowledge from experienced pilgrims. I came from a point of absolutely no experience and had to buy every piece of clothing and equipment I needed to take with me. I ended up with a very successful pack list, and with the experience I gained walking from SJPP to Santiago and on to Muxia and Finisterre, I was able to make various tweaks for last year's Camino Portuguese, which I walked from Lisbon, commencing 2 May 2014.

I published the following Assessment of clothes and walking gear 2014 in my blog in June 2014 after completing the CP. I was expecting warm weather and packed accordingly. The Camino Frances at the same time of year is likely to be rather cooler. My original assessment of items taken on the CF in April/May 2013 can be seen here.

Weights are not included in this report but can be seen in my packing list (link below). So, here goes - I hope it is useful - and I welcome any questions or comments.....

The report below is rather long and detailed. I have been asked so many questions about clothes and gear that I thought I would be a bit thorough. My updated 2014 packing list (including all weights) can be seen here

As an overview, I have reported on the following items, and will make a separate post on technology.

1 Boots and insoles
2 Rain jacket
3 Hiking pants
4 Fleece
5 Visor and Buff
6 Gloves
7 T-shirts
8 Socks
9 Underwear
10 Relaxing / down time clothes
11 Backpack
12 Pack rain cover / cape
13 Walking poles
14 Hydration system
15 Bum bag / waist pack
16 Sleeping stuff

1 New bootsMerrell Moab ventilators.
My Mammut boots from last year felt like a great fit (although I had blisters), but the soles and heels wore down considerably during the camino Frances. The Merrells gave me no problems in training and were comfortable straight from the box, even though they feel a bit wide for my feet and I feel my feet slip about a bit in them. I purchased some replacement insoles from Decathlon, to give me a bit more padding under the balls of my feet.



The first few days were fine, but I picked up a blister during day 6, a 36 km day, which I believe was due to the ridges of padding on the insole being in the wrong place for my foot. I got an identical blister on the other foot towards the end of my walk. The only other foot problems I had were a small blister on the side of each heel, deep blisters which formed under the skin and are difficult to manage because the sack of fluid is below the surface and can’t be reached without some very uncomfortable deep prodding with a needle. I think these must be caused by compression rather than friction – from all the pounding on hard surfaces, but they weren’t big so I just left them alone until they started to cause considerable discomfort during the last couple of days when I applied compeed plasters which stayed in place until I returned home. All in all a much less painful blister experience than last year. I would use replacement insoles in future, but a style without separate areas of padding.

2 New rain jacket – Berghaus
Purely for cosmetic reasons. I was going through a turquoise phase last year and I couldn’t face another journey blending with the sky. My new jacket is a ‘Berghaus Arkleton Shell’ gortex and I love it. It is a very discrete cream colour, looks smart and washes beautifully. It hardly saw the light of day until I reached Porto and then I wore it for some part of every day and all day on a few occasions. It doesn’t have the long ‘pit zips’ that my North Face jacket has, but I discovered that if I pulled up the sleeves to above my elbows, so that my bare forearms were exposed, this regulated my body temperature and I didn’t overheat with my jacket on. I employed this trick most of the time, it didn’t matter if my arms got wet, it was rather refreshing.



I also made a slight adjustment to the jacket – by cutting a small hole in each pocket so that I could thread my backpack waist straps through to fasten inside my jacket, which, in conjunction with my adjusted backpack rain cover, meant that there were no areas of my jacket where pack straps were exposed to the rain. It is my theory that where straps sit on an otherwise waterproof jacket they will rub against the fabric and somehow allow the ingress of water, as was my experience last year.

3 New hiking pants
One of my two bargain basement pairs of trousers from last year is very practical but a bit heavy. The other pair was awful and has been relegated to gardening duties. This year I found a fab pair of Ex Officio zip off pants (BugsAway Convertible Ziwa Pant) that are really light weight with all pockets in the right places.



There was only one pair in the (outlet) shop so I did something I never do (ie buy trousers without trying them on) and ordered the same make, same size, but slightly different style over the phone. Unfortunately, as you may have guessed, they are not the same fit. They are a bit low waisted, and to be honest, a bit tight. And to make things worse, they have a press stud fastening. Now we all know that a tight fit and press studs are not happy bedfellows and as I didn’t want to be popping all the way along the camino, I left them behind. So just one pair of hiking pants this year, although I have brought a comfortable stretch skirt and a pair of cargo pants that I can also wear for walking if necessary. In my opinion the most important thing about hiking pants is the placement of pockets – wrist height side pockets are all I really use – one side for sunglasses when not in use, and the other side for my phone (before I smashed it). I used the waist pocket to keep a tissue, but thankfully I wasn’t blowing my nose every five minutes as I was last year.

