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Has anyone walked with a hip-belt trailer?

malingerer

Active Member
#1
This really is my last shot in the locker! Arthritis in hips and spine have me almost crippled if I walk too far or carry too much in back pack. Cycling is out of the question as I am in the clutches of the balance rehabilitation clinic for severe problems with balance. and NO ITS NOT because of good red wine or strong black coffee! :)
 

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SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Camino Inglés 2018

Now: http://egeria.house/
#2
You have all my sympathy, but I don't think a trailer would be of much use to you - sadly, especially as you might quite often need to 'twist' your back to get around corners and also some stretches, just and after Pamplona come to mind, where the way is simply to narrow for a trailer.

Why don't you use luggage transport plus an ultralight day pack instead?

Buen Camino, SY
 

malingerer

Active Member
#3
This really is my last shot in the locker! Arthritis in hips and spine have me almost crippled if I walk too far or carry too much in back pack. Cycling is out of the question as I am in the clutches of the balance rehabilitation clinic for severe problems with balance. and NO ITS NOT because of good red wine or strong black coffee! :)
Hi and thanks for swift reply! its really the good old veedlepee that I want to finish from Salamanca/Zamora to Astorga. I have never used a "forwarding" style for my rucksack and am thinking of trailer for extra water and carrying a tarp for shade. The weight still has to be thought of no matter what means I use, and my comfort zone is now down to 10kms which not much use on the vdlp:) Its been pointed out to me that walking is still walking and my hips will let me know that! looks like the sedan chair after all:)
Yours aye , The Malingerer.

I think that 14 years of camino have taken their toll but at 79 I am more bloody minded than ever!:)
 
Camino(s) past & future
'Portuguese' ' Frances' ' Norte' 'Salvador_prim' ‘le puy’ ‘Inglés’ ‘CDM’ ‘Invierno’ ‘Fin_Mux’
#4
This really is my last shot in the locker! Arthritis in hips and spine have me almost crippled if I walk too far or carry too much in back pack. Cycling is out of the question as I am in the clutches of the balance rehabilitation clinic for severe problems with balance. and NO ITS NOT because of good red wine or strong black coffee! :)
Hi Malingerer
I'm sure @JennyH94 and also @David would have some feedback for you on this particular trailer from the hip.
Jenny is walking about now to Santiago and I believe one might have been constructed for her as she had shoulder problems and couldn't carry the backpack. It may have been given a good test by now !

Buen camino
I hope you can work something out.
Annie
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Camino Inglés 2018

Now: http://egeria.house/
#5
... my comfort zone is now down to 10kms which not much use on the vdlp:) ... looks like the sedan chair after all:)
... but at 79 I am more bloody minded than ever!:)
Stay as bloody minded as you are, please! Yes, 10km stages on the Wee de la Silver :cool: are difficult to do unless you use taxis to get from/to end/starting points of the stages. Buen Camino and don't give up and retire to the Sedan chair just yet - where a will, there a way, as they say in my country, SY
 

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notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
#6
I met a lady on the VDLP with a trailer, she really loved it, but it did look a bit of a nightmare to me. The side pieces were her poles, which could come off and the trailer could be carried a short distance if the path was just too bad for it. But it struck me that it's like a bike - you need spare tyres, and a pump and whatnot. I cannot comment on how suitable the path might be on this section for the trailer.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
#7
This really is my last shot in the locker! Arthritis in hips and spine have me almost crippled if I walk too far or carry too much in back pack. Cycling is out of the question as I am in the clutches of the balance rehabilitation clinic for severe problems with balance. and NO ITS NOT because of good red wine or strong black coffee! :)
These fellows who passed me up on the VDLP in 2013 didn't seem to be having much trouble. They were smoking me! I think the key to success on this route might be the ONE wheel at the back. Something to consider. BTW, over the years I've been doing the various routes of the Camino I have seen many many versions of this. Here also is a photo of a fellow we passed at Orisson last season, I believe. IMG_3885.JPG
blogger-image-1387665892.jpg IMG_4631.JPG
 
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malingerer

Active Member
#8
I met a lady on the VDLP with a trailer, she really loved it, but it did look a bit of a nightmare to me. The side pieces were her poles, which could come off and the trailer could be carried a short distance if the path was just too bad for it. But it struck me that it's like a bike - you need spare tyres, and a pump and whatnot. I cannot comment on how suitable the path might be on this section for the trailer.
This is the kind of idea I am working on except I don't know as yet how to put wheel on poles! Thought of pinching some kid's trycyle and sawing off the front forks complete with wheel! Oh the wickedness! :)

Agree its more bits with pump etc like u say and of course getting it off and on planes and trains. Has 2 b light and "come apartable"! and acceptable as "hold" luggage! I really need that sedan chair and or the donkey to pull it!

