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Getting Small

Past OR future Camino
2018
This post is aimed at some of you gear hounds, like davebugg. I was curious about the new Osprey Pro 30L, and ordered it. It terms of utility as well as design and aesthetics, it is an impressive pack. In 2016 I carried a Gregory 40L and in 2018 a Gregory 36L, both fine packs. After packing the new Osprey Pro 30, I realized there was still plenty of room. So, out of curiosity I ordered the 20L version--everything I packed on the last Camino fit. Came in at 11 lbs. Here's a photo of the packed Osprey Pro 20L adjacent to a guitar to give you an idea of scale. If you would have told me five years ago that I would think a 20L is adequate, preferable actually, I would have said impossible. I imagine my contents are similar to most others with the exception of no sleeping bag. IMG_0236.JPG IMG_0238.JPG
 
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domigee

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Wow, it’s even lighter than mine! (Osprey Lumina).
Love it! 😎
Would have to check how it fits though....
 

Faye Walker

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2014, CF 2018, CP 2019 from Coimbra
This post is aimed at some of you gear hounds, like davebugg. I was curious about the new Osprey Pro 30L, and ordered it. It terms of utility as well as design and aesthetics, it is an impressive pack. In 2016 I carried a Gregory 40L and in 2018 a Gregory 36L, both fine packs. After packing the new Osprey Pro 30, I realized there was still plenty of room. So, out of curiosity I ordered the 20L version--everything I packed on the last Camino fit. Came in at 11 lbs. Here's a photo of the packed Osprey Pro 20L adjacent to a guitar to give you an idea of scale. If you would have told me five years ago that I would think a 20L is adequate, preferable actually, I would have said impossible. I imagine my contents are similar to most others with the exception of no sleeping bag. View attachment 97145 View attachment 97147
Impressive! I tried to take my 24 L Talon on the CP.... everything fit... but it was too snug, so I still ended up with my side-access zipper Kyle 36, carrying only 24 L of stuff. Will be curious to know how you like it on the ground.
 
Past OR future Camino
Frances (14), Portuguese (15), Le Puy (17), Ingles (17), VDLP (18), Lana (18), Madrid (19) + more
I took a very tiny backpack on the Via de la Plata during my winter walk in 2018. :)
I like being small when I don't need camping equipment on the Camino.

Ensure that the backpack you choose has comfortable shoulder straps (and a waist strap if necessary) to carry comfortably. Otherwise, it is better to use a heavier backpack if you'll feel better wearing it throughout the day. For example, I use a padded thick hipbelt when wilderness hiking because the thin webbing straps (on many super ultralight models) didn't distribute the load properly.

 
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MarkyD

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Francés 31/08/2018 - 20/10/2018
This post is aimed at some of you gear hounds, like davebugg. I was curious about the new Osprey Pro 30L, and ordered it. It terms of utility as well as design and aesthetics, it is an impressive pack. In 2016 I carried a Gregory 40L and in 2018 a Gregory 36L, both fine packs. After packing the new Osprey Pro 30, I realized there was still plenty of room. So, out of curiosity I ordered the 20L version--everything I packed on the last Camino fit. Came in at 11 lbs. Here's a photo of the packed Osprey Pro 20L adjacent to a guitar to give you an idea of scale. If you would have told me five years ago that I would think a 20L is adequate, preferable actually, I would have said impossible. I imagine my contents are similar to most others with the exception of no sleeping bag. View attachment 97145 View attachment 97147
I did my first camino with a 22L Deuter backpack. It was barely noticeable after a few days walking. I did have a "fanny pack"/"riñonera" which I had in front for easy grab items to save taking backpack off too often while walking. It worked a treat.
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
This post is aimed at some of you gear hounds, like davebugg. I was curious about the new Osprey Pro 30L, and ordered it. It terms of utility as well as design and aesthetics, it is an impressive pack. In 2016 I carried a Gregory 40L and in 2018 a Gregory 36L, both fine packs. After packing the new Osprey Pro 30, I realized there was still plenty of room. So, out of curiosity I ordered the 20L version--everything I packed on the last Camino fit. Came in at 11 lbs. Here's a photo of the packed Osprey Pro 20L adjacent to a guitar to give you an idea of scale. If you would have told me five years ago that I would think a 20L is adequate, preferable actually, I would have said impossible. I imagine my contents are similar to most others with the exception of no sleeping bag. View attachment 97145 View attachment 97147
I’d be interested in feedback as to the air-circulation between the sack and your back. I’ve tried several very light rucksacks - although not Osprey to be fair - which do not have a well structured internal frame - and always reverted to my trusty Osprey Kestrel 38.

