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Guidance & thoughts on how to proceed please

Dancing Rain

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Salvado (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
#1
My beloved and I have started our April Meseta Camino. At our careful slow pace we were doing really well - Burgos-Rabe de las Calzadas-San Bol-Castrojeriz.

However, probably as a result of heavy mud on his shoes, carrying a pack, and the downhill slope into Hontanas, my beloved has developed a shin splin, on a leg that has previously been severely affected. We’ve now been “resting” in Castrojeriz for two nights. (A good way to avoid walking in snow!)

I strongly suspect he’s not going to be up to walking easily tomorrow, and possibly quite a few days longer. We’re in Spain for about another two weeks, which was supposed to be all camino time. Only schedule is a plane to catch in Madrid on Apr 26th.

All thoughts about our best options for proceeding valued! I would love to be on the road again, but there are two of us involved in this. I’m our organiser and main communicator. My beloved is partially deaf, gets overwhelmed in new places where English isn’t spoken, and doesn’t have a smart phone.

Options we’ve come up with
- him bussing, taxiing from town to town, while I walk - but is this practical and will he manage?
- both go to Leon and I explore Leon on my own
- both keep walking while he takes lots of ibuprofen, and possibly get his pack transported
- keep staying in Castrojeriz
 

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Camino(s) past & future
Some but not all, and other routes too.
#2
I feel for you both, it's hard when something like this happens.
The only advice I can give you is to seek medical help, if there are no facilities where you are I would suggest you taxi to the nearest place this is available, I'm sure the hospitalario will be able to help.
I'm not medically trained but I'd have thought trying to carry on without expert advice could only make matters worse.
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean 2017.
#3
Sorry to hear your news. Now not being a medical man I can only offer general advice: bus to Fromister & train to Leon. Seek professional advice in Leon, rest I feel is only cure. Weather from Leon westward will also be a concern. Stay safe!
 
S

simply B

Guest
#4
@Dancing Rain -

I am sorry to hear this as I know from personal experience last Fall that it is a real drag on the spirits.

From what you describe, here is my best advice:

Get yourselves to Leon, check into a hotel for a couple nights. As soon as you are settled, ask the desk staff of a local physiotherapist and set up an appointment for a look at the leg. I have seen cases of "shin splints" (tendonitis) which actually were not. Extra heavy use and at a new rate with too little hydration can sometimes cause painful fascial entanglement into the muscle.

Either way, the massaging (or acupuncture/acupressure) treatments will be welcome and you will be able to have a few more days rest on it. (Leon is a beautiful city to explore!)

From there, you can get yourselves to Ponferrada pretty easily with a fresh start in mind. That puts you 10-11 days out from SdC.

Re-evaluate day by day.

Good luck and Buen Camino!

B
 

hel&scott

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
#5
Scott developed shin splints on our first Camino so I can sympathise with your pain, boots and weeks of hard surfaces brought his on, he switched to my walking sandles (I have big feet) and was able to finish. But you will need to see what works for your beloved, and make the call of if you walk as far as you can and call it quits. Or as suggested above, rest, go on to a spot to try and make to the Santiago this time round. Either way, just take heart that it's not the end of the world and that the Camino will still be there should you decide to try again.

I would not recommend the option of splitting and one walking and the other busing ahead, especially with the communication issues you describe, as it makes life way to complicated and can lead to feeling compromised or left out.
 

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Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#6
On one of my walks my dear husband had just had enough. Rain, bad accommodation, a tummy upset. If there is one thing that walking caminos has taught me, it is to live in the moment. So we abandoned that camino and hired a car and had a fabulous time being tourists. Leon is a simply beautiful city with lots to do and see. There are also beautiful and interesting places round about. The tourist office can provide lots of ideas.

The Camino is always there, waiting.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept 2016
Camino Portuguse Oct (2018)
#7
My beloved and I have started our April Meseta Camino. At our careful slow pace we were doing really well - Burgos-Rabe de las Calzadas-San Bol-Castrojeriz.

However, probably as a result of heavy mud on his shoes, carrying a pack, and the downhill slope into Hontanas, my beloved has developed a shin splin, on a leg that has previously been severely affected. We’ve now been “resting” in Castrojeriz for two nights. (A good way to avoid walking in snow!)

I strongly suspect he’s not going to be up to walking easily tomorrow, and possibly quite a few days longer. We’re in Spain for about another two weeks, which was supposed to be all camino time. Only schedule is a plane to catch in Madrid on Apr 26th.

All thoughts about our best options for proceeding valued! I would love to be on the road again, but there are two of us involved in this. I’m our organiser and main communicator. My beloved is partially deaf, gets overwhelmed in new places where English isn’t spoken, and doesn’t have a smart phone.

Options we’ve come up with
- him bussing, taxiing from town to town, while I walk - but is this practical and will he manage?
- both go to Leon and I explore Leon on my own
- both keep walking while he takes lots of ibuprofen, and possibly get his pack transported
- keep staying in Castrojeriz

Good Morning.

