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Gear Review: The little things

MichaelC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
August 2017: Le Puy to Santiago
July 2019: Cammino di Assisi (La Verna to Assisi)
#1
There are more than enough packing lists out there; I don't want to repeat what's already been covered dozens of times regarding packs, socks, shoes, etc. Rather, here are a few of the 'little things' that worked for me, or that I saw others using & that I wished I had.

I walked in France mid-August through September, and in Spain in October.


Recommended for all

- A ten-foot / 3-meter lightning cable to charge phones. Someone on this forum suggested this (I forget who), and it's a brilliant idea.

- Glove liners. It can get cold in the mornings, even in August.

- Dual-port charger. It's nice to share.

- Running tights. Guys, there's a reason all the women are wearing these. They're comfortable, light-weight, and versatile. They work as a thermal layer underneath your pants on a cold morning. They're comfortable to sleep in on a cold night. Tights for men are not just for hipsters and body builders any more!


Worked for me

- Moisturizer. I brought some argan oil, ditched it as excess weight, then bought another bottle of oil a few days later. I didn't need much, but it was nice to moisturize once or twice a week.

- Real books. If you're reading on a kindle, a phone, or another electronic device, people leave you alone. It's socially isolating. If you're reading a paperback novel at a cafe - mostly in France, and especially if you're reading a book by a French author - people will treat it as an open invitation to start a conversation.

- Jungle blanket. I liked having an open blanket rather than a sleeping bag. I never used it in France, while I used it almost every night in Spain.

- Sweat pants. It was nice to have a light-weight pair in the evenings.

- Rain jacket + umbrella. I loved this combo, and will never go back to wearing a poncho again.



The wishlist

- Tupperware. I didn't have room for this, but if I was walking in a warmer season (and needed less clothes), a lunch container would have been nice. As it was, I had a few days where my cheese turned to fondue in my sack. Most French people and a lot of the Germans carried some.

- A thermos. There were many long days without a coffee stop in France. I suffered through a few of them, and then started carrying an emergency supply of coca-cola.

- Face cream / night cream. I was always amazed at how many beauty products some of the Korean women carried. And at times a bit envious.

- Laundry sheets. These seemed more convenient than the shampoo bar I carried.

- Good headphones. I wasn't even tempted to use my headphones for the first couple weeks. Towards the end, when I was walking longer days, it was nice to listen to music in the afternoons.


Didn't work for me

- Leukotape. This was fine for using on hot spots on the heel, but a total pain for small blisters on the toes. It was hard to cut to the proper size, and the glue (or whatever it is) would ooze out and make my toes stick together. I hated it. I would have rather used basic medical tape.

- Flashlight. Never used it.
 

Sailor

Donante Vitalicio
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Infinito
#2
Thanks for the listing.

- Leukotape, worked great for me for the plant and heel [I had thin tape for my toes].

- Flashlight, worked for me, I was on the trail very early in the morning, flashlight or not I missed the sign at the N-120 intersection leaving Carrion de los Condes and the 17 kilometers to Calzadilla de la Cueza became something line 21 plus kilometers [thank you Policia Civil for saving the dark morning and sending me in the right direction].

Feliz Navidad para usted y su familia, y que la brillantisima luz de Dios alumbre su camino.
 

La Brique Jaune

Official member of la confradia del pinza del oro
Camino(s) past & future
2017: SJPDP to Finisterre
(201?): I hope and need to
#3
Hi to All,

My two favorites items was my trekking poles and my Buff. The poles gave me confidence and the multi-purpose Buff is fantastic in cold mornings and hot afternoon. For next Camino (when ?) i will never go without them.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
#4
Thank you, Michael. Great list.
Absolutely concur on the 'real book' and flashlight.
And tights. :):DBTW, they can be worn under a kilt too...
I would have rather used basic medical tape.
Yes, absolutely. I just use paper tape. It works perfectly.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
#5
Recommended for all

- A ten-foot / 3-meter lightning cable to charge phones. Someone on this forum suggested this (I forget who), and it's a brilliant idea.
I'm obviously missing something here :oops:
Why do you need such a long cable?
And 'lightening' cable, as in iPhone/iPad type connection?
 