It’s only filled to 2/3 capacity, but it’s supremely comfortable with an excellent hip belt and fairly good airflow. I also don’t have to worry about how to pack it. Your 20 litre option does look ‘well packed’!
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Past OR future Camino
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
I've walked Caminos with a lot smaller than that, though it does seem that it's just about large enough you could fit a compact sleeping bag in plus absolute minimal basics.

So, during that period of my own super light-weight pilgrimming, I would certainly have been most interested in that pack, which seems like a friendly compromise between utility and relative smallness.

Looks more to me like a 25L than a 20.

The thing I like about it, from my own experience with small kit, is that it seems sturdy enough to manage an outside hanging sleeping bag if you can't manage to fit it inside -- without compromising small size, as most small packs eventually break on long distance hikes.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I did my first camino with a 22L Deuter backpack. It was barely noticeable after a few days walking. I did have a "fanny pack"/"riñonera" which I had in front for easy grab items to save taking backpack off too often while walking. It worked a treat.
I love fanny packs and wear them in front...easy grab for my camera and anything else I need at my fingertips.
I tried crossover bags and there is absolutely no comparison for convenience, imo.
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
This post is aimed at some of you gear hounds, like davebugg. I was curious about the new Osprey Pro 30L, and ordered it. It terms of utility as well as design and aesthetics, it is an impressive pack. In 2016 I carried a Gregory 40L and in 2018 a Gregory 36L, both fine packs. After packing the new Osprey Pro 30, I realized there was still plenty of room. So, out of curiosity I ordered the 20L version--everything I packed on the last Camino fit. Came in at 11 lbs. Here's a photo of the packed Osprey Pro 20L adjacent to a guitar to give you an idea of scale. If you would have told me five years ago that I would think a 20L is adequate, preferable actually, I would have said impossible. I imagine my contents are similar to most others with the exception of no sleeping bag.

The 'Pro' models within the Talon series are really decent backpacks. As Sara mentioned above, the first consideration for a backpack is 'Fit n Feel'; after that, it is all about durability and craftsmanship, ease of adjustability (fine tuning adjustments with the hip and shoulder harnesses on the fly), usability, and personal taste factors related to colors, loading (top or panel), and size and placement of pockets and do-dad holders.

My preference is that a backpack needs to hold everything inside the pack. . . I do not want to be forced to dangle shoes, underwear, sleeping gear, etc. due to lack of space, unless I choose to dangle stuff. And I want the bag large enough so that I am also not needing a shoe horn to compress everything as tight as I can. BUT, if I have the choice between a backpack that is exquisitely comfortable to wear and carry stuff with, but is forcing me to dangle some bits, versus a backpack that is spacious enough, but is fussy to carry and never lets me forget I am have a load on my back, I will choose to dangle bits and enjoy the comfort of the carry.

So if happiness is 20 liters of carrying capacity, and the Pro Talon fits and feels good, you have a winner. PLUS, it can be carried on a plane with no questions asked. . . well, I guess airport security will ask and demand to know how you got that guitar inside the pack, and then confiscate the guitar because guitar strings can be used to garrote the flight crew and hijack the plane to Cuba, but somehow overshoot that island and land in Haiti where the Haitian police will think you are nuts because Jamaica has better beaches and cute tropical umbrella drinks and is just over there to the left across the ocean a little bit . . .

I dunno, maybe the Talon Pro 20L is too much of a risk for international misunderstandings and diplomatic angst. At least Haiti doesn't have nuclear weapons.

All joking aside, it sounds like you have a good backpack that will meet all your needs. :)
 
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Past OR future Camino
2018
The 'Pro' models within the Talon series are really decent backpacks. As Sara mentioned above, the first consideration for a backpack is 'Fit n Feel'; after that, it is all about durability and craftsmanship, ease of adjustability (fine tuning adjustments with the hip and shoulder harnesses on the fly), usability, and personal taste factors related to colors, loading (top or panel), and size and placement of pockets and do-dad holders.

My preference is that a backpack needs to hold everything inside the pack. . . I do not want to be forced to dangle shoes, underwear, sleeping gear, etc. due to lack of space, unless I choose to dangle stuff. And I want the bag large enough so that I am also not needing a shoe horn to compress everything as tight as I can. BUT, if I have the choice between a backpack that is exquisitely comfortable to wear and carry stuff with, but is forcing me to dangle some bits, versus a backpack that is spacious enough, but is fussy to carry and never lets me forget I am have a load on my back, I will choose to dangle bits and enjoy the comfort of the carry.