These pants were great, they dried in no time and were washed fairly frequently for the first couple of weeks – before the rain. But I dont think I actually washed them at all once it started raining. Whenever they got a bit muddy around the ankles and I thought I would have to give them a scrub, they miraculously seemed to self clean by the time I arrived at my destination, so I didn’t bother. They also got drenched a few times in the rain, but seemed to dry instantly once the rain stopped.

4 Fleece
For a mid layer last year I took a ultra lightweight down body warmer and sleeves cut from a fleece that I tucked up into my t-shirt sleeves. The sleeves worked really well – I put them on most mornings and could remove them when the temperature rose without having to take off my pack. The body warmer was slightly less of a success. I didn’t wear it a great deal for walking because I don’t need much warmth on my torso, but on the occasions when I did wear it under my raincoat I found that duck down was not great, it did not wick moisture and quickly became damp or wet. But the system in general of separate sleeves and body warmer worked well for me.

So this year I searched the internet and finally sourced a lightweight fleece with zip off sleeves. It wasn’t quite perfect because I couldn’t manage to unzip the sleeves whilst I was wearing the garment, but this wasn’t really an issue because I hardly wore the complete garment whilst walking, I simply used the sleeves as I had last year, tucked into my t-shirt, and either with or without my raincoat, I could pull them off when the time was right and tuck them into the side pocket of my pack or hang them from my waist pack.



In the evenings I wore the complete garment many times and was very pleased with it, very cosy and lightweight. I purchased it over the internet after talking at length with the very helpful customer service staff who not only weighed the item for me, but tried the garment on to give me a good idea of the fit. This is a useful item that will get lots of wear.

5 Visor and Buff infinity
I used the same home made visor every step of the way, brilliant for keeping my hair off my face, shielding my eyes and face from the sun and mopping my brow.

I also used my ‘infinity’ buff to keep the sun off my neck. Last year I used the long buff to tuck under my backpack shoulder straps where they bruised my collar bones. This year I copied an idea I had seen and purchased a couple of bath sponges, popped them into the feet of a pair of tights, cut and tied the ends and pinned them under the straps to alleviate the pressure. It worked a treat – no bruises – hurrah!



The buff was fabulous when it was very hot. I soaked it in water, wrapped it around my head to protect my scalp from the sun, and around the back of my neck to act as an instant cooling system. It gives an instant pick-me-up and puts the spring back in my step. Very highly recommended.

6 Gloves
I carried a thin pair of liner gloves and left the warmer fleece gloves at home. I used the gloves several times, in the early morning when it could be a bit chilly. I think it is useful to have a pair of lightweight gloves whatever time of year you are walking, especially if you use hiking poles and your hands are constantly exposed to the weather.

7 T-shirts
These have remained the same. Merino wool short sleeved x 2, and long sleeved x 1. At the last minute I decided to leave the long sleeve shirt at home, and didn’t regret it. I could have made good use of a sleeveless merino vest top during the hotter early days and will consider this if/when I walk again. Merino wool is brilliant – it can be worn for days without getting whiffy and dries surprisingly quickly. They did get washed regularly, but I knew that if drying was not an option I could wear one for several days without offending anyone!

8 Socks
Last year I followed advice and wore thin merino wool liners and thicker Merino hiking socks. I got blisters! I stopped wearing two pairs about half way through my walk and didn’t get any more blisters. Who knows! I think probably my feet had acclimatised by then and if I had continued to wear two pairs I would still have been blister-free. However I started this year’s training with just hiking socks and continued throughout the camino. I bought two new pairs of socks, 70% merino smartwool mini style, that just come to my ankle. I did not like the bulk of mid socks that I always turn down anyway.



I bought these new socks a size smaller and they are a comfortable but snug fit and I have not felt the ‘bunching’ under my toes that I felt last year. I did take a pair of liner socks, but didn’t use them, and also a pair of plain black ankle socks for evening wear if required.

9 Underwear
My trusty merino wool knickers kept me comfortable every day. Like all merino wool they wick away any sweat and remain odourless, no matter how hot or long the walk has been. I bought two pairs of these pants last year from a uk company, appropriately called Finisterre, and they were worn every day on the Frances, are called into service every time I ride my horse (3 or 4 times a week) and have now kept me comfortable along the camino Portuguese. There is little sign of wear, other than the waist elastic has stretched a bit, but I can see them lasting a whole lot longer. What I considered a complete extravagance when I bought them have turned out to be a sound investment.



I also bought new this year two ‘tri-action’ sports bras by Truimph. One black and one white. Two black would have been more useful (hand washing doesn’t keep whites very white!) They were very comfortable but didn’t dry very quickly. They will also get plenty of use throughout the year when I ride and walk locally.