Julia Mumford

Adventure Geek
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
#6
Love this post, thanks Michael.

I totally agree with the long cable. I walked my 2nd Camino section in October 17, and took a long cable. It means that you can charge your iPhone whilst in a top bunk.

I had a Polaroid Zip printer (lightweight and smaller than an iPhone). I printed photos of people I met in the way into a little book. It became a talking point and I wouldn’t go without it now.

I’ve added a trekking Umbrella to my Christmas list as I had gear envy on those very wet days, and also the scorching hot days.

Thanks again, great post.
 

linkster

Nunca dejes de creer!
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 05/17 brazo roto Portomarín
Francés 09/17 SJPdP - Santiago
(Portuguese: 09/18)
#7
+1 - A ten-foot / 3-meter lightning cable to charge phones. Someone on this forum suggested this (I forget who), and it's a brilliant idea.
I was able to charge and still have my phone with me in bed almost everywhere I stayed.

+1 - Glove liners
. It can get cold in the mornings, even in August.
I wore my gloves much more than I thought I would have. Sometimes the gloves and a hat allowed me to forgoe wearing my jacket.

+ 1 - Dual-port charger
. It's nice to share.
Sometimes there were not enough available outlets. I would just unplug someone's single and plug them into my dual. I would leave their single there, so that I could plug them back in when I was done.

Maybe a +1 - Running tights
. Guys, there's a reason all the women are wearing these. They're comfortable, light-weight, and versatile. They work as a thermal layer underneath your pants on a cold morning. They're comfortable to sleep in on a cold night. Tights for men are not just for hipsters and body builders any more!
I am thinking this might be a good alternative to 2 pair of zipoff pants. I would bring 1 pair zip off pants, 1 pair of tights, and 1 pair of lightweight running shorts. I think it would save some weight and create some alternatives.

+1 - Jungle blanket. I liked having an open blanket rather than a sleeping bag. I never used it in France, while I used it almost every night in Spain.
I brought a down quilt from Enlightened Equipment ... worked great.

+1 - Good headphones. I wasn't even tempted to use my headphones for the first couple weeks. Towards the end, when I was walking longer days, it was nice to listen to music in the afternoons.
I brought my earbuds rather than my wireless. No charging necessary. Used them at the end of the day or if I was just moving slow and needed a pick me up.

+1 - Leukotape. This was fine for using on hot spots on the heel, but a total pain for small blisters on the toes. It was hard to cut to the proper size, and the glue (or whatever it is) would ooze out and make my toes stick together. I hated it. I would have rather used basic medical tape.
I brought some Leukotape from home. It was more of a fabric tape than the kind I saw in Spain. It worked out great for me.

+1 - Flashlight. Never used it.[/QUOTE]
I changed the lock screen on my iPhone to have a red background and emergency contact info as @trecile suggested. It worked great in the albergue for a bathroom run in the middle of the night etc.
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
#8
*gloves; I always bring woollen fingerless gloves that just cover the nuckles in the morning for my beginning reumathism, and bicycle likewise for long stretches using walking poles. In the wintertime finger gloves

* instead of zip off legs, I don knee long shorts in easy drying quality, but in colder mornings ( -2 to +10) I apply long individual leggings underneath, and drop them around 10 o´clock or when the sun comes out. I look downright silly in the airplane on the way down in April from Scandinavia- but who cares !

*a battery bank, that I will charge a) in a wall socket or b) by solar panel - and then charge my phone whenever..

* a thermal blanket - just in case- f inst Life systems - 55 grams , reusable

* X metres of parachord

* Japanese mint oil drops ( Physio JHP) for stomach upsets, Mentholatum (sort of Tiger Balm) for skin rashes and sore muscles, small bottle of Echinamine for cold and flues. I usually walk in chillier seasons!

* one Petzl head lamp , simple version, 2 light strenghts for night/ dusk walking - 1 thumb size pen light for finding my bed and 2 small coin size powerful blinking diodes for walking beside road traffic.
Yellow running zipped vest, doubling as light wind breaker.
small strips of relective in several items of rucksack poles and vest...

* - always bring collapsible Leki walking poles, my very good friends in ups and downs, literally..
- thought I would never use then, -havent done without them !

