A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Hank's Camino Packing List (ultralight: under 5 kg / 10 lbs)

Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May - June 2015)
#1
A lot of people have asked me about what I packed for the Camino, so, FINALLY, I've put together a video in which I walk through everything I packed. I discuss a bunch of essentially important topics like boots vs. trail runners vs. sandals, CamelBaks vs. bottles, whether you should carry a full-sized guitar, and that silly hat I wore. The video description includes a detailed list of everything I packed (including brands, etc.). I also included a bunch of funny outtakes and behind-the-scenes video clips that never made it into my original film. I hope this helps someone!


-Hank
 
Last edited:

DharmaBum

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Last: Camino Frances (Aug 7th - Sept 15, 2017)
Next: Hadrian's Wall Walk (August 2018)
#4
One of the better videos that i've seen on this topic to date.
Ten lbs is still too heavy for me but you suggest several very good lighter options.
Thank you.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#9
A lot of people have asked me about what I packed for the Camino, so, FINALLY, I've put together a video in which I walk through everything I packed. I discusses a bunch of essentially important topics like boots vs. trail runners vs. sandals, CamelBaks vs. bottles, whether you should carry a full-sized guitar, and that silly hat I wore. The video description includes a detailed list of everything I packed (including brands, etc.). I also included a bunch of funny outtakes and behind-the-scenes video clips that never made it into my original film. I hope this helps someone!


-Hank
Congratulations on a really comprehensive tour of your backpack contents, and thank you for posting it.
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#11
Outstanding video. My only point of discussion is the electric extension cord. The cord you brought is rated for 110 V 60 Hz use. In Spain, the current is 220 v 50 Hz. But, I suspect you knew that and figured that limited use of the cord would be ok.

My solution to sharing outlets is to obtain a 3-way "tap" that is available at any ferreteria (hardware store) or Oriental / China Bazar in Spain. This allows three people to "tap" into the same outlet. But each person needs to use their charger and USB cord. Some are angled, like a "Y" with a center outlet. Others have perpendicular outlets. But all work equally well. They usually cost less than €3.

It weighs less than your solution. I considered the extension cord, but calculated the weight difference, Schuko two-round prong adapter included. A gram here and there adds up...;)

Everything else in your video was spot-on.:cool:
 
Camino(s) past & future
2019
#15
A lot of people have asked me about what I packed for the Camino, so, FINALLY, I've put together a video in which I walk through everything I packed. I discusses a bunch of essentially important topics like boots vs. trail runners vs. sandals, CamelBaks vs. bottles, whether you should carry a full-sized guitar, and that silly hat I wore. The video description includes a detailed list of everything I packed (including brands, etc.). I also included a bunch of funny outtakes and behind-the-scenes video clips that never made it into my original film. I hope this helps someone!


-Hank
Wonderful video Hank. Lots of ideas as I prepare for my first Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May - June 2015)
#19
One of the better videos that i've seen on this topic to date.
Ten lbs is still too heavy for me but you suggest several very good lighter options.
Thank you.
Glad you liked the video! Yes, I agree that it's possible to go even lighter, and people should do so if they're willing! I tried to suggest a realistic tradeoff between comfort and weight (which is always personal and tricky), but, in the video, I also suggest instances where you can shave off extra pounds (fewer clothes, no sandals, no camera, no cards, etc.) People should consider getting an electronic version of their guidebook (or photographing it in their phone). There are also even lighter backpacks than the one I used, though choosing backpacks with fewer features is a comfort trade-off as well.
-Hank
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May - June 2015)
#20
Outstanding video. My only point of discussion is the electric extension cord. The cord you brought is rated for 110 V 60 Hz use. In Spain, the current is 220 v 50 Hz. But, I suspect you knew that and figured that limited use of the cord would be ok....

It weighs less than your solution. I considered the extension cord, but calculated the weight difference, Schuko two-round prong adapter included. A gram here and there adds up...;)

Everything else in your video was spot-on.:cool:
Yes! I probably should have mentioned in the video that people trying to use old-school electric gear (hairdryers, electric shavers, curling irons) equipment shouldn't do so without a voltage converter (though people shouldn't be carrying that heavy stuff anyway!). I forgot about it because nearly all modern electronics (laptops, phone USB chargers, cameras) come with an AC/DC adapter that handles both 110V and 220V, so I never think about it much anymore, even though I use that same cord with different plug adapters all over the world.

And yes, I applaud any additional clever weight savings, because, weight adds up fast, indeed! There's no reason someone couldn't drop the extension cord and adapter completely and just bring a small USB charger with Southern Europe outlet prongs. I just like having the extension cord reach to my bed for convenience.
-Hank
 
Last edited:

Prentiss Riddle

Aprendiz de todo, maestro de nada
Camino(s) past & future
Poco a poco: we're nibbling away at the Francés. (2015, 2016 & 2017)
#22
By the way, kudos for going light, but I have yet to meet any pilgrims who I would call ULTRAlight in the sense that the fanatics do it.

For an entertaining read, check out this guy. He goes to amazing extremes like freeze-drying dots of toothpaste so he omits the weight of the tube. He can do a week of wilderness camping with less weight than a lot of us carry on a day hike.