So if happiness is 20 liters of carrying capacity, and the Pro Talon fits and feels good, you have a winner. PLUS, it can be carried on a plane with no questions asked. . . well, I guess airport security will ask and demand to know how you got that guitar inside the pack, and then confiscate the guitar because guitar strings can be used to garrote the flight crew and hijack the plane to Cuba, but somehow overshoot that island and land in Haiti where the Haitian police will think you are nuts because Jamaica has better beaches and cute tropical umbrella drinks and is just over there to the left across the ocean a little bit . . .

I dunno, maybe the Talon Pro 20L is too much of a risk for international misunderstandings and diplomatic angst. At least Haiti doesn't have nuclear weapons.
Funny, Davebugg, danglements have always been something I have worked to avoid. That everything fits inside and is accessible is mandatory for me as well. For me I think it goes back to the wilderness ethic of leaving no trace and everything in its place, although you will recall, as will diminishing numbers on this forum, that with external frame packs we typically had the sleeping bag lashed below with a sleeping pad strapped to the top. Regarding accessibility, note how deep that top zipper goes. I have also fashioned a small front (8x5x3in) pack from a hip pack, and it attaches with quick release to my shoulder straps. It holds passport, money/cards, iPhone, iPad, tissue and some blister treatment as well as a small water bottle. I pretty much never have to get into my pack during the day, except for a rain jacket which is inside right on top. There's something satisfying and aesthetically appealing to me to have the equipment side of the walk well-dialed in. All of which relates to my theory about a big trip/adventure. There are three basic parts: First, researching and preparation; Second, actually going on the trip/adventure; Third, talking about it for years afterwards. I am bit embarrassed to say that for me the First the Third are almost as enjoyable as the Second.
 

Anhalter

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2019 CF
For my taste, the mentioned pack is way to heavy for what it offers. Sorry if i burst a bubble. Size might be enough for a dialed in lightweight setup (and no, i don't see a need to fix a sleeping bag on the outside). It might be "sturdy", but imho that is a feature not needed for a camino.
Thats not to say, it might not work. But i do not see anything that makes it stand out.

edit: my first camino, i had my clothes in a 8L drybag. My sleeping bag in a 4L one. Both bags where not full, and if i would have had the need, could have been compressed to almost half of the stated volume. Add a 1L wash bag, a 1L electronics bag and my rain gear. 20l should have done the trick.

edit2: the (unfortunately discontinued) Montane Ultra Tour 22 did offer more or less the same features and volume at 545g. And claimed to have some water proofing (DWR). At half the price.
 
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davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
Funny, Davebugg, danglements have always been something I have worked to avoid. That everything fits inside and is accessible is mandatory for me as well. For me I think it goes back to the wilderness ethic of leaving no trace and everything in its place, although you will recall, as will diminishing numbers on this forum, that with external frame packs we typically had the sleeping bag lashed below with a sleeping pad strapped to the top. Regarding accessibility, note how deep that top zipper goes. I have also fashioned a small front (8x5x3in) pack from a hip pack, and it attaches with quick release to my shoulder straps. It holds passport, money/cards, iPhone, iPad, tissue and some blister treatment as well as a small water bottle. I pretty much never have to get into my pack during the day, except for a rain jacket which is inside right on top. There's something satisfying and aesthetically appealing to me to have the equipment side of the walk well-dialed in. All of which relates to my theory about a big trip/adventure. There are three basic parts: First, researching and preparation; Second, actually going on the trip/adventure; Third, talking about it for years afterwards. I am bit embarrassed to say that for me the First the Third are almost as enjoyable as the Second.
You've got an excellent handle on things, Bob :)
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
For my taste, the mentioned pack is way to heavy for what it offers. Sorry if i burst a bubble. Size might be enough for a dialed in lightweight setup (and no, i don't see a need to fix a sleeping bag on the outside). It might be "sturdy", but imho that is a feature not needed for a camino.
Thats not to say, it might not work. But i do not see anything that makes it stand out.

edit: my first camino, i had my clothes in a 8L drybag. My sleeping bag in a 4L one. Both bags where not full, and if i would have had the need, could have been compressed to almost half of the stated volume. Add a 1L wash bag, a 1L electronics bag and my rain gear. 20l should have done the trick.

edit2: the (unfortunately discontinued) Montane Ultra Tour 22 did offer more or less the same features and volume at 545g. And claimed to have some water proofing (DWR). At half the price.