* "woollens" ; socks, Y-fronts, Woolpower woollen fleece long sleve, HH merino/ polypropylene LS sports shirts , & merino neck gaiter

* woolen knit cap now exhanged with woollen Stetson.......

afterthought;
* - and of late; Kinesiotape. Brilliant invention to sprained anything, will stick to skin 3-5 days, then peels off, - reinforcements can be done with leukotape which is normally welded to the skin. Better than mere elastic bandages...alleviates swellings better...

* Mentholatum creme for skin abrasion, cold cracks on skin, and under the nose to unblock snotty nose
 
Last edited:

Paladina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Cycled caminos francés, Finisterre, primitivo & del norte (2017); VdlP/Sanabres, ingles et al (2018)
#9
Interesting list. I like your novel reasons for preferring a paperback to an e-book. Bringing a small flashlight, however, seems to me a sensible precaution; I was glad that I never needed my modified first-aid kit, but not sorry that I’d brought it.
 
Camino(s) past & future
plan to walk in may (2017)
#10
There are more than enough packing lists out there; I don't want to repeat what's already been covered dozens of times regarding packs, socks, shoes, etc. Rather, here are a few of the 'little things' that worked for me, or that I saw others using & that I wished I had.

I walked in France mid-August through September, and in Spain in October.


Recommended for all

- A ten-foot / 3-meter lightning cable to charge phones. Someone on this forum suggested this (I forget who), and it's a brilliant idea.

- Glove liners. It can get cold in the mornings, even in August.

- Dual-port charger. It's nice to share.

- Running tights. Guys, there's a reason all the women are wearing these. They're comfortable, light-weight, and versatile. They work as a thermal layer underneath your pants on a cold morning. They're comfortable to sleep in on a cold night. Tights for men are not just for hipsters and body builders any more!


Worked for me

- Moisturizer. I brought some argan oil, ditched it as excess weight, then bought another bottle of oil a few days later. I didn't need much, but it was nice to moisturize once or twice a week.

- Real books. If you're reading on a kindle, a phone, or another electronic device, people leave you alone. It's socially isolating. If you're reading a paperback novel at a cafe - mostly in France, and especially if you're reading a book by a French author - people will treat it as an open invitation to start a conversation.

- Jungle blanket. I liked having an open blanket rather than a sleeping bag. I never used it in France, while I used it almost every night in Spain.

- Sweat pants. It was nice to have a light-weight pair in the evenings.

- Rain jacket + umbrella. I loved this combo, and will never go back to wearing a poncho again.



The wishlist

- Tupperware. I didn't have room for this, but if I was walking in a warmer season (and needed less clothes), a lunch container would have been nice. As it was, I had a few days where my cheese turned to fondue in my sack. Most French people and a lot of the Germans carried some.

- A thermos. There were many long days without a coffee stop in France. I suffered through a few of them, and then started carrying an emergency supply of coca-cola.

- Face cream / night cream. I was always amazed at how many beauty products some of the Korean women carried. And at times a bit envious.

- Laundry sheets. These seemed more convenient than the shampoo bar I carried.

- Good headphones. I wasn't even tempted to use my headphones for the first couple weeks. Towards the end, when I was walking longer days, it was nice to listen to music in the afternoons.


Didn't work for me

- Leukotape. This was fine for using on hot spots on the heel, but a total pain for small blisters on the toes. It was hard to cut to the proper size, and the glue (or whatever it is) would ooze out and make my toes stick together. I hated it. I would have rather used basic medical tape.

- Flashlight. Never used it.
There are more than enough packing lists out there; I don't want to repeat what's already been covered dozens of times regarding packs, socks, shoes, etc. Rather, here are a few of the 'little things' that worked for me, or that I saw others using & that I wished I had.

I walked in France mid-August through September, and in Spain in October.


Recommended for all

- A ten-foot / 3-meter lightning cable to charge phones. Someone on this forum suggested this (I forget who), and it's a brilliant idea.

- Glove liners. It can get cold in the mornings, even in August.

- Dual-port charger. It's nice to share.