Lighten Up!: A Complete Handbook for Light and Ultralight Backpacking
by Don Ladigin
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/210669
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May - June 2015)
#23
By the way, kudos for going light, but I have yet to meet any pilgrims who I would call ULTRAlight in the sense that the fanatics do it.
Regarding semantics, I consider "ultralight" to be any hiking with a backpack base weight less than 10 lbs (or ~5kg). Admittedly, in this case, using the word is a bit of a cheat, because, in the world of backcountry camping, that weight would include some kind of shelter, cook system, and sleeping pad. Regardless, no matter how you pack, there will always be a crazy guy that figures out how to shave off an additional 100 grams -- and I applaud that guy's ingenuity! *heads off to freeze toothpaste dots*
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances , St Jean Pied de Port - Finisterra May/ June 2017
Le Puy en Velay - Ales May 2018
#25
Super ! Funny as well , a great video .
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#27
Gosh, in my years of walking the camino I've never needed duct tape. I'm having trouble thinking of its uses on camino. Anyone who has used it? What for?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese (2019) Walking Lisbon North
#28
Gosh, in my years of walking the camino I've never needed duct tape. I'm having trouble thinking of its uses on camino. Anyone who has used it? What for?
Last year, I was summer teaching in one of the countries with endless "cobbles" and my ankle rolled ... when I told someone there what happened, their very first response was "duct tape it" lol
anyhow, I would be 5K down the road with someone else's pole before I noticed I think, so, colored duct tape on my poles will keep me in line probably - fun to think about your question Kanga!
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Via Francigena (2017), plus more than 2000 Km/year of trekking, hiking and minor caminos since 2000.
#29
Gosh, in my years of walking the camino I've never needed duct tape. I'm having trouble thinking of its uses on camino. Anyone who has used it? What for?
I would feel naked without duct tape in my equipment.
In my walks I used it a good deal of times, for me and other people to:
- fix a broken pole until next town.
- seal a torn cloak
- emergency repair of detached soles of low quality boots (people who wanted to save on shoes!!!)
- temporary protection of sprained ankles
- emergency kinesio taping until next village...
 
#30
By the way, kudos for going light, but I have yet to meet any pilgrims who I would call ULTRAlight in the sense that the fanatics do it.
I walk for shorter 7-10 day periods on the Norte, staying mainly in hotels, during May and September

My pack volume is 12L and weight excluding water is under 3kg (let's call it hyper-light!) - but I have been known to carry up to 4 litres of water during a long day in the absence of open supermarkets
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 13
VdlP 14
LePuy 15
Invierno DosFaros CP 16
The 88, Japan 17
Sicily. Arles-Santiago Fall 18
#31
Gosh, in my years of walking the camino I've never needed duct tape. I'm having trouble thinking of its uses on camino. Anyone who has used it? What for?
Walking in Portugal my wife broke her pole and I had the same experience in Japan last year and was very happy that I had some black tape on my poles carried specifically for this purpose. It was a life saver!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 13
VdlP 14
LePuy 15
Invierno DosFaros CP 16
The 88, Japan 17
Sicily. Arles-Santiago Fall 18
#32
Hank, nice effort with the video. I noticed that you promote a water bottle, but you seem to have carried a hydration system on your camino. I think you made reference to a 3 litre system, but one could go lighter with a smaller water reservoir, 1-2 litres. Also a spring or fall camino might require a rethink on wet gear and foot wear (heavy mud) depending on the individual. Lots of good information and discussion generated:cool:
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May - June 2015)
#33
So Prentiss what changes would you suggest for a May Camino?
By the way, I did the Camino starting on May 5, and that gear was totally adequate. I mostly think that gear will work fine from Spring to Fall, especially since you can always wear your jacket if you have an especially cold night. But, there's a lot of different temperature ratings for different sleeping bags and sleeping bag liners, and some people run colder/hotter than others. The right thing for everyone to do is confirm the historical temperature conditions for the time of year you're planning on doing the Camino, and getting a liner (or bag) that can handle those temperatures (plus about 5C/10F since you'll be warmer inside). For me, since sleeping in albergues in spring to summer meant sleeping inside in mostly warm rooms for the entire Camino, I never got cold just using a sleeping bag liner. For people nervous about this, get a sleeping bag liner beforehand and test out whether you feel warm enough using it in your own bedroom, with climate control adjusted to be a bit chillier than usual. See how it feels!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May - June 2015)
#34
Hank, nice effort with the video. I noticed that you promote a water bottle, but you seem to have carried a hydration system on your camino. I think you made reference to a 3 litre system, but one could go lighter with a smaller water reservoir, 1-2 litres.
Yes, it's true that I had a CamelBak when I did the Camino. It was a convenience luxury for me, but if I were to do it again, I wouldn't carry it due to the additional weight. The weight difference between the various Camelbak reservoir sizes isn't big: a 3L Camelbak is 260g, a 2L is 210g, and a 1.5L is 200g -- compared to a 36g plastic bottle makes me think that they're not worth it. It's certainly an option though.
-Hank
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (May 2020)
#35
By the way, I did the Camino starting on May 5, and that gear was totally adequate. I mostly think that gear will work fine from Spring to Fall, especially since you can always wear your jacket if you have an especially cold night. But, there's a lot of different temperature ratings for different sleeping bags and sleeping bag liners, and some people run colder/hotter than others. The right thing for everyone to do is confirm the historical temperature conditions for the time of year you're planning on doing the Camino, and getting a liner (or bag) that can handle those temperatures (plus about 5C/10F since you'll be warmer inside). For me, since sleeping in albergues in spring to summer meant sleeping inside in mostly warm rooms for the entire Camino, I never got cold just using a sleeping bag liner. For people nervous about this, get a sleeping bag liner beforehand and test out whether you feel warm enough using it in your own bedroom, with climate control adjusted to be a bit chillier than usual. See how it feels!
Hank, thanks for the response! What bag liner did you use?
 
