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Hats and shade... The definitive post...

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t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
This is a frequent subject in the forum. Every summer, when the really hot dry weather comes to northern Spain, and indeed all Spanish pilgrimage routes, the subject arises.

Recently, with the serious heat wave across all of Europe and much of Spain, this discussion has taken on a new urgency.

In one recent thread, I expressed the opinion that I would buy an "umbrella hat" for test purposes and to report here in the forum. On second thought, and after ordering said funny-looking umbrella hat, I had an epiphany.

It occurred to me that what was needed was standard series of comparative photos, where the only thing that changed was the head gear.

Living in South Florida, waiting for a really sunny day was not an issue. I just had to wait for the umbrella hat to arrive, and to set up this experiment.

Attached below are small images of the various photos I took. Viewed correctly, and in order, assuming they uploaded sequentially, one looks at the least covering and shade generating hat, to the most.

Try not to wet yourself laughing. I took one for the team.

Luckily, only my long-suffering and very patient wife saw me. She had to take the photos... She DID try very hard NOT to laugh for the 10 minutes outside that it took to get all these photos.

Anyway, open the photos in order and see the continuum from left to right:
  • Adidas synthetic fabric ball cap, (this is my SIGNATURE cap. People use it to locate me in Santiago) to a,
  • Outdoors Research, ventilated, lightweight bucket hat, to a
  • Fedora style hat, generic straw style, (I bought it in Santiago) to a
  • Beachcomber style, straw, broad brimmed hat, to a
  • Basic folding umbrella jammed in the sternum strap, (any old umbrella with a long enough shaft works, but light colors are REALLY best, this one got hot to the touch in less than 5 minutes in the sun, then the
  • "Umbrella hat," I got from Amazon for less than USD 20, and finally the
  • Euroschirm Trekking Umbrella, über expensive at about €60, but provides the most shade.
From less to most coverage, you get the most shade and rain protection. However, the Euroschirm is IMHO wind-sensitive while walking. Passing trucks would frequently cause it to turn inside out. It was a royal pain in the butt, at least in my experience. It is also according to my metric scale heavier than the Umbrella Hat.

Conversely, the silly looking but very comfortable 'Umbrella Hat' provides nearly as much shade and rain protection, is UPF 50 rated, and has a second layer at the top that provides a "chimney" effect. This will vent heat, and wind pressure. Also, the top level can be turned up (inside out) while you are wearing the big part to provide added heat venting.

I have recommended the generic, inexpensive basic, but light colored folding umbrella as a cheap option. A light color is better in the bright sun, and the light color usually provides added contrast for safety.

The advantages include that, if it is inexpensive to start, you won't get too upset if it breaks on Camino. The other benefit is that you have a usable folding umbrella when you get home.

So, check the photos below and make your choices. I will answer any sane question put to me.

But, I need to state that I have not yet walked outside my walled and gated community with the Umbrella Hat. I am looking forward to leaving here to fly to Santiago in only 10 days. I do not want to be committed to a psych ward for evaluation before-hand and spoil this planning.

‘Nuff said...

IMG_5759.jpgIMG_5760.jpgIMG_5761.jpgIMG_5762.jpgIMG_5763.jpgIMG_5764.jpgIMG_5765.jpg

The Umbrella Hat and Euroschirm Trekking Umbrella will be with me when I start work at the Pilgrim Office in Santiago for a month on 15 July. You are welcome to try it on for a spin around the block...IF YOU DARE...

Hope this helps someone.
 
Last edited:

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Tom, what an awesome, informative post, literally covering all the bases on every head gear imagineable for sun and rain! You were a good natured "guinea pig"...and I'm sorry, but I did laugh just a little! A very amusing, yet serious post! Thank you!☺ 👍
 

Phil71

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese (2014,2016),Primitivo (2015), San Salvador (2017), Norte (2018), Ingles (2018)
I've always said it doesn't matter what it looks like as long as it works.
I am re-evaluating this statement.....
Great pics. And it did make my night!
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2010j, Primitivo (2013), Plata (2014 + 2015), Salvador (2016), Torres 2017), Portugues (2018
This is a frequent subject in the forum. Every summer, when the really hot dry weather comes to northern Spain, and indeed all Spanish pilgrimage routes, the subject arises.

Recently, with the serious heat wave across all of Europe and much of Spain, this discussion has taken on a new urgency.

In one recent thread, I expressed the opinion that I would buy an "umbrella hat" for test purposes and to report here in the forum. On second thought, and after ordering said funny-looking umbrella hat, I had an epiphany.

It occurred to me that what was needed was standard series of comparative photos, where the only thing that changed was the head gear.

Living in South Florida, waiting for a really sunny day was not an issue. I just had to wait for the umbrella hat to arrive, and to set up this experiment.

Attached below are small images of the various photos I took. Viewed correctly, and in order, assuming they uploaded sequentially, one looks at the least covering and shade generating hat, to the most.

Try not to wet yourself laughing. I took one for the team.

Luckily, only my long-suffering and very patient wife saw me. She had to take the photos... She DID try very hard NOT to laugh for the 10 minutes outside that it took to get all these photos.

Anyway, open the photos in order and see the continuum from left to right:
  • Adidas synthetic fabric ball cap, (this is my SIGNATURE cap. People use it to locate me in Santiago) to a,
  • Outdoors Research, ventilated, lightweight bucket hat, to a
  • Fedora style hat, generic straw style, (I bought it in Santiago) to a
  • Beachcomber style, straw, broad brimmed hat, to a
  • Basic folding umbrella jammed in the sternum strap, (any old umbrella with a long enough shaft works, but light colors are REALLY best, this one got hot to the touch in less than 5 minutes in the sun, then the
  • "Umbrella hat," I got from Amazon for less than USD 20, and finally the
  • Euroschirm Trekking Umbrella, über expensive at about €60, but provides the most shade.
From less to most coverage, you get the most shade and rain protection. However, the Euroschirm is IMHO wind-sensitive while walking. Passing trucks would frequently cause it to turn inside out. It was a royal pain in the butt, at least in my experience. It is also according to my metric scale heavier than the Umbrella Hat.

Conversely, the silly looking but very comfortable 'Umbrella Hat' provides nearly as much shade and rain protection, is UPF 50 rated, and has a second layer at the top that provides a "chimney" effect. This will vent heat, and wind pressure. Also, the top level can be turned up (inside out) while you are wearing the big part to provide added heat venting.

I have recommended the generic, inexpensive basic, but light colored folding umbrella as a cheap option. A light color is better in the bright sun, and the light color usually provides added contrast for safety.

The advantages include that, if it is inexpensive to start, you won't get too upset if it breaks on Camino. The other benefit is that you have a usable folding umbrella when you get home.

So, check the photos below and make your choices. I will answer any sane question put to me.

But, I need to state that I have not yet walked outside my walled and gated community with the Umbrella Hat. I am looking forward to leaving here to fly to Santiago in only 10 days. I do not want to be committed to a psych ward for evaluation before-hand and spoil this planning.

‘Nuff said...

View attachment 60435View attachment 60436View attachment 60437View attachment 60438View attachment 60439View attachment 60440View attachment 60441

The Umbrella Hat and Euroschirm Trekking Umbrella will be with me when I start work at the Pilgrim Office in Santiago for a month on 15 July. You are welcome to try it on for a spin around the block...IF YOU DARE...

Hope this helps someone.
Hi t2andreo!
Very informative post! You forgot to grin or smile while your wife was laughing her head off taking the photos!

Seriously, I love the Euro-thingy, have used it for years now, even before it became hands-free. Am waiting for them to develop air-conditioning under it - after all although it provides shade the air you walk through is hot and does not cool while you are walking through it. Since air-conditioning is probably not feasible you might a ventilator attached to the shaft to provide a bit of a brise!? Shall I propose this improval(?) to the manufacturers? Get part of the profit from patent!
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
The umbrella hat DOES have a double tiered canopy. You cannot see it in the photo, but it is there.

Anyone who decides to buy an umbrella hat should only consider the “double canopy” design. This is because this feature allows heat to rise up and out. It also vents air pressure that causes other umbrellas including the very well engineered Euroschirm to turn inside out.

The umbrella hat uses a nylon web “headband harness” to allow the “hat” to wear exactly like a hat... albeit with a HUGE BRIM.

I admit it looks silly. But out in the boonies, on the senda, or Meseta, it could prove priceless. It feels light and well balanced. I walked around my home, bent over, and did the sort of things I would do while on Camino.

On consideration, the umbrella hat is worth trying. Remember that you CANNOT walk through a doorway. You must remember to remove this ‘hat’ when going indoors.

Hope this helps.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature
Hi t2andreo!
Very informative post! You forgot to grin or smile while your wife was laughing her head off taking the photos!

Seriously, I love the Euro-thingy, have used it for years now, even before it became hands-free. Am waiting for them to develop air-conditioning under it - after all although it provides shade the air you walk through is hot and does not cool while you are walking through it. Since air-conditioning is probably not feasible you might a ventilator attached to the shaft to provide a bit of a brise!? Shall I propose this improval(?) to the manufacturers? Get part of the profit from patent!
I have walked in heatwaves with the Euro thingy umbrella (40 deg C +).
Looks stupid, I know but allowed me to brave the harshest heat until I arrived early afternoon.
Sadly, it looks like I have to take it again this year 🙄
 

Juspassinthrough

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, May-June (2017)
Ingles, June (2019
Leon-Sarria, June (2019)
Le Puy-Santiago (2023)
t2andreo,

Not everyone could pull that off but somehow you managed...