Walk soft and stay safe.

The Malingerer.
 

malingerer

Active Member
#11
You can also include a lightweight chair if you are pulling a cart, sitting and resting every couple of km might be helpful.



Have you considered a pack umbrella attached to your small day pack?
If I'm gonna take a chair it will be the saddle on a bloody great motorbike! :) :) and an umbrella? come off it! An awning at least eh? Keep on truckin folks! Its the thought that counts! It was in all seriousness the fact I had no where to sit on last mishap that caused me such grief. I could hit the floor no problem, it was gittin back up that did me in!:)

Take care all of u, and thank u. Thanks Annie for the piccies. The Philistines amongst whom I dwell think ive lost the plot!

Vaya con Dios

The Malingerer.
 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
#14
This really is my last shot in the locker! Arthritis in hips and spine have me almost crippled if I walk too far or carry too much in back pack. Cycling is out of the question as I am in the clutches of the balance rehabilitation clinic for severe problems with balance. and NO ITS NOT because of good red wine or strong black coffee! :)
Hello! I am looking into trailers as well, for different back pains.
If you haven't found this thread yet, I recommend reading it:
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...g-pack-loads-over-distance.48162/#post-520319
I hope to try a Wheelie from Radical Design in the near future, I am very curious to find out how it works with poles. The good news is that the news about two-wheelers is good, they take most of the weight (80%) off the person who is pulling the Wheelie.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2018
#16
Hey I could earn EUR5 a day if I got a cart and brought my own pack and someone else's o_O
@malingerer
... have you actually considered walking with a donkey? BC SY
PS As we are speaking VdlP here, perhaps Don Blas in Fuenterobles can put you in contact with somebody that has one?
:D The donkey could pull the (bigger) cart and that could be €5 x 10 packs a day.
 

malingerer

Active Member
#17
:D The donkey could pull the (bigger) cart and that could be €5 x 10 packs a day.
This is getting hilarious! Were I a doggie person I could have a wheelie sled and mush the trail! However, its nice to see the wheels :))) turning in the brains and its off to the city dump for me shortly just 2 c if I can snaffle wheels of some sort! Had thought of ambushing a golf fanatic and making off with their cart! Gonna have to say a lot of Mea Culpas before this thread is over! :) :)

Vaya con Dios

The Malingerer.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
#18
Just home from the camino frances. Met a man walking happily with a shopping trolley he had modified by adding a pair of walking poles as extended handles. As above, where there's a will..
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2000); Ch St. Giles (2013); Le Puy to SJPP (May/June 2015); vdlp 2016
#20
I walked the Le Puy route a couple of years ago and many times ran into a French couple who were walking with a little trailer that they pulled behind them. That route would be comparable to the second part of the VDLP in terms of hills, rocks, etc. Once they got to SJPP they decided to continue over the pyrenees to Pamplona. I think they had decided to use the trailer because the man had problems with his knees. They told everyone they liked it - but they had overloaded it (they carried both of their packs on it) and said they would use it again but with less stuff. I also met a german woman who walked from Le Puy to Conques (10 days) with a donkey. :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#21
Just FYI, the trailer pictures above, outside Refuge Orisson appears to be a Radical Designs walking trailer. They are from a Dutch company that specializes in bicycle trailers. So the engineering is first-rate.

See it at: https://www.radicaldesign.com/walking-trailers.html

Over the years, I have seen several of these along the Camino. I have spoken to their users. Most loved the trailers. One fellow complained about getting through the muddy and rocky bits, especially on a downhill segment.

As Notion9000 correctly points out, they ARE essentially bicycle trailers and you do have to be prepared to repair things that have problems along the way. I am thinking that punctures should bit a big problem as the weight is less than for a bicycle with a human rider. But, I defer to pilgrims who have actually used one of these or a similar rig.

I hope this helps.
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#22
I just had a thought...amazing! Anyway, what about adapting a cart made for another purpose and environment to the Camino. As but one example, check this out:

https://www.wheeleez.com/

This firm makes BEACH CARTS. It is the puffy, squishy, low pressure tires that make this a viable idea for the Camino, at least IMHO. They can take the load, cushion the ride, and likely float over mud and rocks.

Some years back, I owned such a beach cart, the one with the garden type, tipping bed, and it worked brilliantly, at least getting to and from the beach.