Camino(s) past & future
camino primitivo, camino de la costa
#39
for the utlimate weight saver inspiration take a look at the peregrinos from the golden era in the early middle ages: a robe + rope, a hat, a stick and a cabassa for water, a pair of sandals. you can literally do the frances with a shopping bag, a toothbrush, some money and the clothes you wear.

if you miss something you will find it in the albergues for free because half of the 250 000 pilgrims per year take too much stuff with them and leave it behind at some point.

the only serious equipment mistake you can make is insist on wearing heavy duty hiking boots in the summer. blisters mainly develop on sweat soaked feet in socks without ventilation. the friction heat builds up under your skin and causes burns = blisters. i did the whole frances with no socks and the cheapest hiking sandals for 9.90 euro from decathlon in spain, with not one blister - inspired by the middle ages ;-)

in the first week i overtook a guy who was also inspired by the middle ages and did the frances barefeet, without talking and with just the clothes he was wearing, very slowly of course. i was convinced he would never reach santiago but i met him again in finisterre two days after i arrived and he made it just fine. amazing experience!
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to leave South Africa on 15 September and return on 14 October 2018.
#40
A lot of people have asked me about what I packed for the Camino, so, FINALLY, I've put together a video in which I walk through everything I packed. I discuss a bunch of essentially important topics like boots vs. trail runners vs. sandals, CamelBaks vs. bottles, whether you should carry a full-sized guitar, and that silly hat I wore. The video description includes a detailed list of everything I packed (including brands, etc.). I also included a bunch of funny outtakes and behind-the-scenes video clips that never made it into my original film. I hope this helps someone!


-Hank
Great! Thank you. Most useful information
 

Suzanne H

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Baztan and Frances 2017
#41
Gosh, in my years of walking the camino I've never needed duct tape. I'm having trouble thinking of its uses on camino. Anyone who has used it? What for?
I used it on my feet (wrapping toes removed rubbing and kept blisters at bay on days my feet were swollen). Super convenient to keep on the poles.

Hank, I feel the need to start packing! I’ll use this guide to help me keep the weight down this year. Thanks!!
 

Jeri

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: March-May (2016)
Del Norte: April-May (2018)
Finisterre: May (2018)
#42
Yes, it's true that I had a CamelBak when I did the Camino. It was a convenience luxury for me, but if I were to do it again, I wouldn't carry it due to the additional weight. The weight difference between the various Camelbak reservoir sizes isn't big: a 3L Camelbak is 260g, a 2L is 210g, and a 1.5L is 200g -- compared to a 36g plastic bottle makes me think that they're not worth it. It's certainly an option though.
-Hank
Interesting. I went the superlight supermarket water bottle route on my last camino. Most days I finished with full bottles. It was hard to get to, I had a small cup that I used to get water at the frequent fuentes on the Frances. This year I am walking Del Norte and plan on using 2 liter Osprey bladder. With the hose easily available on my chest I believe I will stay better hydrated. Time will tell. Great video and suggestions!
 
Camino(s) past & future
camino primitivo, camino de la costa
#43
> and plan on using 2 liter Osprey bladder.

really no need for that, there is water everywhere on the del norte. you are either at the sea or mostly in the mountains, no long stretches of meseta - a one liter bottle is ideal, i use a stainless steel one because its easy to clean, maybe 150g more than a plastic bottle but absolutely worth it. plastic containers in the heat will build up bacteria and even algae over weeks.
 
Last edited:

Gillis

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances in 2014
#45
A lot of people have asked me about what I packed for the Camino, so, FINALLY, I've put together a video in which I walk through everything I packed. I discuss a bunch of essentially important topics like boots vs. trail runners vs. sandals, CamelBaks vs. bottles, whether you should carry a full-sized guitar, and that silly hat I wore. The video description includes a detailed list of everything I packed (including brands, etc.). I also included a bunch of funny outtakes and behind-the-scenes video clips that never made it into my original film. I hope this helps someone!


-Hank
This was really enjoyable...thanks.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Newbie. Walking CN June/July 2018. ❤️
#46
A lot of people have asked me about what I packed for the Camino, so, FINALLY, I've put together a video in which I walk through everything I packed. I discuss a bunch of essentially important topics like boots vs. trail runners vs. sandals, CamelBaks vs. bottles, whether you should carry a full-sized guitar, and that silly hat I wore. The video description includes a detailed list of everything I packed (including brands, etc.). I also included a bunch of funny outtakes and behind-the-scenes video clips that never made it into my original film. I hope this helps someone!


-Hank
So great and interesting, thank you!
 

H Richards

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2017 Francés
October 2017 Le Puy / Francés
June/July 2018 Norte
#47
Outstanding video. My only point of discussion is the electric extension cord. The cord you brought is rated for 110 V 60 Hz use. In Spain, the current is 220 v 50 Hz. But, I suspect you knew that and figured that limited use of the cord would be ok.
I see quite a few people recommending bringing really long charging cables, and I have to cringe, because think what the albergue rooms are going to be like if everyone decides they only want to charge their phone from their bed - masses of wires for people to trip over and damage equipment or themselves :/

For 100g you could carry a small charging pack which will let you use your phone on your bed for an hour if you need to, or recharge it on the trail. That seems to be a more considerate way to go.
 

Prentiss Riddle

Aprendiz de todo, maestro de nada
Camino(s) past & future
Poco a poco: we're nibbling away at the Francés. (2015, 2016 & 2017)
#48
you can literally do the frances with a shopping bag, a toothbrush, some money and the clothes you wear.
You bring to mind the Austin couple who, having just met on OK Cupid, went on a 21-day European vacation with no luggage at all. He used the pockets of his skinny jeans and she carried a small purse.