While I appreciate your research, I’m going to stick with my Panama. It breathes, it’s actually water repellent (good thing, I finished the Inglés during a very wet early June) and, it even makes me look good, sort of. Same style during my CF in May-June 2017, another hot spring.

60444
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Wearing a Panama or Fedora style stare hat is a very good compromise. About the biggest ‘con’ is wind performance.

At home, a sudden gust frequently sends my hats flying into the road. I have a stack of inexpensive such hats because they get lost.

Ball caps are tighter, but do not provide shade. However, on a rainy day, the ball cap is best worn under a poncho hood.

The bucket style hat, like the Outdoors Research (OR) I use does have a cinch-able neck cord. This is important on a windy day. As important, it folds small enough to fit a cargo pocket.

Each hat or umbrella has pros and cons. I decided to provide a standard “index” for others to refer to.

Had my purpose been to include ALL hats , I would have included Buffs and watch caps. But my focus was on shade and rain protection.

Hope this all helps.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Jul-Sept 2019: Six weeks in Northern Spain.
Apr 2018 Asturias
May 2016 CP: Portuguese
Try not to wet yourself laughing. I took one for the team...Luckily, only my long-suffering and very patient wife saw me...
@t2 Thank You for this! Please thank the Mrs because, it might just save a life...you never know!

Skipping over the hats, the first umbrella appears to have its ribs almost on top of your head. Is that right? I ask because, I purchased a cheap $7 umbrella and it appeared to be for a child once opened. After reading about the Euroshim and others like it, I decided to wait until they get that wind inverting issue corrected. Finally, the ever so clever umbrella hat. If it were the beach ball looking one then yes indeed, it would look goofy! The one you're using is cool! IF hats didn't bother me so much (or tight bands around the forehead), I wouldn't let anyone or anything stop me from wearing it, if it does the trick. I can suggest trying the UH with the under neck strap fastened, behind the head at the nape of the neck for a less nerd-alert look.

BTW, recently stumbled across this following 'photographers' gizmo and have been trying to figure it out for a DIY. ;)

Well Done, Tom!

60452
 

Juspassinthrough

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, May-June (2017)
Ingles, June (2019
Leon-Sarria, June (2019)
Le Puy-Santiago (2023)
Wearing a Panama or Fedora style stare hat is a very good compromise. About the biggest ‘con’ is wind performance.

At home, a sudden gust frequently sends my hats flying into the road. I have a stack of inexpensive such hats because they get lost.

Ball caps are tighter, but do not provide shade. However, on a rainy day, the ball cap is best worn under a poncho hood.

The bucket style hat, like the Outdoors Research (OR) I use does have a cinch-able neck cord. This is important on a windy day. As important, it fold small enough to fit a cargo pocket.

Each hat or umbrella has pros and cons. I decided to provide a standard “index” for others to refer to.

Had my purpose been to include ALL hats , I would have included Buffs and watch caps. But my focus was on shade and rain protection.

Hope this all helps.
Wind is a hazard, that’s for sure. Helps me keep my reflexes sharp 😎
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
@t2 Thank You for this! Please thank the Mrs because, it might just save a life...you never know!

Skipping over the hats, the first umbrella appears to have its ribs almost on top of your head. Is that right? I ask because, I purchased a cheap $7 umbrella and it appeared to be for a child once opened. After reading about the Euroshim and others like it, I decided to wait until they get that wind inverting issue corrected. Finally, the ever so clever umbrella hat. If it were the beach ball looking one then yes indeed, it would look goofy! The one you're using is cool! IF hats didn't bother me so much (or tight bands around the forehead), I wouldn't let anyone or anything stop me from wearing it, if it does the trick. I can suggest trying the UH with the under neck strap fastened, behind the head at the nape of the neck for a less nerd-alert look.

BTW, recently stumbled across this following 'photographers' gizmo and have been trying to figure it out for a DIY. ;)

Well Done, Tom!

View attachment 60452
The first umbrella was just one of many we have around the house. I think that one came from my car.

The reason the ribs were nearly on my head is because the umbrella shaft is not necessarily intended for this use. I recommend looking for the folding umbrella with the longest shaft available. That is the critical dimension.

I would not wait for Euroschirm to change their design. But you could research the home site at: https://www.euroschirm.com/

If you DO find a model with a double canopy design, so it has a vent to allow heat and air pressure out, search for the specific model on Amazon. Then share those result with the rest of us.

The buggy-canopy design photo looks too cumbersome for use while wearing a rucksack.

Finally, the umbrella hat-head harness was actually very comfortable and well ventilated. The chin strap has a spring toggle for fastening. Wearing it at the base of one’s skull is certainly doable. It just did not occur to me. But I would still be concerned about gusts of winds from passing vehicles.

Hope this helps.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
The first umbrella was just one of many we have around the house. I think that one came from my car.

The reason the ribs were nearly on my head is because the umbrella shaft is not necessarily intended for this use. I recommend looking for the folding umbrella with the longest shaft available. That is the critical dimension.

I would not wait for Euroschirm to change their design. But you could research the home site at: https://www.euroschirm.com/

If you DO find a model with a double canopy design, so it has a vent to allow heat and air pressure out, search for the specific model on Amazon. Then share those result with the rest of us.

The buggy-canopy design photo looks too cumbersome for use while wearing a rucksack.

Finally, the umbrella hat-head harness was actually very comfortable and well ventilated. The chin strap has a spring toggle for fastening. Wearing it at the base of one’s skull is certainly doable. It just did not occur to me. But I would still be concerned about gusts of winds from passing vehicles.

Hope this helps.
Your advice always helps, Tom. In my opinion you are a camino angel without even setting foot in the Pilgrim's Office!
 

Evvie

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2019
This is a frequent subject in the forum. Every summer, when the really hot dry weather comes to northern Spain, and indeed all Spanish pilgrimage routes, the subject arises.

Recently, with the serious heat wave across all of Europe and much of Spain, this discussion has taken on a new urgency.

In one recent thread, I expressed the opinion that I would buy an "umbrella hat" for test purposes and to report here in the forum. On second thought, and after ordering said funny-looking umbrella hat, I had an epiphany.

It occurred to me that what was needed was standard series of comparative photos, where the only thing that changed was the head gear.

Living in South Florida, waiting for a really sunny day was not an issue. I just had to wait for the umbrella hat to arrive, and to set up this experiment.

Attached below are small images of the various photos I took. Viewed correctly, and in order, assuming they uploaded sequentially, one looks at the least covering and shade generating hat, to the most.

Try not to wet yourself laughing. I took one for the team.

Luckily, only my long-suffering and very patient wife saw me. She had to take the photos... She DID try very hard NOT to laugh for the 10 minutes outside that it took to get all these photos.

Anyway, open the photos in order and see the continuum from left to right:
  • Adidas synthetic fabric ball cap, (this is my SIGNATURE cap. People use it to locate me in Santiago) to a,
  • Outdoors Research, ventilated, lightweight bucket hat, to a
  • Fedora style hat, generic straw style, (I bought it in Santiago) to a
  • Beachcomber style, straw, broad brimmed hat, to a
  • Basic folding umbrella jammed in the sternum strap, (any old umbrella with a long enough shaft works, but light colors are REALLY best, this one got hot to the touch in less than 5 minutes in the sun, then the
  • "Umbrella hat," I got from Amazon for less than USD 20, and finally the
  • Euroschirm Trekking Umbrella, über expensive at about €60, but provides the most shade.
From less to most coverage, you get the most shade and rain protection. However, the Euroschirm is IMHO wind-sensitive while walking. Passing trucks would frequently cause it to turn inside out. It was a royal pain in the butt, at least in my experience. It is also according to my metric scale heavier than the Umbrella Hat.

Conversely, the silly looking but very comfortable 'Umbrella Hat' provides nearly as much shade and rain protection, is UPF 50 rated, and has a second layer at the top that provides a "chimney" effect. This will vent heat, and wind pressure. Also, the top level can be turned up (inside out) while you are wearing the big part to provide added heat venting.

I have recommended the generic, inexpensive basic, but light colored folding umbrella as a cheap option. A light color is better in the bright sun, and the light color usually provides added contrast for safety.

The advantages include that, if it is inexpensive to start, you won't get too upset if it breaks on Camino. The other benefit is that you have a usable folding umbrella when you get home.

So, check the photos below and make your choices. I will answer any sane question put to me.

But, I need to state that I have not yet walked outside my walled and gated community with the Umbrella Hat. I am looking forward to leaving here to fly to Santiago in only 10 days. I do not want to be committed to a psych ward for evaluation before-hand and spoil this planning.

‘Nuff said...

View attachment 60435View attachment 60436View attachment 60437View attachment 60438View attachment 60439View attachment 60440View attachment 60441

The Umbrella Hat and Euroschirm Trekking Umbrella will be with me when I start work at the Pilgrim Office in Santiago for a month on 15 July. You are welcome to try it on for a spin around the block...IF YOU DARE...

Hope this helps someone.
Curious. Given your dubious review of the Euroschirm why will you be taking it with you? Wind sensitive, pain in the butt, etc. Also, how does it attach to your backpack strap?
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
The bucket hat works well - a friend wired the brim of mine (British Army trick) so you can make it into a gutter when it rains. I wear the cord snugged at the rear (like the Mounties) and it's never blown away yet.
A friend was going to take an umbrella hat on out 2016 Camino. Her daughter threatened to disown her if she did - I can understand why!
I can only imagine Tom's next door neighbours tweaking the drapes: "Mildred! Come see what the damned fool is up to now!"
 