I suspect the bigger issue would be the frame required. One would not want too heavy or elaborate a frame. Also, and ideally, the design would permit the trailer to collapse and be shippable as checked luggage.

The wheels are available separately. Do a web search There are various suppliers, worldwide. So, my thought is about a hybrid solution combining a current hiking trailer with the larger beach tires to achieve an optimum result.

I hope this helps the discussion.
 

simeon

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP LosArcos 09\14 Tricastella SDDC 0515 Porto SDDC 1015 LosArcos Burgos 1016 Burgos Leon 0917
#26
a donkey I suppose would be a slow go cart
I don't think they take donkeys as hold luggage. I met a guy from switzerland who had a donkey. He started with one in Switzerland and by the time he got to Burgos had two. He didn't realise it was pregnant.. He was planning to go the whole way to sdc and back!!!! That was the story he told me anyway.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Past? Not enough.
Future? Sure!
#28
Hi Malingerer,

I'm using a Carrix since 10 years, on caminos and shorter hikes in Switzerland.
I'm way junger than you, but I suffer from knies and ankles problems.
It's a real help when the wheel can work normally but can be more difficult than a backpack in specific situations (typical example: the stairs in Portomarin).

Buen Camino, Jacques-D.
PS: don't hesitate to ask if you have questions...
 

Glenn Rowe

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
#32
don't know where to find the damn things (hiking trailers) anyway!!
Malingerer,

There are several links in this thread (including mine) that lead straight to said hiking trailers, and AFAIK they all have price/purchasing information.

As best I can tell, your issue is not one of ABILITY (can't find) but MOTIVATION (choose not to find).

Regards as always.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2018
#34
I have trouble with emojis but I like this one! Methinks this thread has gone to hell
on a handcart! :)

don't know where to find the damn things anyway!!

Vaya con Dios.

The Malingerer
Those contraptions are also not available to us; pricey too. I am looking at baby prams (jogger); trying to figure out which one can be redesigned into a two-wheeled hiking trolley with minimal inputs. They are usually made of aluminum alloy (light), foldable, and public-transport-friendly (already); cheap too. $30 - $100 will get you a nice comfy one; made in China (where else?). If it can do babies, its strength-of-materials should be enough for a 5 to 18-kilo load. My primary consideration now is larger long-distance wheels. If it won't do, I will just have to build something from materials used in ultralight bicycle frames and "Brompton" wheels. I hope this helps.

This is in preparation for the time when my present 10-15% scoliosis decides to become worse and not allow me to carry a backpack anymore.

Hey, this thread is informative and has the "feel-good vibes" in it. I am thankful for it.;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
St.Jean-Santiago (2017)
#35
I met a family from Australia that were pushing their 11month old in an industrial grade 3 wheeled stroller along the entire Camino Frances. They should be in Santiago by now.
The father was getting concerned about the front wheel bearings going over some of the hills though.
B.C.
-jgp
 

malingerer

Active Member
#36
Malingerer,

There are several links in this thread (including mine) that lead straight to said hiking trailers, and AFAIK they all have price/purchasing information.

As best I can tell, your issue is not one of ABILITY (can't find) but MOTIVATION (choose not to find).

Regards as always.
Hi Glen, I meant to say I couldn't find the emojis! The info and help re the trailers has been fantastic! Thanks to u and all who contributed. Much food for thought so many blessings etc :)

Vaya con Dios

The Malingerer.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Camino Inglés 2018

Now: http://egeria.house/
#37
@malingerer To find the emojis, just click on the smiley face in the top menu of the reply field and choose the one you like ;-) Or just copy and paste one or more of these:

:) ;);) :( :mad: :confused: :cool: :p :D :eek: :oops: :rolleyes: o_O

BC SY
 
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
#40
Hi, just an update. The trailers are marvelous and one cannot know how brilliant they are unless they have tried one. Jenny has been walking with the one I made and I with the Radical Design one. One never has to twist round corners and they are never ever too wide. There is no sense of weight or pulling. No weight on knees or feet. Jenny has arthritic knee and problem foot and has has had zero problems, same for me. No sweaty back, no pain, no stress. It just goes where you go and rides easily over any terrain and that military report shows a reduction of 88% in energy expenditure. We both use small grab bags, tiny shoulder bags, for when we walk away from the trailer with our important items. In hot weather, and it has been hot, we can carry as much water as we want with no extra stress or feeling of weight. I added two tubes to each trailer. One to carry a walking pole but we never have to use them as the trailer gives stability going downhill, and the other to carry an umbrella, which we use daily as sun shades. Oh! And we fitted bicycle bells too!!
The truth is this - they are far superior to wearing a pack!!
Buen Camino!!!
P.s. single wheel trailers don't work well as the weight is equal between the wheel and the hipbelts so the hips/waist is heavy. The design has to be two wheels with the weight over the wheels/axle, then there is zero load on the body.
 