Hi, Anhalter. Now that I read that you are comfortable with, and prefer a fastpack like the Montane Ultra Tour, I can understand why you would find a backpack like the Talon Pro model not to your liking.

For me, the Montane was uncomfortable and I did not care for it. I do envy those, like yourself, who find such fastpacks a good alternative because of the weight advantages; the Talon Pro is about 455 grams heavier. But I think, as such, ultralightweight and frameless fastpacks have an appeal and usability that is embraced most universally by a niche group of hikers and climbers. Because of such a disparity between the Montane and the Osprey - with these two backpacks - I do not see them as directly comparative as choices for everyone.

For comparisons to the Montane, my comparatives would be to other frameless offerings by different manufacturers. For the style and functions of the Pro Talon as a framed backpack, if one is not comfortable wearing or using a fastpack style frameless backpack to begin with, then I think I would be looking to compare choices between other framed, day/overnight volume backpacks.

BTW, the Talon Pro bag material has a high level of water resistance as well as a good DWR treatment, which, as you mentioned, is a Plus for a backpack..

This is definitely not meant as a criticism, but as an observation of how such variations in tolerances and needs and basic comfort levels really affect choices that I've made.
 
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domigee

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
I took a very tiny backpack on the Via de la Plata during my winter walk in 2018. :)
I like being small when I don't need camping equipment on the Camino.

Ensure that the backpack you choose has comfortable shoulder straps (and a waist strap if necessary) to carry comfortably. Otherwise, it is better to use a heavier backpack if you'll feel better wearing it throughout the day. For example, I use a padded thick hipbelt when wilderness hiking because the thin webbing straps (on many super ultralight models) didn't distribute the load properly.

Absolutely. I went on a short pilgrimage (to Walsingham) and as we were staying in B&Bs, no sleeping bags, towels etc. Everything easily fitted in my small daypack (Tempest 20). It just wasn’t comfortable! I went back to my Exos 48 even though it was mostly empty.
 
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Anhalter

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2019 CF
Hi, Anhalter. Now that I read that you are comfortable with, and prefer a fastpack like the Montane Ultra Tour, I can understand why you would find a backpack like the Talon Pro model not to your liking.

For me, the Montane was uncomfortable and I did not care for it. I do envy those, like yourself, who find such fastpacks a good alternative because of the weight advantages; the Talon Pro is about 455 grams heavier. But I think, as such, ultralightweight and frameless fastpacks have an appeal and usability that is embraced most universally by a niche group of hikers and climbers. Because of such a disparity between the Montane and the Osprey - with these two backpacks - I do not see them as directly comparative as choices for everyone.

For comparisons to the Montane, my comparatives would be to other frameless offerings by different manufacturers. For the style and functions of the Pro Talon as a framed backpack, if one is not comfortable wearing or using a fastpack style frameless backpack to begin with, then I think I would be looking to compare choices between other framed, day/overnight volume backpacks.

BTW, the Talon Pro bag material has a high level of water resistance as well as a good DWR treatment, which, as you mentioned, is a Plus for a backpack..

This is definitely not meant as a criticism, but as an observation of how such variations in tolerances and needs and basic comfort levels really affect choices that I've made.
Hi Dave,

i agree with you that the two backpacks are not made for the same kind of users. But as i tried to say, i don't think the use case of the Talon Pro is closer to the camino. A pilgrim that can get his stuff into a 20L pack likely won't have much need for a frame. Talking of which, from the description on the website i am not sure if that back plate functions as a frame, or more like a piece that gives some support and padding (like on many of the gossamer gear packs). From what i have seen, the Montane pack had a similar piece of padding (looks sewn in) in the back, which likely would not be as massive as the Osprey one, but then, at the weight that one can put into a 20L pack on a camino, that might have been sufficient. Also in terms of DWR i dont find any info on the Talon Pro website. That might not mean its not there, but i hope you understand my confusion.

