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AZgirl

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2012 , via de la Plata 2014
Madrid/frances Sept/Oct 2017
Next : mozarabe 2021
So I have been wanting more of a solitary camino and am thinking this one would be perfect. I have been reading thru some of the recent posts here in this forum and it seems there are mixed reviews of the guidebook by the Amigos in Valencia. I think I would probably be able to muddle thru the Spanish one, since it seems the English one maybe hasn't been updated as recently. I would love to here more detailed reviews if you would carry it again or if the arrows and maybe research beforehand would be enough?

Thanks,
Ash
 
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Donovan

Active Member
Hi Ash,
I loved this camino – it was a great experience. IMO it would be difficult to do it without the maps and guide and, to answer your question, I would definitely carry the guide despite its weight. Incidentally the maps were bound into the guide, and they there was also a separate set of maps which were the same as those in the guide. The Amigos in Valencia posted me the English guide and also emailed 6 or 7 revised maps which I think took care of most of the updates that are already in the Spanish version. I took these with me. I presume they do this whenever they issue the English version.

As has been noted by others, waymarking in the towns is generally poor. However the guide book has a number of town maps that give generalized directions, and also there are some written explanations “walk down this street, turn right into that street” – that kind of thing. So, with the maps & guide, getting through the towns isn’t that hard. As Laurie has mentioned there are often references to local landmarks that people will direct you to if you ask.

Marking outside the towns is OK, but variable. There are usually arrows at intersections but you may have to look around to find them. It is worth investing the time to get it right as there aren’t many arrows on the trail to provide reassurance that you are on the correct path. Occasionally at intersections there are no arrows, though it is usually evident which is the correct way. On these occasions the maps provide very useful backup. I also had a GPS map on a tablet which was useful on a couple of occasions. Marking in the mountains between Escalona and Avila , where you really don’t want to get lost, is excellent. On the two occasions I got lost it was entirely my own fault. Total time lost in 5 weeks was only an hour or two.

The Levante and Sureste keep joining and dividing. It is worth developing a clear picture of where they divide to make sure you stay on your chosen camino.
 

AZgirl

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2012 , via de la Plata 2014
Madrid/frances Sept/Oct 2017
Next : mozarabe 2021
Thank you so much for your detailed response. I will have to get the guide, glad to know it comes with the updated maps. When did you walk the levante?
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi Ash, I agree with Donovan completely. I used the Spanish guide in summer 2013 and soon after the new version came out. I know some have had complaints about the guide but I used it exclusively and thought it was accurate and just what I needed in a pinch. I would not walk without it.

When are you planning to walk? I started around May 1 or 2 and the weather was great (a few hours of rain all the way to santiago), and the flowers and the shockingly bright emerald green fields were beautiful. I'd love to walk this camino again! Buen camino, Laurie
 

AZgirl

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2012 , via de la Plata 2014
Madrid/frances Sept/Oct 2017
Next : mozarabe 2021
Hi Ash, I agree with Donovan completely. I used the Spanish guide in summer 2013 and soon after the new version came out. I know some have had complaints about the guide but I used it exclusively and thought it was accurate and just what I needed in a pinch. I would not walk without it.

When are you planning to walk? I started around May 1 or 2 and the weather was great (a few hours of rain all the way to santiago), and the flowers and the shockingly bright emerald green fields were beautiful. I'd love to walk this camino again! Buen camino, Laurie
Hi Laurie,

I was thinking of leaving early September. My other two caminos gave been in May, which I loved but I would like to see a different season, if possible.

I also read and loved your blog. I suppose I could work it out, but how many days/stages did you take? I like doing the distances that you did.

That's good to hear that the guide is adequate, I do think I will get a phone for this camino, though. And I already a coil!
 
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alansykes

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Except the Francés
I strongly recommend not getting the French guide by Gérard Rousse, which is fractionally better than useless, with badly out of date maps.

The signalisation is mostly pretty good, but today I spent 12km without an arrow between San Clemente and Las Pedroñeras, which would have been worrying if I didn't have GPS on my mobile, and I knew I had to head broadly west-north-west. It was still a relief when I saw the lovely tower of the Asunción in the distance - the difference between "knowing" you're going the right way and having it confirmed is quite great.
 

