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Gender differences walking the Caminos

2020 Camino Guides

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Hi - I was thinking about the 10% rule for rucksack loads and so on and realised that I couldn't remember gender differences being mentioned.
On the whole - kilo for kilo male muscle is much stronger than female muscle. Also, as males flood with testosterone they build more and denser and more efficient upper body muscle - yet we don't seem to factor this in.

Par ex: with reference to top level athletes and quoting D Leyk (et al) "But certain fundamental sex differences exist between men's and women's physical prowess. Men's greater upper body strength is a prime example. Women's lower body strength tends to be more closely matched to men's, while their upper body strength is often just half that of men's upper body strength. In a 1993 study exploring gender differences in muscle makeup, female participants exhibited 52 percent of men's upper body strength, which the researchers partially attributed to their smaller muscles and a higher concentration of fatty tissues in the top half of the female body [source: Miller et al]. Another study published in 1999 similarly found women had 40 percent less upper body skeletal muscle [source: Janssen]. Even controlling for athletic aptitude doesn't tip the upper body strength scales in favor of the female; an experiment comparing the hand grip strength of non-athletic male participants versus elite women athletes still revealed a muscle power disparity in favor of the menfolk."

This being the case should the 10% rucksack rule be different for females? 8% or even 6% for instance? And should women walk shorter day distances than men? So ... should there be a Camino guide for females with different day stages? Or is the female pelvis better designed to have a pack strapped to it?
Do female partners find they are exhausted after keeping up with their partner (of same size and fitness)?

I have seen many times, on long ago long-distance group cycle rides I used to organise and run, an exhausted woman struggling to keep up with her male partner, who tends to wait in impatience stance, until she catches up - that type of marriage has never looked like a shared and fun experience to me.

Apart from this there are definite other physical differences (you may have noticed). In archery women need to wear a forearm brace as their arms are a different shape to males and the released bow-string hits them every time. Does the difference in shape of hip make it harder to walk long distances carrying a pack?

Before I get any emotive replies based on false gender equality such as "well, I am a woman and stronger than my husband, you are being chauvinist, you idiot, how dare you even mention this" and so on I am writing about the scientifically acknowledged gender dimorphism and how it may (or may not) affect women on the Camino; and that this subject never seems to be mentioned, which doesn't seem quite fair.

I am interested - except for Alison Rajou, guide books seem to be written by men, stages set by men .... any thoughts?
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
David,

All I can say is "NEVER under estimate the power of a woman"!

Women may not be able to easily lift a heavy load, but we can endure. We are realists and know that where there's a will there's generally a way. Even now at 74 I can out walk my husband with a loaded pack (6.5 kilos) any day. Of course it is a challenge and never easy, but what matters we try and DO IT!

Carpe Diem!

Margaret Meredith
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Oh, Margaret ... that response was exactly what I was hoping not to get .. sure, you can outwalk your husband (why would you want to do that?) Sure, women can lift their loads and endure ..... my post was really about physical differences and a discussion from there ....... :|
 

Brigitte Klaib

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
August (2013)
David,
Thanks for your post. Women and men are created different in body. And this should be addressed as it is often overlooked.

I will be starting my camino in 24 days and my pack is just 7 percent of my body weight.

While studies show men to have the body strength women do have an advantage in endurance. So the stages are probably fine. We just need to be careful what we pack.

Brigitte

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Camino de Santiago Forum mobile app
 

NicoZ

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013
The 10% rule is based on body weight. Not fitness. Not strength. Not endurance. It's never been something with a great deal of logic behind it.

Yes women carry more body fat then men. A lean woman might be 15% bodyfat. A man at 15% won't look lean. Guess what that doesn't mean the 10% rule is better/worse for the average woman. It's just one more reason why the 10% rule isn't a rule .

You also miss the point the average woman is lighter then the average man. If a person was stuck on the 10% rule she'll be carrying less weight. Factor in on average today the average woman is fitter then the average male :oops: and she'll be less stressed.

I've point this out before. Eating a cheese cake a day won't make you able to carry more weight. Even if you're weight and 10% "rule" claims it should.
 

CaminoGen

CF May-June 2011; Oloron to Fisterra Sept-Oct 2013
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances-SJPP. Santiago (2011); Oloron to Fisterra (Sept 5-Oct 23 2013)
Upper body strenght should not make any difference un carrying a pack since the weight should rest on the hips, the straps are there to not make the pack fall. Of course men and women's bodies are different but I don't see how it should affect one's ability to make the pilgrimage since it is not a race or a competition.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
I didn't overlook the difference in size between men and women, I just assumed that anyone would obviously compare a man and a woman of the same size when considering strength. As for packloads- well, that is why it is in percentages, isn't it

I live in the uk and women are definitely not 'fitter on average' than males ...