To make matters worse: are we talking of the same backpack? You do use the term fastpack, which for me is typically a "vest-style" pack, which the ultra tour 22 was not. I dont find an english article atm, but here is a german one with some pics of the pack i am talking about: https://www.alpin.de/8538/artikel_der_ist_tragbar__montane_ultra_tour_22.html

Now thats all a lot of "theorycrafting" as we gamers call it, since unfortunately i was to late to get my hands on a UT22 and don't plan on getting a Talon Pro. I can see the charm of a "full feature daypack" and there are not many on the market and every addidtion is welcome. But then, it sometimes saddens me a bit that none of the major brands seem to be able to manufacture one that would fit my needs. My wifes Lithia Speed isnt bad, but then, it's made for ants ;)
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
i agree with you that the two backpacks are not made for the same kind of users. But as i tried to say, i don't think the use case of the Talon Pro is closer to the camino. A pilgrim that can get his stuff into a 20L pack likely won't have much need for a frame.

A fair point to consider for those wishing to evaluate choices and consider a frameless backpack. I'm not arguing against choosing such a backpack, only that such a backpack will not suit a good number of folks for a variety of valid reasons. For those folks, a pack like the Talon Pro is a good candidate for consideration.

Talking of which, from the description on the website i am not sure if that back plate functions as a frame, or more like a piece that gives some support and padding (like on many of the gossamer gear packs).

The Talon and some of the Gossamer Gear daypacks do use an internal frame sheet which effectively transfers weight to the hipbelt. The backpad on those packs are simply that, a back pad/cushion. The Montane has a very modest back pad, but no internal frame, which for its intended use is, as you said, not really necessary at very light load weights.

Also in terms of DWR i dont find any info on the Talon Pro website. That might not mean its not there, but i hope you understand my confusion.

The information is contained in the Specs data in the materials list. I copied the text from the Osprey website. It is hard to spot because Osprey tends not to add it in the main description sections.

FABRIC
MAIN - Nanofly® 100D x 200D nylon UHMWPE, PFC-free DWR
ACCENT - bluesign®-approved recycled 420HD nylon packcloth, PFC-free DWR
BOTTOM - bluesign®-approved recycled 420HD nylon packcloth, PFC-free DWR

Note for those curious: PFCs are Per-fluorinated compounds. In recent years, due to environmental controversies, PFCs which were a normal part of DWR treatment compounds have been replaced. For those concerned, increasing numbers of gear and clothing manufacturers labels will state if their DWR treatments are PFC free.

To make matters worse: are we talking of the same backpack? You do use the term fastpack, which for me is typically a "vest-style" pack, which the ultra tour 22 was not. I dont find an english article atm, but here is a german one with some pics of the pack i am talking about:

Sorry for the confusion. Fastpacking is a term used in the American backpacking and trail running communities in a variety of ways. While a 'fastpack' can be a vest-style small pack for hydration or stuff to eat on the fly, it also is used to mean small and light packs used by those hiking fast and light. The Monatane would fit into that category. This is an example of what I'm talking about from Six Moon Designs.

One thing I try to not do is to debate personal preferences; you simply cannot argue against someone's subjective likes or dislikes. But we can certainly provide information - which folks may be unaware of - to help folks who wish to evaluate their options and choices.
 
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My major problem with rucksack comparisons is quite simply ' back sizing'. I have a long back by all normal means of measurement and few sellers actually advertise that part of the equation, usually Osprey do. They also have an app showing how to size a backpack and how to adjust their backpacks to fit. However for me that means a larger capacity rucksack. With Ospreys being, in general, fairly light, with enough compression straps to choke an elephant, I have learned that I can carry smaller loads with the enth degree of comfort. I just haven't got enough life left to look further, having spent a huge amount of time looking for the perfect fit, weight and volume. Ah, also due to the fact that I now carry extra weight by way of a pacemaker I have discovered that the straps are in just the wrong place rubbing right on the edge of the protrusion, my wife has made a foam pad which covers the whole area of the P. M. and it us covered in a waterproof nylon sleeve attached under a shoulder strap, it does the job perfectly. So Exos, you had just better last for as long as I need you.
I do like the look of those small, ultra light bags though.
 
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linkster

¡Nunca dejes de creer!
Past OR future Camino
2022
I used an Exos on my first Camino. Worked out fine, but then I encountered a couple of people who met the infamous chinches. Their stuff was all washed, dried, bagged, and sprayed etc. So I looked at my Exos to see if I could remove the frame to wash the pack if needed. That thing is strung tight like a guitar string. It might be possible, but Osprey recommended not to remove the frame.