She wrote a great piece about it for Salon, which has turned into a book and may become a movie.

https://www.salon.com/2013/11/12/the_craziest_okcupid_date_ever/
 
Camino(s) past & future
Walking Jun 29 - Aug 18, 2018. If we get done early, we'll tour Spain by rail
#49
Great job Hank Thank you. I will rethink my boots in favor of some Trail Runners and running sox as we will be walking from June 29th til we make it. Also a great idea for some duct tape on the trekking poles.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May - June 2015)
#50
Interesting. I went the superlight supermarket water bottle route on my last camino. Most days I finished with full bottles. It was hard to get to, I had a small cup that I used to get water at the frequent fuentes on the Frances. This year I am walking Del Norte and plan on using 2 liter Osprey bladder. With the hose easily available on my chest I believe I will stay better hydrated. Time will tell. Great video and suggestions!
Yes, this works better if you have an easily-accessible water bottle pocket on the outside of your pack that you can access without taking your packing off. I like bladders too, it's just that they weigh too much. Good luck!
-Hank
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May - June 2015)
#51
I see quite a few people recommending bringing really long charging cables, and I have to cringe, because think what the albergue rooms are going to be like if everyone decides they only want to charge their phone from their bed - masses of wires for people to trip over and damage equipment or themselves :/ For 100g you could carry a small charging pack which will let you use your phone on your bed for an hour if you need to, or recharge it on the trail. That seems to be a more considerate way to go.
I agree with you, though usually the outlets were near enough to my bed that it wasn't a problem. I never ran an extension cord across a room or put it somewhere that was dangerous. I think small battery packs are also a good way to go, though they can also weigh too much, depending on the pack. Admittedly, the extension cord isn't particularly light either.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May - June 2015)
#52
Great job Hank Thank you. I will rethink my boots in favor of some Trail Runners and running sox as we will be walking from June 29th til we make it. Also a great idea for some duct tape on the trekking poles.
Good luck! I think you'll be very happy with trailrunners -- most people are! Buen camino!
 

H Richards

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2017 Francés
October 2017 Le Puy / Francés
June/July 2018 Norte
#53
I think small battery packs are also a good way to go, though they can also weigh too much, depending on the pack. Admittedly, the extension cord isn't particularly light either.
I found a "lipstick" power bank for about 80 grammes that'll half-load an iphone, but yeah, they can go up to 400g for the big ones.

Regarding cables, adaptors, chargers, it seems to me to be the perfect candidate for buying in the country instead of bringing, because having the wrong plug + an adaptor is all unnneccessary weight. A long USB cable is probably also much lighter than a long AC cable!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May - June 2015)
#54
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May - June 2015)
#55
I found a "lipstick" power bank for about 80 grammes that'll half-load an iphone, but yeah, they can go up to 400g for the big ones.

Regarding cables, adaptors, chargers, it seems to me to be the perfect candidate for buying in the country instead of bringing, because having the wrong plug + an adaptor is all unnneccessary weight. A long USB cable is probably also much lighter than a long AC cable!
Yeah, I totally agree. My charging setup is a hold-over from urban travel trips where I go to different countries with different outlets during one trip, and I can just swap out an adapter and everything else in my setup continues to work fine. But on the Camino, using a locally-bought extension cord or very long USB cable also makes perfect sense.
-Hank
 
Camino(s) past & future
camino primitivo, camino de la costa
#56
You bring to mind the Austin couple who, having just met on OK Cupid, went on a 21-day European vacation with no luggage at all.
i just read the story its brilliant! at one point they both realize "We both live for the unexpected, the experimental and the subtly disruptive." thats exactly the point of a pilgrimage, let go of all scourges like control, perfectionism, scientific optimization and social networking for a few weeks and see what happens. i do every camino as primal and low tech as possible and every year im making more progress.

im just now reading "jerusalem: a biography by simon sebag montefiore" and his description of the crusaders is similar. thousands of europeans knights would be lit up by religous fevers, drop everything, jump on a horse and start riding to jerusalem which was a 2 year journey and most of them didnt become rich or make it back alive.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Summer of 2012 - Astorga -Finisterre
Summer of 2014 SJPP - Sarria
Summer of 2017 Primitivo-Muxia
#57
A lot of people have asked me about what I packed for the Camino, so, FINALLY, I've put together a video in which I walk through everything I packed. I discuss a bunch of essentially important topics like boots vs. trail runners vs. sandals, CamelBaks vs. bottles, whether you should carry a full-sized guitar, and that silly hat I wore. The video description includes a detailed list of everything I packed (including brands, etc.). I also included a bunch of funny outtakes and behind-the-scenes video clips that never made it into my original film. I hope this helps someone!


-Hank
Did find a summer bag necessary in many albergues, especially on the Camino Primitivo.
 

Prentiss Riddle

Aprendiz de todo, maestro de nada
Camino(s) past & future
Poco a poco: we're nibbling away at the Francés. (2015, 2016 & 2017)
#58
Regarding cables, adaptors, chargers, it seems to me to be the perfect candidate for buying in the country instead of bringing, because having the wrong plug + an adaptor is all unnneccessary weight. A long USB cable is probably also much lighter than a long AC cable!
Note that for an American in Spain this $3 item is the only adapter you need for portable devices. It weighs almost nothing. There’s no need for a big boxy universal adapter.

https://www.rei.com/product/775157/rei-co-op-adapter-plug-e106-europe-and-asia

A7C06CAF-ED2B-4B25-9122-1B09F2E65B50.jpeg A7C06CAF-ED2B-4B25-9122-1B09F2E65B50.jpeg

But sure, USB wall chargers are available cheap in any “euro store” so you can easily buy locally if you prefer.
 