Camino(s) past & future
Jul-Sept 2019: Six weeks in Northern Spain.
Apr 2018 Asturias
May 2016 CP: Portuguese
This is the (I thought it was collapsible but, it's not) umbrella I bought which, claims to be windproof and has two canopies. Not sure if you can see but, the under canopy has two rows of hole-punched design for air flow. I've been testing it in my Las Vegas, NV. backyard where the temps are currently around 100-104F/37-40C. The only problem (for me) is that ginormous "C" handle is about 6"/15cm long which doesn't fit diagonally in my backpack. Seriously considering sawing it off. Apart from that, I really do like it and feel much relief from that blazing ball of fire up there.

60494
 

Becky 59

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (May 2018)
Camino Ingles (Aug 2019)
Tom, your generosity to the rest of us, in being a guinea pig, is beyond compare! I love this forum and all the wonderful tips and crazy exchanges I read. I’m hoping my Tilly hat is sufficient for the Ingles (no Meseta, after all), and I sincerely hope you don’t wear the umbrella hat in the pilgrim office, it could be dangerous for the rest of us, lol! Love the post!
 

AndreaCT

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Fall 2016 Camino Frances to Leon
Fall 2017 Camino Frances to Finisterre
May 2019 Portuguese
Bless your heart Tom for taking one for the team! I really appreciated the pictures and information about the options for shade. You said 9 days until Santiago - you're going back again! Is this the trip that your wife and your cat are accompanying you at the Pilgrim Office?
 

Ivan_Prada

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés-(septiembre 2018)
Portugués-(en planes 2021)
This is the (I thought it was collapsible but, it's not) umbrella I bought which, claims to be windproof and has two canopies. Not sure if you can see but, the under canopy has two rows of hole-punched design for air flow. I've been testing it in my Las Vegas, NV. backyard where the temps are currently around 100-104F/37-40C. The only problem (for me) is that ginormous "C" handle is about 6"/15cm long which doesn't fit diagonally in my backpack. Seriously considering sawing it off. Apart from that, I really do like it and feel much relief from that blazing ball of fire up there.

View attachment 60494
Wow!!! Good idea. Yes, I would cut the “C” handle; would make it easier to place it on your shoulders harness and hold it with some Velcro straps.
Let us know.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Curious. Given your dubious review of the Euroschirm why will you be taking it with you? Wind sensitive, pain in the butt, etc. Also, how does it attach to your backpack strap?
Simple, I use it when I am working outside the Pilgrim Office in the hot sun. Although the ambient temperatures in July & August are usually in the upper 20s (c), or upper 70s to low 80s (f), Lorenzo (the sun) is typically very strong / muy fuerte.

So, to enable me to stand out there for a longish time, as needed, helping arriving pilgrims, I bring the Euroschirm. Weight is not an issue, and I am using it as a parasol, not attached to a rucksack.

When I was there in May I bought a FABULOUS, inexpensive yellow umbrella at Decathlon for €14,99. It is billed in the US as a golf umbrella, but is bright neon yellow and very well engineered.

I left it at Santiago with a friend. When I return, I plan to use both the Euroschirm and the Decathlon umbrellas and compare them. The 'winner' comes home with me, to be used on the next Camino, hopefully in Spring 2020. The 'loser' stays at Santiago to be used as a parasol when I am visiting or working there.

BTW, the Euroschirm comes with two velcro and plastic clips that attach to either shoulder strap of your rucksack. The umbrella shaft snaps into this clip, either right or left. But, this alone will not hold the umbrella in place.

So, the attachment kit includes two adjustable bungees to hold the vertical umbrella shaft in the plastic clip and against the shoulder strap. Further, the handle of the umbrella has another toggle that is intended to allow you to put your rucksack belt through it, and adjust the toggle to apply downward tension on the handle to help hold it all in place and vertical.

This is all VERY well engineered. But, when you use everything as the instructions tell you, it is a right pain in the butt to set up, and take down. Add to that complexity, the wind issue and the canopy flipping inside out when a truck or bus passes you when road walking and my frustration level grows. There is a specific order to do things properly. This can get in the way of enjoying your walk, at least iMHO.

But, the canopy is great for using as a parasol. It is some 20 degree fahrenheit cooler under the canopy than outside on a sunny day. That is a huge difference.

Hope this answers the question.
 
Last edited:

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
The bucket hat works well - a friend wired the brim of mine (British Army trick) so you can make it into a gutter when it rains. I wear the cord snugged at the rear (like the Mounties) and it's never blown away yet.
A friend was going to take an umbrella hat on out 2016 Camino. Her daughter threatened to disown her if she did - I can understand why!
I can only imagine Tom's next door neighbours tweaking the drapes: "Mildred! Come see what the damned fool is up to now!"
I love the wire idea. What type of wire should I use, should I be so interested? Type and gauge (thickness) would be appreciated. It sounds like a very good idea.

Yes, my neighbors ARE very nosy. I live in what is billed as a 55+ senior citizen community. Many of my neighbors have little else to do...

That is why I stationed my wife in the open garage door, facing out with my iPhone. I only went about 3 meters down the driveway to minimize the field of view from adjoining homes.

No sense in giving the aged neighbors heart attacks, or making them think there is an alien invasion going on. I took no chances. But, I nonetheless took one for the team...
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
This is a frequent subject in the forum. Every summer, when the really hot dry weather comes to northern Spain, and indeed all Spanish pilgrimage routes, the subject arises.

Recently, with the serious heat wave across all of Europe and much of Spain, this discussion has taken on a new urgency.

In one recent thread, I expressed the opinion that I would buy an "umbrella hat" for test purposes and to report here in the forum. On second thought, and after ordering said funny-looking umbrella hat, I had an epiphany.

It occurred to me that what was needed was standard series of comparative photos, where the only thing that changed was the head gear.

Living in South Florida, waiting for a really sunny day was not an issue. I just had to wait for the umbrella hat to arrive, and to set up this experiment.

Attached below are small images of the various photos I took. Viewed correctly, and in order, assuming they uploaded sequentially, one looks at the least covering and shade generating hat, to the most.

Try not to wet yourself laughing. I took one for the team.

Luckily, only my long-suffering and very patient wife saw me. She had to take the photos... She DID try very hard NOT to laugh for the 10 minutes outside that it took to get all these photos.

Anyway, open the photos in order and see the continuum from left to right:
  • Adidas synthetic fabric ball cap, (this is my SIGNATURE cap. People use it to locate me in Santiago) to a,
  • Outdoors Research, ventilated, lightweight bucket hat, to a
  • Fedora style hat, generic straw style, (I bought it in Santiago) to a
  • Beachcomber style, straw, broad brimmed hat, to a
  • Basic folding umbrella jammed in the sternum strap, (any old umbrella with a long enough shaft works, but light colors are REALLY best, this one got hot to the touch in less than 5 minutes in the sun, then the
  • "Umbrella hat," I got from Amazon for less than USD 20, and finally the
  • Euroschirm Trekking Umbrella, über expensive at about €60, but provides the most shade.
From less to most coverage, you get the most shade and rain protection. However, the Euroschirm is IMHO wind-sensitive while walking. Passing trucks would frequently cause it to turn inside out. It was a royal pain in the butt, at least in my experience. It is also according to my metric scale heavier than the Umbrella Hat.

Conversely, the silly looking but very comfortable 'Umbrella Hat' provides nearly as much shade and rain protection, is UPF 50 rated, and has a second layer at the top that provides a "chimney" effect. This will vent heat, and wind pressure. Also, the top level can be turned up (inside out) while you are wearing the big part to provide added heat venting.

I have recommended the generic, inexpensive basic, but light colored folding umbrella as a cheap option. A light color is better in the bright sun, and the light color usually provides added contrast for safety.

The advantages include that, if it is inexpensive to start, you won't get too upset if it breaks on Camino. The other benefit is that you have a usable folding umbrella when you get home.

So, check the photos below and make your choices. I will answer any sane question put to me.

But, I need to state that I have not yet walked outside my walled and gated community with the Umbrella Hat. I am looking forward to leaving here to fly to Santiago in only 10 days. I do not want to be committed to a psych ward for evaluation before-hand and spoil this planning.

‘Nuff said...

View attachment 60435View attachment 60436View attachment 60437View attachment 60438View attachment 60439View attachment 60440View attachment 60441

The Umbrella Hat and Euroschirm Trekking Umbrella will be with me when I start work at the Pilgrim Office in Santiago for a month on 15 July. You are welcome to try it on for a spin around the block...IF YOU DARE...

Hope this helps someone.
For shade coverage, the umbrella hat seems, by the photos, to provide more shade than the umbrella attached to the pack strap in the final picture. Probably because it is centred better. In the final picture, you can see a fair amount of sun on the right upper arm and chest that is shaded with the umbrella hat.
 

t2andreo

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Tom, your generosity to the rest of us, in being a guinea pig, is beyond compare! I love this forum and all the wonderful tips and crazy exchanges I read. I’m hoping my Tilly hat is sufficient for the Ingles (no Meseta, after all), and I sincerely hope you don’t wear the umbrella hat in the pilgrim office, it could be dangerous for the rest of us, lol! Love the post!
Thank you for the very kind comments. Your Tilley hat will be excellent. Remember that you can immerse it in water - any clear water available will do - even a puddle. The soaked hat causes evaporative cooling. It works! Try it out at home...