10 Relaxing clothes
A new pair of black crocs, the same style as I wore last year. I hadn’t experienced crocs before I bought these last year – it was a revelation – so very comfortable, and this style is acceptable for every day wear, in fact I have worn them practically every day throughout the year. My original pair were multi coloured and quite pretty (I get lots of compliments about them), but they didn’t look quite so pretty when I had to wear them with socks because it was unexpectedly cold in the evenings. So this year I treated myself to a plain black pair which were just about acceptable if I had to don a pair of black socks.



Other downtime items consisted of
– lightweight 3/4 length cargo pants that I could have worn for walking if necessary.
– Ancient knee length skirt, very comfortable, and worn most evenings
– Vest tops x 2, one worn for sleeping. On a couple of occasions worn for hiking on hot days.
– Cardigan, very lightweight
– Knickers x 1 (next time I will take at least two pairs, they weigh virtually nothing and one pair just isn’t enough)
– Two pairs of short lightweight socks, little worn, as it was generally warm enough for bare feet in the evenings.
– Footless tights, worn just a couple of times with skirt for a little extra warmth, but could have been worn for sleeping or under hiking pants on cold days if necessary.
– Bag for evenings, extra lightweight, waterproof shoulder bag. Used for valuables in the evening, for shopping bag, for clothes and valuables when showering. Folds up into tiny pouch. Very useful.

Overall I was very pleased with my choice of down-time clothes, they were perfect for the weather, but could have been layered up for colder weather if necessary. It was very nice to get out of trousers and wear a skirt in the evenings.

11 Backpack
remains the same – osprey Altus 34 litre, but with the addition this year of the padding for my collar bones as described above. It works – it ain’t broke – so I didn’t fix it!



12 Backpack rain cover
Ok, so I have explained my theory that pack straps on waterproof jacket cause that area not to be waterproof. This theory was developed through personal experience of walking in the rain in a waterproof jacket and getting soaked inside the jacket. I had decided to take a poncho this year, although I hate the look and the thought of them. But they serve their purpose, they completely cover the backpack (straps included) and therefore you should stay dry inside, except that they are normally not very breathable and so a lot of humidity is caused through sweat and some people prefer to be wet through rain rather than through sweat.

I then began to think about making a mini poncho that I could attach to the backpack rain cover and extend over my shoulders to cover the straps and tuck in somewhere at the front. Meanwhile I purchased a rain cover because I had borrowed my daughter’s last year and had returned it to her. When I took the cover out of its integral stuff sack I could immediately see that it was way too big for my pack – I had mistakenly picked up a cover for an 80 litre pack rather than the 34 litre pack that I would be carrying. Brain cells began to activate :idea: and I thought that I could make something good out of this mistake rather than returning the cover to the shop.

I had a willing assistant because Ella was visiting at the time and between us we fashioned the ‘super-duper Maggie shoulder cape’. I was tempted to trial it at home when it poured with rain a week or so before I left for my camino, but nobody actually chooses to walk in the rain, and in the end I chose to trust to luck rather than take part in soggy research, so it wasn’t until I left Porto that I discovered I was on to a winner – my SDMSC functioned perfectly, and was put to good use many times during the last part of my camino Portuguese! (And I didn’t look quite so daft as the ‘full poncho pilgrims’ – unless you tell me differently, of course!)



13 Walking poles
I need say no more than ‘Pacer Poles‘. They are so comfortable to use. I don’t have experience of any other type, and don’t feel the need to try.



14 Hydration system
Last year, after researching, I purchased water bladder – a bag made from some sort of plastic/rubber material that sits in a special compartment of the backpack and has a tube that threads through and sits somewhere near your shoulder with a bite valve at the end of the tube through which you suck water as and when required. I don’t like this system for various reasons……
The extra weight in the backpack – one kilo per litre
The need to remove and undo the pack to refill
Not being able to see how much you have drunk and how much remains



















But on the plus side the suction tube is good because it is convenient to use.

I much prefer to drink from a bottle and carry the weight from my waist pack, and so modified a ‘Raidlight’ bottle intended to be carried on the shoulder strap by substituting a longer suction tube that I could reach from a waist position.

This worked well. I could refill without removing my pack and carried an additional 750 ml bottle in the side pocket of my backpack. It only ceased to work well when it rained and I couldn’t fit the bottle inside my rain jacket along with my waist pack. So for the final stages from Porto when it rained every day I then carried the drinking bottle in the other side pocket of my back pack and could still reach the tube. On reflection I think carrying the bottle via the shoulder strap might be a good idea and will try it on my next camino.