Prentiss Riddle

Aprendiz de todo, maestro de nada
Camino(s) past & future
Poco a poco: we're nibbling away at the Francés. (2015, 2016 & 2017)
#59
(Don’t know why that image is doubled! I guess it comes from posting on my phone.)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2016
Kumano Kodo 2015
#60
Gosh, in my years of walking the camino I've never needed duct tape. I'm having trouble thinking of its uses on camino. Anyone who has used it? What for?
I used it on the CF when the backs of my boots wore out at the top, in a fold-over to smooth out the rough bits. My wife used it to repair her boot inserts.
Wrapped round walking poles it is easy to take, or wrapped around a pen/pencil.
 
Camino(s) past & future
camino primitivo, camino de la costa
#61
USB wall chargers are available cheap in any “euro store”
exactly, whenever you are in a small town ask for "el chino" (the chinese shop) and you will find anything made of plastic in asia for a lot less than what you would pay in the us. the chinese mafia seems to have a monopoly on household goods in spain.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - June 2018
#62
A lot of people have asked me about what I packed for the Camino, so, FINALLY, I've put together a video in which I walk through everything I packed. I discuss a bunch of essentially important topics like boots vs. trail runners vs. sandals, CamelBaks vs. bottles, whether you should carry a full-sized guitar, and that silly hat I wore. The video description includes a detailed list of everything I packed (including brands, etc.). I also included a bunch of funny outtakes and behind-the-scenes video clips that never made it into my original film. I hope this helps someone!


-Hank
Note that for an American in Spain this $3 item is the only adapter you need for portable devices. It weighs almost nothing. There’s no need for a big boxy universal adapter.

https://www.rei.com/product/775157/rei-co-op-adapter-plug-e106-europe-and-asia

View attachment 40257 View attachment 40257

But sure, USB wall chargers are available cheap in any “euro store” so you can easily buy locally if you prefer.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - June 2018
#63
When I went into Apple store for some advice was told the same thing - buy the phone charger over there and save yourself a bundle - thanks for confirming this and the pic of what is looks like - I assume that the one you would need in France is the same as one for Spain?
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - June 2018
#64
Note that for an American in Spain this $3 item is the only adapter you need for portable devices. It weighs almost nothing. There’s no need for a big boxy universal adapter.

https://www.rei.com/product/775157/rei-co-op-adapter-plug-e106-europe-and-asia

View attachment 40257 View attachment 40257

But sure, USB wall chargers are available cheap in any “euro store” so you can easily buy locally if you prefer.
A lot of people have asked me about what I packed for the Camino, so, FINALLY, I've put together a video in which I walk through everything I packed. I discuss a bunch of essentially important topics like boots vs. trail runners vs. sandals, CamelBaks vs. bottles, whether you should carry a full-sized guitar, and that silly hat I wore. The video description includes a detailed list of everything I packed (including brands, etc.). I also included a bunch of funny outtakes and behind-the-scenes video clips that never made it into my original film. I hope this helps someone!


-Hank
A lot of people have asked me about what I packed for the Camino, so, FINALLY, I've put together a video in which I walk through everything I packed. I discuss a bunch of essentially important topics like boots vs. trail runners vs. sandals, CamelBaks vs. bottles, whether you should carry a full-sized guitar, and that silly hat I wore. The video description includes a detailed list of everything I packed (including brands, etc.). I also included a bunch of funny outtakes and behind-the-scenes video clips that never made it into my original film. I hope this helps someone!


-Hank
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - June 2018
#65
Thanks for confirming for me that a water bladder is completely not necessary and as I thought too heavy to carry. I will however bring my insulated camelback bottle and not just a plastic water bottle as I'm sure to lose that and have to just keep buying more - the environmentalist in me is screaming. Also I think that a 'what to pack for females' video is in order as we also need some sports bras! Finally what does everyone sleep in clothing wise - have the silk sleeping bag liner but nobody really talks about night time clothes????
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May - June 2015)
#66
Thanks for confirming for me that a water bladder is completely not necessary and as I thought too heavy to carry. I will however bring my insulated camelback and not just a plastic water bottle as I'm sure to lose that and have to just keep buying more - the environmentalist in me is screaming. Also I think that a 'what to pack for females' video is in order as we also need some sports bras! Finally what does everyone sleep in clothing wise - have the silk sleeping bag liner but nobody really talks about night time clothes????
Hi Sherry, yes, my big regret with this video is that I didn't add a few extra things to focus on women -- when I first put the video together, I errored toward only discussing what I know, but I now realize I should have done some extra research myself or had one of my female friends appear on screen. Anyway, one of my female friends suggested Lululemon sports bras, and I know Exofficio (the same brand I like) also makes women's underwear which some women like for traveling. At night, I wore my underwear, shorts, and the short-sleeved shirt that I planned to hike in the next day (because it was about to get it dirty when hiking with it anyway). I would always put on a clean shirt after I showered when arriving at albergues in the afternoon.

By the way, there's certainly nothing wrong with carrying a Camelbak bladder instead of a water bottle, it just weighs more, and I was focusing on going ultralight. You can probably make it through the Camino buying only a couple plastic bottles (especially if you wash them) if you want to try it but avoid buying a lot of plastic. I did carry a Camelbak bladder when I did the Camino -- I've just come to the conclusion that if you're weight sensitive, it's really a luxury item and not a necessity.

