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Heading to Narbonne Plage - next week!

Discussion in 'The Piémont Route' started by Carla Lee Fabian, Apr 19, 2017.

  1. Carla Lee Fabian

    Carla Lee Fabian New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2017
    Messages:
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    Camino(s) past & future:
    Camino Frances (2002), Via Della Plata (2006), Via Francigena Italian half (2008), In the Footsteps of St Francis (2009)
    (Voie du Piemonte - May/June 2017)
    Hi! I have just this week decided to walk from Narbonne Plage to San Jean (and possibly on from there to Irun and Santiago, leaving here (Alaska) on May 1st!
    I have done several caminos in the past 15 years and am excited to be walking this route. I do, however, have one burning question:
    Where can I can get a guidebook for this route and a credential (in Marseilles or Narbonne). Thanks so much!
    Carla
     
    crackmrmac likes this.
  2. mspath

    mspath Veteran Member Donating Member

    Joined:
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    Camino(s) past & future:
    Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
    Welcome to the Forum!

    For where to get a Credential in Narbonne you might ask the tourist office via their English web site.
    http://www.narbonne-tourism.co.uk/

    For many helpful tips/links re walking from Narbonne plage see this earlier forum thread --https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/from-narbonne-plage-to-puente-la-reina-or-pamplona.10239/

    For helpful info in French see
    http://pelerins-compostelle.com/pelerinage-compostelle-chemin-piemont-etape-itineraire/

    See also this encyclopedic overview from CSJ dated December 2016--
    https://www.csj.org.uk/planning-you...he-routes-today/the-pyrenean-foothills-route/

    Happy planning, Bon chemin and Buen camino!
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2017
    Carla Lee Fabian and crackmrmac like this.
  3. TMcA

    TMcA Active Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2008
    Messages:
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    159
    Location:
    Vermont USA
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Pamplona to Santiago (2013)
    Le Puy to Pamplona in segments (2013 - 2016)
    Pamplona to Burgos (2017)
    Possibly most complete response ever! Well done, mspath.
     
    Kiwi-family and mspath like this.
  4. Helen1

    Helen1 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2014
    Messages:
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    214
    Location:
    London, UK
    Camino(s) past & future:
    London to Leon & Leon to Santiago (2014)
    Narbonne Plage to Oloron-Sainte-Marie (2015)
    Camino Portugues (2016)
    This is a really lovely walk. Guess Carla Lee Fabian is already walking but for others benefit I struggled with this guide at times: http://www.martin-delbert.fr/978284...la-route-des-abbayes-de-l-aude-olivier-guix/#

    Crossing over the hills out of Narbonne I got mixed up on the woodland paths and the local fireman ended up giving me a lift - mostly out of concern about wild boar attacks but also because they couldn't work out the route in the book or find the crosses it mentioned (probably easy if you know where to look). Also coming into Lourdes it takes you through a very little used footpath that was head high in brambles and pretty unpleasant. I can't quite remember the location but there's another section (which includes a big hill) that obviously was way marked to Santiago but there must be a more recent path, you get taken through the edge of a woodland/fence along a marked path that's been totally overtaken by stinging nettles with no easy way out once you start down.

    I also took this http://www.randonnees-midi-pyrenees.com/les-gr/topo-guides-gr/ref780.aspx the route is much easier after Carcassonne in terms of way marking. This book is very good, the GR takes you up hill and down dale but with the maps you can cut off some of the big loops that it takes you.
     
    mspath and crackmrmac like this.
  5. Carla Lee Fabian

    Carla Lee Fabian New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2017
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    Camino(s) past & future:
    Camino Frances (2002), Via Della Plata (2006), Via Francigena Italian half (2008), In the Footsteps of St Francis (2009)
    (Voie du Piemonte - May/June 2017)
    Thanks, Helen, for your response, which I am only seeing now that I am in Carcassonne! Yesterday (day 5) was the first day I had waymarking on the GR 36 from Monze all the way, and it made the walking so much more enjoyable. Having to rely on my French guidebook and dictionary has been mentally exhausting and slowed me down as well. That said, the landscapes have been lovely!
    Hoping to be able to follow the GR78 from here on out, but it sounds like some roads may be preferable if it rains a lot.
    Carrying a sleeping bag but haven't needed it yet. Thinking about sending it on, but perhaps there it will come in handy up ahead if more pilgrim accommodation. Any thoughts on this?
    Thanks for your input!
    Carla
     
  6. Helen1

    Helen1 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2014
    Messages:
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    Location:
    London, UK
    Camino(s) past & future:
    London to Leon & Leon to Santiago (2014)
    Narbonne Plage to Oloron-Sainte-Marie (2015)
    Camino Portugues (2016)
    Hi Carla,

    Hope things are going well, I camped more or less all the way so I'm not much help with pilgrim accommodation. I got the impression that there were plenty of pilgrim style places to stay along the route. As you've probably already found out the tourist info places are v helpful. Seem to remember Le Mas-d'Azil had places to stay with local priest and I think there were quite a few places around there. (I'm love prehistory so mas d'azil was cool, but there's another set of caves a bit off the route, (it looks like they are on route but the entrance is miles away) which I found really moving, entrance is limited to X number per day but they have red hand prints and all sorts of drawings... I don't have my books with me and can't remember name but it was pretty awesome if you like that kind of thing.)

    There's an eco gite in the place before bernard de comminges at bottom of mountain that I really loved. I had planned to camp on top of the mountain but the campsite was unexpectedly closed, so I walked down the mountain feeling pretty miserable as it was getting late. I rocked into this little village thinking it's miles to next campsite but should be able to make it before dark. Stopped for a drink in a little shop and asked if the gite was open he said of course and I spent a very special night there drinking water from the village stream, enjoying a fantastic meal and watching the most tremendous thunderstorm via the roof light - someone was looking after me that night :)

    Note bernard de comminges, the night I got there, possibly a Monday? there was only one place to eat and all they served was salad. It was a very lovely salad but the place was full of starving walkers and cyclists. The campsite there has wooden chalets pilgrims can stay in I can't remember how much 10-15 euro maybe. You would need sleeping bag there.

    All the best - Helen
     

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