- Running tights. Guys, there's a reason all the women are wearing these. They're comfortable, light-weight, and versatile. They work as a thermal layer underneath your pants on a cold morning. They're comfortable to sleep in on a cold night. Tights for men are not just for hipsters and body builders any more!


Worked for me

- Moisturizer. I brought some argan oil, ditched it as excess weight, then bought another bottle of oil a few days later. I didn't need much, but it was nice to moisturize once or twice a week.

- Real books. If you're reading on a kindle, a phone, or another electronic device, people leave you alone. It's socially isolating. If you're reading a paperback novel at a cafe - mostly in France, and especially if you're reading a book by a French author - people will treat it as an open invitation to start a conversation.

- Jungle blanket. I liked having an open blanket rather than a sleeping bag. I never used it in France, while I used it almost every night in Spain.

- Sweat pants. It was nice to have a light-weight pair in the evenings.

- Rain jacket + umbrella. I loved this combo, and will never go back to wearing a poncho again.



The wishlist

- Tupperware. I didn't have room for this, but if I was walking in a warmer season (and needed less clothes), a lunch container would have been nice. As it was, I had a few days where my cheese turned to fondue in my sack. Most French people and a lot of the Germans carried some.

- A thermos. There were many long days without a coffee stop in France. I suffered through a few of them, and then started carrying an emergency supply of coca-cola.

- Face cream / night cream. I was always amazed at how many beauty products some of the Korean women carried. And at times a bit envious.

- Laundry sheets. These seemed more convenient than the shampoo bar I carried.

- Good headphones. I wasn't even tempted to use my headphones for the first couple weeks. Towards the end, when I was walking longer days, it was nice to listen to music in the afternoons.


Didn't work for me

- Leukotape. This was fine for using on hot spots on the heel, but a total pain for small blisters on the toes. It was hard to cut to the proper size, and the glue (or whatever it is) would ooze out and make my toes stick together. I hated it. I would have rather used basic medical tape.

- Flashlight. Never used it.
There are more than enough packing lists out there; I don't want to repeat what's already been covered dozens of times regarding packs, socks, shoes, etc. Rather, here are a few of the 'little things' that worked for me, or that I saw others using & that I wished I had.

I walked in France mid-August through September, and in Spain in October.


Recommended for all

- A ten-foot / 3-meter lightning cable to charge phones. Someone on this forum suggested this (I forget who), and it's a brilliant idea.

- Glove liners. It can get cold in the mornings, even in August.

- Dual-port charger. It's nice to share.

- Running tights. Guys, there's a reason all the women are wearing these. They're comfortable, light-weight, and versatile. They work as a thermal layer underneath your pants on a cold morning. They're comfortable to sleep in on a cold night. Tights for men are not just for hipsters and body builders any more!


Worked for me

- Moisturizer. I brought some argan oil, ditched it as excess weight, then bought another bottle of oil a few days later. I didn't need much, but it was nice to moisturize once or twice a week.

- Real books. If you're reading on a kindle, a phone, or another electronic device, people leave you alone. It's socially isolating. If you're reading a paperback novel at a cafe - mostly in France, and especially if you're reading a book by a French author - people will treat it as an open invitation to start a conversation.

- Jungle blanket. I liked having an open blanket rather than a sleeping bag. I never used it in France, while I used it almost every night in Spain.

- Sweat pants. It was nice to have a light-weight pair in the evenings.

- Rain jacket + umbrella. I loved this combo, and will never go back to wearing a poncho again.



The wishlist

- Tupperware. I didn't have room for this, but if I was walking in a warmer season (and needed less clothes), a lunch container would have been nice. As it was, I had a few days where my cheese turned to fondue in my sack. Most French people and a lot of the Germans carried some.

- A thermos. There were many long days without a coffee stop in France. I suffered through a few of them, and then started carrying an emergency supply of coca-cola.

- Face cream / night cream. I was always amazed at how many beauty products some of the Korean women carried. And at times a bit envious.

- Laundry sheets. These seemed more convenient than the shampoo bar I carried.

- Good headphones. I wasn't even tempted to use my headphones for the first couple weeks. Towards the end, when I was walking longer days, it was nice to listen to music in the afternoons.