I switched to a Gossamer Gear Gorilla 40. The frame and hip belt are removeable. The Gorilla does not breathe as well against my back as the Exos did. I also wish the Gorilla hip belt tightening was similar to the Exos. Rather than pulling the tensioning straps forward, the Gorilla straps pull backward. Seems subtle, but the Exos snugs up better. Similar to my Granite Gear packs.

I would like a 30 liter pack similar to the Gorilla, and may try out the Kumo 36.
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
I used an Exos on my first Camino. Worked out fine, but then I encountered a couple of people who met the infamous chinches. Their stuff was all washed, dried, bagged, and sprayed etc. So I looked at my Exos to see if I could remove the frame to wash the pack if needed. That thing is strung tight like a guitar string. It might be possible, but Osprey recommended not to remove the frame.

I switched to a Gossamer Gear Gorilla 40. The frame and hip belt are removeable. The Gorilla does not breathe as well against my back as the Exos did. I also wish the Gorilla hip belt tightening was similar to the Exos. Rather than pulling the tensioning straps forward, the Gorilla straps pull backward. Seems subtle, but the Exos snugs up better. Similar to my Granite Gear packs.

I would like a 30 liter pack similar to the Gorilla, and may try out the Kumo 36.

For either the Gorilla or the Kumo, you can swap out the standard sitpad that is used for the back pad with this more breathable version It made a big difference for me.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
Has anyone tried the new lightweight Aarn pack, the Pace Magic 33? I'm tempted.
 
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movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2015
Impressive! I tried to take my 24 L Talon on the CP.... everything fit... but it was too snug, so I still ended up with my side-access zipper Kyle 36, carrying only 24 L of stuff. Will be curious to know how you like it on the ground.
Five years, and I still use my Osprey Women's Kyte 30l. I may be wrong but I think women probably pack more items than men do. At least that's what I observed on the Camino and the Great Glen way in Scotland.
 

MarkyD

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Francés 31/08/2018 - 20/10/2018
The 'Pro' models within the Talon series are really decent backpacks. As Sara mentioned above, the first consideration for a backpack is 'Fit n Feel'; after that, it is all about durability and craftsmanship, ease of adjustability (fine tuning adjustments with the hip and shoulder harnesses on the fly), usability, and personal taste factors related to colors, loading (top or panel), and size and placement of pockets and do-dad holders.

My preference is that a backpack needs to hold everything inside the pack. . . I do not want to be forced to dangle shoes, underwear, sleeping gear, etc. due to lack of space, unless I choose to dangle stuff. And I want the bag large enough so that I am also not needing a shoe horn to compress everything as tight as I can. BUT, if I have the choice between a backpack that is exquisitely comfortable to wear and carry stuff with, but is forcing me to dangle some bits, versus a backpack that is spacious enough, but is fussy to carry and never lets me forget I am have a load on my back, I will choose to dangle bits and enjoy the comfort of the carry.

So if happiness is 20 liters of carrying capacity, and the Pro Talon fits and feels good, you have a winner. PLUS, it can be carried on a plane with no questions asked. . . well, I guess airport security will ask and demand to know how you got that guitar inside the pack, and then confiscate the guitar because guitar strings can be used to garrote the flight crew and hijack the plane to Cuba, but somehow overshoot that island and land in Haiti where the Haitian police will think you are nuts because Jamaica has better beaches and cute tropical umbrella drinks and is just over there to the left across the ocean a little bit . . .

I dunno, maybe the Talon Pro 20L is too much of a risk for international misunderstandings and diplomatic angst. At least Haiti doesn't have nuclear weapons.

All joking aside, it sounds like you have a good backpack that will meet all your needs. :)
The irrepressible Dave Bugg, superb information and practical advice with a sense of humour.
 

andylm65

Member
Past OR future Camino
2018
I’ve just sold a kestrel 38 and picked up a Gregory Jade 28 I’m hoping to walk spring 22 on the VDLP. No reason to overpack and no room to!
 

Marbe2

Active member
Past OR future Camino
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
Currently using the 18 litre Osprey daypack for my next camino. I am down to around 6 lbs,less than 3 kilos, exclusive of water and snacks. I try to distribute the water weight to my pockets or hips.
 
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henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
Currently using the 18 litre Osprey daypack for my next camino. I am down to around 6 lbs,less than 3 kilos, exclusive of water and snacks. I try to distribute the water weight to my pockets or hips.
Care to share your packing list?

I really must be doing something wrong - perhaps it’s that I treat my spring and autumn Caminos as active vacation as opposed to elite endurance events - but I cannot even imagine a sub 3kg weight, pack included.
 