The same thing happened to me, but it was on day 36 of our 40 day walk to Santiago. The internet is wonderful. I looked up my symptoms and the internet answered. Seems there are four types of pain and four remedies; that is, how to tape your leg. The local pharmacy had the KT tape or (ketotape I think). It comes in colors, the web will help with your choice and the pharmacist was a big help. The web will tell you just how to wrap your leg. I found immediate relief and walked tall into Santiago. Two things, one you need to shave your leg; this can be painful. And two, be very careful when you remove the tape. I forget (the web will tell you) how long to leave the tape on before you replace it. But when you remove the tape be very careful. You can remove skin. Again the web will tell you how to do it.

Don't despair, try it.

Buen Camino -- Bob
 

Dancing Rain

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Salvado (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
#8
I so appreciate everyone’s support and replies! It’s great to have extra ideas.

I’m delighted to say we are on our way again, at least for the moment. Walked from Castrojeriz to Itero de la Vega - for today no rain, sleet or snow, and wonderful to be on the road again (there was mud).

My beloved had his backpack transported - a first for us. Other things we’ve done
1) virtually complete rest for 2.5 days
2) lower leg massage
3) ensuring well hydrated
4) taping/strapping
5) gel in-soles
6) lower leg & foot exercises
7) creating enjoyable other possibilities & options - changing from Plan A
8) shorter steps
9) altering gait so swinging from the hip rather than pushing off from the toe

The combination of all of these has made a difference. We’ll keep up short distances and backpack transport for at least a few more days.

Once again - thanks - more heads thinking about this and sharing their thoughts and experiences was really valuable.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
#9
My beloved and I have started our April Meseta Camino. At our careful slow pace we were doing really well - Burgos-Rabe de las Calzadas-San Bol-Castrojeriz.

However, probably as a result of heavy mud on his shoes, carrying a pack, and the downhill slope into Hontanas, my beloved has developed a shin splin, on a leg that has previously been severely affected. We’ve now been “resting” in Castrojeriz for two nights. (A good way to avoid walking in snow!)

I strongly suspect he’s not going to be up to walking easily tomorrow, and possibly quite a few days longer. We’re in Spain for about another two weeks, which was supposed to be all camino time. Only schedule is a plane to catch in Madrid on Apr 26th.

All thoughts about our best options for proceeding valued! I would love to be on the road again, but there are two of us involved in this. I’m our organiser and main communicator. My beloved is partially deaf, gets overwhelmed in new places where English isn’t spoken, and doesn’t have a smart phone.

Options we’ve come up with
- him bussing, taxiing from town to town, while I walk - but is this practical and will he manage?
- both go to Leon and I explore Leon on my own
- both keep walking while he takes lots of ibuprofen, and possibly get his pack transported
- keep staying in Castrojeriz
I would say keep moving with him taking pilgrim transport, if he is willing to do this. If he has a history of severe shin splints I wouldn't risk walking with brufen.
 

Sr.Bigote

Three Weeks - Three Caminos
Camino(s) past & future
Unknown
#10
So many people get shin splints -- it is a very typical complaint. One night I arrived at a hostel and there were 6 or 8 people who could hardly walk. I only had one small flare up -- and that was following a 35KM day with lots of pavement. The best warning that I received was to be really sure that it isn't a stress fracture -- stop if that is the case. If you are convinced it is only shin splints, then RICE (rest, ice, compress, elevate). Also, you might try a product (from a local pharmacy) called Volteren (a massaging creme). It seemed to work miracles in relieving the inflammation and I saw many people using it.
 

Dancing Rain

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Salvado (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
#11
I would say keep moving with him taking pilgrim transport, if he is willing to do this. If he has a history of severe shin splints I wouldn't risk walking with brufen.[/
I would say keep moving with him taking pilgrim transport, if he is willing to do this. If he has a history of severe shin splints I wouldn't risk walking with brufen.
Thanks. Our preference is to avoid the ibuprofen so we are sure he is healing, and not creating further damage.
 

Dancing Rain

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Salvado (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
#12
So many people get shin splints -- it is a very typical complaint. One night I arrived at a hostel and there were 6 or 8 people who could hardly walk. I only had one small flare up -- and that was following a 35KM day with lots of pavement. The best warning that I received was to be really sure that it isn't a stress fracture -- stop if that is the case. If you are convinced it is only shin splints, then RICE (rest, ice, compress, elevate). Also, you might try a product (from a local pharmacy) called Volteren (a massaging creme). It seemed to work miracles in relieving the inflammation and I saw many people using it.
Thanks. We have the cream if necesssry, but prefer to avoid pain relief do as to tune into what his body is saying - eg.needs to do less and rest more
 

Dancing Rain

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Salvado (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
#13
We are progressing, another 8 km today with his backpack transported again. His level of comfort is increasing, so fingers crossed - more walking tomorrow.

Tonight we’re in Boadilla del Camino at the El Camino albergue. Lots of people here who’ve been doing long distances and have knees and ankles playing up on them
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
#14
We are progressing, another 8 km today with his backpack transported again. His level of comfort is increasing, so fingers crossed - more walking tomorrow.