I am packing the umbrella hat and will have it with me at the Pilgrim office. If any forum member shows up and wants to try it out, for a test spin around the block, they are welcome to do so. I suspect the idea is basically a sound one.

The Camino is NOT a fashion parade. We need to emphasise and support useful, utilitarian solutions to recurring problems regardless of who stupid they might look. If they work, who cares.

Thank you again for your support...
 

t2andreo

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Bless your heart Tom for taking one for the team! I really appreciated the pictures and information about the options for shade. You said 9 days until Santiago - you're going back again! Is this the trip that your wife and your cat are accompanying you at the Pilgrim Office?
No, this is my annual "month off for good behavior." I get to go live in Santiago and work for a month at the Pilgrim Office. I return home exhausted, but fulfilled. It recharges my batteries, until the next Spring, when it is time to do my annual Camino.

My three weeks at Santiago in May were a Plan B, in response to my doctor cancelling my planned Camino Primitivo for health reasons. I think I addressed the underlying health issue with my June surgery. We shall see how I feel over the next few months.

I plan to look into options for bringing wife and cat next summer. It is looking overly expensive at present. I need to expand my circle of friends there...
 

t2andreo

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For shade coverage, the umbrella hat seems, by the photos, to provide more shade than the umbrella attached to the pack strap in the final picture. Probably because it is centred better. In the final picture, you can see a fair amount of sun on the right upper arm and chest that is shaded with the umbrella hat.
On reviewing the photos after the fact, I noticed the same shade pattern. I concur with your finding that the umbrella hat, though odd looking provided the best shade, relatively. It also offered very good circulation as the head harness is straps and not material like a ball cap. As has been stated above, you could cinch the chin strap to the rear of your head if you wished. I would be concerned about a gust of wind...

The photos were taken within 15 minutes, start to finish. So the sun position was essentially the same. Only the head gear changed. THAT was my purpose in doing this. I wanted to make all things equal, except the head gear.

For reference, I was facing true SOUTH. My back faced true NORTH. To MY right was WEST and to my left, was EAST. The photos were taken about 16:00 in the afternoon.

Obviously, the person looking at the photos needs to reverse this to know that to THEIR left is West and to their right is EAST.

In my experience, this would be comparable to an afternoon on the Meseta.

Hope this helps.
 

chinacat

Veteran Member
For shade coverage, the umbrella hat seems, by the photos, to provide more shade than the umbrella attached to the pack strap in the final picture. Probably because it is centred better. In the final picture, you can see a fair amount of sun on the right upper arm and chest that is shaded with the umbrella hat.
I noticed that ... it provides the best coverage by far 🙂
 

Texas Walker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2017 summer)
Portugues (2015)
Frances (2014)
Curious. Given your dubious review of the Euroschirm why will you be taking it with you? Wind sensitive, pain in the butt, etc. Also, how does it attach to your backpack strap?
It (the Euroschirm) looked to me like a longer-handled duplicate of the car umbrella tucked into the pack harness. I still have the broad-brimmed (Outdoor Research?) hat in my profile pic. (Also a bucket hat. But may stick with the broader brim.) Combined with sunglasses it is portable shade. But I'm not sure they make them for fellows. I won't buy a hat without the "stampede string" feature.
 

Evvie

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2019
Simple, I use it when I am working outside the Pilgrim Office in the hot sun. Although the ambient temperatures in July & August are usually in the upper 20s (c), or upper 70s to low 80s (f), Lorenzo (the sun) is typically very strong / muy fuerte.

So, to enable me to stand out there for a longish time, as needed, helping arriving pilgrims, I bring the Euroschirm. Weight is not an issue, and I am using it as a parasol, not attached to a rucksack.

When I was there in May I bought a FABULOUS, inexpensive yellow umbrella at Decathlon for €14,99. It is billed in the US as a golf umbrella, but is bright neon yellow and very well engineered.

I left it at Santiago with a friend. When I return, I plan to use both the Euroschirm and the Decathlon umbrellas and compare them. The 'winner' comes home with me, to be used on the next Camino, hopefully in Spring 2020. The 'loser' stays at Santiago to be used as a parasol when I am visiting or working there.

Hope this answers the question.
It does, and thank you! FYI: I had a vision of the wind catching your umbrella hat like Sister Bertrille.
 

Attachments

t2andreo

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It (the Euroschirm) looked to me like a longer-handled duplicate of the car umbrella tucked into the pack harness. I still have the broad-brimmed (Outdoor Research?) hat in my profile pic. (Also a bucket hat. But may stick with the broader brim.) Combined with sunglasses it is portable shade. But I'm not sure they make them for fellows. I won't buy a hat without the "stampede string" feature.
At first glance you are correct, except:

The Euroschirm comes with a specialized mounting kit with clips and bungees. I edited post #25 above to discuss how this works.

Conversely, if you used some other suitable umbrella, like the car umbrella for example, you just stuff it into your sternum cross strap, and then use a bungee or velcro strap to hold the shaft vertical, more or less aligned with your upper rucksack strap.

I recommend using the velcro straps sold inexpensively for holding loose wires, extension cords, etc. around the house. They are about 8 inches, 20 cm long and are narrow. Usually one sees a package of them in multi colors. I use bright colors so I do not lose them.

The beauty of using a generic, bright colored umbrella with a long enough shaft is that it more readily converts to regular umbrella use when you are not on Camino. Also, this solution will be a lot less expensive that investing in a specialized trekking umbrella. So, if it gets damaged with use, or lost, you just replace it...

Hope this helps.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
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Frances 2017;
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I just use cheapie car/home umbrellas. I consider buying them on the "installment plan" as needed...just toss when broken and replace with no care or worries!
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
I love the wire idea. What type of wire should I use, should I be so interested? Type and gauge (thickness) would be appreciated. It sounds like a very good idea.

Yes, my neighbors ARE very nosy. I live in what is billed as a 55+ senior citizen community. Many of my neighbors have little else to do...

That is why I stationed my wife in the open garage door, facing out with my iPhone. I only went about 3 meters down the driveway to minimize the field of view from adjoining homes.

No sense in giving the aged neighbors heart attacks, or making them think there is an alien invasion going on. I took no chances. But, I nonetheless took one for the team...
Mine was done by a retired "Squaddie" - the standard issue bush or boonie hats come with a soft brim which isn't impressive and tends to droop in front of your eyes.

He used a single strand of copper wire - don't use steel in case it rusts. It was cut from a scrap of UK spec power wiring of 2.5mm2 - or AWG13 if you prefer ;)

Look at the rear of the brim and you should see an overlap in the binding:

20190702_203850.jpg

ease the wire in and then "milk" it: push the wire in, smooth the material along. Repeat. It is a slow, finger aching job! Eventually you'll come full circle. Clamp the hidden end of the wire and gently start to pull the exposed end of the wire out. The binding will start to cockle as the brim curls inwards. Milk back now until you're happy with the degree of curl then cut off the exposed wire and let the cut end just disappear into the binding. Don't worry if the rim relaxes a bit later, you can always milk it back into place.

I wear mine rim up to form a gutter in the rain or . . .

20190702_204015.jpg

rim down for more shade.

I cropped the chin strap and tied it like the bootlace cord in a Tilley hat to wear at the back of the head:

20190702_204130.jpg

which stops it being blown away (if you wear it to the front and the hat gets snagged by a branch you'll get choked)

If you decide you don't like it just fish out the end with some needle nose pliers and tug it out.
 

chinacat

Veteran Member
Our daughter had a peaked cap (peak is very generous) with a detachable ‘Beau Geste’ piece of fabric that falls below her shoulders. She soaks it when walking in the heat and her neck benefits from the evaporation too.
My own, far from special, ‘National Trust’ hat has a wide brim, which provided a good ‘shelf’ for an insect net that kept those flies from either landing on our faces, or becoming an unwanted source of protein in our diet.

I have a (free) white umbrella ... a promo from a local clothes shop.
It has ‘mais il est où le soleil’ on it! 😎😄

It’s a bit thin, but it could be useful ...as a brolly. I am very unlikely to walk in severe heat 🥵
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
At first glance you are correct, except:

The Euroschirm comes with a specialized mounting kit with clips and bungees. I edited post #25 above to discuss how this works.

Conversely, if you used some other suitable umbrella, like the car umbrella for example, you just stuff it into your sternum cross strap, and then use a bungee or velcro strap to hold the shaft vertical, more or less aligned with your upper rucksack strap.

I recommend using the velcro straps sold inexpensively for holding loose wires, extension cords, etc. around the house. They are about 8 inches, 20 cm long and are narrow. Usually one sees a package of them in multi colors. I use bright colors so I do not lose them.

The beauty of using a generic, bright colored umbrella with a long enough shaft is that it more readily converts to regular umbrella use when you are not on Camino. Also, this solution will be a lot less expensive that investing in a specialized trekking umbrella. So, if it gets damaged with use, or lost, you just replace it...

Hope this helps.
Those velcro strips are a useful way of quickly tying a pack to a cafe chair backrest too - snatch my pack and you have to take the chair with you.

These can form a similar function (for umbrellas and theft deterent)

60503

They'll hook onto 25mm/1 inch straps and the bungee hooks back onto the clip.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Mine was done by a retired "Squaddie" - the standard issue bush or boonie hats come with a soft brim which isn't impressive and tends to droop in front of your eyes.