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Deleted member 61803

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Given that that pack itself weighs 700 gram I too would be extremely interested in the packing list.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Past OR future Camino
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
Given that that pack itself weighs 700 gram I too would be extremely interested in the packing list.
Backpack 22oz
1 silk bed sack 4oz
2very ultra lite patagonia LS shirts (4oz each) 8oz
2x base layer ultra lite pants 4oz= 8oz
2 underwear 3 oz
1wrist BP 5 oz
3 pair wicker sock liners 4oz (no extra socks)
Eye Glass protector 4oz
Waterproof Windbreaker 10oz
Slippers 7oz
Poncho 7oz
Toothbrush paste 4oz
Maps/instructions 3oz
First aide 4oz
Tourniquet 4oz
Meds 3oz

100oz = 6lbs 4oz



always wear 1 ultralite shirt, pants, hat (depending-on season), shoes, pair of wick tubesocks, underware/bra, silk gloves
 
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Deleted member 61803

Guest
Backpack 22oz
1 silk bed sack 4oz
2very ultra lite patagonia LS shirts (4oz each) 8oz
2x base layer ultra lite pants 4oz= 8oz
2 underwear 3 oz
1wrist BP 5 oz
3 pair wicker sock liners 4oz (no extra socks)
Eye Glass protector 4oz
Waterproof Windbreaker 10oz
Slippers 7oz
Poncho 7oz
Toothbrush paste 4oz
Maps/instructions 3oz
First aide 4oz
Tourniquet 4oz
Meds 3oz

100oz = 6lbs 4oz



always wear 1 ultralite shirt, pants, hat (depending-on season), shoes, pair of wick tubesocks, underware/bra, silk gloves
Wow looks good for the summer. No soap/shampoo? Phone, camera not mentioned but then again not necessary. Will certainly take some tips from this.

Thank you so much for the prompt reply.
 
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Marbe2

Active member
Past OR future Camino
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
Wow looks good for the summer. No soap/shampoo? Phone, camera not mentioned but then again not necessary. Will certainly take some tips from this.

Thank you so much for the prompt reply.

I do not bring soap or shampoo. We stay in enough private rooms to pick these up along the way. Also use them for washing clothes.

When I bring a mini IPad 10.5oz for pics/storage of tripinfo+internet, I put it in my 4oz, fanny pack, along with credentials, + CCs. The pouch is worn in front in order to distribute weight better. My sister brings an Iphone.

In cold or winter months, I have used an 8oz go-lite hiking backpack. Great arm shoulder padding, but nothing else. I add a sleeping bag of 24 oz but no silk sleepsack. (Even in private facilities, it can get very cold at night in the rooms) Then I shift the fanny pack around to the back. The backpack then sits on the fannypack, which, for me, then functions also like a hip support. In the winter, I eliminate the waterproof windbreaker in favor of a fleece jacket which is about 3 oz heavier. However, in Winter, I wear the fleece jacket while hiking almost everyday, so, in toto, in winter, I am only adding a couple of ounces.

Backpack 8oz
1 sleeping bag 24 oz
2 ultra lite patagonia LS shirts (4oz each) 8oz
2 base layer ultra lite pants 4oz= 8oz
2 underwear 3 oz
1wrist BP 5 oz
3 pair wicker sock liners 4oz (no extra socks)
Eye Glass protector 4oz
Light weight balaclava 4oz
Slippers 7oz
Poncho 7oz
Toothbrush paste 4oz
Maps/instructions 3oz
First aide 4oz
Tourniquet 4oz
Meds 3oz
3oz bottle of hydrogen peroxide (which I refill as needed)

103oz

A fleece jacket is added to my warmer weather clothing list as is a medium weight padagonia LS shirt. These are worn daily.
 
Last edited:

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Past OR future Camino
2018
I hadn't heard that Spanish name for it, riñonera. I like that.
I did my first camino with a 22L Deuter backpack. It was barely noticeable after a few days walking. I did have a "fanny pack"/"riñonera" which I had in front for easy grab items to save taking backpack off too often while walking. It worked a treat
 

Jarrad

Member
Past OR future Camino
2014
I do not bring soap or shampoo. We stay in enough private rooms to pick these up along the way. Also use them for washing clothes.

When I bring a mini IPad 10.5oz for pics/storage of tripinfo+internet, I put it in my 4oz, fanny pack, along with credentials, + CCs. The pouch is worn in front in order to distribute weight better. My sister brings an Iphone.