Brigitte - yes, research seems to show that men are better at short term physical tasks and women better at long term endurance tasks - maybe we need a guide for men with a day off every four days :lol:

It is also possible that the male upper body muscle mass is a waste on something like the Camino, just unused weight to carry - hhmm .. unless they are large breasted perhaps females have the advantage?
 

Stellere

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
March 2014 - con mi padre
The 10% rule isn't exactly a rule, though. If it were, then a severely obese person could carry 3 times as much as a someone in top condition.

I do think that there are differences between men and women. But I'm not sure that it makes sense to approach those differences from the perspective of a rule that doesn't actually make a lot of sense on its own.

I do think that leg-length comes into play, though. If I'm 5'0 walking with a 6'4 tall man, then I'm probably taking two steps for every one of his. That's bound to be exhausting.
 

JohnMcM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some, and with luck, some more.
Gender differences!?!
For guidance on contributing to this thread.................... Take one full can of worms, shake vigorously, remove lid, step back and watch what happens. :wink:
 

Laliibeans

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014)
I must say, I was expecting this thread to either be about relieving oneself or the discomfort women face with the backpack strap/bra sandwich going on.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Laliibeans said:
I must say, I was expecting this thread to either be about relieving oneself or the discomfort women face with the backpack strap/bra sandwich going on.

Ha - good point. I am surprised that none of us - both women and men - wear hiking skirts (kilts for men of course :wink: ) - would be much more practical wouldn't it? All that fresh air getting up there and the simplest thing when nature calls ....

You are right about the rucksack strapping - overweight men have the same problem with the chest strap ... hmmm .. integral outer shaped bra cover instead of elastic strap? :D
 

dmantony

Member
Camino(s) past & future
9.19(13)
I had considered wearing a skirt then spent a warm day trekking around a local park.
I will take a bit of "relief" inconvenience over chapped thighs any day.
Those ladies on the forum with svelte limbs need not comment. ;)
 

Laliibeans

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014)
I've half been considering a hiking skirt with bike shorts underneath (no svelte limbs here, I'm afraid), but I think I'd just feel odd.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
LePuy, Frances, Aragones, Ingles, Vezelay, Toulosana, Muxia, Fisterra, Portugues, Sanabres
The 10% rule is based on body weight. Not fitness. Not strength. Not endurance. It's never been something with a great deal of logic behind it.
How convenient that the number is round and memorable. Imagine if the rule was 9.654327%. No one could calculate it in their head. :D

Carry what is comfortable. It is likely to 10% or less of your body weight.
 

Caminomary525

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2014)
Could Brigitte PLEASE let us know how she got her pack to 7% of body weight? I can't imagine getting that low as I struggle planning to get to 10%. 8:)

Also, David , fifteen years ago my husband and I rode bikes 1800 miles from Maryland to Colorado (had to give up trans-continental ride when I broke my leg white-water rafting, a story for another day). My better half did much better than I on steep grades. I walked my bike (and cried!) on many ascents. BUT I felt much better at the end of the day than he did. Several evenings, he showered, crashed into bed without eating and didn't return to consciousness until the next morning. I, on the other hand, never missed a nice dinner and was more than able to visit any local sights within a short walking distance.

So, an example of greater masculine muscle strength and greater feminine endurance?
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
CaminoMary - I think that is perfect - exactly so, I think. (sorry about the leg) :wink:
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean May/June 2017. Plans to walk Porto 2020
:D
What a great subject, more laughs than you usually get on the Camino trail. How to get your pack down to 6.75 kg? - well the women I spoke to told me to be ruthless in your packing. If you are not going to use an item every day, or at least every other day then don't take it. I now know what they were talking about and are aiming for 10kg (including water) when I return to the Camino Frances :D 8)
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
CF - sections and whole (2012-2019) and part VF (2017)
David - thank you for this informative (and entertaining) thread. I agree with Saint Mike that it's a lot of fun too. Top marks for coming up with the idea!
John McM ... could I please take the first worm from the can? ... Hiking Skirts/Kilts and how much sense they really do make ...
There's been quite a bit of discussion amongst the girls on the Forum of late concerning a certain brand of hiking skirt/yoga pants/shorts combo in one item of clothing which seems to be working out very well (starts with an 'M' ... check your recent Forum updates) ... well, lads, the good news is that it's suitable for men too! The website states it's for guys "who truly know no fear ... for rugged individualists" (i.e. peregrinos game enough to wear it!) Check out the website and smile ... this garment, for the guys, will be a fantastic conversation-starter in any albergue!
Cheers - JennyH
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
hhmmm .. :| so, if equality goes in each direction we should start wearing hiking skirts? and why not? (Well, I can think of a dozen reasons for why not when it is to do with me!!!)