Kevin F. O*brien

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2002-2019 Via Podiensis, Camino Frances, Via de la plata, Camino del Norte, Camino Primitivo, etc.
I walked with two French pilgrims and they were always cursing Gerard and his errors. Based on their comparison with my amigos guide, I think Alan's comment is accurate.


Hi Alan, absolutely wonderful to hear you are out there on our (Laurie and me) Camino! Haha I had to laugh when I read about the way out of San Clemente. Yep, if I remember, there's one arrow just past the cement factory and then one half hidden where you turn left, one on the top of the hill, and then that's it!! As you say, you can't really go wrong but they should be a bit more generous with marking. I found it varied from council area to council area (Shire?) but might be wrong. I had a compass, and when I lined it up with the map it seemed to function very well. I just thought the whole thing was so quiet, and, in its strict and ascetic way, very beautiful. I do hope you are walking along quietly, and enjoying the countryside and being on this Camino.
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Except the Francés
Hi Kevin and Laurie,

yup, I'm having a wonderful time on the Levante (/sureste). A compass is a great reassurance to help let you that you're on roughly the right track, because in the meseta, nobody can hear you scream (briefly, yesterday, I was fairly sure I was heading towards Belmonte rather than Las Pedroñeras). I think the sureste generally is better marked, which is odd, and the amigos in Albacete province, for example, seem to put out more arrows than in Cuenca, but that's just my experience. My Estonian friend has an old version of the Valencia guide and I am very jealous of his maps.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi Levante fans. I have to check my notes on this stage but I know that we followed the instructions to turn left about 5-8 kms out of town to go past the little white farmhouse and complex and then turn right. Kevin, I think that was thanks to you because the arrow we saw in stock was faded and turned around. But someone said, I think, that there's been a re- routing and that you don't go that way anymore. Alan's experience suggests that's what has happened.
 
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andy.d

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino de Levante 2009
Camino Ingles (Coruna) 2011
Camino Ingles (Coruna) 2014
Pilgrims Way Winchester - Canterbury
Camino Ingles (Ferrol) 2015
Cistercian Way (Wales) 2016
It's good to read all these and remember! The one small advantage of the Gerard Rousse French Guide is that it details some accommodation that is not in the Valencian Guide.

Ash - I started walking in September 2009. Just beware that it can be very hot and that on the long stages there can be very little water available. You need to be prepared to carry a lot.

Andy
 

Donovan

Active Member
Hi Ash - I walked earlier this year, in April/May. Spring was a lovely time to walk, though judging by Laurie's photos I was probably a month or so early for the best of the wildflowers.

Andy-d's advice regarding limited water supply is correct. Between La font de Figuera to Higurela would be tough in hot weather due to lack of water, shade or a village to take a break.
 

AZgirl

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2012 , via de la Plata 2014
Madrid/frances Sept/Oct 2017
Next : mozarabe 2021
Hi Ash - I walked earlier this year, in April/May. Spring was a lovely time to walk, though judging by Laurie's photos I was probably a month or so early for the best of the wildflowers.

Andy-d's advice regarding limited water supply is correct. Between La font de Figuera to Higurela would be tough in hot weather due to lack of water, shade or a village to take a break.
Thanks for the tips. Fortunately (or maybe unfortunately) I live in very hot part of the world and should be able to build my heat tolerance through the summer. And hope the weather smiles on me.
 

george.g

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
French way 10, 11
Norte 12
Vdlp 13
Levante 14
Mozarabe/Malaga 15
Augusta 16
Mozarabe/Almeria 17
Hi, I walked from Alicante to Finisterre this year, my advice would be to read all the Sureste and Levante blogs and posts, ie, the left turn 7kms after San Clemente would be very easy to miss, I only became aware of it after reading Lauries blogg, routes through towns can be seen and printed from "the walking pilgrim."Various internet sites can provide hostel/ albergue info ie mundicamino etc From town sites on the internet you can get town hall/ tourist office phone nos. google maps can pinpoint locations for albergues/ hotels and you can print maps before you go. A small tablet with an off line capability ( I used a nexus 7) can provide gps location if you are spatially displaced (lost) and allow you to skype home (lots of bars have wifi).
In fact with the info available on this forum and the net I would venture to say an out of date or inaccurate guide would be more of a liability than asset!
Regards
George
PS. Gathering the info gives you a great insight to this camino, and you can " pre walk" some of the route using google earth.
 