I hope that helps.
-Hank
 
Camino(s) past & future
camino primitivo, camino de la costa
#67
You can probably make it through the Camino buying only a couple plastic bottles (especially if you wash them) if you want to try it but avoid buying a lot of plastic.
on my first camino del norte i bought one of these cheap aluminum bottles because plastic in the sun will release all kinds of chemicals into the water. it had a narrow opening so you couldnt clean it very well. after about 4 weeks i noticed a strange taste to the water and at home i took a closer look inside and saw that it had a plastic lining and brown algae was happily growing on it. thats when i switched to stainless steel ... glass is even better but a lot heavier.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese (2019) Walking Lisbon North
#69
Hi Sherry, yes, my big regret with this video is that I didn't add a few extra things to focus on women -- when I first put the video together, I errored toward only discussing what I know, but I now realize I should have done some extra research myself or had one of my female friends appear on screen. Anyway, one of my female friends suggested Lululemon sports bras, and I know Exofficio (the same brand I like) also makes women's underwear which some women like for traveling. At night, I wore my underwear, shorts, and the short-sleeved shirt that I planned to hike in the next day (because it was about to get it dirty when hiking with it anyway). I would always put on a clean shirt after I showered when arriving at albergues in the afternoon.

By the way, there's certainly nothing wrong with carrying a Camelbak bladder instead of a water bottle, it just weighs more, and I was focusing on going ultralight. You can probably make it through the Camino buying only a couple plastic bottles (especially if you wash them) if you want to try it but avoid buying a lot of plastic. I did carry a Camelbak bladder when I did the Camino -- I've just come to the conclusion that if you're weight sensitive, it's really a luxury item and not a necessity.

I hope that helps.
-Hank
I am new here, but I been finding such helpful information! I think Magwood's pack list for women is good too, she seems to walk all the caminos, so this list I am putting here from her might be from any number of camino's but you can check her blog I guess to see to be sure it is a good match to what you are thinking of walking. I have added the "warmers sleeves/PDF 50" from her list because taking sleeves on and off seems like a smart choice for me - plus the added sun protection and bright green - for the cars (so I have heard) :))
here is her list:
https://magwood.files.wordpress.com/2016/10/packing-list-20161.pdf
 
Camino(s) past & future
Planning May/June 2016
#70
Hi Hank, fantastic video.

The bladder vs bottles issues seems to have been thoroughly discussed, but here are my thoughts: I started the Camino Frances with a single plastic bottle of water in the side pocket of my pack. After the walk to Roncesvalles and running out of water, I switched to two bottles, but very rarely needed the second bottle. The downside is that I found it very inconvenient to drink, and spent most of the Camino under-hydrated. I implemented a plan where I would hike to my breakfast stop (1-2hr) with the water in my pack, and then set the goal of finishing a bottle 15-20 min before the next town, as this timing seemed to be convenient for a bathroom break and water refill. It was still inconvenient and I found myself hand-carrying the bottle much of the time, which would be impossible with walking poles. I was never really happy with my solution, but still agree that the bladder is too heavy. Next trip, I plan to try something like this:

https://sourceoutdoor.com/en/bottles/22-convertube-hydration-system

The upside to my side pocket solution was that I was walking alone, and if I wanted to start a conversation while walking, I would ask just somebody to pull out my water bottle for me.

I walked in mid May-early June 2016, and while I carried pretty much the same clothing, I found I was uncomfortably cold much of the time. The shorts that I thought I would wear every day, were worn only rarely and while I was doing laundry. The knit stocking cap that I threw in at the last minute as a luxury item was worn almost every morning. I think my fleece was too light, and I'll carry a slightly heavier/warmer one next time.

The sleeping bag liner was a perfect solution, and I found that almost all albergues offered supplemental blankets when needed. Unfortunately, Roncesvalles did not, and that was a really cold night even wearing all of my clothes.

Shoes: I started with trail runners, but had blister issues and discovered a previously quiet Morton's neuroma. I exchanged for Tevas in Viana, and was super happy.

Thanks again for your insights!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - June 2018
#71
> and plan on using 2 liter Osprey bladder.

really no need for that, there is water everywhere on the del norte. you are either at the sea or mostly in the mountains, no long stretches of meseta - a one liter bottle is ideal, i use a stainless steel one because its easy to clean, maybe 150g more than a plastic bottle but absolutely worth it. plastic containers in the heat will build up bacteria and even algae over weeks.
Hi Sherry, yes, my big regret with this video is that I didn't add a few extra things to focus on women -- when I first put the video together, I errored toward only discussing what I know, but I now realize I should have done some extra research myself or had one of my female friends appear on screen. Anyway, one of my female friends suggested Lululemon sports bras, and I know Exofficio (the same brand I like) also makes women's underwear which some women like for traveling. At night, I wore my underwear, shorts, and the short-sleeved shirt that I planned to hike in the next day (because it was about to get it dirty when hiking with it anyway). I would always put on a clean shirt after I showered when arriving at albergues in the afternoon.

By the way, there's certainly nothing wrong with carrying a Camelbak bladder instead of a water bottle, it just weighs more, and I was focusing on going ultralight. You can probably make it through the Camino buying only a couple plastic bottles (especially if you wash them) if you want to try it but avoid buying a lot of plastic. I did carry a Camelbak bladder when I did the Camino -- I've just come to the conclusion that if you're weight sensitive, it's really a luxury item and not a necessity.

