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Have any of you left the Camino and done long walks elsewhere?

2020 Camino Guides

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
I see a lot of folks on the forum who got kind of addicted to walking the Camino across Spain. Most increased their mileage and fitness along the way. Many decide to go back and do it again. I am curious if there are some here who discovered a new-found love of walking on the Camino and did some other non-Camino treks/hikes later.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
I think I fit the description ;-) I walk mainly on Caminos here in Europe, my only other long-distance walk was last year from Helensburgh to Dunbar on the John Muir Way: http://johnmuirway.org
I liked it, even if it was November, but I am more fascinated by ancient pilgrims routes ...

Buen Camino, SY
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
I walked the Camino Frances twice. After that I walked from west Wales to St Jean Pied de Port to make the journey from home "complete". Also quite a few long routes in the UK. I have returned to Spain and Portugal several times to walk the Ingles, the Primitivo and most recently the Portugues. Last year I walked from Canterbury to Rome - mostly on the waymarked Via Francigena. I set off intending to finish at the Swiss-Italian border but I was enjoying myself too much to stop. Next week I will be flying to Sweden to begin walking from Sundsvall (on the Baltic coast) to Trondheim in Norway. Addicted? - probably!
 
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kayagee66

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2016)
Le Puy - Roncesvalles (2016)
Figeac - Cahors (2017)
Stevenson Trail (2018
The longest was the walk commonly known as "Wainwright's Coast to Coast" 200 miles. Can be done in under a fortnight. Across northern England, through 3 national parks. Very good. Done more of around a week, following canals, Hadrian's wall, a couple in France.
 

Wokabaut_Meri

somewhere along the Way
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 2015
Pilgrims Way 2018
Via Francigena #1 Canterbury-Dover 2018
I see a lot of folks on the forum who got kind of addicted to walking the Camino across Spain. Most increased their mileage and fitness along the way. Many decide to go back and do it again. I am curious if there are some here who discovered a new-found love of walking on the Camino and did some other non-Camino treks/hikes later.
I did it the other way around - have always done long treks and hikes both here in Australia and around the world and then walked the Camino. Still have a long list of 'other' walks but 'other' Caminos are now added to this too.

We have also helped many friends achieve their 'first' dream trek and then watched them head out into the world on other paths, the Camino among them.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
I have been walking long walks in the mountains of western Canada for most of my adult life, beginning when I was twenty-five. These were always backpacking trips, so could not be much longer than 100 miles, for the distance that I could carry all my gear and food. A couple of years ago, I went to New Zealand and walked a couple of tracks, Round the Mountain Track on North Island and a shorter track on South Island. I avoided the tourist routes in favour of less traveled tracks and fitted those in around more extensive travels to see as much of the country as I could in five weeks. Since last year's camino, I find myself currently focused on Spain and the camino routes, and have little interest in trekking in other countries. However, my walks in the Rocky Mountains are still an important part of my life and I fit in as many as I can each summer. I shall be leaving again to walk from Banff to Lake Louise in June for ten days or so. I guess that my long walks have always been spiritual, so I prefer mountain walking alone and so far the pilgrimage routes in Spain seem to fit well in this. As I am getting older, the lure of carrying twenty kilos or more over mountain terrain is getting more challenging. I have never wanted to walk long treks in the United States, with the necessity of exiting from the trail to pick up prepared food packages. But the camino was a new adventure for me, so there is no telling what might come next. I think, however, that it is better designed for walking long distances through scenic terrain without having to carry too much, so is ideal for older bones.
 

Wokabaut_Meri

somewhere along the Way
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 2015
Pilgrims Way 2018
Via Francigena #1 Canterbury-Dover 2018
I have been walking long walks in the mountains of western Canada for most of my adult life, beginning when I was twenty-five. These were always backpacking trips, so could not be much longer than 100 miles, for the distance that I could carry all my gear and food. A couple of years ago, I went to New Zealand and walked a couple of tracks, Round the Mountain Track on North Island and a shorter track on South Island. I avoided the tourist routes in favour of less traveled tracks and fitted those in around more extensive travels to see as much of the country as I could in five weeks. Since last year's camino, I find myself currently focused on Spain and the camino routes, and have little interest in trekking in other countries. However, my walks in the Rocky Mountains are still an important part of my life and I fit in as many as I can each summer. I shall be leaving again to walk from Banff to Lake Louise in June for ten days or so. I guess that my long walks have always been spiritual, so I prefer mountain walking alone and so far the pilgrimage routes in Spain seem to fit well in this. As I am getting older, the lure of carrying twenty kilos or more over mountain terrain is getting more challenging. I have never wanted to walk long treks in the United States, with the necessity of exiting from the trail to pick up prepared food packages. But the camino was a new adventure for me, so there is no telling what might come next. I think, however, that it is better designed for walking long distances through scenic terrain without having to carry too much, so is ideal for older bones.
A walk suited to older bones... a new byeline for the Camino. Well describing the concessions we long distance trekkers are having to make as the walks and years add up.