15 Bumbag/waist pack
My faithful friend from the last couple of years has accompanied me on all my ryanair flights where, until recently, no handbag was allowed, and it could be hidden away under a coat or jumper. This leather bag has also been used when horse riding and local trekking to carry all the paraphernalia necessary to keep two animals and one human replenished and safe, ie dog biscuits, snacks, hoof pick, camera, phone, tissues, etc, etc.

Understandably, it was looking a bit sad and worn after so much use, so I treated myself to a new one. I looked long and hard to try to find the perfect combination of pockets and compartments, and finally realised that I already had it. So I ordered an identical replacement.



The sturdy webbing strap is strong enough to carry water bottles, and I sewed on an additional safety strap in case the buckle failed (which it didn’t, as it happens). The phone pocket is not large enough for the new iPhone, but this was not an issue – I used the pocket for tissues and lip salve. The small pocket at the front held my cash, the compartment behind was perfect for my camera, then a larger compartment housed a waterproof wallet for passport, credencial, bank cards and extra cash, with plenty of room left for painkillers, ear phones, hair band and clips, and my iPhone when it was raining and I didn’t want to keep it in my pants pocket. The last compartment at the back of the bag carried my external battery pack and charging leads. So everything I needed was completely accessible at all times.

During the second part of my trip when I was walking alone from Porto to Santiago, I wanted to also keep my iPad mini accessible, and I drilled some holes into the bag with my pen knife and attached two carabiners, from which I hung my ipad carry case (as I had done last year). To do this the case zip had to be open so I kept the ipad in a ziplock bag to keep it safe from moisture and I also carried my map and guide book pages tucked into the carry case, so another multi-tasking item. As mentioned above in the hydration section, I also hung my water bottle from the belt for most of my journey.

The bag was quite heavy, but I don’t seem to feel the weight hanging from my waist as I would do on my shoulders. It suits me very well.

16 Sleeping stuff
Sleeping bag is new. I swapped the synthetic mummy shaped bag weighing 850 grams for a super duper Mont Bell spiral down thermal sheet weighing 430 grams. The new bag completely unzips to be used as a quilt and packs down into a tiny compression sack. The fabric of the new bag is cut on the bias (hence the name ‘spiral’) and so allows for more movement and stretching than a traditional straight cut bag. It was my biggest single expense, I love it. Didn’t need it much during the first couple of weeks when we mostly stayed in hostels that provided bedding (including sheets and towels), but from Porto it was in use most nights and was wonderfully comfortable. Did I say ‘I love it’? I can imagine getting regular use from the bag as a comforter at home, as an extra layer on a cold night – so light weight, but so warm and cosy. I love it!



I also took my silk liner. One night I cut it open at the bottom seam so that my feet are not so restricted and was rewarded with instant freedom. Both items were treated with permethrin before leaving. I also took a pre-treated under sheet which I bought last year. If I was buying this item with the knowledge I now have, I would have purchased the double as opposed to the rather undersized single. It gives an extra layer of security against the dreaded bed bugs (which I have yet to see).

I bought an inflatable pillow for this camino. I only used it once. It wasn’t comfortable. Don’t bother!
As usual Maggie, you are very well prepared ..your gear but also your information is great ! Just at your blog... Thanks for sharing..

Mid of May next my wife and I will start our third caminho from Fernanda's house do maybe we'll see you around again.

Best regards

Albert and Nel
 
Camino(s) past & future
2016
Best post on the site in a while. lots of info, pics, and specific references that point a proven direction. Well done.
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
Thank you @Magwood , as usual I am very impressed with your pack cover cape! You could make money on that design you know!

One comment and one question: the pack looks like an Osprey Exos, not Altus (for the benefit of peope trying to google them) and do you know what the model of Crocs is called? I used the Mary Janes until they changed them and renamed them Shayna ... there are so many models these days.
 

camino2015

Peregrina
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Sept-Oct (2015), Cammino di Francesco May-June( 2017), Portuguese (2019)
Can you provide more information on how you built your pack cover cape? Looks like a great idea! Thank you for the post.
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature line for links to daily posts to blogs from many caminos
Outstanding post!.

Really like the look of that sleeping bag!

The sleeping bag is great, so lightweight and cozy and comfortable with the bit of stretch. Probably not warm enough for right now, later in the spring its pefect for me.
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature line for links to daily posts to blogs from many caminos
Very nice! I like your backpack cover, smart thinking. What is the total weight of your backpack? Just curious since I'm trying to keep my backpack to a minimum weight.

Not as light as many would want. But I am strong and knew I wouldn't have an issue with a few extra grams.
Backpack weight was 6.5 kilos, I was wearing 2.8 kilos and carrying 1.7 kilos in my waist pack. As mentioned, I also carry water from my waist when possible (I can't do this if I have my raincoat zipped). I carried a lot of gizmos, all in my waist pack, which created at least 1.5 kilos of the weight.
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature line for links to daily posts to blogs from many caminos
Thank you @Kitsambler and @david townsend for your kind words.