I hope that helps.
-Hank
Icebreaker and smart wool seem to be best and for women you can buy sports bras as base layer in both brands - I'm a bit sensitive to wool but seem ok with Icebreaker. The typical lycra sports bras will get sweaty and stinky pretty quickly - they are work-out wear and need to be thrown in wash right away so not a 'go to' for this type of venture. My challenge will be to pack smart for pre and post camino stays as in Paris for three days and hoping to hit Barcelona after. I'm sure that in Barcelona I will be buying some new clothes LOL! Think for my website I will put together a what did I pack for the Camino based on research and experience and what did I actually use and don't need for next venture if I ever do it again....
http:/mycaminosresolve.com
 

Jeri

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: March-May (2016)
Del Norte: April-May (2018)
Finisterre: May (2018)
#72
Yes, this works better if you have an easily-accessible water bottle pocket on the outside of your pack that you can access without taking your packing off. I like bladders too, it's just that they weigh too much. Good luck!
-Hank
I agree the bladder is heavy. I am going to experiment with a different setup. I still have a couple of weeks until my trip. Will rig up holder for Ultimate Direction Softflask Body Bottle. Weighs 36 grams for 500 ml. See picture. I will post results after I try it out. 1521389215764720458846.jpg
 

H Richards

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2017 Francés
October 2017 Le Puy / Francés
June/July 2018 Norte
#73
I'm not understanding why everyone is saying water bladders are heavy. My Deuter Source bladder weighs 180g - about the same as a decent size aluminium water bottle. But perhaps my standards for "heavy" are different !
 
Camino(s) past & future
Summer of 2012 - Astorga -Finisterre
Summer of 2014 SJPP - Sarria
Summer of 2017 Primitivo-Muxia
#74
I used it on the CF when the backs of my boots wore out at the top, in a fold-over to smooth out the rough bits. My wife used it to repair her boot inserts.
Wrapped round walking poles it is easy to take, or wrapped around a pen/pencil.
ALWAYS have some wrapped around my poles...sliced tight boots and wrapped up the soles to give a fellow suffering camino some relief from his too tight boots.
 

JeanB

Explorer Jean
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
#75
A lot of people have asked me about what I packed for the Camino, so, FINALLY, I've put together a video in which I walk through everything I packed. I discuss a bunch of essentially important topics like boots vs. trail runners vs. sandals, CamelBaks vs. bottles, whether you should carry a full-sized guitar, and that silly hat I wore. The video description includes a detailed list of everything I packed (including brands, etc.). I also included a bunch of funny outtakes and behind-the-scenes video clips that never made it into my original film. I hope this helps someone!


-Hank
Great video. Thanks.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May - June 2015)
#76
I'm not understanding why everyone is saying water bladders are heavy. My Deuter Source bladder weighs 180g - about the same as a decent size aluminium water bottle. But perhaps my standards for "heavy" are different !
My video focuses on ultralight, and a plastic 1L water bottle from the grocery store weighs 36g, which is significantly less than a bladder or an aluminum bottle. There are certainly good things about having a water bladder, but many thru-hikers going ultralight these days are using plastic bottles that weigh very little to save on grams.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May - June 2015)
#78
I agree the bladder is heavy. I am going to experiment with a different setup. I still have a couple of weeks until my trip. Will rig up holder for Ultimate Direction Softflask Body Bottle. Weighs 36 grams for 500 ml. See picture. I will post results after I try it out.
On a trip recently, I just put the bottle in one of the sidepockets on my Osprey pack, which worked fine. Some of the newer Osprey packs have side pockets that make it easy to access the water bottle even by the wearer.
-Hank
 
#79
Wow! Care to share your packing list?
Since the short-term weather forecast included a day of thunderstorms, I went with the full Gore-Tex jacket and trousers; without that, I would just take the Berghaus hyper smock

Here it is
Wearing 990
Merrell Trail Glove shoes 420
Craghoppers shorts 270
Icebreaker Cool-Lite t-shirt LS 180
Underpants 90
Liner socks 30

Not wearing 2,975
Gregory Miwok 12L 520
Guide book / town plans 410
Nuun tablets x3 210
Shaver 200
Icebreaker Cool-Lite t-shirt LS 180
Soap, deoderant, plasters 180
Icebreaker Cool-Lite t-shirt SS 150
Sigg water bottles x2 150
Sleeping bag liner 130
Spare glasses 110
Berghaus Vapourlight Hyper Smock 100
Running shorts 100
Soltan sun cream 100
Lowe Alpine hat 90
Underpants 90
Liner socks x3 90
Alarm clock 90
Exped dry bags (XS, XXS) 60
Buff 15

Goretex Pac-lite jacket 270
Goretex Pac-lite trousers 200
 

SueG

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 frances
2018 porteguese
#80
Thanks for confirming for me that a water bladder is completely not necessary and as I thought too heavy to carry. I will however bring my insulated camelback bottle and not just a plastic water bottle as I'm sure to lose that and have to just keep buying more - the environmentalist in me is screaming. Also I think that a 'what to pack for females' video is in order as we also need some sports bras! Finally what does everyone sleep in clothing wise - have the silk sleeping bag liner but nobody really talks about night time clothes????
I slept in my sports bra and yoga shorts.
 
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017
#81
Regarding underwear for women:

I like the ex officio giv-n-go camisoles with a shelf bra, and giv-n-go underwear. I could wash them out and then dry them overnight. So.. I just brought one pair, and wore one pair. I also felt fine walking in just the camisole when it got hot during the afternoons. You can find inexpensive exofficio on sierra trading company website. (Camisole are $7) -- One thing to note though, is that the "give" in the camisole breaks down after about 5-6 weeks. I end up throwing them away. Some women will need more support than the shelf bra offers.

Also! I wore a fresh "light day" panty liner every day to keep my underwear clean and not have to worry about toilet paper during the day.

We walked in the cooler months and I loved/needed a sleeping bag in many albergues and the few times I camped. My sleeping bag gave me flexibility and warmth. I took a down sleeping bag that is rated to 20 F. There were two nights in a tent in France on a rainy October night where that that was not enough-- (the second night I dressed warmly with a jacket and curled up with a large dog.) -- The down sleeping bag is about 2.5#, so yes, it definitely adds weight. In the summer I would go with a liner.