He used a single strand of copper wire - don't use steel in case it rusts. It was cut from a scrap of UK spec power wiring of 2.5mm2 - or AWG13 if you prefer ;)

Look at the rear of the brim and you should see an overlap in the binding:

View attachment 60500

ease the wire in and then "milk" it: push the wire in, smooth the material along. Repeat. It is a slow, finger aching job! Eventually you'll come full circle. Clamp the hidden end of the wire and gently start to pull the exposed end of the wire out. The binding will start to cockle as the brim curls inwards. Milk back now until you're happy with the degree of curl then cut off the exposed wire and let the cut end just disappear into the binding. Don't worry if the rim relaxes a bit later, you can always milk it back into place.

I wear mine rim up to form a gutter in the rain or . . .

View attachment 60501

rim down for more shade.

I cropped the chin strap and tied it like the bootlace cord in a Tilley hat to wear at the back of the head:

View attachment 60502

which stops it being blown away (if you wear it to the front and the hat gets snagged by a branch you'll get choked)

If you decide you don't like it just fish out the end with some needle nose pliers and tug it out.
Clever idea, Jeff, although that style offers less sun protection than other styles of brim hats.
 

t2andreo

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Those velcro strips are a useful way of quickly tying a pack to a cafe chair backrest too - snatch my pack and you have to take the chair with you.

These can form a similar function (for umbrellas and theft deterent)

View attachment 60503

They'll hook onto 25mm/1 inch straps and the bungee hooks back onto the clip.
Jeff: Did you buy these or make them? I am interested.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
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Remember that you CANNOT walk through a doorway. You must remember to remove this ‘hat’ when going indoors.
I only started chuckling when I read this, imagining what it took to realize that.
🤭
Great post, Tom. Thanks! It looks like the silliest option is the best.
And...there is the Asian option. Bamboo, light, cool, easy on the planet.
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean May/June 2017. Plans to walk Porto 2020
Hola Tom. As one who lives in the melanoma country, I love your experiment. For my money your head gear from left to right goes up in order of sensibility. The baseball cap is, imho, totally useless as sun protection. The next three are Ok. The umbrella and that umbrella hat (my mum had one 50 years ago) may draw laughs but during the last week in Spain's 40+ heatwave they are ideal. Cheers
 

t2andreo

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I only started chuckling when I read this, imagining what it took to realize that.
🤭
Great post, Tom. Thanks! It looks like the silliest option is the best.
And...there is the Asian option. Bamboo, light, cool, easy on the planet.
Vira: If I had an Asian peasant hat - the stereotypical conical shaped straw hat - I would have included it.

The placement in the continuum I photoed would be to the right of the beachcomber hat and before the umbrellas.

Personally, I feel that is an excellent option. Maybe next time. I need to find a high quality one with a headband and, ideally a chin strap / tie.

All suggestions welcomed.

Santiago, here I come, in EIGHT days...
 

t2andreo

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Hola Tom. As one who lives in the melanoma country, I love your experiment. For my money your head gear from left to right goes up in order of sensibility. The baseball cap is, imho, totally useless as sun protection. The next three are Ok. The umbrella and that umbrella hat (my mum had one 50 years ago) may draw laughs but during the last week in Spain's 40+ heatwave they are ideal. Cheers
That was my idea and purpose. Glad others found it valuable.
 

t2andreo

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For what it is worth, I found a nylon variant of the conical Acadian hat. While I personally feel that bamboo or other fiber is superior to fabric. This hat DOES have advantages.

See it here:


Note: it comes in a multitude of colors and patterns.

WATCH the video on the page above that explains how they developed this hat.

This may just be THE SOLUTION... go figure!

Hope this helps.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean May/June 2017. Plans to walk Porto 2020
At $45, I don't think so! How about this?...
Got one in my car. Uber lightweight. Cut it in half and twist it into this hat. ;)
View attachment 60510
Woe = $45 for a good sun proofing hat is imho a bargain. I have a Canadian made "Tillie"hat and I paid over $80 US for it and would never part with it. It has a lifetime guarantee, although I am not sure how I collect from Oz.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Jeff: Did you buy these or make them? I am interested.
Hi Tom - the only thing I make is Sourdough Bread and pizza ;)

You can get Molle clips with BUNGEE CORD or D-RING and even a HYDRATION TUBE CLIP

These are from eBay's US site so not sure why some are quoted in Canadian Loonies. I can't even post a letter in the UK for those prices. China seems to be in the position Britain was in during the mid-1800s - manufacturer for the world!

I find the tube clip version is just the right size for the shaft of my Senz umbrella and one of the bungee cord ones holds it in place.
 

t2andreo

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It does, and thank you! FYI: I had a vision of the wind catching your umbrella hat like Sister Bertrille.
It would take a MUCH larger umbrella to get me off the ground. But I loved the analogy. Watching Sally Field flying around supported by her starched wimple (IIRC) was one of my childhood delights. We all wished we could fly like that...

For those of you 'culturally deprived' folks out there. There was a 1960s TV sitcom called "The Flying Nun." It starred a very young Sally Field (US actress). It was silly but funny. That was the idea back then. No one took offense at was clearly intended to be light and goofy humor involving professed religious persons. Ah, those were the days... (sigh)

Thanks for the warm memory...
 

t2andreo

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Hi Tom - the only thing I make is Sourdough Bread and pizza ;)

You can get Molle clips with BUNGEE CORD or D-RING and even a HYDRATION TUBE CLIP

These are from eBay's US site so not sure why some are quoted in Canadian Loonies. I can't even post a letter in the UK for those prices. China seems to be in the position Britain was in during the mid-1800s - manufacturer for the world!

I find the tube clip version is just the right size for the shaft of my Senz umbrella and one of the bungee cord ones holds it in place.
Thank you. They looked DIY. I will research and build my own.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
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Then, it strikes me...DUH!
What about cutting one of these thingies to 'wear' over head and shoulders?!
View attachment 60515
That makes the umbrella hat, at USD $20 look downright stylish... I also have several lying around from older cars i no longer have. They are made to fit a specific car, or a range of cars.

But seriously, someone with sewing skills COULD convert one of these into an effective head shield that folds to go in the side pocket of a rucksack. Think of a nun's starched wimple, it's basically a hat with wings...

I have also seen automobile sun shades sold as two rectangular or square panels that go in your windshield / windscreen and overlap in the middle. One of these panels, with appropriate head harness - think a ballcap sacrificed for the cause, and a chin tie, and you are ready to go.

It would look about as dorky and silly as the umbrella hat, but might achieve mostly the same thing... except in rain. THEN the umbrella hat excels.
 
Last edited:

t2andreo

Veteran Member
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It (the Euroschirm) looked to me like a longer-handled duplicate of the car umbrella tucked into the pack harness. I still have the broad-brimmed (Outdoor Research?) hat in my profile pic. (Also a bucket hat. But may stick with the broader brim.) Combined with sunglasses it is portable shade. But I'm not sure they make them for fellows. I won't buy a hat without the "stampede string" feature.
Just FYI, the Euroschirm shaft collapses using the same twist-to-adjust mechanism as most hiking poles.

When collapsed, it is about 18” long.

Fully deployed it is about 1.5 meters or nearly 5 feet from tippy top (outside the canopy) to the bottom of the handle.

Hope this helps.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
I have a Tilley as well. My reply was about the simplistic style of that particular hat. ;)

@JeffCrawley has that Senz lived up to its excellent description?
My Senz is a delight. Being more teardrop shaped than most umbrellas if you point the short side into the wind it will stand up to considerable buffeting. On a sunny day, say on the CF, I'd start with the long tail behind me and, as the sun comes round to the south, slowly rotate it until I have maximum shade over my left shoulder.
As you can see it also acts as a mobile mojón. Nobody walking behind me has ever complained about getting lost!

60524

Heading into Castrojeriz, 2016

Underneath the Senz I'm wearing a Tilley hat too (belt, braces and a piece of string - that's me!) which replaced one left in a bar in Logroño in 2012 just three weeks after I'd bought it 😢

60527
 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
It would take a MUCH larger umbrella to get me off the ground. But I loved the analogy. Watching Sally Field flying around supported by her starched wimple (IIRC) was one of my childhood delights. We all wished we could fly like that...

For those of you 'culturally deprived' folks out there. There was a 1960s TV sitcom called "The Flying Nun." It starred a very young Sally Field (US actress). It was silly but funny. That was the idea back then. No one took offense at was clearly intended to be light and goofy humor involving professed religious persons. Ah, those were the days... (sigh)

Thanks for the warm memory...

There have been instances where a small rotor system gets a long way....


60533


FYI, in case you wonder, this is Karlsson-on-the-Roof, a character created by Swedish author Astrid Lindgren.
 

t2andreo

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My Senz is a delight. Being more teardrop shaped than most umbrellas if you point the short side into the wind it will stand up to considerable buffeting. On a sunny day, say on the CF, I'd start with the long tail behind me and, as the sun comes round to the south, slowly rotate it until I have maximum shade over my left shoulder.
As you can see it also acts as a mobile mojón. Nobody walking behind me has ever complained about getting lost!

View attachment 60524

Heading into Castrojeriz, 2016

Underneath the Senz I'm wearing a Tilley hat too (belt, braces and a piece of string - that's me!) which replaced one left in a bar in Logroño in 2012 just three weeks after I'd bought it 😢

View attachment 60527
Just FYI, those interested in a Senz, Original Umbrella in Shiny Silver, like the one above can obtain it here... in the US.