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#41
Hi, just an update. The trailers are marvelous and one cannot know how brilliant they are unless they have tried one. Jenny has been walking with the one I made and I with the Radical Design one. One never has to twist round corners and they are never ever too wide. There is no sense of weight or pulling. No weight on knees or feet. Jenny has arthritic knee and problem foot and has has had zero problems, same for me. No sweaty back, no pain, no stress. It just goes where you go and rides easily over any terrain and that military report shows a reduction of 88% in energy expenditure. We both use small grab bags, tiny shoulder bags, for when we walk away from the trailer with our important items. In hot weather, and it has been hot, we can carry as much water as we want with no extra stress or feeling of weight. I added two tubes to each trailer. One to carry a walking pole but we never have to use them as the trailer gives stability going downhill, and the other to carry an umbrella, which we use daily as sun shades. Oh! And we fitted bicycle bells too!!
The truth is this - they are far superior to wearing a pack!!
Buen Camino!!!
P.s. single wheel trailers don't work well as the weight is equal between the wheel and the hipbelts so the hips/waist is heavy. The design has to be two wheels with the weight over the wheels/axle, then there is zero load on the body.
Hi and thanks for the update! You realise I am just about turning green with envy at your prowess! Would it be possible to have a meet next time you are back in Weston? I will even buy the coffee! You have heard "Beware of Greeks bringing gifts" ? Beware of Celts in hot pursuit of trailers!:) Am lighting extra candles in the church and going to the bookies to "make a rise" as they say.:) I WILL have a trailer come what may n then its raise the pennies to git back to the veedlepee and start again from Salamanca. Thinking next time of a tarp + s/bag + mat + plenty water means I could still do short hops and be self sufficient without a weight penalty if trailer is as good as you say!:) Might even add a bottle of mead to the bribery!
Walk soft. Stay safe. love to Jenny and as always

Vaya con Dios.

The Malingerer
 
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
#42
Hi and thanks for the update! You realise I am just about turning green with envy at your prowess! Would it be possible to have a meet next time you are back in Weston? I will even buy the coffee! You have heard "Beware of Greeks bringing gifts" ? Beware of Celts in hot pursuit of trailers!:) Am lighting extra candles in the church and going to the bookies to "make a rise" as they say.:) I WILL have a trailer come what may n then its raise the pennies to git back to the veedlepee and start again from Salamanca. Thinking next time of a tarp + s/bag + mat + plenty water means I could still do short hops and be self sufficient without a weight penalty if trailer is as good as you say!:) Might even add a bottle of mead to the bribery!
Walk soft. Stay safe. love to Jenny and as always

Vaya con Dios.

The Malingerer

Hahahaha. Sean, I will be back Wednesday and if you want to borrow the Radical Design trailer for a couple of days to try it out, maybe going high
up onto Worlebury where the Celtic hill for is, you are welcome. I'm in George Street and will pm you when home and have slept a bit.

Con Dios
 

Purky

The Dutch guy
Camino(s) past & future
Breathe properly.
Stay curious.
And walk a camino.
#43
Since Radical Design is Dutch, it might be worth checking the Dutch second-hand site 'Marktplaats'. They don't come up often, but since I've been following this thread one or two used Wheelie trailers rolled by. Still pricey, but cheaper than new.
If you need help translating (or maybe even purchasing), you can always pm me.
 
#44
Since Radical Design is Dutch, it might be worth checking the Dutch second-hand site 'Marktplaats'. They don't come up often, but since I've been following this thread one or two used Wheelie trailers rolled by. Still pricey, but cheaper than new.
If you need help translating (or maybe even purchasing), you can always pm me.
Many thanks for that. hoping to see David soon and take a look at the thing in the flesh! Looks like it will have to be the Sherman tank at this rate! Think of the treads! That good red Spanish earth sticks to the boots like super glue so am a bit apprehensive about dragging a trailer in the wet!

Yours aye,

The Malingerer.
 