Here in Australia we usually have to carry some water as well on long distance hikes so our Camino was a lightweight delight.

I wish you many, many more years and miles beneath your boots.
 

Devon Mike

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Finisterre & Muxia (2014, 2015, 2016, 2018 & 2019), Primitivo & Ingles (2017)
My first Camino was in 2014, but I have enjoyed long distance walks throughout my life mostly in the UK.

Completed walks include The Pennine Way, The West Highland Way, The Two Moors Way and The Southwest Coast Path which was the longest at 632 miles.

Now I have retired, I like to plan a long walk each year as it is such a great experience.
 

beiramar

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho Português, Camino del Norte, Fisterra,
I started walking on the Caminho Português in 2011, then I found out that what I really love is being in nature.
Since then I walked some more caminos and did a lot of other hikes in Portugal, Spain, Sweden and Norway.
It's amazing how one always can discover a new trail, a new adventure.
 

katdavis

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013), C2C(2013), Shikoku 88 Temples(2013), Thames Path(2013), Camino Portuguese(2014), Hadrian's Wall(2014), Cinque Terre(2014), Camino Primitivo(2014), Camino Ingles(2014), PCT(2015), Camino Frances (2015)
The Camino Frances was my first long walk in 2013 and since then I've walked a further 9,000km on other caminos, in the UK, Japan and most recently the PCT... The caminos have been the most rewarding and insightful for me personally and I can't keep away! Addicted...
 

kayagee66

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2016)
Le Puy - Roncesvalles (2016)
Figeac - Cahors (2017)
Stevenson Trail (2018
I walked the Camino Frances twice. After that I walked from west Wales to St Jean Pied de Port to make the journey from home "complete". Also quite a few long routes in the UK. I have returned to Spain and Portugal several times to walk the Ingles, the Primitivo and most recently the Portugues. Last year I walked from Canterbury to Rome - mostly on the waymarked Via Francigena. I set off intending to finish at the Swiss-Italian border but I was enjoying myself too much to stop. Next week I will be flying to Sweden to begin walking from Sundsvall (on the Baltic coast) to Trondheim in Norway. Addicted? - probably!
Hi. Just out of curiosity, living near Canterbury. Is there much waymarking on the Via Francigena? I guess you'd walk to Dover following the North Downs Way first.
I'm thinking about walking some of Kungsleden in Sweden later this year.
 

kayagee66

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2016)
Le Puy - Roncesvalles (2016)
Figeac - Cahors (2017)
Stevenson Trail (2018
I started walking on the Caminho Português in 2011, then I found out that what I really love is being in nature.
Since then I walked some more caminos and did a lot of other hikes in Portugal, Spain, Sweden and Norway.
It's amazing how one always can discover a new trail, a new adventure.
Hi. I've been doing a bit of research on Kungsleden and on the Göta canal. Have you walked either of these?
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
The Via Francigena does follow the North Downs Way to Dover. I then made my own way mostly along canal paths to Besançon and joined the VF route there. From other people's comments I gather signposting in France is erratic. Very good from Besançon onwards.

I'm also tempted by the Kungsleden. Spent a few days at Abisko - the northern endpoint - a couple of years ago and itched to set off up that path.
 

kayagee66

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2016)
Le Puy - Roncesvalles (2016)
Figeac - Cahors (2017)
Stevenson Trail (2018
The Via Francigena does follow the North Downs Way to Dover. I then made my own way mostly along canal paths to Besançon and joined the VF route there. From other people's comments I gather signposting in France is erratic. Very good from Besançon onwards.