Last edited:

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
I'm really more and more interested to walk Levante & Sureste next year. Seems kind of similar to VdlP (terrain) to me, but with much less traffic. And today when I was doing my first research on albergues (@ Mundicamino) I was really surprised how many municipal and other albergues there are! Much much more than on Camino de Madrid for example. OK, some pretty long stages, but it is what it is.

Have a nice Camino @AZgirl and keep us posted please ;)

Ultreia!
 
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george.g

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
French way 10, 11
Norte 12
Vdlp 13
Levante 14
Mozarabe/Malaga 15
Augusta 16
Mozarabe/Almeria 17
Hi Kinky One, have you seen Bills post on the Sureste forum, there's a photo of a pamphlet that was available on the camino this year with some very up to date info,
Regards
George
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Hi Kinky One, have you seen Bills post on the Sureste forum, there's a photo of a pamphlet that was available on the camino this year with some very up to date info,
Regards
George
I haven't, but will take a look. Just started today with a little bit of research.
Thank you very much!

Ultreia!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I was really surprised how many municipal and other albergues there are!
Ultreia!

Hi, Kinky,
I did a calculation when I walked in 2013, and I think that two thirds of the typical stopping points between Valencia and Zamora have albergues. After I finished in August, there were three new albergues opened during the rest of the year -- Castronuno, Torrijos, and San Clemente. Not sure if 2014 has seen more openings, but the infrastructure is pretty darn good.

I think there are no more than five or six unavoidable stages of 30 to 35 kms. And none of those days has any elevation gain at all to speak of. So, I think it's quite d0-able for a trooper like you.

It's always good to be either planning or walking a Camino! Buen camino, Laurie
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Except the Francés
you can't really go wrong but they should be a bit more generous with marking. I found it varied from council area to council area (Shire?).

I think you're right. The very worst marking was from just outside San Clemente to just before El Toboso, where you're on the edge of Cuenca province, so perhaps the camino amigos from Cuenca put all their yellow paint on arrows on the Ruta de la Lana, which goes through Cuenca capital. The Sureste rejoins the Levante at El Toboso, and I think generally it is better marked at well - Juan at the rincón at Don Fadrique said the amigos from Valencia/the Levante and Alicante/the Sureste won't agree on the communal sections, and it looks to me as if the Sureste ones are a bit more active.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Well
Hi, Kinky,
I did a calculation when I walked in 2013, and I think that two thirds of the typical stopping points between Valencia and Zamora have albergues. After I finished in August, there were three new albergues opened during the rest of the year -- Castronuno, Torrijos, and San Clemente. Not sure if 2014 has seen more openings, but the infrastructure is pretty darn good.

I think there are no more than five or six unavoidable stages of 30 to 35 kms. And none of those days has any elevation gain at all to speak of. So, I think it's quite d0-able for a trooper like you.

It's always good to be either planning or walking a Camino! Buen camino, Laurie
Well, Laurie, I guess we all know who's the real trooper here :D
I'm very lazy and my comfort zone is 20-25kms although I can do more. But I really enjoy long stops, looking at life going by in front of me having a cerveza or two and enjoying it all. But for now (from Mundicamino only) I've found only six stages longer than 30kms if I want to sleep on a budget:
- Almansa - Higueruela = 34,7kms,
- La Roda - San Clemente = 31,2kms,
- San Clemente - Las Pedroneras = 34,3kms,
- Villacanas - Mora = 36,3kms,
- Rielves - Escalona = 32,7kms,
- Castronuno - Villalazan = 35,6kms.

I haven't been through your blog yet, but I'm planning to, of course.
 