Didn't work for me

- Leukotape. This was fine for using on hot spots on the heel, but a total pain for small blisters on the toes. It was hard to cut to the proper size, and the glue (or whatever it is) would ooze out and make my toes stick together. I hated it. I would have rather used basic medical tape.

- Flashlight. Never used it.
There are more than enough packing lists out there; I don't want to repeat what's already been covered dozens of times regarding packs, socks, shoes, etc. Rather, here are a few of the 'little things' that worked for me, or that I saw others using & that I wished I had.

I walked in France mid-August through September, and in Spain in October.


Recommended for all

- A ten-foot / 3-meter lightning cable to charge phones. Someone on this forum suggested this (I forget who), and it's a brilliant idea.

- Glove liners. It can get cold in the mornings, even in August.

- Dual-port charger. It's nice to share.

- Running tights. Guys, there's a reason all the women are wearing these. They're comfortable, light-weight, and versatile. They work as a thermal layer underneath your pants on a cold morning. They're comfortable to sleep in on a cold night. Tights for men are not just for hipsters and body builders any more!


Worked for me

- Moisturizer. I brought some argan oil, ditched it as excess weight, then bought another bottle of oil a few days later. I didn't need much, but it was nice to moisturize once or twice a week.

- Real books. If you're reading on a kindle, a phone, or another electronic device, people leave you alone. It's socially isolating. If you're reading a paperback novel at a cafe - mostly in France, and especially if you're reading a book by a French author - people will treat it as an open invitation to start a conversation.

- Jungle blanket. I liked having an open blanket rather than a sleeping bag. I never used it in France, while I used it almost every night in Spain.

- Sweat pants. It was nice to have a light-weight pair in the evenings.

- Rain jacket + umbrella. I loved this combo, and will never go back to wearing a poncho again.



The wishlist

- Tupperware. I didn't have room for this, but if I was walking in a warmer season (and needed less clothes), a lunch container would have been nice. As it was, I had a few days where my cheese turned to fondue in my sack. Most French people and a lot of the Germans carried some.

- A thermos. There were many long days without a coffee stop in France. I suffered through a few of them, and then started carrying an emergency supply of coca-cola.

- Face cream / night cream. I was always amazed at how many beauty products some of the Korean women carried. And at times a bit envious.

- Laundry sheets. These seemed more convenient than the shampoo bar I carried.

- Good headphones. I wasn't even tempted to use my headphones for the first couple weeks. Towards the end, when I was walking longer days, it was nice to listen to music in the afternoons.


Didn't work for me

- Leukotape. This was fine for using on hot spots on the heel, but a total pain for small blisters on the toes. It was hard to cut to the proper size, and the glue (or whatever it is) would ooze out and make my toes stick together. I hated it. I would have rather used basic medical tape.

- Flashlight. Never used it.
There are more than enough packing lists out there; I don't want to repeat what's already been covered dozens of times regarding packs, socks, shoes, etc. Rather, here are a few of the 'little things' that worked for me, or that I saw others using & that I wished I had.

I walked in France mid-August through September, and in Spain in October.


Recommended for all

- A ten-foot / 3-meter lightning cable to charge phones. Someone on this forum suggested this (I forget who), and it's a brilliant idea.

- Glove liners. It can get cold in the mornings, even in August.

- Dual-port charger. It's nice to share.

- Running tights. Guys, there's a reason all the women are wearing these. They're comfortable, light-weight, and versatile. They work as a thermal layer underneath your pants on a cold morning. They're comfortable to sleep in on a cold night. Tights for men are not just for hipsters and body builders any more!


Worked for me

- Moisturizer. I brought some argan oil, ditched it as excess weight, then bought another bottle of oil a few days later. I didn't need much, but it was nice to moisturize once or twice a week.

- Real books. If you're reading on a kindle, a phone, or another electronic device, people leave you alone. It's socially isolating. If you're reading a paperback novel at a cafe - mostly in France, and especially if you're reading a book by a French author - people will treat it as an open invitation to start a conversation.

- Jungle blanket. I liked having an open blanket rather than a sleeping bag. I never used it in France, while I used it almost every night in Spain.

- Sweat pants. It was nice to have a light-weight pair in the evenings.

- Rain jacket + umbrella. I loved this combo, and will never go back to wearing a poncho again.