Here is a photo of a hiking skirt ........ will men take them up? (no pun intended)

I could wear the family tartan kilt - very manly .. but a hiking skirt? I am too afraid .. sorry :oops: :lol: any male volunteers out there?
... anyway, it doesn't have pockets or even belt loops!!
 

Attachments

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
LePuy, Frances, Aragones, Ingles, Vezelay, Toulosana, Muxia, Fisterra, Portugues, Sanabres
Kilts and how much sense they really do make
I like lots of pockets in my pants, shorts, and shirts. Are there lots of pockets on kilts?
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Me too - loads of good pockets for me - but, no Falc - no pockets on a kilt, but there is the Sporran, which is a purse (men wearing purses, whatever next) which hangs on a chain from the belt and covers and protects the genitals.
A kilt is a fine thing. Comfortable, fine air-conditioning underneath, excellent for nipping behind a tree, and looks rather well too.
 

Attachments

WayWalker63

Active Member
Laliibeans- I've thought about hiking my Camino in a hiking skirt (I've got a Macabi), and bike shorts or legging/long underwear if its cold. Don't think it's a odd combo at all.

Brigitte - I would also like to know how you managed to get your pack weight that low.

Interesting subject David. Thanks for starting the thread.

A traditional kilt might not have the pockets you need but I bet you could design one with the required pockets and get a good seamstress/tailor to make it for you, if you don't sew yourself.
 

Brigitte Klaib

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
August (2013)
I will give my packing list via PM to anyone that would like it. I am not taking a sleeping bag or pad. Just the bear minimum.

I am always too hot so I am not taking much for cold days, everything can be layered.

I also started packing months ago and keep looking at what can be removed or exchanged for lighter things.

I leave Colorado on August 20, starting the walk on the 22nd. I have 45 days to walk so I will be doing a "stop and smell the roses" walk.

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Camino de Santiago Forum mobile app
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
"A traditional kilt might not have the pockets you need but I bet you could design one with the required pockets and get a good seamstress/tailor to make it for you, if you don't sew yourself."

What?!*?*! pockets on a kilt? Heresy!!! A kilt is a pretty complicated item - 8 yards of material, heavy pleats that are at the back which come round to the sides - so nowhere for a pocket - and the front is a flat panel, held from flapping with a kilt pin, then there are three integrated leather fastening belts - and there is a special drying hanger so that the pleats don't fall out after washing.

It would be possible to hang 'pockets' or small bags from the belt - that could work.

You can get non-tartan hiking 'kilts' which are flat at the sides and do have a pocket on one side but my understanding is that if anyone wears them in Scotland they are chased down the street, caught, put in the stocks, and then pelted with out of date Haggises until they repent (or something like that) :wink:
 

drutherford520

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
August 26 (2013)
Brigitte,
Can you send me your packing list also? I tried to send you a pm but got a message telling me that i had to contact the system administrator. I also live in Colorado and i'm leaving on the 26th, 24 days 17 hours and 18 minutes....not counting. I will not start walking until the 28th. Hopefully our paths will cross. I'm not stopping to smell the roses but slowing.. 8)

Dan from Colorado

Buen Camino

Sent from my GT-N8013 using Camino de Santiago Forum mobile app
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
CF - sections and whole (2012-2019) and part VF (2017)
Laliibeans and WayWalker - two friends of mine, Lesley and Peter, who walked with me last year from Leon, wore matching hiking shorts with Skins (the sports shorts/leggings) underneath. They were slightly worried that they looked like Kath and Kel (the Aussies will 'get' this!) but the shorts and Skins worked well for them in the cold and not so cold conditions we experienced.
David - could the sporran be a previous incarnation of the 'manbag' ? Quite possibly!
Cheers - JennyH
 