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alansykes

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Except the Francés
Nope, it's not that bad. Go to Alpera after Almansa, very nice albergue €7 and then on to Higueruela, stages of about 25km each, or it is if you don't miss an arrow at some point after Alpera, which meant I took 32km to Higueruela. La Roda to San Clemente is great, very easy track, zumo/cerveca stops on the way, I think there is acogida at the halfway village (Minaya) if you really need it. San C to Las P is also not bad, I'm fairly sure it's only 4-6 hours (?25km), and there is some shade. Rather than do Villacañas to Mora, I'd stop in Villanueva de Bogas, where the Valenciano pilgrim I was with last night said he stayed free in municipal acogida. I went from Tembleque to Almonacid de Toledo, where the (fairly horrible, but free) acogida is in the changing rooms of the swimming pool, it's also 10km closer to Toledo than Mora. After leaving Almonacid make sure you follow the Sureste rather than the Levante, as this avoids Nambroca, saving another couple of km, and the coffee in Burguillos de Toledo is fine, and there's virtually no tarmac. I would recommend buying food for the evening at the minimercado in Villanueva, as there is no shop in Almonacid and the Kuki bar [sic] is smokey and not very friendly.
Rather than do Rielves to Escalona, I'd stop in Torrijos where there is acogida municipal, and Torrijos from Toledo is not a bad walk (?30km, but in pleasant countryside once you get out of the suburbs and the quarries). Sadly, I can't help you with Castronuño to Villalazán. It would be sad to miss Toro. Last year I did Siete Iglesias (albergue), Toro, Zamora (albergue) which was quite hard work, especially the last.

Whichever way you go, you'll find lots to enjoy.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Nope, it's not that bad. Go to Alpera after Almansa, very nice albergue €7 and then on to Higueruela, stages of about 25km each, or it is if you don't miss an arrow at some point after Alpera, which meant I took 32km to Higueruela. La Roda to San Clemente is great, very easy track, zumo/cerveca stops on the way, I think there is acogida at the halfway village (Minaya) if you really need it. San C to Las P is also not bad, I'm fairly sure it's only 4-6 hours (?25km), and there is some shade. Rather than do Villacañas to Mora, I'd stop in Villanueva de Bogas, where the Valenciano pilgrim I was with last night said he stayed free in municipal acogida. I went from Tembleque to Almonacid de Toledo, where the (fairly horrible, but free) acogida is in the changing rooms of the swimming pool, it's also 10km closer to Toledo than Mora. After leaving Almonacid make sure you follow the Sureste rather than the Levante, as this avoids Nambroca, saving another couple of km, and the coffee in Burguillos de Toledo is fine, and there's virtually no tarmac. I would recommend buying food for the evening at the minimercado in Villanueva, as there is no shop in Almonacid and the Kuki bar [sic] is smokey and not very friendly.
Rather than do Rielves to Escalona, I'd stop in Torrijos where there is acogida municipal, and Torrijos from Toledo is not a bad walk (?30km, but in pleasant countryside once you get out of the suburbs and the quarries). Sadly, I can't help you with Castronuño to Villalazán. It would be sad to miss Toro. Last year I did Siete Iglesias (albergue), Toro, Zamora (albergue) which was quite hard work, especially the last.

Whichever way you go, you'll find lots to enjoy.
Wow, very welcome info!!! I personally like acogidas (which are plenty apparently) as the locals look at you somewhat differently if you want to stay in them. I found that out this year on Camino de Madrid. I got the feeling that I'm not just another tourist full of cash in their eyes and therefore was kind of awarded with lots of sincerity. Spending some additional € in local bar for a beer or a meal helps a lot though :D
But as said I was just checking out Mundicamino website for now. More research to come.

One other question - what's the distance between Albacete and La Roda (there's no such info on that stage on Mundicamino)?

Thanks in advance!
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Except the Francés
I stayed in the polideportivo in La Gineta, about 15 (very dreary) km from Albacete, then another 20-25ish to lovely La Roda.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
One other question - what's the distance between Albacete and La Roda (there's no such info on that stage on Mundicamino)?

Thanks in advance!

Hi, Kinky,
Albacete to La Roda is 35 km. There is also an albergue about halfway in the polideportivo of La Gineta. Problem for us was that, even though I called on Friday to say we would be arriving on Sunday, when we arrived, we could find no one. No police officer, no one at the polideportivo, no one in a bar who knew anything. We wound up having to take a train to La Roda, because we had already walked 35 km (we started in Chinchilla and had breakfast in Albacete) and there was no way I was going to walk 20 more km to La Roda. So, if you arrive during the week there should be no problem.