I'm also tempted by the Kungsleden. Spent a few days at Abisko - the northern endpoint - a couple of years ago and itched to set off up that path.
I have been to Abisko a couple of times, in winter, for the Northern Lights. I came across the start/finish of Kungsleden while having a wander around.
 
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kayagee66

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2016)
Le Puy - Roncesvalles (2016)
Figeac - Cahors (2017)
Stevenson Trail (2018
The Via Francigena does follow the North Downs Way to Dover. I then made my own way mostly along canal paths to Besançon and joined the VF route there. From other people's comments I gather signposting in France is erratic. Very good from Besançon onwards.

I'm also tempted by the Kungsleden. Spent a few days at Abisko - the northern endpoint - a couple of years ago and itched to set off up that path.
I got in touch with the Kungsleden facebook group a couple of years ago to ask if anyone can recommend a good book on it in English. I got a reply that there isn't even a good book on it in Swedish. An opportunity there, maybe.
 

Patch

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leon to Santiago (June 2014)
St Jean to Leon (Sept 2015)
Burgos to Santiago (June 2016)
Porto to Finisterre (June 2017)
I did it the other way around and did a few long distance ones over the years before discovering the Camino (which is a delight as no heavy packs required).
GR10 from Med to Atlantic (France/Spain) - not all in one hit (as I was working then ) but over 4 years. It really is a first class walk and their are a number of other routes in addition to the GR10 that run sort of parallel depending on how adventurous you feel.
Appalachian Trail (USA)- walked across Virginia. This is a great nature walk as much the trail is in national forest. But...can get a bit busy and a few times I chose to camp in the bush rather then the shelters to avoid partying.
Bibbulmun Track (Western Australia) - nice walk but I found it really isolating in places - on one part it was 5 days before I saw anyone!
Annapurna Trail (Nepal) - This was a great walk that was spoilt a bit by the civil war that was going on at the time. Even with a guide and porter I really struggled at times.

Done lots more of the 7/14 days length in NZ, UK, France, Auz, Vietnam, Tibet, India - but the 4 above were the most memorable and longest.

The ones on my list (apart from Camino) at the moment are the Colorado Trail (USA) and pilgrimage trail in Japan.

I try to do 3 months a year.......which is the most I can get away with the blessing of both wife and family :)
 
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kmrice

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago - Fisterra 2008
St. Jean Pied de Port - Santiago 2013
We walked the Camino de Santiago (St. Jean PdP to Fisterra) in 2013.

Walked the Cammino de Assisi (near Florence to Assisi, Italy) in 1014.

Walked the Via di Francesco (Assisi to Rome, Italy) last year.

All three were great, but the Camino de Santiago calls us back and we will walk Le Puy to Santiago this summer and fall.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
I am curious if there are some here who discovered a new-found love of walking on the Camino and did some other non-Camino treks/hikes later.
Peg and I have been long-time backpackers so it wasn't the Camino that got us addicted to walking with packs. However just last week we spent 5 days on the Appalachian Trail down in Georgia near the 60 mile mark of the 2,200 mile trail. We met one man who was attempting to do the whole thing who had done the Camino in 2009 and we met 2 others attempting to do the whole thing who planned to do the Camino afterwards.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Well, I must be an old fuddy duddy stuck in her ways, but I have never "branched out" to a long distance walk anywhere else. Since 2000, I have come back to the Camino every year but one. I did my first camino as a way to celebrate my 50th birthday, having never done anything remotely similar. I came to the camino as a newbie to long distance hiking. But having walked it once, I was hooked. Since then I have "branched out" to untravelled caminos (Lebaniego, Vadiniense, Olvidado, Levante, Salvador, Invierno, etc) and have never looked back. Many people ask me why I don't go walk long distance hikes in other countries, but that question doesn't even compute with me.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
We walked the Camino de Santiago (St. Jean PdP to Fisterra) in 2013.

Walked the Cammino de Assisi (near Florence to Assisi, Italy) in 1014.

Walked the Via di Francesco (Assisi to Rome, Italy) last year.

All three were great, but the Camino de Santiago calls us back and we will walk Le Puy to Santiago this summer and fall.
Wow, you are quite a time traveler. :p:D
 

beiramar

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho Português, Camino del Norte, Fisterra,
I got in touch with the Kungsleden facebook group a couple of years ago to ask if anyone can recommend a good book on it in English. I got a reply that there isn't even a good book on it in Swedish. An opportunity there, maybe.
The Kungsleden it by far the most known and most hiked trail in Sweden.
There are plenty of guidebooks, maps and guided walks.
I don't know about guidebooks in English but there are plenty in Swedish and German. Also the STF has an online guide in english.
 