@Albertinho - it would be great to meet up with you and Nell. I can't believe we were in Fernanda's together last year and didn't realise. That is just crazy! Not sure sure when I will be in Santiago this year as I will probably break up my camino Mozárabe from Málaga into a couple of stages - but hopefully...one day
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature line for links to daily posts to blogs from many caminos
Thank you @Magwood , as usual I am very impressed with your pack cover cape! You could make money on that design you know!

One comment and one question: the pack looks like an Osprey Exos, not Altus (for the benefit of peope trying to google them) and do you know what the model of Crocs is called? I used the Mary Janes until they changed them and renamed them Shayna ... there are so many models these days.

You are absolutely correct, @nidarosa. Just went to check and it is an Exos. I have no idea where the Altus popped out from. I will edit the post with ththe correct info.

The crocs are 'huarache' style. Very comfortable. I wear them all the time in the summer.
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature line for links to daily posts to blogs from many caminos
Can you provide more information on how you built your pack cover cape? Looks like a great idea! Thank you for the post.

Importantly, the cover was twice the size I needed for the pack (lucky accident)

Firstly I worked out some anchor points to attach it securely to my pack - one at the bottom and one on each side. I attached a pull ring (key ring) to the bottom of the pack and a carabiner to each side (at the top to the webbing compression straps). I then used the existing draw-cord from the cover to attach to these points.

Once it was in place on the fully loaded pack, I tried it on for size and basically cut it in two from the top edge straight down to where it needed to divide at the nape of my neck. I think I reinforced this point so that it wouldn't tear.

The two sides then came each side of my neck and I applied a couple of pieces of Velcro to fasten under my chin.

One day I will get around to doing full instructions with photos, but I doubt it will be any time soon.

I couldn't have done it alone, although I am very practically minded. It was too fiddly to get the cutting in the right place, and it needs to fit you, not some model! Luckily my daughter was visiting at the time and she is a trained costumier, so I was well served in that department.

Isn't it great when your children know more than you do about some things? Rather than just thinking they know everything!
 

Jo Jo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, July '14 & Sep-Oct '16
Via di Francesco, July '15,
CP Oct. '17, Salvador & Primitivo Sep '19
Mag,

Thank you for your gear review. I hope more people do likewise. And the cape is a work of art.

Jo Jo
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
CF - sections and whole (2012-2019) and part VF (2017)
Fantastic post Maggie! Thanks for sharing your Gear report II - so well researched and excellent decisions made by you as to what works well - with Forum members. Your list has given me some great ideas for my gear list for later this year. Thank you again.
I remember your coloured crocs from a Forum thread last year and how cool looking they were, but I just LOVE the black crocs - I think they could be the "LBD" (little black dress) - now the LBC's (little black crocs) - on the Camino for all the girls!
Cheers - Jenny
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013), Primitivo (2015), Muxia/Fisterra (2015), Haervejen (2017)
I LOVE your back pack cover and am going to make one myself!!! Like you I do not care for ponchos flapping around me and much prefer a jacket. Thanks for posting the picture! Liz
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues (2021)
Camino Frances (April 17, - May, 15, 2015)
I like your pack cover cape! :D It is good to see people adapting equipment specifically for their Camino. The equipment manufacturers should be reading the Camino forum and using the information to improve their equipment designs.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
Magwood, you are such a pro! LOVE this post. And love your backpack cover which you MUST pattent! Brilliant. Thank you for sharing.
 

MaidinBham

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances SJPP to Muxia, April (2014)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon>Santiago, April/May (2016)
Looks like an old thread, but such great info, and I hope @Magwood will respond. Wondering if the waistbag would fit my compact camera, which, in its leather case measures 3 x 51/2 x 4 inches? I need good cheap solution, and bag will also be for money, passport, credencial etc. (the bag that goes into the shower with me, hahahha) I need cheap so can buy that Monbell down blanket!
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature line for links to daily posts to blogs from many caminos
Looks like an old thread, but such great info, and I hope @Magwood will respond. Wondering if the waistbag would fit my compact camera, which, in its leather case measures 3 x 51/2 x 4 inches? I need good cheap solution, and bag will also be for money, passport, credencial etc. (the bag that goes into the shower with me, hahahha) I need cheap so can buy that Monbell down blanket!

Hi @MaidinBham - yes, a very old thread. So old that I had forgotten I'd posted it!

My trusty leather waistpack is on the verge of dying, after serving me for 2,000 kms of camino and countless local hiking. I have just purchased a rather large replacement to use on local hikes when I don't want to use my full size backpack and I don't own a day pack.