Have you seen this website? I thought it was pretty good, though there were a few errors if I remember correctly and it may not be totally up to date.
http://www.caminosantiago.org/cpperegrino/caminos/caminover.asp?CaminoId=14
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Hi, Kinky,
Albacete to La Roda is 35 km. There is also an albergue about halfway in the polideportivo of La Gineta. Problem for us was that, even though I called on Friday to say we would be arriving on Sunday, when we arrived, we could find no one. No police officer, no one at the polideportivo, no one in a bar who knew anything. We wound up having to take a train to La Roda, because we had already walked 35 km (we started in Chinchilla and had breakfast in Albacete) and there was no way I was going to walk 20 more km to La Roda. So, if you arrive during the week there should be no problem.

Have you seen this website? I thought it was pretty good, though there were a few errors if I remember correctly and it may not be totally up to date.
http://www.caminosantiago.org/cpperegrino/caminos/caminover.asp?CaminoId=14
:D:D:D I already see me doing the same compilation/booklet of info as for Madrid and Invierno.
But yes, first I have to finish my Invierno blog ;) I did solve the problem with external disc...

Thanks, Laurie, for this link!
 
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alansykes

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Except the Francés
I've found the number for the acogida at Minaya, half way between La Roda and San Clemente, if you don't want to do that trek in one day. It's at the polideportivo and you should call Jesús [sic ...] on 615.680.385.

Rather than heading on to San Clemente, it's possible to bifurcate at Minaya onto the Sureste, which is possibly slightly better arrowed than the Levante: Minaya to El Provencio (23km), El Provencio to Las Mesas (19km) and Las Mesas to El Toboso (25km). Polideportivo in El Provencio (Ayuntamiento tel. 967.165.381, or Manolo 626.719.493). Ayuntamiento in Las Mesas, tel 967 155 522 (or possibly the parroco: Don José Tel. 967 155022 or 626 175521)
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
I've found the number for the acogida at Minaya, half way between La Roda and San Clemente, if you don't want to do that trek in one day. It's at the polideportivo and you should call Jesús [sic ...] on 615.680.385.

Rather than heading on to San Clemente, it's possible to bifurcate at Minaya onto the Sureste, which is possibly slightly better arrowed than the Levante: Minaya to El Provencio (23km), El Provencio to Las Mesas (19km) and Las Mesas to El Toboso (25km). Polideportivo in El Provencio (Ayuntamiento tel. 967.165.381, or Manolo 626.719.493). Ayuntamiento in Las Mesas, tel 967 155 522 (or possibly the parroco: Don José Tel. 967 155022 or 626 175521)
Thanks for the hint, Alan.
I already got it:
"AC (??pl, MUNI, c/Calvario 52, 967-450-006 (Ayto., c/Olmo 48) or 615-680-385 (Jesus))" (from my booklet)
I have a plan to do La Roda - San Clemente (31,2kms) as one stage, but as always I'll decide when being there.
And I'll leave Sureste as whole for another occasion ;)

My walking companion from Frankfurt, Germany, already bought a guidebook. I guess it's in German and will report on how accurate we'll find it.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I've found the number for the acogida at Minaya, half way between La Roda and San Clemente, if you don't want to do that trek in one day. It's at the polideportivo and you should call Jesús [sic ...] on 615.680.385.

Rather than heading on to San Clemente, it's possible to bifurcate at Minaya onto the Sureste, which is possibly slightly better arrowed than the Levante: Minaya to El Provencio (23km), El Provencio to Las Mesas (19km) and Las Mesas to El Toboso (25km). Polideportivo in El Provencio (Ayuntamiento tel. 967.165.381, or Manolo 626.719.493). Ayuntamiento in Las Mesas, tel 967 155 522 (or possibly the parroco: Don José Tel. 967 155022 or 626 175521)
Hi, Alan,

I don't know what El Provencio and Las Mesas are like, but I think San Clemente is one of the little jewels along the Levante. Its Plaza Mayor is really very pretty. People who went wrong from Minaya to San Clemente didn't find the arrows across the highway and in front of the hotel/cafe on the highway. But once you find them, it's a pretty straight obvious shot to San Clemente. And the people in the hotel know where they are, of course. San Clemente now has an albergue, but we were in the Hostal Milan II at the entrance to town since it hadn't yet opened.