One presumes it is available on other countries Amazons sites as well. The price at Senz.com is USD 80. So the Amazon price is a significant discount. Plus, if you have Prime, shipping is free and FAST.

I would like to know how long the shaft is when the umbrella is open.

Hope this helps.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
??? I'm only familiar with this word as meaning...poo.

After pouring over their website, this umbrella looks like a winner! BTW, luv the bungee looking cord trim on your hat. ;)
mojón (moh-hohn)
masculine noun
1. (geography)
a. boundary stone
Estos mojones delimitan las fronteras de nuestra propriedad. These boundary stones define the borders of our property.
b. mile marker
Para llegar a su casa, gire a la izquierda en el mojón del kilómetro 226. To arrive at his house, turn left at the 226 kilometer marker.


Bungee cord is elastic - what you can see is the outer casing of some 12 Strand Colour Matched Dyneema from a racing yacht . . . I'd have thought anybody would have recognised that ⛵ ;)
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Just FYI, those interested in a Senz, Original Umbrella in Shiny Silver, like the one above can obtain it here... in the US.


One presumes it is available on other countries Amazons sites as well. The price at Senz.com is USD 80. So the Amazon price is a significant discount. Plus, if you have Prime, shipping is free and FAST.

I would like to know how long the shaft is when the umbrella is open.

Hope this helps.
Ah that's the larger Senz. I have the telescopic Senz Manual.

Collapsed the umbrella is 9.5 inches (24cms) over all and 2.25 inches (5.5cms) diameter. Extended it's 21.75 inches (55.5cms) overall. Once open the telescopic shaft from the underside of the clip to the handle is 17.5 inches (44.5cms)
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Having shared Tom's "umbrella hat" with a nephew I was surprised at his response. At first I mocked but then I though "Mmm, why not?" Obviously you'd cook on a hot day but in Galicia, why not?

60600 60601

Also good for dining accidents - spilled food/soup could be directed straight back to the plate!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013)
San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
This is a frequent subject in the forum. Every summer, when the really hot dry weather comes to northern Spain, and indeed all Spanish pilgrimage routes, the subject arises.

Recently, with the serious heat wave across all of Europe and much of Spain, this discussion has taken on a new urgency.

In one recent thread, I expressed the opinion that I would buy an "umbrella hat" for test purposes and to report here in the forum. On second thought, and after ordering said funny-looking umbrella hat, I had an epiphany.

It occurred to me that what was needed was standard series of comparative photos, where the only thing that changed was the head gear.

Living in South Florida, waiting for a really sunny day was not an issue. I just had to wait for the umbrella hat to arrive, and to set up this experiment.

Attached below are small images of the various photos I took. Viewed correctly, and in order, assuming they uploaded sequentially, one looks at the least covering and shade generating hat, to the most.

Try not to wet yourself laughing. I took one for the team.

Luckily, only my long-suffering and very patient wife saw me. She had to take the photos... She DID try very hard NOT to laugh for the 10 minutes outside that it took to get all these photos.

Anyway, open the photos in order and see the continuum from left to right:
  • Adidas synthetic fabric ball cap, (this is my SIGNATURE cap. People use it to locate me in Santiago) to a,
  • Outdoors Research, ventilated, lightweight bucket hat, to a
  • Fedora style hat, generic straw style, (I bought it in Santiago) to a
  • Beachcomber style, straw, broad brimmed hat, to a
  • Basic folding umbrella jammed in the sternum strap, (any old umbrella with a long enough shaft works, but light colors are REALLY best, this one got hot to the touch in less than 5 minutes in the sun, then the
  • "Umbrella hat," I got from Amazon for less than USD 20, and finally the
  • Euroschirm Trekking Umbrella, über expensive at about €60, but provides the most shade.
From less to most coverage, you get the most shade and rain protection. However, the Euroschirm is IMHO wind-sensitive while walking. Passing trucks would frequently cause it to turn inside out. It was a royal pain in the butt, at least in my experience. It is also according to my metric scale heavier than the Umbrella Hat.

Conversely, the silly looking but very comfortable 'Umbrella Hat' provides nearly as much shade and rain protection, is UPF 50 rated, and has a second layer at the top that provides a "chimney" effect. This will vent heat, and wind pressure. Also, the top level can be turned up (inside out) while you are wearing the big part to provide added heat venting.

I have recommended the generic, inexpensive basic, but light colored folding umbrella as a cheap option. A light color is better in the bright sun, and the light color usually provides added contrast for safety.

The advantages include that, if it is inexpensive to start, you won't get too upset if it breaks on Camino. The other benefit is that you have a usable folding umbrella when you get home.

So, check the photos below and make your choices. I will answer any sane question put to me.

But, I need to state that I have not yet walked outside my walled and gated community with the Umbrella Hat. I am looking forward to leaving here to fly to Santiago in only 10 days. I do not want to be committed to a psych ward for evaluation before-hand and spoil this planning.

‘Nuff said...

View attachment 60435View attachment 60436View attachment 60437View attachment 60438View attachment 60439View attachment 60440View attachment 60441

The Umbrella Hat and Euroschirm Trekking Umbrella will be with me when I start work at the Pilgrim Office in Santiago for a month on 15 July. You are welcome to try it on for a spin around the block...IF YOU DARE...

Hope this helps someone.
Well mine cost the vast sum of 7 euro, it has no vents, but what do you say, t2andreo? !!!
some people who know me say they would not own up to that if they saw me wearing it. Who knows? Good for a laugh. And it is one of those things that weighs almost nothing...
This is a frequent subject in the forum. Every summer, when the really hot dry weather comes to northern Spain, and indeed all Spanish pilgrimage routes, the subject arises.

Recently, with the serious heat wave across all of Europe and much of Spain, this discussion has taken on a new urgency.

In one recent thread, I expressed the opinion that I would buy an "umbrella hat" for test purposes and to report here in the forum. On second thought, and after ordering said funny-looking umbrella hat, I had an epiphany.

It occurred to me that what was needed was standard series of comparative photos, where the only thing that changed was the head gear.

Living in South Florida, waiting for a really sunny day was not an issue. I just had to wait for the umbrella hat to arrive, and to set up this experiment.

Attached below are small images of the various photos I took. Viewed correctly, and in order, assuming they uploaded sequentially, one looks at the least covering and shade generating hat, to the most.

Try not to wet yourself laughing. I took one for the team.

Luckily, only my long-suffering and very patient wife saw me. She had to take the photos... She DID try very hard NOT to laugh for the 10 minutes outside that it took to get all these photos.

Anyway, open the photos in order and see the continuum from left to right:
  • Adidas synthetic fabric ball cap, (this is my SIGNATURE cap. People use it to locate me in Santiago) to a,
  • Outdoors Research, ventilated, lightweight bucket hat, to a
  • Fedora style hat, generic straw style, (I bought it in Santiago) to a
  • Beachcomber style, straw, broad brimmed hat, to a
  • Basic folding umbrella jammed in the sternum strap, (any old umbrella with a long enough shaft works, but light colors are REALLY best, this one got hot to the touch in less than 5 minutes in the sun, then the
  • "Umbrella hat," I got from Amazon for less than USD 20, and finally the
  • Euroschirm Trekking Umbrella, über expensive at about €60, but provides the most shade.
From less to most coverage, you get the most shade and rain protection. However, the Euroschirm is IMHO wind-sensitive while walking. Passing trucks would frequently cause it to turn inside out. It was a royal pain in the butt, at least in my experience. It is also according to my metric scale heavier than the Umbrella Hat.

Conversely, the silly looking but very comfortable 'Umbrella Hat' provides nearly as much shade and rain protection, is UPF 50 rated, and has a second layer at the top that provides a "chimney" effect. This will vent heat, and wind pressure. Also, the top level can be turned up (inside out) while you are wearing the big part to provide added heat venting.

I have recommended the generic, inexpensive basic, but light colored folding umbrella as a cheap option. A light color is better in the bright sun, and the light color usually provides added contrast for safety.

The advantages include that, if it is inexpensive to start, you won't get too upset if it breaks on Camino. The other benefit is that you have a usable folding umbrella when you get home.

So, check the photos below and make your choices. I will answer any sane question put to me.

But, I need to state that I have not yet walked outside my walled and gated community with the Umbrella Hat. I am looking forward to leaving here to fly to Santiago in only 10 days. I do not want to be committed to a psych ward for evaluation before-hand and spoil this planning.

‘Nuff said...

View attachment 60435View attachment 60436View attachment 60437View attachment 60438View attachment 60439View attachment 60440View attachment 60441

The Umbrella Hat and Euroschirm Trekking Umbrella will be with me when I start work at the Pilgrim Office in Santiago for a month on 15 July. You are welcome to try it on for a spin around the block...IF YOU DARE...

Hope this helps someone.
74F22675-7F70-4A89-87F2-B58E0E11C594.jpeg
This umbrella hat is about the length of a wine bottle when closed. it is one of many items that weigh nothing! It broke the bank:€7.00, bought in a joke shop in Dublin. Will I have the nerve to wear it? Probably. Nobody knows me! What say you, t2andreo? Just remember, it’s a joke. A joke! Nothing as serious as a whatever kind of Schirm...no roof vents, but hey, what do you want for 7 euro?!!!
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Those velcro strips are a useful way of quickly tying a pack to a cafe chair backrest too - snatch my pack and you have to take the chair with you.