The wishlist

- Tupperware. I didn't have room for this, but if I was walking in a warmer season (and needed less clothes), a lunch container would have been nice. As it was, I had a few days where my cheese turned to fondue in my sack. Most French people and a lot of the Germans carried some.

- A thermos. There were many long days without a coffee stop in France. I suffered through a few of them, and then started carrying an emergency supply of coca-cola.

- Face cream / night cream. I was always amazed at how many beauty products some of the Korean women carried. And at times a bit envious.

- Laundry sheets. These seemed more convenient than the shampoo bar I carried.

- Good headphones. I wasn't even tempted to use my headphones for the first couple weeks. Towards the end, when I was walking longer days, it was nice to listen to music in the afternoons.


Didn't work for me

- Leukotape. This was fine for using on hot spots on the heel, but a total pain for small blisters on the toes. It was hard to cut to the proper size, and the glue (or whatever it is) would ooze out and make my toes stick together. I hated it. I would have rather used basic medical tape.

- Flashlight. Never used it.
Hi, great ideas--if you want one more idea, the absolute best thing I brought with me was a u-shaped hook from Home Depot that cost about $2. I used it in the showers where there were no hooks to hang up my bag of valuables. Speaking of which, I loved my small waterproof bag (which unfortunately was quite a bit more than $2, but worth it) in which to keep my phone and money while in the shower. I just hooked my waterproof bag on the shower door and all my stuff was dry and safe!
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#12
I'm obviously missing something here :oops:
Why do you need such a long cable?
And 'lightening' cable, as in iPhone/iPad type connection?
The long cable is great when you are in an upper bunk or the nearest outlet is far away. Of course bring a cable that's suitable for your phone. A lightning cable would be useless for my Android phone.
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016)
Future (God-willing): Madrid, Salvador, Primitivo (2018)
#13
Real books. If you're reading a paperback novel..... people will treat it as an open invitation to start a conversation.
Now *there* is a reason NOT to take a real book;-) (for me)
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#14
Agreed, @kaixo, i used a this ultralight backpack as my purse/shopping bag while walking around town and cities. Very handy indeed. Check amazon for less expensive options (15$ and up)
https://www.rei.com/product/867165/...lGQntzdRXNckLybbadU2x62aHCUfkslRoCwe4QAvD_BwE
If you can wait until you are in Spain, or if you have Decathlon stores where you live, you can pick up this ultra light 10 liter, 48 gram/1.7 ounce backpack really cheap.
https://www.decathlon.co.uk/arpenaz-10l-ultra-compact-id_8348925.html

Quecha backpack.jpg
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPP - Santiago May/June 2015)
Camino Primitivo & Santiago - Finisterre (June 2018)
#15
Forgot REI,:eek:! Decathlon, here I come after I return all of my overpriced gear. I wish I would have known it was a bargain compared to our stores in the US.
 
Camino(s) past & future
None
#18
In Saint Jean I got a S shaped hook that worked the same as the U shaped thing above and it also worked great. They had two sizes for sale and I got the larger one so that it would hook on more things. It had a point on one end and was blunt on the other end.
 
#19
I had one piece of Tupperware with me but never any room in it for food as my Mum's ashes were in it.

When preparing for this pilgrimage, I was intending to use a metal box but was advised due to TSA potential issues, it should be see through. Mum travelled well and made it to the Sea at Fisterre. I still keep the bag her ashes were in inside that same box on my Mantel.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
#20
Robo doesn't do upper bunks (albergues) :eek:

But we're working on that :rolleyes: because . . . .


:D:D:D:D
I walked right into that one! :oops::oops::oops::oops::oops:

Who would have thought. No power outlet next to the bed! :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

You never know, we might experience an Albergue next time :eek::eek::eek:
If Pat is not able to walk far enough to the next Casa Rural ;););)
 
Last edited:

linkster

Nunca dejes de creer!
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 05/17 brazo roto Portomarín
Francés 09/17 SJPdP - Santiago
(Portuguese: 09/18)
#21
I had brought a small suction cup with a J hook on it for use in the shower, but never used it. Instead I used a loop of tach cord (tied with a fisherman's knot to form the loop), and a small carabiner. I used a larks head knot around anything and hung things from the carbiner. Closed dry bags have a loop for use in the shower. I used a similar setup to hang my backpack from the bunk bed rail. I typically left the dry bag for my sleep kit rolled and clipped around the bed rail for easy access in the morning.
 