Purky

The Dutch guy
Camino(s) past & future
Breathe properly.
Stay curious.
And walk a camino.
#45
am a bit apprehensive about dragging a trailer in the wet!
You can't win 'em all. By the looks of it, and the reviews I have read (not only on this forum), such a trailer is the best alternative between carrying your own pack or having it transported. Short of hiring a Sherpa to walk with you, that is.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
#46
Re "dragging it through mud"

You don't drag it - it has wheels ...... divide the weight of the packed trailer by the footprint as both wheels touch the ground and you will get the square inch pressure/weight. Now combine the weight of your body and loaded pack and divide it by the footprint of one foot - as all the weight is on one foot alternately - and you will see that the difference between the two is huge; it is the person that has the problem in mud, not the trailer - also, by not carrying a loaded pack the feet will not push so far into mud ....

I say again, if someone hasn't walked with a trailer they cannot know how superb it is
 
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
#47
Malingerer - Sean? - message me your email address and I will send you loads of info about building one!!
 
#48
Malingerer - Sean? - message me your email address and I will send you loads of info about building one!!
Hi Dave, am not moving a muscle till I see the trailer of yours in front of my very eyes! been in hospital ref eyes today:) PC went down and now back on!
I like the look of the Carrix as it is half way to what I am trying to put together. Good point about the mud! I have a trolley that I use for fishing. The handle extends and the sides fold. The wheels are solid tho and IM not too sure about them. Figuring it all out slowly and not in a rush. I have 2 see (no pun intended!) eye consultant again in July, medication review this Friday. and balance clinic some whenever!
Nice nursey sez its AGE. Sheeesh! sez me under me breath and other things. Walk soft and stay safe.
Sean aka The Malingerer!
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Aug-Sept(2016) SJPDP-Finisterre, July-Aug(2017) SJPDP-Muxia-Finisterre, July-Aug(2018) El Norte
#49
Hi Dave, am not moving a :eek: muscle till I see the trailer of yours in front of my very eyes! been in hospital ref eyes today:) PC went down and now back on! I am at
I like the look of the Carrix as it is half way to what I am trying to put together. Good point about the mud! I have a trolley that I use for fishing. The handle extends and the sides fold. The wheels are solid tho and IM not too sure about them. Figuring it all out slowly and not in a rush. I have 2 see (no pun intended!) eye consultant again in July, medication review this Friday. and balance clinic some whenever!
Nice nursey sez its AGE. Sheeesh! sez me under me breath and other things. Walk soft and stay safe.
Sean aka The Malingerer!
@malingerer I recommend that you edit your post and remove your email address unless you like lots of spam emails! :eek: You can contact other members here via private conversations.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
#50
Hi Dave, am not moving a muscle till I see the trailer of yours in front of my very eyes! been in hospital ref eyes today:) PC went down and now back on!
I like the look of the Carrix as it is half way to what I am trying to put together. Good point about the mud! I have a trolley that I use for fishing. The handle extends and the sides fold. The wheels are solid tho and IM not too sure about them. Figuring it all out slowly and not in a rush. I have 2 see (no pun intended!) eye consultant again in July, medication review this Friday. and balance clinic some whenever!
Nice nursey sez its AGE. Sheeesh! sez me under me breath and other things. Walk soft and stay safe.
Sean aka The Malingerer!
Stay away from the Carrix - it is a travois so half the weight rests on your waist and hips - you have to have the load directly over a two wheel axle.

also - edit your post and remove your email address!!! Use the PM facility instead for info like that.
 
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#51
Stay away from the Carrix - it is a travois so half the weight rests on your waist and hips - you have to have the load directly over a two wheel axle.

also - edit your post and remove your email address!!! Use the PM facility instead for info like that.
email removed! many thanks! n thanks again for info!

The malinger.
 

hampshire!tim

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013), Ingles (2014), Finisterre (2015)
#53
I once slipped in rain and fell on a steep stretch somewhere after Roncesvalles, and damaged my shoulder and hip. Stubbornly carrying my pack until Logrono made the injuries much worse than the incident itself, and I was on the point of aborting my Camino. But I decided to buck convention, bought a small golf cart and pulled my pack along until I could ditch the cart (near Castrojeriz) and carry the pack again .

PRO : it was the only way I could continue the Camino, and it allowed me to do the journey and still walk into Santiago more or less on schedule. I felt guilty for a while but I was still "carrying" my stuff under my own steam, and in fact a greater load with the cart.

CON : there are certainly issues with some terrain - it's not an easy option at all - boulders and mud (December walk). And it even created some additional strain on the good arm and body due to different posture. So pulling a trailer by the hip could help avoid the secondary impact.