-- I also packed layers, and pants with micro fleece. I had a morning warmer outfit, and would strip off the layers as the day heated up.

--I did not carry a tent, as there is no need in Spain, but I think in France I would carry one to keep the costs down. The camp grounds there are lovely. (The above tent and dog mentioned belonged to a friend who met me on the trail for few days.) -- I have a one person tent that is 2#, and a 2 person tent that is 3#.

--So my Spring and Fall pack was a little under 20 pounds, about 9kgs. I am 130#, and the weight was fine. But then, my back is stronger than many as I take care of horses (shovel out muck, move hay bales, and push wheel barrows). I was surprised at how many people were having problems with their back and shoulders a few days after Le Puy.

Kate
 

Lexine

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017
#82
Thank you so much for the video. Very helpful. The video states there is an actual packing list. Where can I find this?
 

Jeri

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: March-May (2016)
Del Norte: April-May (2018)
Finisterre: May (2018)
#83
I agree the bladder is heavy. I am going to experiment with a different setup. I still have a couple of weeks until my trip. Will rig up holder for Ultimate Direction Softflask Body Bottle. Weighs 36 grams for 500 ml. See picture. I will post results after I try it out........ it worked great! Will use it on Del Norte starting 4/5. So excited, can't wait!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#84
I see quite a few people recommending bringing really long charging cables, and I have to cringe, because think what the albergue rooms are going to be like if everyone decides they only want to charge their phone from their bed - masses of wires for people to trip over and damage equipment or themselves :/
I bring a 10 foot long charging cable, which I never have to run across the room where people might trip on it. It's especially useful when you're in an upper bunk. I bought a European plug charger with 2 USB outlets on Amazon, so that I could share with other pilgrims, and wouldn't have to worry about leaving a plug adapter behind in a wall outlet.
Also I think that a 'what to pack for females' video is in order as we also need some sports bras!
Honestly, you aren't running and jumping, so a sports bra is overkill. Wear what you are comfortable in. I'm particularity not a fan of trying to take off or put on a tight pull over bra, in a tiny shower cubicle!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - June 2018
#85
I bring a 10 foot long charging cable, which I never have to run across the room where people might trip on it. It's especially useful when you're in an upper bunk. I bought a European plug charger with 2 USB outlets on Amazon, so that I could share with other pilgrims, and wouldn't have to worry about leaving a plug adapter behind in a wall outlet.


Honestly, you aren't running and jumping, so a sports bra is overkill. Wear what you are comfortable in. I'm particularity not a fan of trying to take off or put on a tight pull over bra, in a tiny shower cubicle!
LOL - I only wear pretty much sports bras as find them much more comfortable - then again I'm only an A cup and need no support
 
Camino(s) past & future
(Le Puy- St Jean Pied a Port (September 2018 )

St. Jean Pied a Port - Finisterre 2008
#86
We cannot get duck tape here, so my substitute is electrical tape. Always useful to have along.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - June 2018
#87
So I finally got my packing video posted. This one is geared towards women and on my blog I list in detail the items that I am taking. Again what you pack is personal but I feel like I have gained so much valuable information from this forum and others as well as from research and seminars, that I thought I would share some finds and thoughts as a resource and starting point!

for more details and pics of all actual contents see:
http://mycaminosresolve.com/
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May - June 2015)
#92
@sherrykirkham - Generally good advice and good video. BUT.... have you tried those shampoo leaves? (Just sayin!)
I'm not a big fan of those things because I've ruined multiple entire books of them just by getting the whole thing wet, which is pretty easy to do when you have wet hands and want to grab a leaf. Maybe I'm just clumsy?
-Hank
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May - June 2015)
#93
So I finally got my packing video posted. This one is geared towards women and on my blog I list in detail the items that I am taking. Again what you pack is personal but I feel like I have gained so much valuable information from this forum and others as well as from research and seminars, that I thought I would share some finds and thoughts as a resource and starting point!
Great! I hope your Camino is fantastic, and it'll be interesting to see how the contents of your bag changes once you're there (if at all)!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May - June 2015)
#94
Thank you so much for the video. Very helpful. The video states there is an actual packing list. Where can I find this?
There is a full, detailed packing list in the Description right below my Youtube video on Youtube.
-Hank
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - June 2018
#95
Great! I hope your Camino is fantastic, and it'll be interesting to see how the contents of your bag changes once you're there (if at all)!
THANKS and Yes - so will I - the double hiking foot wear is my only concern but since I'm in Paris for 3 days and post in Barcelona I wasn't sure how not to pack runners and hiking shoes - plus my feet are so wide and hard to fit I can't just buy a pair along route if something happens.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - June 2018
#96
I'm not a big fan of those things because I've ruined multiple entire books of them just by getting the whole thing wet, which is pretty easy to do when you have wet hands and want to grab a leaf. Maybe I'm just clumsy?
-Hank
As for shampoo leaves yes I'm hoping that I don't ruin the container either but do have backup samples to use as well
 

OLDER threads on this topic



A few items available from the Camino Forum Store




Advertisement
Booking.com

Most read today

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 8 1.1%
  • February

    Votes: 4 0.5%
  • March

    Votes: 33 4.5%
  • April

    Votes: 107 14.6%
  • May

    Votes: 179 24.5%
  • June

    Votes: 52 7.1%
  • July

    Votes: 15 2.1%
  • August

    Votes: 10 1.4%
  • September

    Votes: 218 29.8%
  • October

    Votes: 89 12.2%
  • November

    Votes: 11 1.5%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.7%
Top