These can form a similar function (for umbrellas and theft deterent)

View attachment 60503

They'll hook onto 25mm/1 inch straps and the bungee hooks back onto the clip.
Jeff:

Where I can I by those EXACT nylon / plastic strap clips? I am searching but apparently am not calling them the correct name. Got a URL?

There are many similar items. But the ones pictured above are PERFECT! The cord and toggles I have plenty of. But I WANT THOSE CLIPS.

Even if the vendor is in the UK, just send me the link... I will sort it...

Thanks
 

Ivan_Prada

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés-(septiembre 2018)
Portugués-(en planes 2021)
This is a frequent subject in the forum. Every summer, when the really hot dry weather comes to northern Spain, and indeed all Spanish pilgrimage routes, the subject arises.

Recently, with the serious heat wave across all of Europe and much of Spain, this discussion has taken on a new urgency.

In one recent thread, I expressed the opinion that I would buy an "umbrella hat" for test purposes and to report here in the forum. On second thought, and after ordering said funny-looking umbrella hat, I had an epiphany.

It occurred to me that what was needed was standard series of comparative photos, where the only thing that changed was the head gear.

Living in South Florida, waiting for a really sunny day was not an issue. I just had to wait for the umbrella hat to arrive, and to set up this experiment.

Attached below are small images of the various photos I took. Viewed correctly, and in order, assuming they uploaded sequentially, one looks at the least covering and shade generating hat, to the most.

Try not to wet yourself laughing. I took one for the team.

Luckily, only my long-suffering and very patient wife saw me. She had to take the photos... She DID try very hard NOT to laugh for the 10 minutes outside that it took to get all these photos.

Anyway, open the photos in order and see the continuum from left to right:
  • Adidas synthetic fabric ball cap, (this is my SIGNATURE cap. People use it to locate me in Santiago) to a,
  • Outdoors Research, ventilated, lightweight bucket hat, to a
  • Fedora style hat, generic straw style, (I bought it in Santiago) to a
  • Beachcomber style, straw, broad brimmed hat, to a
  • Basic folding umbrella jammed in the sternum strap, (any old umbrella with a long enough shaft works, but light colors are REALLY best, this one got hot to the touch in less than 5 minutes in the sun, then the
  • "Umbrella hat," I got from Amazon for less than USD 20, and finally the
  • Euroschirm Trekking Umbrella, über expensive at about €60, but provides the most shade.
From less to most coverage, you get the most shade and rain protection. However, the Euroschirm is IMHO wind-sensitive while walking. Passing trucks would frequently cause it to turn inside out. It was a royal pain in the butt, at least in my experience. It is also according to my metric scale heavier than the Umbrella Hat.

Conversely, the silly looking but very comfortable 'Umbrella Hat' provides nearly as much shade and rain protection, is UPF 50 rated, and has a second layer at the top that provides a "chimney" effect. This will vent heat, and wind pressure. Also, the top level can be turned up (inside out) while you are wearing the big part to provide added heat venting.

I have recommended the generic, inexpensive basic, but light colored folding umbrella as a cheap option. A light color is better in the bright sun, and the light color usually provides added contrast for safety.

The advantages include that, if it is inexpensive to start, you won't get too upset if it breaks on Camino. The other benefit is that you have a usable folding umbrella when you get home.

So, check the photos below and make your choices. I will answer any sane question put to me.

But, I need to state that I have not yet walked outside my walled and gated community with the Umbrella Hat. I am looking forward to leaving here to fly to Santiago in only 10 days. I do not want to be committed to a psych ward for evaluation before-hand and spoil this planning.

‘Nuff said...

View attachment 60435View attachment 60436View attachment 60437View attachment 60438View attachment 60439View attachment 60440View attachment 60441

The Umbrella Hat and Euroschirm Trekking Umbrella will be with me when I start work at the Pilgrim Office in Santiago for a month on 15 July. You are welcome to try it on for a spin around the block...IF YOU DARE...

Hope this helps someone.
Hi Tom:

With this one you can keep your “SIGNATURE “ cap all the time....

66348902-C546-4CD7-BA07-1349CB820AA4.jpeg
 
Last edited:

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Jeff:

Where I can I by those EXACT nylon / plastic strap clips? I am searching but apparently am not calling them the correct name. Got a URL?

There are many similar items. But the ones pictured above are PERFECT! The cord and toggles I have plenty of. But I WANT THOSE CLIPS.

Even if the vendor is in the UK, just send me the link... I will sort it...

Thanks
Hi Tom,

As always they're from China/Hong Kong off of eBay.

Here's a typical LINK to on seller on eBay.com - just search for MOLLE clips.

There's likely to be the standard 4 week wait . . . .
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
Thanks for the link and pictures Jeff. I notice that the loops can be cut. If a thief does that it is bad but if you do it before your trip the loop can be replaced with a loop of thin steel cable.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Thanks for the link and pictures Jeff. I notice that the loops can be cut. If a thief does that it is bad but if you do it before your trip the loop can be replaced with a loop of thin steel cable.
I only use the MOLLE clip with the elastic to hold my umbrella up above my head. You can always shorten or replace the elastic - it's just 3mm shock cord.

I guess you could use something like this if you wanted steel:

60737

Edit: just re-read my original post. For temporary attachment of pack to cafe chair I use @t2andreo style velcro strips.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Hi Tom,

As always they're from China/Hong Kong off of eBay.

Here's a typical LINK to on seller on eBay.com - just search for MOLLE clips.

There's likely to be the standard 4 week wait . . . .
Thank you. I will place my order. They will be here by the time I return in late August...
 

skipronin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (May-June 2016)
Jeff:

Where I can I by those EXACT nylon / plastic strap clips? I am searching but apparently am not calling them the correct name. Got a URL?

There are many similar items. But the ones pictured above are PERFECT! The cord and toggles I have plenty of. But I WANT THOSE CLIPS.

Even if the vendor is in the UK, just send me the link... I will sort it...

Thanks
If I understand the item you are asking about, they are ITW Web Dominator's in the US. If you google the term it will pop up. REI sells them under a different name, but at a higher unit price as they only sell individual pieces. It should be located in the store by the cord locks if your local REI carries it.
 

skipronin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (May-June 2016)
Web dominator's were designed to be used with 1 inch strapping. You could probably make it work with 3/4 inch.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
....and ebay??!
You think they’re any better?

At least Amazon Smile gives a wee percentage to a charity of your choice.
The British are known for their hypocrisy - besides you fight the battles you know you can win and I always donate to the charities of my choice.

Now off to the sunshine for a walk!
 
Last edited:

skipronin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (May-June 2016)
Update: REI will no longer be selling this item. While my local REI store has 2 in stock, the online store has none. The salesman stated that they would not be buying more.


20190706_095933.jpg
In REI they were sold as Gear Aid Strap Tender..


If I understand the item you are asking about, they are ITW Web Dominator's in the US. If you google the term it will pop up. REI sells them under a different name, but at a higher unit price as they only sell individual pieces. It should be located in the store by the cord locks if your local REI carries it.
 
Last edited:

Dandabika

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Completed GR65 (2016)
This is a frequent subject in the forum. Every summer, when the really hot dry weather comes to northern Spain, and indeed all Spanish pilgrimage routes, the subject arises.

Recently, with the serious heat wave across all of Europe and much of Spain, this discussion has taken on a new urgency.

In one recent thread, I expressed the opinion that I would buy an "umbrella hat" for test purposes and to report here in the forum. On second thought, and after ordering said funny-looking umbrella hat, I had an epiphany.

It occurred to me that what was needed was standard series of comparative photos, where the only thing that changed was the head gear.

Living in South Florida, waiting for a really sunny day was not an issue. I just had to wait for the umbrella hat to arrive, and to set up this experiment.

Attached below are small images of the various photos I took. Viewed correctly, and in order, assuming they uploaded sequentially, one looks at the least covering and shade generating hat, to the most.

Try not to wet yourself laughing. I took one for the team.

Luckily, only my long-suffering and very patient wife saw me. She had to take the photos... She DID try very hard NOT to laugh for the 10 minutes outside that it took to get all these photos.

Anyway, open the photos in order and see the continuum from left to right:
  • Adidas synthetic fabric ball cap, (this is my SIGNATURE cap. People use it to locate me in Santiago) to a,
  • Outdoors Research, ventilated, lightweight bucket hat, to a
  • Fedora style hat, generic straw style, (I bought it in Santiago) to a
  • Beachcomber style, straw, broad brimmed hat, to a
  • Basic folding umbrella jammed in the sternum strap, (any old umbrella with a long enough shaft works, but light colors are REALLY best, this one got hot to the touch in less than 5 minutes in the sun, then the
  • "Umbrella hat," I got from Amazon for less than USD 20, and finally the
  • Euroschirm Trekking Umbrella, über expensive at about €60, but provides the most shade.
From less to most coverage, you get the most shade and rain protection. However, the Euroschirm is IMHO wind-sensitive while walking. Passing trucks would frequently cause it to turn inside out. It was a royal pain in the butt, at least in my experience. It is also according to my metric scale heavier than the Umbrella Hat.

Conversely, the silly looking but very comfortable 'Umbrella Hat' provides nearly as much shade and rain protection, is UPF 50 rated, and has a second layer at the top that provides a "chimney" effect. This will vent heat, and wind pressure. Also, the top level can be turned up (inside out) while you are wearing the big part to provide added heat venting.