Simple point I wish to offer : if it's the only option which allows the completion of the Camino, well, then it's the only option. It's not a 2nd best. It's the best in the circumstances.
 

malingerer

Active Member
#54
I once slipped in rain and fell on a steep stretch somewhere after Roncesvalles, and damaged my shoulder and hip. Stubbornly carrying my pack until Logrono made the injuries much worse than the incident itself, and I was on the point of aborting my Camino. But I decided to buck convention, bought a small golf cart and pulled my pack along until I could ditch the cart (near Castrojeriz) and carry the pack again .

PRO : it was the only way I could continue the Camino, and it allowed me to do the journey and still walk into Santiago more or less on schedule. I felt guilty for a while but I was still "carrying" my stuff under my own steam, and in fact a greater load with the cart.

CON : there are certainly issues with some terrain - it's not an easy option at all - boulders and mud (December walk). And it even created some additional strain on the good arm and body due to different posture. So pulling a trailer by the hip could help avoid the secondary impact.

Simple point I wish to offer : if it's the only option which allows the completion of the Camino, well, then it's the only option. It's not a 2nd best. It's the best in the circumstances.
many heartfelt thanks for this and very timely post! still battling the arthritis and severe balance problems but have built a secret weapon which I aint gonna discuss or show photies of until I disembark at astorga. The date for that is in the lap of the gods and the dispenser of thirty pieces of silver :) :)

Walk soft n stay safe and as ever

Vaya

con Dios.

The Malingerer
 
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk El Camino (2014)
#56
I will be Starting via Serrana/ via de la Plata 19 April. Due to the long stages along the route and luck of facilities I have decided to take a Tent, Then I run into trouble with "WEIGHT "!
After much research I will be taking a Trolley .
I will be using a slightly modified Joggers child trolley /pram.
Trolley 1.jpg

Trolley 2.jpg

16 " wheels, (3 wheels),
Aluminium frame
with hand brake ! I added a two piece of tubing( $19), Bicycles hand grips ($10) , a couple of my golf buggie parts. and a waist belt ($50 from Katmandu) Paid $90 on Ebay for the trolley ,
Quick removal of both rear wheels it can be turned it into a monowheel trolley.
 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
#57
Hi, that looks interesting! Very Radical Design! Will you be pushing this or pulling it? Have you tried it out yet, how does it perform in different types of terrain (hills, rocks, sand etc)? Please keep us posted!

:cool: :cool: :cool:
 

Portach

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017
#58
This really is my last shot in the locker! Arthritis in hips and spine have me almost crippled if I walk too far or carry too much in back pack. Cycling is out of the question as I am in the clutches of the balance rehabilitation clinic for severe problems with balance. and NO ITS NOT because of good red wine or strong black coffee! :)
There was a guy on the VDLP in October with a trailer and harness that was quite elaborate. He said it was excellent on the paved or smoother sections but very hard to pull on sandy surface - there are parts of the track that are like walking on a beach. He had a tent on board so wasn't confined to the typically fewer lodging options on that Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
I plan to walk El Camino (2014)
#59
Hi, that looks interesting! Very Radical Design! Will you be pushing this or pulling it? Have you tried it out yet, how does it perform in different types of terrain (hills, rocks, sand etc)? Please keep us posted!

:cool::cool::cool:
Hi @MinaKamina ,
Both , pushing and pulling.
On the flats I will be pulling it on the 3 wheels configuration
For rough terrain I can converted it into a monowheel configuration and I will either pull it or push it , the terrain will dictate !
Yes, I have tried it and it seems really good
3 Wheel configuration (Pull and push)
On Flat tracks / roads excellent,
On reasonable surface up or down hills very good
Monowheel configuration
On narrow and rocky paths, Pushing is very good but I can not use my poles (Which I love to use), Pulling is good but I have to keep the trolley balanced, in another words I have to use my hands on the extended handles ( once again I am not able to use my poles) .
I have not tried it on soft sand but I think it will be OK with the 16" wheels (3)
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
#60
I have now modified my Radical Design Wheelie. I found that the big black bag was just not the thing as there were no outside zippable pockets for all those things we need during the day. Also that as there are just two large compartments when you put something fairly small in it just disappears down to the bottom! The water bottle holders are too short so that the bottles lean outwards and rub on the wheels, and when you get to a refugio the hospitelaros show you a good place for it downstairs and then you have to sort what you need and leave the rest below.