Dutchwalk53

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2015 with son #1, CF 2016 alone, CF 2017 with son #2 and husband , CF Sept 2018 with daughter
I SOOOOOO would wish there was a trail in the USA where you don't have to camp/carry food. There is plenty amazing scenery here , but nothing compares to the trails in Europe. I am not talking about the nature. But the other "stuff" . No cute towns where you can sit down for some food/drinks, no hostels where you can sleep while on a long walk and gather with fellow walkers. The AT and PCT here in the USA also don't attract this international crowd , which is another great thing on the Camino. So we just have to go to Europe for this, which is a hassle flight wise. But worth it for me. I am planning on doing more long distance walks. This year the Camino again.....but one year when I am "done " (IF ever ha ha ) with the Camino trails, I hope to venture out to some other trails. The West Highland way in Scotland is on my "to do" list and also the Kerry Way in Ireland.
 
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beiramar

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho Português, Camino del Norte, Fisterra,
Those who walked the Camino de Santiago as a first long distance walk and then moved on to other treks/hikes are unlikely to be on this forum to answer this question.
Then you apparently didn't read my comment. ;)

The Camino was my starting point, where I got interested in walking, with everything I need on my back.
Then I found out that I don't need to limit myself to the pilgrimage but that there are so many trails that gave me what I'm looking for. Contact with nature, challenges, friendships.
 

lovingkindness

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
... I am curious if there are some here who discovered a new-found love of walking on the Camino and did some other non-Camino treks/hikes later.
...I was madly in love with hiking long before I walked the Camino and, yes, I have walked a few non-Camino treks since....
 
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Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
The West Highland way in Scotland is on my "to do" list and also the Kerry Way in Ireland.
The West Highland Way is a lovely route - great scenery but enough food and accommodation options to make it very manageable. Fairly short at a little under 100 miles. If you are travelling so far to begin do consider walking the Great Glen Way too. The extension north from Fort William to Inverness which passes Loch Ness amongst many others. Slightly shorter and less hilly than the WHW. Well worth walking too.
 

kmrice

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago - Fisterra 2008
St. Jean Pied de Port - Santiago 2013
Those who walked the Camino de Santiago as a first long distance walk and then moved on to other treks/hikes are unlikely to be on this forum to answer this question.
Perhaps some are not here, but, for us, the Camino has been calling even as we walked other pilgrimages. There really is something special about the sense of comradery we experienced walking with hundreds of others all with the same goal, if not the same reasons for walking. We gained a Cammino daughter on the Cammino di Assis; on the Camino de Santiago we had an entire family. It's special.
 

Donna Sch

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
VdLP-Sanabres-Fisterra (Summer 2015); Levante-Invierno (Feb/Mar 2019);
England Camino routes ?2024
I would love to do another Camino like walk. But with young kids it won't be possible for a while. I would love to walk down from my Dad's hometown in the Netherlands through Belgium and France and end up on the Norte.
Otherwise I would like to do the Shikoku especially as my sister lives in Japan. But at the moment my long distance walking is confined to dabbling in rogaining and orienteering with a view to doing the Oxfam Trailwalker in Perth this year.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
I am starting the Camino next week from SJPP. So looking forward to it, and trying to be reassured by this forum that it isn't too much on tarmac or too crowded. But I love Spain and am sure it will be a wonderful time. Planning to branch off onto the Invierno, too. I have done lots of long hikes/backpacks in the US. Managed a backpacking store for many years, too. I love hearing about all the other long historical walking routes, which are interesting to me. As for this comment: [[I think, however, that it is better designed for walking long distances through scenic terrain without having to carry too much, so is ideal for older bones.]] ... When I was young I had a donkey who was a beloved pet. I still dream of getting a donkey again, or even a packing goat, for long treks after my back won't hold out anymore.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
When I was young I had a donkey who was a beloved pet. I still dream of getting a donkey again, or even a packing goat, for long treks after my back won't hold out anymore.
On the Camino Frances I met a couple walking with a pack donkey they obviously loved and treated as a pet. They were carrying almost as much as the donkey! A small bar in Samos emptied as people went out onto the road to meet them and wish them well. Our paths crossed several times in Galicia. One morning I spotted them in a field by the track: the woman was trying to catch the donkey who had decided to misbehave and kept running away for a few feet, then waiting for her owner to get near, then doing it again, and again, and again... Still makes me smile thinking about it :)