WayWalker63

Active Member
Jenny-that sounds like a sight to behold. :lol: My plan right now is to start Oct. 1. so I don't know if shorts event the skins/bike shorts type would be warm enough. I might just wear either long underwear bottoms and/or some leg warmers. The leg warmers can be taken off easily if I get too hot and the long underwear can be rolled/pushed up.
I think in the past it was usually the man who carried or held the purse. And didn't the pilgrims of old carry a satchel of sorts to hold their food for the trail?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Sept/Oct (2013) Camino Frances to Muxia
Speaking of skirts...I am taking a couple very light skirts. It is better for me due to the bunching up in the crotch, That drives me CRAZY! They dry fast also. I am looking for a pair of fast drying comfortable tights to possibly wear under if necessary. I wear shorts or skirts sometimes year around. Hot blooded and warm legs. I am carrying the Deuter ACT Lite SL 45+10. Packing minimal. I have read everything ya'll have said and have been helped greatly by all! Thank you. My COUNTDOWN APP(LOL) says I leave for London in 27 days; 16 hrs;43 mins then I start my Camino in 38 days; 08 hrs; 42 mins...LOL in which I learned about on here! Let's see what else...I bought my wicking-light weight clothes at WALMART and saved a BIG bundle. Light Fleece and Wind Jacket, shopped in my son's closet...free except I bought all their clothes. LOL Making silk sack and pillow sack. Leaving new sleeping bag at home. Getting a few bits and bobs figured out then I shall be ready! Couldn't have done this without you all!
Thank you again,
Cindi :lol:
 

Laliibeans

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014)
I'm used to hiking in thermals under my shorts, so it's not the look I'm worried about, just the feel! I'm not really a dainty walker and legging or not, I might make people blush as I'm loping along (and climbing because I'm still a child...)

i was going to take a hiking dress with leggings for after the days walk is over though. I'd just feel physically weird doing the actual walk in it. It's a tradition thing. Maybe the Camino will teach me how to lope in a skirt with ease :lol:
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
CF - sections and whole (2012-2019) and part VF (2017)
Hi WayWalker, Maggie, Cindi, Laliibeans and Forum members et al -
There were certainly some sights to behold!
The item I found to be "truly unisex" though was the rain poncho - in bad weather you couldn't tell WHO was under them! Every pilgrim looked like an extra in a Lord of The Rings movie - hunched backs due to "backpack bulge" and all flapping away in the wind and rain!
We all find out what works for us best gear-wise during training and on the Camino itself - whatever gear you've invested in, I hope it works out really well for you and that you can continue to use those items once you're home. I continue to wear everything I bought, except for the poncho - funny about that ...
Maggie - 'love that work/hiking skirt! I think it could work for the girls too ... replace that belt with a scarf and you're 'good to go'!
Cheers - JennyH
 

WayWalker63

Active Member
Maggie- love the working kilt! Very manly and a little bit sexy.
Jenny- except for my Altus raincoat/poncho, I think I will use everything I've got in my kit when I get home. In fact I already wear the Macabi skirt and my hiking pants.
Laliibeans- the skirt is pretty long, hangs somewhere between my calves and ankles, so it should hide leggings or long johns underneath.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
There are plenty of kilt-wearing men walking the caminos, and hosting in the albergues, too. If you are lucky you will meet Frank from Lockerbie, hospitalero at Refugio Gaucelmo in Rabanal, done up in his Stuart tartan. I assure you it does not require special hangers and fussy inner workings... he wears it on the road and over the mountains, says it´s much easier to get a ride when hitchhiking. Spanish families invite him in for drinks and have their photos taken with him.

Plenty of peregrinas wear skirts when they walk -- regular, non-brand-name skirts of all sizes, lengths, and colors. I wear a nice Columbia "skort" some days walking, a skirt with shorts built-in underneath. Some women even wear... :shock: DRESSES!

No word on what scientific effect these garments have on the relative carrying/endurance capacities of male and female pilgrims. Men and women, boys and girls walk every day with loads on their backs. A lot of them -- even the older, female ones! -- make it all the way.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
now now - I wasn't remotely suggesting an 'inferiority' in regard to women :lol:
Women certainly seem to have greater endurance (well, they put up with us for a start)

I was really wondering .. with a female and a male of the same size and fitness, with female muscles being significantly less strong, do females have a harder time? Especially if they are walking with that male .. are they always trying to catch up and so on ... nothing serious, just another thread

Great thing is, no one has come out with any chauvinist responses - has been fun -

p.s. a kilt is a fine thing - the kilt hanger is very similar to those hangers for women's clothing that have a grip at each end, but wider.
 

Tumbleweed

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
David, really? You seem so serious with this question of male and female strength. Why the obsession? If you must know, I have more strength in my female brain than you do in your male upper body. :lol: LOL Eat them worms. LOL :lol:

Ha ha...just kidding. :D I think I would do just fine and could keep up with a man who is the same size and what not. I carry my load more on my hips therefore no back or shoulder strain. Women have strong hips, men have strong upper bodies, at the end of the day we're just happy to have a place to lay our heads. Which are roughly what, 8 pounds each? Regardless of being male or female.