I have recommended the generic, inexpensive basic, but light colored folding umbrella as a cheap option. A light color is better in the bright sun, and the light color usually provides added contrast for safety.

The advantages include that, if it is inexpensive to start, you won't get too upset if it breaks on Camino. The other benefit is that you have a usable folding umbrella when you get home.

So, check the photos below and make your choices. I will answer any sane question put to me.

But, I need to state that I have not yet walked outside my walled and gated community with the Umbrella Hat. I am looking forward to leaving here to fly to Santiago in only 10 days. I do not want to be committed to a psych ward for evaluation before-hand and spoil this planning.

‘Nuff said...

View attachment 60435View attachment 60436View attachment 60437View attachment 60438View attachment 60439View attachment 60440View attachment 60441

The Umbrella Hat and Euroschirm Trekking Umbrella will be with me when I start work at the Pilgrim Office in Santiago for a month on 15 July. You are welcome to try it on for a spin around the block...IF YOU DARE...

Hope this helps someone.
Hi, This is the hat I used for the GR65 COMPOSTELLE, GR70 Stevenson, the Del Norte with the Primitivo and some of the Frances: https://www.tilley.com/ca_en/ltm5-airflo-hat.html
 

tjb1013

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017
One vote for the Akubra Territory. I was told that a felt hat wouldn’t be hot in the heat and I was skeptical, but went with it for the somewhat ludicrously broad brim (think Indiana Jones hat with a pituitary disorder) for the sun and rain shield.

Reached 29C/84F on the sun-blanched meseta in 2017 and I never was uncomfortable, and it kept the rain off my glasses in Portugal this spring.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Jul-Sept 2019: Six weeks in Northern Spain.
Apr 2018 Asturias
May 2016 CP: Portuguese
...I have the telescopic Senz Manual...
Aha, now I see. Because it is 'foldable' it can't have the original extra strong patented ribs...yet, it's still a delight to you! Thanks, Jeff. 👍 Thinking of ordering it to be delivered to where we'll be staying for some time, in Oviedo. ;)
 

chinacat

Veteran Member
The British are known for their hypocrisy - besides you fight the battles you know you can win and I always donate to the charities of my choice.

Now off to the sunshine for a walk!
My Smile charity is one I already support.
My niece worked for the charity, as Area Coordinator of a huge part of the UK.
And of course these donations, however small, are in addition to my regular ones. And, they are paid by Amazon.
 

taigirl

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2019
T
This is a frequent subject in the forum. Every summer, when the really hot dry weather comes to northern Spain, and indeed all Spanish pilgrimage routes, the subject arises.

Recently, with the serious heat wave across all of Europe and much of Spain, this discussion has taken on a new urgency.

In one recent thread, I expressed the opinion that I would buy an "umbrella hat" for test purposes and to report here in the forum. On second thought, and after ordering said funny-looking umbrella hat, I had an epiphany.

It occurred to me that what was needed was standard series of comparative photos, where the only thing that changed was the head gear.

Living in South Florida, waiting for a really sunny day was not an issue. I just had to wait for the umbrella hat to arrive, and to set up this experiment.

Attached below are small images of the various photos I took. Viewed correctly, and in order, assuming they uploaded sequentially, one looks at the least covering and shade generating hat, to the most.

Try not to wet yourself laughing. I took one for the team.

Luckily, only my long-suffering and very patient wife saw me. She had to take the photos... She DID try very hard NOT to laugh for the 10 minutes outside that it took to get all these photos.

Anyway, open the photos in order and see the continuum from left to right:
  • Adidas synthetic fabric ball cap, (this is my SIGNATURE cap. People use it to locate me in Santiago) to a,
  • Outdoors Research, ventilated, lightweight bucket hat, to a
  • Fedora style hat, generic straw style, (I bought it in Santiago) to a
  • Beachcomber style, straw, broad brimmed hat, to a
  • Basic folding umbrella jammed in the sternum strap, (any old umbrella with a long enough shaft works, but light colors are REALLY best, this one got hot to the touch in less than 5 minutes in the sun, then the
  • "Umbrella hat," I got from Amazon for less than USD 20, and finally the
  • Euroschirm Trekking Umbrella, über expensive at about €60, but provides the most shade.
From less to most coverage, you get the most shade and rain protection. However, the Euroschirm is IMHO wind-sensitive while walking. Passing trucks would frequently cause it to turn inside out. It was a royal pain in the butt, at least in my experience. It is also according to my metric scale heavier than the Umbrella Hat.

Conversely, the silly looking but very comfortable 'Umbrella Hat' provides nearly as much shade and rain protection, is UPF 50 rated, and has a second layer at the top that provides a "chimney" effect. This will vent heat, and wind pressure. Also, the top level can be turned up (inside out) while you are wearing the big part to provide added heat venting.

I have recommended the generic, inexpensive basic, but light colored folding umbrella as a cheap option. A light color is better in the bright sun, and the light color usually provides added contrast for safety.

The advantages include that, if it is inexpensive to start, you won't get too upset if it breaks on Camino. The other benefit is that you have a usable folding umbrella when you get home.

So, check the photos below and make your choices. I will answer any sane question put to me.

But, I need to state that I have not yet walked outside my walled and gated community with the Umbrella Hat. I am looking forward to leaving here to fly to Santiago in only 10 days. I do not want to be committed to a psych ward for evaluation before-hand and spoil this planning.

‘Nuff said...

View attachment 60435View attachment 60436View attachment 60437View attachment 60438View attachment 60439View attachment 60440View attachment 60441

The Umbrella Hat and Euroschirm Trekking Umbrella will be with me when I start work at the Pilgrim Office in Santiago for a month on 15 July. You are welcome to try it on for a spin around the block...IF YOU DARE...

Hope this helps someone.
Totally off the subject but could you tell me about your front bag. I have been trying to make something similar and that might save me the trouble. Xx
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
As long as we’re being completely serious at this point:

View attachment 60791
But DO NOT wear this during periods of lightning and thunder, lest you become a convenient receiving antenna / lightning rod... YIKES...

Has its uses, but shade is not one of them.
 

moxy

May your search through nature lead to yourself.
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015), Camino Ingles (2016), Camino Primitivo (2018), Camino Português (2019)

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
T

Totally off the subject but could you tell me about your front bag. I have been trying to make something similar and that might save me the trouble. Xx
Over the years I have experimented with several options:

First - I tried a runner's chest bag made by Solomon. However, that was too small. It also lacked organization. I used this only on my second Camino then passed it along within my local APOC chapter.

Second - Next, I tried the wonderful ZPacks, combination (4-in-1 Multi-Pack). This has a myriad of mounting options, all over your person. However, it is a single 3 liter (+/-) bag. It lacks organization possibilities, but is über light and waterproof, being made of cuben fabric by a small Florida firm. I used this pack on the following three Caminos. I first used it mounted high, like a belly bag, then discovered that it worked best for me worn low, like a sporran (kilt purse).

See the ZPacks 4-in-1 "Multi-Pack" here: https://zpacks.com/products/multi-pack

Do watch the video and check out their other ultra-lightweight pack accessories... I swear by this small firms stuff. It is well made and their customer service is tops. Be patient, as most of their fabric items are custom made to order.

Third - A couple of years ago, a good friend introduced my to the bag I am now using, and which is pictured in the photos. It is called the Pack Avant Ultra. The original packaging says it was from: www.verticalmountain.com. However, I cannot locate this specific pack at the website.

This pack is superior to the others because of the organization possibilities. It features:
  • Two external bottle sleeves, good for .5 liter bottles
  • A clear plastic map pocket, comes off with velcro. I removed it.
  • A top-mounted insulated tunnel sleeve for a 1.5 liter water bottle (horizontal)
  • A central main compartment of about 4 liters.
  • Bungee cord harness on the front for loose stuff like a poncho, hat, or gloves...
  • Total three compartments for organization.
This unique front-pack attaches with 2 - fast mount 1 inch (30 mm) harness clips with snap fasteners for rapid front pack removal. It attaches to the front of your rucksack shoulder harness and has a belt loop on back to pass your rucksack waist strap through. It is among the more clever mounting schemes I have come across.

I searched for this exact pack on Amazon.com (US) - no luck... My assessment is that the pack is no longer being made. When I did a general Google search, here is one of the results:


It tends to confirm my assessment that this pack is no longer made... (sigh). It is the best design I have yet seen. Here is a related review of this bag on another backpacking website:


I also found this comparable front pack at Raidlight.com. They have a US website:


As well as an international site: www.raidlight.com

My best recommendation for harness mounting, quick release front pack is the ZPacks bag, followed by something analogous to my Pack Avant Ultra.

As a tip, look in runner supply locations for lightweight front packs. As a second likely source, try vendors of ultra-lightweight hiking gear.

The lightest weight most functional front bags will usually be found here. Most of what I found using Amazon and Google were military styled tactical gear that are all higher mounted, not flexible for mounting, heavy, and very military looking.

Hope this helps.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Jul-Sept 2019: Six weeks in Northern Spain.
Apr 2018 Asturias
May 2016 CP: Portuguese
This is the (I thought it was collapsible but, it's not) umbrella I bought which, claims to be windproof and has two canopies...only problem (for me) is that ginormous "C" handle is about 6"/15cm long which doesn't fit diagonally in my backpack. Seriously considering sawing it off...

View attachment 60494
Did it! BF stuck a rubber plug into opening. Now it weigh's less, too! ;)
61013
 

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