Tonight we’re in Boadilla del Camino at the El Camino albergue. Lots of people here who’ve been doing long distances and have knees and ankles playing up on them
Great to hear!
 

JohnMcM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some, and with luck, some more.
#15
My beloved and I have started our April Meseta Camino. At our careful slow pace we were doing really well - Burgos-Rabe de las Calzadas-San Bol-Castrojeriz.

However, probably as a result of heavy mud on his shoes, carrying a pack, and the downhill slope into Hontanas, my beloved has developed a shin splin, on a leg that has previously been severely affected. We’ve now been “resting” in Castrojeriz for two nights. (A good way to avoid walking in snow!)

I strongly suspect he’s not going to be up to walking easily tomorrow, and possibly quite a few days longer. We’re in Spain for about another two weeks, which was supposed to be all camino time. Only schedule is a plane to catch in Madrid on Apr 26th.

All thoughts about our best options for proceeding valued! I would love to be on the road again, but there are two of us involved in this. I’m our organiser and main communicator. My beloved is partially deaf, gets overwhelmed in new places where English isn’t spoken, and doesn’t have a smart phone.

Options we’ve come up with
- him bussing, taxiing from town to town, while I walk - but is this practical and will he manage?
- both go to Leon and I explore Leon on my own
- both keep walking while he takes lots of ibuprofen, and possibly get his pack transported
- keep staying in Castrojeriz
Maybe you could consider:
(A) Going to Leon and staying there 2-3 days together to see if he recovers enough to walk again. Then plan what else you can do?
(B) Hiring a car and being tourists until either he heals or you need to go to home.
(C) Doing whatever pleases you both and at the same time plan your return.

Buen (whatever happens) Camino
 

Dancing Rain

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Salvado (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
#16
We continue to progress. A very slow camino!!!!

We’ve added a compression bandage to the mix from the amazing farmacia in Fromista - blister plasters and elastic supports of all sorts. My beloved is wearing it while walking and for about two hours after we stop.

With all we’re doing he’s actually improving each day, which is fabulous. We’ve been walking about 8km a day and he has carried his pack for the last two days - amazing.

What intrigued us both was that with the whole of Europe to explore as an alternative option, we both preferred if we could to be walking the Camino Frances - there is something so especially precious about walking this route each day. We love it - snoring, wonky showers and all - and the meseta is beautiful

The weather is improving - beautiful sunny day today. Since Castrojeriz our stops have been
1) Itero de la Vega
2) Boadella del Camino
3) Poblacion de Campos
4) Villalcazar de Sirga
(about 37 km). Fingers crossed our progress continues
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances [08 ]Portuguese [09 ]Le Puy[10] Norte[ 11] Madrid [12] Figeac - Pamplona [13] Mont Saint Michel - Bordeaux / St Palais - Pamplona [14] Moissac -Burgos [15] , Norte to Oviedo and then Primitivo [16]
Le Puy to Moissac and Dax to Santo Domingo
#18
- him bussing, taxiing from town to town, while I walk - but is this practical and will he manage?
Yes , a friend did this 2 years ago when she fell outside of Zubiri . She was in a group and bused to the day ahead until she was right , which was 8 days.
 

Dancing Rain

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Salvado (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
#19
Hurray - seems like my precious beloved has healed his shin with all his efforts!! Walked all 17km with his backpack from Carrion de los Condes to Calzadilla de la Cueza - no twinges in that leg!!!! All done with no ibuprofen or Voltarin so we could monitor what was actually going on
 

hel&scott

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
#20
Hurray - seems like my precious beloved has healed his shin with all his efforts!! Walked all 17km with his backpack from Carrion de los Condes to Calzadilla de la Cueza - no twinges in that leg!!!! All done with no ibuprofen or Voltarin so we could monitor what was actually going on
Great to hear, keep it going light and listening to your body. What comes through most from your posts is that you are enjoying the journey, despite the pain, I think this really helps. Whenever we got sore and stiff on the Camino we used to take the time to stretch breathe and look around us, it's beautiful.
 

hel&scott

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
#21
On one of my walks my dear husband had just had enough. Rain, bad accommodation, a tummy upset. If there is one thing that walking caminos has taught me, it is to live in the moment. So we abandoned that camino and hired a car and had a fabulous time being tourists. Leon is a simply beautiful city with lots to do and see. There are also beautiful and interesting places round about. The tourist office can provide lots of ideas.

The Camino is always there, waiting.
Ha, yes very true Kanga. When we had to give up the Levante after Scott cracked his ribs, we took off to France to recover with a diet of champagne, duck confee and cream brûlée... It was a different form of pilgrimage.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2019)
#22
Hurray - seems like my precious beloved has healed his shin with all his efforts!! Walked all 17km with his backpack from Carrion de los Condes to Calzadilla de la Cueza - no twinges in that leg!!!! All done with no ibuprofen or Voltarin so we could monitor what was actually going on
That’s outstanding! I’ve heard so many stories of bodies healing on their own, I’d love to understand the “how” of it. One day someone can be hiking in extreme pain and the next day the pain is gone. It is one of the mysteries of the Camino.
 
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