I much prefer to carry the weight on my waist and this new pack is cavernous and can hold all my gear for a long day's hike including food and drink for my dog and myself, sunglasses, hats, raincoat, camera and other gadgets, etc, etc.

I didn't originally intend to use it on camino and haven't yet tried it in conjunction with my backpack so don't know if it will be a marriage made in heaven. The main issue for me is that it will fit within my zipped rain jacket when necessary, something else I haven't tried yet.

But I haven't yet answered your question...will your camera case fit in the waistpack. I didn't use a case for my compact camera (Panasonic Lumix). I made a slip case from a couple of spectacle cleaning cloths sewn together which made it very convenient to access and as there was no bulk it fitted easily into the front pocket of my original pack. I don't think a camera case would fit in the front pocket, although there is plenty of room in the main section.

ok...so just decided to stop waffling about 'not having tried this' and 'not having tried that' and went and tried it all. The new waist pack seems very comfortable with my backpack and it can just about be zipped inside my rain jacket (I want this for two reasons - (1) to keep it dry and (2) so as not to have the waist strap on top of my jacket, which will affect the waterproof-ness, and in my experience is likely to cause an ingress of rainwater).

So top marks for my very versatile new waist pack and it looks as though it will accompany me on my forthcoming camino.

Original 'Lorenz' leather waist pack amazon link £7.15

New much larger 'Metrolite' canvas pack (can even fit my iPad mini inside the main pocket, athough the phone pocket still isn't big enough for an iPhone 6, it remains very useful for tissues and lip balm) Amazon link £11.24

I particularly like to use a waist pack so that my valuables (money, documents and technology) are always on my person.

And I would add that after yet another long camino, I am still loving my Mont Bell sleeping bag.

Buen camino!
 

MaidinBham

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances SJPP to Muxia, April (2014)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon>Santiago, April/May (2016)
Hi @MaidinBham - yes, a very old thread. So old that I had forgotten I'd posted it!

My trusty leather waistpack is on the verge of dying, after serving me for 2,000 kms of camino and countless local hiking. I have just purchased a rather large replacement to use on local hikes when I don't want to use my full size backpack and I don't own a day pack.

I much prefer to carry the weight on my waist and this new pack is cavernous and can hold all my gear for a long day's hike including food and drink for my dog and myself, sunglasses, hats, raincoat, camera and other gadgets, etc, etc.

I didn't originally intend to use it on camino and haven't yet tried it in conjunction with my backpack so don't know if it will be a marriage made in heaven. The main issue for me is that it will fit within my zipped rain jacket when necessary, something else I haven't tried yet.

But I haven't yet answered your question...will your camera case fit in the waistpack. I didn't use a case for my compact camera (Panasonic Lumix). I made a slip case from a couple of spectacle cleaning cloths sewn together which made it very convenient to access and as there was no bulk it fitted easily into the front pocket of my original pack. I don't think a camera case would fit in the front pocket, although there is plenty of room in the main section.

ok...so just decided to stop waffling about 'not having tried this' and 'not having tried that' and went and tried it all. The new waist pack seems very comfortable with my backpack and it can just about be zipped inside my rain jacket (I want this for two reasons - (1) to keep it dry and (2) so as not to have the waist strap on top of my jacket, which will affect the waterproof-ness, and in my experience is likely to cause an ingress of rainwater).

So top marks for my very versatile new waist pack and it looks as though it will accompany me on my forthcoming camino.

Original 'Lorenz' leather waist pack amazon [/B] £7.15

New much larger 'Metrolite' canvas pack (can even fit my iPad mini inside the main pocket, athough the phone pocket still isn't big enough for an iPhone 6, it remains very useful for tissues and lip balm) Amazon [/B] £11.24

I particularly like to use a waist pack so that my valuables (money, documents and technology) are always on my person.

And I would add that after yet another long camino, I am still loving my Mont Bell sleeping bag.

Buen camino!


Thank you Magwood for generous and thoughtful reply. I am now looking at Osprey Tempest 6L - it is gender specific and I can try on with my Osprey backpack before buying. Still trying to decide about taking compact camera (Fuji X100) but think it would need to stay in low profile leather case for protection. I really want that MontBell bag, merino wool underpants, and Exofficio Ziwa pants! I am such a sucker for this stuff!

I thoroughly enjoyed reading your blog and binge read your CP camino. Just like a good book with excellent narration, stories, useful info, and your sense of humor is so delightful. Your Macro water drop shots are amazing! I swore I would not take more than 5 pics daily on my CF, but my journal readers demanded it. I used nothing but a iPod Touch 5 - which was also my phone (wifi). I thought that taking tons of pics would be too distracting, slow me down and take away from the experience of my camino. Take away from the precious moments we have on the camino, instead of being in the moment and fully appreciative. A little selfish maybe? After all, so much of the Camino is about sharing.