J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
#22
There are more than enough packing lists out there; I don't want to repeat what's already been covered dozens of times regarding packs, socks, shoes, etc. Rather, here are a few of the 'little things' that worked for me, or that I saw others using & that I wished I had.

I walked in France mid-August through September, and in Spain in October.


Recommended for all

- A ten-foot / 3-meter lightning cable to charge phones. Someone on this forum suggested this (I forget who), and it's a brilliant idea.

- Glove liners. It can get cold in the mornings, even in August.

- Dual-port charger. It's nice to share.

- Running tights. Guys, there's a reason all the women are wearing these. They're comfortable, light-weight, and versatile. They work as a thermal layer underneath your pants on a cold morning. They're comfortable to sleep in on a cold night. Tights for men are not just for hipsters and body builders any more!


Worked for me

- Moisturizer. I brought some argan oil, ditched it as excess weight, then bought another bottle of oil a few days later. I didn't need much, but it was nice to moisturize once or twice a week.

- Real books. If you're reading on a kindle, a phone, or another electronic device, people leave you alone. It's socially isolating. If you're reading a paperback novel at a cafe - mostly in France, and especially if you're reading a book by a French author - people will treat it as an open invitation to start a conversation.

- Jungle blanket. I liked having an open blanket rather than a sleeping bag. I never used it in France, while I used it almost every night in Spain.

- Sweat pants. It was nice to have a light-weight pair in the evenings.

- Rain jacket + umbrella. I loved this combo, and will never go back to wearing a poncho again.



The wishlist

- Tupperware. I didn't have room for this, but if I was walking in a warmer season (and needed less clothes), a lunch container would have been nice. As it was, I had a few days where my cheese turned to fondue in my sack. Most French people and a lot of the Germans carried some.

- A thermos. There were many long days without a coffee stop in France. I suffered through a few of them, and then started carrying an emergency supply of coca-cola.

- Face cream / night cream. I was always amazed at how many beauty products some of the Korean women carried. And at times a bit envious.

- Laundry sheets. These seemed more convenient than the shampoo bar I carried.

- Good headphones. I wasn't even tempted to use my headphones for the first couple weeks. Towards the end, when I was walking longer days, it was nice to listen to music in the afternoons.


Didn't work for me

- Leukotape. This was fine for using on hot spots on the heel, but a total pain for small blisters on the toes. It was hard to cut to the proper size, and the glue (or whatever it is) would ooze out and make my toes stick together. I hated it. I would have rather used basic medical tape.

- Flashlight. Never used it.
I use Leukotape for not for blisters but taping my feet for my plantar fasciitis as taught to me by my physical therapist. It really works well.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France's (2018)
#23
I had one piece of Tupperware with me but never any room in it for food as my Mum's ashes were in it.

When preparing for this pilgrimage, I was intending to use a metal box but was advised due to TSA potential issues, it should be see through. Mum travelled well and made it to the Sea at Fisterre. I still keep the bag her ashes were in inside that same box on my Mantel.
Blessings Michelle! My mom just passed away 11/9 I will be walking the Camino in her memory and in memory of my friend Nancy who died of Cancer the year before... I have no ashes but have both of them in my heart to encourage me along the way. I will carry a little Tupperware to hold some chocolate both mom and Nancy would approve! Life was grand and the memories we have continue...
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Via de La Plata (spring, 2019)
#24
I just brought a very bright little squeeze flashlight that was essential to me. Sometimes the light went off suddenly in the albergie when I wasn't ready. I used it to read at night, too.
 
Camino(s) past & future
St Jean to Burgos 2017
St Jean to Fisterra 2018
St Jean to Fisterra 2020 or Chemin Piemont
#25
A small USB fan. None of the albergues we stayed in ever had decent climate control. You can find em on Amazon that will run off your wall charger or a battery pack.

Mine runs for 8 hours and never puts much of a dent in the battery charge.
 

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