So! I removed the bag and replaced it with a rucksack. Not just any rucksack but one that is parallel all the way up and is exactly the right width and height. (a Yellowstone Edinburgh 65l - I need the space for all my first aid supplies). I bought two wide army style webbing belts and clipped one tightly to the bottom frame and one tightly to the top frame so that the rucksack just rests on the frame. Then bought two narrow army style webbing belts and ran these through the shoulder strap D fittings and they then run to the top cross bar. I clip the pack at the bottom using the hip belt (on this pack it is a perfect shape and design for that) and by clipping the two top belts. It is then secure and snug and I have access to all the pouches on the pack. Also, in just a moment I can unclip it from the trailer and carry it wherever I want.
I keep a long cycle cable lock with me (number code tumblers rather than a key lock - never want to worry about losing a key!) and can lock the trailer up when it is empty.

I have also replaced their hipbelt with a lighter, more comfortable one, and used webbing belt clips as part of the fixings so it unclips easily. And as you can see, added two plastic tubes, one for a walking pole and the other for an umbrella/parasol, both accessible when walking. Oh! and a bicycle bell too!!!

Perfect!!

This really works and is a huge improvement. I did write to them explaining how I felt the black bag was good for trekking over wildernesses but not right for pilgrims, told them how I had adapted it and included photos, but they didn't reply - ah well.
Radical Design sell the trailers without the black bag at a little less cost.

trailer 1.jpg
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
#61
Fantastic! And both designs still incorporate a back pack so if either doesn’t work for whatever reason there’s nothing to lose. Met many pilgrims walking with trolleys some with children on board and they seemed to be coping just fine. Once I was even overtaken going up a hill by a woman dragging one of those large vinyl shopping bags on wheels. :oops:
 

hecate105

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 Portuguese Estellas 2014 Aurelia 2016 St Davids 2017 Via Augusta/V dl P. 2018 Michael Mary Way
#62
I have a Dixon Rollerpack which was v expensive.... But it works brilliantly. You can pull twice what you can carry - so if you pack what you would carry - it will feel like half that weight when you pull it!
It is a single wheel, which is so much easier on tough terrain and narrow, twisty paths (I did 3 days on the Via Aurelia dragging it up stream beds....! But it makes me about 6 foot long - so i need a big turning circle, and it is REALLY handy having my husband there to lift the rear over stiles, fences etc.
If you are travelling alone and to finish a Camino, and you are not intending to gallop off on lots of routes, then I would say a trolley with extended handles - or even use something like a strimmer harness (like reins for adults!) it would be far cheaper....
But just to make you laugh I've added a pic below of me doing my 'turning circle' at Cricklade this winter! IMG_3605.JPG
 
#64
I have just discovered this thread - well about an hour ago - and read the lot with great pleasure, although I am not looking for a trailer. Am wondering where Malingerer is now on his way back to he VdlP.
???
alas! plans gone to hell on a rail! still battling the medics over hips n spine etc! steroid injections didn't work and now waiting for x rays and further consultations with musculoskeletal outfit whatever the hell they are ! haven't given up yet tho even if I do that last bit by bus, train or taxi :) I could still get out and walk the last few kms and blithely say I HAVE FINISHED!! Thank you for the interest and if you really want to find out wot is goin on in my skull, read the Poetry ( thread: Poems for Seekers) tucked away down on the Via de la Plata section!

Walk soft.

Stay safe.

And as ever

Vaya

con Dios.

The Malingerer
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte, Primitivo, Plata, Salvador Torres
#65
O dear! I am so sorry! However when you look at what ailments people manage to walk with... Since I discovered this forum almost a year ago this never ceases to impress me. Bought the book "I'll push you"....

Excellent idea to go by bus and finish on foot. I will keep my fingers crossed if that is any help!? By the way where did you stop walking the VdlP?

Will go now and try to find your poem - not very good with these IT things - cyber dummy.
 
#66
O dear! I am so sorry! However when you look at what ailments people manage to walk with... Since I discovered this forum almost a year ago this never ceases to impress me. Bought the book "I'll push you"....

Excellent idea to go by bus and finish on foot. I will keep my fingers crossed if that is any help!? By the way where did you stop walking the VdlP?

Will go now and try to find your poem - not very good with these IT things - cyber dummy.
Came a cropper at Calzada just north of Salamanca April 2017. In between other sessions on the CF I started the Veedlepee 2009!! I started from Malaga with the intention of going sea to sea and have actually done so courtesy of walking where I can, and bus and train etc where I cant! Its a question of pride really as the old route was from Seville to Astorga and I in just bloody minded Celt mode want to walk into Astorga! If I could just find a nice care home nearby I could schnuck off now and then! :)

I could get pushed in the bath-chair tho would prefer the trike with a 5 litre Chevvy engine!

keep on truckin.