Thanks for the giggles,
Angela
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
No, not serious, not an obsession - all I am doing is bringing up a subject that I noticed hadn't been mentioned before. Another subject that is never mentioned is women's monthly periods and how to cope with those using the sometimes primitive facilities one can find out there. I have never seen sanitary products on a packing list.

We are different, males and females, in body and mind - quite different. That doesn't mean better or worse, inferior or superior - just different. It is a worthy topic I think.

There are no muscles in the brain you know - as for strength of brain, between yours and mine, well, I don't know. My IQ was last tested at 163 - does this count? No, of course not.

It is just that if there are significant differences then this is a subject worth talking about as if there are differences these should be factored into one's Camino, don't you think?
 

cherie

Member
Camino(s) past & future
VDLP to Finisterre 2009
Le Puy to SJPDP 2013
Frances 2014
GR700 & Arles 2017
David, I'm with you re the difference in muscle strength re men and women. (Yes ladies I believe we are tough!!) I walked the VDLP with my brother and whilst we carried similar weights he was able to carry it easier and lighter, if that makes sense. Being taller he was also able to cover the same distance in shorter time than myself even if I matched him step by step I believe being a short arse @ 4' 11" I need to walk twice as many steps as someone much taller than myself so does this ultimately have an effect on the weight we carry too?
 

Tumbleweed

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
David said:
Women certainly seem to have greater endurance (well, they put up with us for a start)
This is the brain strength I was referring to, not flexing any muscle here. :D
David said:
Another subject that is never mentioned is women's monthly periods and how to cope with those using the sometimes primitive facilities one can find out there. I have never seen sanitary products on a packing list.
Well David, us women are mysterious creatures.
David said:
the macho image rolls on - "Gillette, the mark of a man" - as if women don't need razors ...
At least Gillette gave us the "Venus" so it will "reveal the Goddess" in us women. I mean, who doesn't want to feel like a Goddess now and again?
David said:
the haulers and carriers of heavy things, those doing the grunt work, well, they should all be men ......don't you think?
I hate grunt work, so yes, give me a man with big beautiful strong arms any day to do my heavy lifting. :)

You are definitely veering off trail (subject)....so for now, I'm going to get back to building my physical strength so I can carry my own pack and walk over 800km on the Camino :arrow:

God Bless, :)
Angela
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
Brother David, you might be a big strong man, but you are also a great tap-dancer.
Didn´t you take on this subject in the past, and stir up a lot of trouble for yourself thereby?

People are being very patient and kind with you. I wish you would just come out and tell us what point you are trying to make with this discussion.
 

siseale94

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Oct.( 2012), Pamplona to Santiago Compostela. Camino Finisterre, Oct. (2015)
It was my experience that women were the strongest walkers on the Camino. Last Oct. I went from Pamplona to Santiago de Compostela in 29 days and there were multiple women I could not keep up with. Lenka Cavojska, one of my walking partners went from SJPP to Santiago in 25 days. I for one, do not question the ability of women. lol
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Dear Rebekah, I am neither big nor strong - but I did learn to tap dance with one foot - couldn't integrate the other for some reason.
If an honest subject causes you problems what am I to do about that?
Shall I be censored ? Why? You don't like it but I do so I have to stop? You could just stop reading it you know, if it is causing you distress.

Or, shall I ask for a list of subjects I can talk about and subjects that I cannot? Who from?
Am I being 'anti' anything? Am I being partisan? No. My only 'point' is to open up discussion - it is a worthy subject isn't it? If there are differences then these should be taken into account in one's preparation for the Camino - and is that not one of the things this forum is about?
Am I to pretend that there are no differences between males and females? Would that make you happier?

From previous posts on this thread it would seem that a number of people seem to be enjoying it, there have been excellent replies ...

I am glad that you keep in touch with all of my previous posts but I have no memory of having posted this before. It may be my age, but I have looked back through all of my posts - just to check - and cannot find anything ... never mind.

All is well Rebeka :wink:

Buen Camino
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
siseale94 said:
It was my experience that women were the strongest walkers on the Camino. Last Oct. I went from Pamplona to Santiago de Compostela in 29 days and there were multiple women I could not keep up with. Lenka Cavojska, one of my walking partners went from SJPP to Santiago in 25 days. I for one, do not question the ability of women. lol
Ah - I am happy to go with that - it would seem that there are so many people of mixed ages and mixed abilities on the Camino, that my question isn't really important after all (I initially thought it was :oops:).
On the athletics track or in the Olympics, where athletes are honed to perfection, of course, but on Camino? It would seem not! I am happy to concede. :wink:
 

KentuckyJay

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Hiked Leon to Santiago in May, 2014.
Hiked Porto to Santiago in May, 2016.
Please refrain from purely personal attacks.

Moderator edited
 
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