For a great menu del dia in San Clemente, go to Milan I (brother in law of Milan II) -- 10 euros and an excellent price/quality ratio.

I will say that Las Pedroneras is lacking in the charm department, but it is the garlic capital of Spain!

Alan, did you do the Sureste for those stages? Buen camino, Laurie
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
So, just to show some of the highlights between Minaya and El Toboso, which is not to say that there aren't other wonderful things on the alternate route, of course!

Between Minaya and San Clemente.jpg
Countryside between Minaya and San Clemente

San Clemente.jpg San Clemente2.jpg

Entering Plaza Mayor

Abandoned castle before Pedroneras.jpg Abandoned castle before Pedroneras2.jpg
Abandoned castle before Las Pedroñeras

Quijote-ville before Toboso.jpg
Quijote-ville before El Toboso

Every time I look at my Levante pictures, it makes me want to return. You guys are so lucky! Buen camino, Laurie
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Except the Francés
Hi, Alan,

I don't know what El Provencio and Las Mesas are like, but I think San Clemente is one of the little jewels along the Levante.

Laurie's pics bring back very happy memories. I loved San Clemente as well. Had an excellent menú del día in the Torre del Reloj, just opposite the wonderful renaissance church of Santiago, with its wonderful sculptures (including Santiago on a fierce horse matamoro [sic] - there was only one underhoof). Next to the restaurant, in the Casa Consistorial (Laurie's third pic) was an art gallery with a surprising display of modern Dutch painting. I arrived on All Saint's Eve, so on my evening tapas crawl I passed half the town's children dressed up as imps and demons, and everything was very raucous and jolly. The brand new (free) albergue is only about 300 yards from the Plaza Mayor.

Somebody recently asked me about a perfect day on the camino, and I realised I was describing the day from La Roda to San Clemente: a quick tostada and café con leche in La Roda just before dawn, 3 hours walking on dirt tracks through vines and olive groves, a convenient break for a zumo in Minaya, another 3 hours over corn and fruit trees to a hamlet and the first caña and tapa of the day, then a final 3 hours, with some shady pine woods to help against the hot sun, before getting in to San Clemente at 4pm, just in time for the menú del día, then picking up the key to the albergue from the tourist office when it opened at 5pm, clothes washing, shower, nap, church, art gallery, tapas crawl, bed. Blissful: 35km with virtually no tarmac, two convenient villages for pit stops, lively and handsome towns at both ends and two excellent albergues - the one in La Roda is inside the bull ring.
 
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trevorcc

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SJPD to Santiago 2013,2014, Camino de Levante Sept. 2016, Frances March 2018, planning 2020
Hi Laurie,

I was thinking of leaving early September. My other two caminos gave been in May, which I loved but I would like to see a different season, if possible.

I also read and loved your blog. I suppose I could work it out, but how many days/stages did you take? I like doing the distances that you did.

That's good to hear that the guide is adequate, I do think I will get a phone for this camino, though. And I already a coil!
Hi,
Trevor from Oz here I am thinking the same Camino in September 2016 to meet up with friends on the CF who are doing the Madrid leg we may cross paths, I am chasing a good guide book in english to start planning.
 

AZgirl

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2012 , via de la Plata 2014
Madrid/frances Sept/Oct 2017
Next : mozarabe 2021
That would be great! I am hoping to get the one the friends of camino in Valencia sell, it's the only one I know of in English?
 

Bad Pilgrim

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
So I have been wanting more of a solitary camino and am thinking this one would be perfect. I have been reading thru some of the recent posts here in this forum and it seems there are mixed reviews of the guidebook by the Amigos in Valencia. I think I would probably be able to muddle thru the Spanish one, since it seems the English one maybe hasn't been updated as recently. I would love to here more detailed reviews if you would carry it again or if the arrows and maybe research beforehand would be enough?

Thanks,
Ash

Hello Ash,

I did the Levante in 2014, with the spanish version of the Amigos in Valencia guide. I read here and there that there are different opinions about how good it works. I for one am very satisfied with it and I would definitely use it again. There were some small discrepancies between the maps and reality, but only minor errors. Unfortunatley I didn't save it. If I had I could have given you an update on it. If you can read spanish and this is the most recent version, I suggest that you buy it.

Good luck

BP
 

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