PS: Have you read this book?
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1117772.Travels_with_My_Donkey
 
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Sansthing

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
French Camino (May 2009), French Camino (May 2011), Via de la Plata (April/May 2012)
I´ve done the French Camino twice, followed by the Via de la Plata. Before that loads of walking in the Lake District (UK) but before my first Camino I did the Inca Trail in Peru...an unforgettable experience. This year I am doing the Camino Ingles (short but sweet due to time constraints). My name is Sandra and I am an addict!
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature
I see a lot of folks on the forum who got kind of addicted to walking the Camino across Spain. Most increased their mileage and fitness along the way. Many decide to go back and do it again. I am curious if there are some here who discovered a new-found love of walking on the Camino and did some other non-Camino treks/hikes later.
Yes I think it applies to me. I had never walked long distances before. Walking the Camino gave me both the courage and the opportunity to walk to Jerusalem, from my doorstep.
I befriended a fellow pilgrim on my first day's walk in Roncesvalles and it was his idea to take 6 months off to walk to the Holy City. When he asked me if I wanted to join him, I was able to say yes, something I would never have considered without walking the Camino first! It gave me the confidence and also the companionship as it is not something I would have attempted on my own.
When they say the Camino provides....;)
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
Walking the Camino gave me both the courage and the opportunity to walk to Jerusalem, from my doorstep.
I'm intrigued. Last year I walked from Canterbury to Rome. Long but very straightforward. Making your way to Jerusalem sounds like a serious challenge. What was your route?
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Fun reading everyone's story. Here is mine: I came across the Camino while surfing the internet for information about the GR 10. Needless to say I never got to walk coast to coast along the Pyrenees but have been back to Spain 10+ times to walk various Caminos since my SJPP-Finisterre Camino in 2010.
This March I walked the Rota Vicentina in Portugal, my first non-Camino walk in 6 years and it was strange. Scenery spectacular but I missed the Camino "feel" and the simple act of stamping my credential.
Next walk will definitely include a Camino repeat or a whole new Camino.
 

robertt

Active Member
Long day walks on or off the Via Francigena near Siena were the beginning for me. I actually stumbled into the whole pilg thing when I ran into a group of young Sienese who were promoting the VF with tours around their city.Then, on my own, I did excursions on foot out to towns like Asciano and Montereggioni. A year later I was walking along the Aubrac Plateau in snow. That's how it happened for me!
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature
I'm intrigued. Last year I walked from Canterbury to Rome. Long but very straightforward. Making your way to Jerusalem sounds like a serious challenge. What was your route?
First to Canterbury. Then the VF to Besançon. Veered off to Switzerland then Germany, Austria, Slovakia, Hungary, Serbia, Bulgaria, Turkey.
Ferry to Northern Cyprus, walked to South Cyprus, flight to Tel Aviv then walk to Jerusalem.
Followed the footsteps of Brandon Wilson 'Along the Templar Trail'.

I have yet to walk Besançon to Rome... Tempting! :)
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
Thanks for the reply. You have walked the part of the VF I missed - I made my own way to Besancon mostly along canal towpaths and joined the VF there. At least between us we have walked the whole official route. I loved most of the VF but will be very happy if I never see the rice swamps and mosquitos of the Po valley again.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(15,16,18)CheminduPuy(16) Portuguese(16 VDLP(17)Primitivo(17)Ireland-3000K(18) Norte18Vasco17
I see a lot of folks on the forum who got kind of addicted to walking the Camino across Spain. Most increased their mileage and fitness along the way. Many decide to go back and do it again. I am curious if there are some here who discovered a new-found love of walking on the Camino and did some other non-Camino treks/hikes later.
I did my first Camino last year doing 11 days on the GR5 through the Alps south of Lake Geneva before training to SJPP and walking to Santiago, Finnisterre, Muxia, and then 4 days backwards on Portuguese Way to Valencia.

I just started the 600k portion of the Irish E8 and will then walk from Dublin to Santiago and Porto and hopefully Lisbon. Hope to start in Dublin on 23 July and get to Portugal by October.
 