Buen Camino,

Janice
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature line for links to daily posts to blogs from many caminos
Hi again @MaidinBham. Just looked at the osprey lumbar pack - does the name suggest it should be worn with the pack section at the back? This wouldn't work with a backpack. And it is soooo expensive. I am a bargain hunter and couldn't bring myself to pay so much for a bumbag.

I bought new merino pants (knickers) this year as my old ones had seen me through three caminos and countless additional kms off Camino had definitely reached their 'use-by' date. I found these which are very comfortable (and rather large!) and have caused some confusion in this household - see my recent blog post 'the riddle of the big knickers'.

The Exofficio Ziwa hiking trousers are brilliant and they will be coming on their third Camino this year.

Many thanks for your kind comments about my blog. I have to admit that I write it first and foremost for myself - I have a terrible memory and don't want to forget a thing about my caminos. The fact that it has been useful to others is a huge bonus. And the absolute pleasure I get from blogging and the interaction from readers is boundless.

As regards a camera - I wouldn't be without one. On my first Camino I used my iPad mini for photos, which was excellent. But I really missed the possibility to be able to zoom in on distant subjects. I love taking photos and I sincerely believe that looking at the Camino with a photographer's eye (not that I consider myself - a photographer - merely an over-keen snapper) truly enhances my Camino experience.
 

MaidinBham

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances SJPP to Muxia, April (2014)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon>Santiago, April/May (2016)
Hi @Magwood - just purchased a lumbar pack - they did not have the Osprey at the store, so ended up buying Marmot Excursion #9372 $40. I took my camera and backpack with me, and found this pack to be perfect. I love stuff that does double-duty, and this will be my full time camera bag, camino lumber pack, and my general hiking bag, and a purse. It has a "guaranteed for life" warranty - and I WILL hold them to it! It has 4 zippered compartments, two lined in micro-fleece for electronics. Two Port opening's, 2 trekking pole holders (I think), compression straps. The waist strap sort of fans out from body of bag at two different points then joins up to buckle. Low profile, no interference with backpack - it will be worn in front of me. Two water bottle holder that fit my Nalgene 500ml water bottle. 7L, so big enough for camera, my passports, guide book, money etc. It fits nicely slung over my shoulder, worn at the side, or positioned behind my back, for a not quite so dorky look when I am off trail.
I am waiting for Icebreaker merino wool hoody to arrive - I love their stuff, and am starting to replace some of my gear with merino wool.
Okay now I'm starting to ramble.....................
Getting excited for CP in April.........
The Exofficio Ziwa pants are on sale
Thanks again for all the advice, and sharing
Oh, and I did read blog about the knickers...............Hilarious. Honestly I was lol!!!!! Took me back to Secondary School (born and raised in Birmingham) when we wore those big blue knickers for PE - you know when we were young and weighed less than 6 stone, and even the teens wore big knickers!

Buen Camino,

Janice
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature line for links to daily posts to blogs from many caminos
Oh said:
Hey Janice, I remember them well - they even had a pocket for a hanky.
Micro-fleece for electronics sounds good - my gizmos go in ziplock bags to keep out the weather and perspiration. Same goes for documents and paper money. Waist packs can get very sweaty (well they can when I'm wearing them!).

What date in April are you setting off? Any chance we might cross over in Santiago - I'm guessing I will arrive around the very end of May and if I walk on to Finisterre, then again a few days later.

Buen Camino!
Maggie
 

MaidinBham

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances SJPP to Muxia, April (2014)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon>Santiago, April/May (2016)

Mine not quite that posh - no hanky pocket!
I will hit the trail April 28th, and leave from Santiago airport May 31st. I wish now I would have given myself more time, especially since I think I will do Caminho do Mor and did not account for 3 extra days it takes to do this route.
Good chance we shall meet, and good luck with your planning. What is your starting point?
On my CF I took bus from SdC > Finesterre (because of time constraints), walked to lighthouse (you will pass 0km marker!) and then walked on to Muxia . This was a perfect end to my Camino and one of my highlights.
Buen Camino

Janice
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature line for links to daily posts to blogs from many caminos
What is your starting point?
On my CF I took bus from SdC > Finesterre (because of time constraints), walked to lighthouse (you will pass 0km marker!) and then walked on to Muxia . This was a perfect end to my Camino and one of my highlights.