The Malingerer.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte, Primitivo, Plata, Salvador Torres
#67
What a camino history!
Found the reference to your poem, but dont' know how to get there and open it. Will try again tomorrow...

Bon courage as they say where I live!
 

Anamiri

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
#68
These fellows who passed me up on the VDLP in 2013 didn't seem to be having much trouble. They were smoking me! I think the key to success on this route might be the ONE wheel at the back. Something to consider. BTW, over the years I've been doing the various routes of the Camino I have seen many many versions of this. Here also is a photo of a fellow we passed at Orisson last season, I believe. View attachment 34342
View attachment 34339 View attachment 34340
There was an excellent thread earlier this year from a man who walked extensively with a trailer, and built one for a woman, probably the woman mentioned in this thread with a bad shoulder.
The key element is to have two wheels, and the weight positioned directly over the wheels to take all the weight. He explained how that doesn't happen with the single wheel variety. The single wheel version looks like a backward facing wheelbarrow, and there is definitely weight on one of those.
The post also showed how they break down for air/bus transport etc.
I am most intrigued by them, I have a dream of walking from one end of my country to the other, and I think a trailer might be the answer.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
#69
I have now modified my Radical Design Wheelie. I found that the big black bag was just not the thing as there were no outside zippable pockets for all those things we need during the day. Also that as there are just two large compartments when you put something fairly small in it just disappears down to the bottom! The water bottle holders are too short so that the bottles lean outwards and rub on the wheels, and when you get to a refugio the hospitelaros show you a good place for it downstairs and then you have to sort what you need and leave the rest below.

So! I removed the bag and replaced it with a rucksack. Not just any rucksack but one that is parallel all the way up and is exactly the right width and height. (a Yellowstone Edinburgh 65l - I need the space for all my first aid supplies). I bought two wide army style webbing belts and clipped one tightly to the bottom frame and one tightly to the top frame so that the rucksack just rests on the frame. Then bought two narrow army style webbing belts and ran these through the shoulder strap D fittings and they then run to the top cross bar. I clip the pack at the bottom using the hip belt (on this pack it is a perfect shape and design for that) and by clipping the two top belts. It is then secure and snug and I have access to all the pouches on the pack. Also, in just a moment I can unclip it from the trailer and carry it wherever I want.
I keep a long cycle cable lock with me (number code tumblers rather than a key lock - never want to worry about losing a key!) and can lock the trailer up when it is empty.

I have also replaced their hipbelt with a lighter, more comfortable one, and used webbing belt clips as part of the fixings so it unclips easily. And as you can see, added two plastic tubes, one for a walking pole and the other for an umbrella/parasol, both accessible when walking. Oh! and a bicycle bell too!!!

Perfect!!

This really works and is a huge improvement. I did write to them explaining how I felt the black bag was good for trekking over wildernesses but not right for pilgrims, told them how I had adapted it and included photos, but they didn't reply - ah well.
Radical Design sell the trailers without the black bag at a little less cost.

View attachment 39009

This looks very tempting @David as my legs seem to get worse with each Camino!

Which model is it? Or which of their current models would you suggest?

And what spare parts do you carry?
 

hecate105

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 Portuguese Estellas 2014 Aurelia 2016 St Davids 2017 Via Augusta/V dl P. 2018 Michael Mary Way
#70
Malingerer - or anyone else with incurable/chronic pain problems etc - try tmswiki.com - it got me better from 22 years of fibromyalgia - all free!!!
 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
#71
This looks very tempting @David as my legs seem to get worse with each Camino!

Which model is it? Or which of their current models would you suggest?

And what spare parts do you carry?

At last! The story we have all been waiting for:

"our Camino with a rice cooker"



If you decide to buy a Wheelie, Robo, you can have it delivered to your starting point at the Camino. Then wheel the Camino and take the used object home ~ that will probably save you taxes & postage you have to pay when they dispatch a new item to your home adress.
 

Vovo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
future 2019
#72
Praise be, plenty of good ideas to answer the burning question, its all been done before, the cart designs are inventive, will consider.... thanks to readers who were onto the appropriate threads etc...it rivals wikipedia!! I can imagine what is meant by travelling very light mit backpack even so my back has problems. A bottle of water is a 'solid' weight really. Pockets must be very useful.
All the same backpack weight is taken by the hips I understand. Another style of back pack is half sized and supported at waist level, larger than a money type bag but not very large......regards..
 

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