In cold or winter months, I have used an 8oz go-lite hiking backpack. Great arm shoulder padding, but nothing else. I add a sleeping bag of 24 oz but no silk sleepsack. (Even in private facilities, it can get very cold at night in the rooms) Then I shift the fanny pack around to the back. The backpack then sits on the fannypack, which, for me, then functions also like a hip support. In the winter, I eliminate the waterproof windbreaker in favor of a fleece jacket which is about 3 oz heavier. However, in Winter, I wear the fleece jacket while hiking almost everyday, so, in toto, in winter, I am only adding a couple of ounces.

Backpack 8oz
1 sleeping bag 24 oz
2 ultra lite patagonia LS shirts (4oz each) 8oz
2 base layer ultra lite pants 4oz= 8oz
2 underwear 3 oz
1wrist BP 5 oz
3 pair wicker sock liners 4oz (no extra socks)
Eye Glass protector 4oz
Light weight balaclava 4oz
Slippers 7oz
Poncho 7oz
Toothbrush paste 4oz
Maps/instructions 3oz
First aide 4oz
Tourniquet 4oz
Meds 3oz
3oz bottle of hydrogen peroxide (which I refill as needed)

103oz

A fleece jacket is added to my warmer weather clothing list as is a medium weight padagonia LS shirt. These are worn daily.
Love your reference to the Patagonia LS shirts. Of the several shirts I have worn on the Camino, my favorite LS shirt has been an ultra lite Patagonia running shirt. Quick-drying and airy with a comfortable feeling against the skin (I hate the clammy feel of many of the synthetic fabrics). I've been looking for a similar replacement on their website, but I'm resigned to getting to one of their stores so I can feel the fabric before I make a purchase.
 
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Robo

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Backpack reviews are always interesting and I'm always tempted to try something smaller and lighter.
The Talon Pro certainly looks good.
I was watching the video on the Osprey YT channel

Packs are such a personal choice though.
And so much of the choice comes down to 'fit'.

The things I did notice from the video, are that the shoulder straps and waist belt are quite lightweight, as you would expect. Like the Exos? I'd be concerned with the comfort level, though with a light load, maybe that's not an issue.

When I compare it to my old and well used Osprey Stratos 34, at only 200 gms more weight, that includes well padded and broader straps, air suspension back, frame and a little more capacity. I don't think I would be tempted. just to save 200 gms.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
The 2017 version of the Osprey Exos48 has excellent thick padded shoulder straps, especially for such a light pack. I was actually rather envious of those wonderful thick puffy straps my daughter-in-law had.
 
Last edited:

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I have used backpacks with very thin (not narrow, but unpadded) shoulder straps, and they were just as comfortable for me as more padded ones. Since most of the weight from my pack is carried on my hips, I don't really need padding on the straps.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I have used backpacks with very thin (not narrow, but unpadded) shoulder straps, and they were just as comfortable for me as more padded ones. Since most of the weight from my pack is carried on my hips, I don't really need padding on the straps.
I totally agree with what you are saying. My problem is always for the first week wearing my pack on the Camino the part of the shoulder strap that begins to wrap under the arm itches, not the top of my shoulder. I have no problem with that either as my hips carry most of the weight.
(I am removing my photo because I think it is giving the wrong impression.)
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
I have used backpacks with very thin (not narrow, but unpadded) shoulder straps, and they were just as comfortable for me as more padded ones. Since most of the weight from my pack is carried on my hips, I don't really need padding on the straps.

Good point!
 
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JillGat

la tierra encantada
Past OR future Camino
2018
I carried an Osprey Sirrus 36. I like it because it is top loading, but has a side zipper so I can easily access things I stuff lower down in the pack whenever I need to. Mostly I like it because it is incredibly comfortable and durable. Could I get away with a smaller pack? Yes, but not if I find some amazing wines in the Bierzo region and decide I need to pick up a couple of bottles to carry for the next etapa.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I carried an Osprey Sirrus 36. I like it because it is top loading, but has a side zipper so I can easily access things I stuff lower down in the pack whenever I need to. Mostly I like it because it is incredibly comfortable and durable. Could I get away with a smaller pack? Yes, but not if I find some amazing wines in the Bierzo region and decide I need to pick up a couple of bottles to carry for the next etapa.
This is my exact pack, too, in the women's specific version. Not too big, not too small. I know it's not the lightest pack around, but it still looks like new and serves me well. The extra side zipper is a nice feature.
 

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