I am walking el Norte commencing at Irun. But rather than follow the traditional route I which joins with the CF shortly before SdC, I will continue to walk along the northern most point of Spain to reach Ferrol and approach Santiago via the Camino Ingles, possibly continuing to Finisterre. This plan is a little weather dependent, as I do not want to walk a non-camino stretch for 5 or 6 days in awful weather. Vamos a ver!

But there is every possibility that we may be in Santiago at the same time. I am starting a week before you, but walking further distance. I shall pm you my email address so that we can keep in touch.

I would recommend that anyone getting the bus to Finisterre gets off at Cee and walks from there. The old quarter of Cee, set around the harbour, is delightful and the walk on to Finisterre is fabulous. When arriving at the beach, remove your boots and paddle through the water for the remaining 2km of your camino - it is the most amazing camino experience.


Enjoy the rest of your planning (and shopping)
Buen Camino!
Maggie
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
CF - sections and whole (2012-2019) and part VF (2017)
Hi Maggie -
So great that your most helpful thread has been resurrected courtesy of Janice! Thank you Janice too! I've printed off your packing list and I'm going to use it as a basis for my first aid camino in August after I finish volunteering at Rabanal.
While writing, I wanted to let you know that I've signed up for your blog - I'm really looking forward to reading about your el Norte camino this year.
Cheers Maggie, and take joy in every step -
Jenny
 

MaidinBham

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances SJPP to Muxia, April (2014)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon>Santiago, April/May (2016)
Hi Maggie -
So great that your most helpful thread has been resurrected courtesy of Janice! Thank you Janice too! I've printed off your packing list and I'm going to use it as a basis for my first aid camino in August after I finish volunteering at Rabanal.
While writing, I wanted to let you know that I've signed up for your blog - I'm really looking forward to reading about your el Norte camino this year.
Cheers Maggie, and take joy in every step -
Jenny

Magwood blogs are the best! Wish I could get them on audio to listen to on The Way.
Burn Camino, Jenny

Janice
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature line for links to daily posts to blogs from many caminos
Hi Maggie -
So great that your most helpful thread has been resurrected courtesy of Janice! Thank you Janice too! I've printed off your packing list and I'm going to use it as a basis for my first aid camino in August after I finish volunteering at Rabanal.
While writing, I wanted to let you know that I've signed up for your blog - I'm really looking forward to reading about your el Norte camino this year.
Cheers Maggie, and take joy in every step -
Jenny

Hi Jenny, I already noticed this morning that I had you as a new follower on the blog, which put a huge smile on my face.

I am changing my packing list quite a bit this year and will post it in this thread when it is ready. If you would like me to send you the spreadsheet I used for the list so that you can amend it with your stuff, I will be happy to do that. I don't think I can upload an editable version to the forum (unless someone can tell me different - and tell me how).
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature line for links to daily posts to blogs from many caminos
Magwood blogs are the best! Wish I could get them on audio to listen to on The Way.
Burn Camino, Jenny

Janice

There is a camino podcast you can download - I have listened to a few and they are really professional. There are ten in the series so far, by Dave Whitson who is the co-author of "The Northern Caminos" guidebook. Just search for 'The Camino Podcast" - you will enjoy them.
Buen camino!
 

MaidinBham

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances SJPP to Muxia, April (2014)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon>Santiago, April/May (2016)
There is a camino podcast you can download - I have listened to a few and they are really professional. There are ten in the series so far, by Dave Whitson who is the co-author of "The Northern Caminos" guidebook. Just search for 'The Camino Podcast" - you will enjoy them.
Buen camino!
Found it! Yes these look great
Thanks, again
Janice
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
CF - sections and whole (2012-2019) and part VF (2017)
Hi Jenny, I already noticed this morning that I had you as a new follower on the blog, which put a huge smile on my face.

I am changing my packing list quite a bit this year and will post it in this thread when it is ready. If you would like me to send you the spreadsheet I used for the list so that you can amend it with your stuff, I will be happy to do that. I don't think I can upload an editable version to the forum (unless someone can tell me different - and tell me how).
Cheers Maggie - that would be fantastic. I'll PM you my email address.
'Hope all is well with you in gorgeous Spain and happy training for the Norte!
Jenny x
 

MaidinBham

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances SJPP to Muxia, April (2014)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon>Santiago, April/May (2016)
Hi Jenny, I already noticed this morning that I had you as a new follower on the blog, which put a huge smile on my face.

I am changing my packing list quite a bit this year and will post it in this thread when it is ready. If you would like me to send you the spreadsheet I used for the list so that you can amend it with your stuff, I will be happy to do that. I don't think I can upload an editable version to the forum (unless someone can tell me different - and tell me how).

Hi Maggie,
forum member @cj2003 has editable spreadsheet I downloaded few days ago:

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...-route-portugues-route-monacal-coastal.35534/

Janice
 

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