SueTomkinson

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances by bike 2003; Frances on foot 2009; Finesterre 2009; Madrid 2011; Portuguese 2011; via de la plata 2013; Mozarabic May/June 2016
I see a lot of folks on the forum who got kind of addicted to walking the Camino across Spain. Most increased their mileage and fitness along the way. Many decide to go back and do it again. I am curious if there are some here who discovered a new-found love of walking on the Camino and did some other non-Camino treks/hikes later.
I too have a long distance walking addiction. And am working my way through Spain coz it is such an amazing and simple way to feed my addiction. There are many walks in all parts of the world, but none that I have found that provide such fabulous infrastructure. I can no longer carry the weight for serious pack carrying trips but will hopefully have more years to undertake more caminos. So far Frances on foot and bicycle, fisterre, Madrid, Portugal, via de la plata and start from Almeria to Merida on Tuesday. Oh, forgot, the European Peace Walk that I did last year does not require tent and food prep equipment so you may like to look into it. Started in Vienna and finished in Trieste, through Hungary, Croatia and Slovenia, and has some similarities to a Camino. It is open in the summer months this year I believe.
 

Toreld

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés, Fromista to SdC June/July 2016
WOW!! I get sooo inspired by you all.
On the 5.th of June I will start my first Camino walk.
It will be my first ever long distance walk
And since I am 60 ++ years old, and very out off fit, I will start in Fromista on the meseta. There will be many days of flat landscape for me to get into the walking.
 

PlutseligPilegrim

Rota Vicentina, fisherman’s trail, is sweet...
Camino(s) past & future
St Olav’s way Novgorod - Åbo
- Stiklestad - Nidaros (2019)
Via del a plata from Cadiz (2019)
I walked the Camino Frances twice. After that I walked from west Wales to St Jean Pied de Port to make the journey from home "complete". Also quite a few long routes in the UK. I have returned to Spain and Portugal several times to walk the Ingles, the Primitivo and most recently the Portugues. Last year I walked from Canterbury to Rome - mostly on the waymarked Via Francigena. I set off intending to finish at the Swiss-Italian border but I was enjoying myself too much to stop. Next week I will be flying to Sweden to begin walking from Sundsvall (on the Baltic coast) to Trondheim in Norway. Addicted? - probably!

And not to bee forgotten....Oslo-Trondheim.....
 

Scott Sweeney

Active Member
Spent most of my life walking and hiking. It would be something that would very difficult to remove from my life. The Spainish and French Pyrenees from Ceret north are like few other places you get to expierence but I walk because I need to. I was fortunate enough to have found someone who understands such a thing.
 

tom kline

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I will start the Camino Frances on May 12, 2016
I see a lot of folks on the forum who got kind of addicted to walking the Camino across Spain. Most increased their mileage and fitness along the way. Many decide to go back and do it again. I am curious if there are some here who discovered a new-found love of walking on the Camino and did some other non-Camino treks/hikes later.
Like many other contributors I have been a life time long distance walker and in a few weeks will undertake my first Camino. I recently completed a 6500 mile stage walk from Point Barrow, Alaska to Key West, Florida. For high adventure try walking Alaska's Dalton Road a 485 mile trek from Deadhorse to Fairbanks. In British Columbia you can walk the Cassiar Highway from the Yukon border and 600 mile later cross into the U.S. through the woods in Washington State. These are dangerous routes please check in with me or others before attempting them.

The Florida Historic Trail is a fascinating 1000 miles journey through swamps, farm land and back roads.

Detailed maps and itineraries for these suggestions and other segments are on my web site Mydreawalk.com

For the culturally minded there are routes I completed from Rome to Florence, from New York City to Washington, D.C and another 400 mile jaunt to Niagara Falls. California's Pacific Coast highway from the Mexican border to San Francisco is a doable 600 mile adventure.

For the daring there is a walk from the Pacific to the Atlantic Oceans across Panama and a 75 mile journey from south China across Laos into Myanmar. These routes have security challenges.

If you want to cross a stretch of the Sahara Desert join the runners in the Marathon de Sables. Maps and itineraries for these adventures can be found on my other web site Stridetothetop.com

Please feel free to contact me at Klinehealthgrp@aol.com

Go for it!
 

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