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Help choosing which Camino Portuguese to follow

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo, Norte, Francés, Volunteer Hospitalero.
Hi all!!

I need a little advice to choose which Camino Portugues I will follow.

I was planning to start CN or CF, but yesterday, I thought, why not choose the Camino Portugues? I have never walked that camino and I really have no idea about it.

The start of the Camino I had planned was delayed due to the need to fix some official documents before departing, but now it seems that in less than a week I will be able to start. Being optimistic, I think I could start the Camino on July 29.

As far as reaching Santiago takes more than 10 days, that the Camino is longer or shorter it is not the main issue to decide where to start. (I can always extend the Camino to Finisterre and Muxia or even walk in reverse through the Primitivo or Norte to my hometown). Whatever between 10 days and 1 month will be ok.

I would prefer a Camino that is not too lonely. Considering covid, I think it is better to stick to the more popular routes. Most likely, it will be difficult to find accommodation on the less traveled routes.

My first idea has been to start in Porto. Is that a good idea? Is it better to start in Lisbon? In some other city?

I chose Porto because I think I remember reading some publications that said that the section between Lisbon and Porto is more boring and with fewer facilities (albergues, etc.). Is that correct?

When walking on other caminos, I always recommend some alternative routes that I consider interesting (Samos in CF, Hospitales in Primitivo, etc.). Is there an alternative route that you think I can't miss?

Do you have a link to a site that shows which albergues are open in the Camino Portugues?

I apologize because I understand that I am requesting some kind of complete and personal guide to the Camino Portugues !! ;)

Even opinions about which starting point is best or about which alternative routes are important are highly subjective and personal opinions. But believe me ... your opinions will help me!!

In the meantime, I keep reading every guide I can find in internet, airplane schedules, etc...... And trying to resolve those official documents!!😅
 

Phoenix

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014, CF: partial
2016, CF
2018, CF: partial
2019, CP
I walked the CP last fall, starting in Porto. I took a couple days in Porto; it's a great city to explore. If you did a search for threads about the CP from Porto, many will likely suggest walking out of the city along the Douro River then up the coast. Vila do Conde is a decision point for many pilgrims; you can decide to continue the littoral/coastal route or go inland to the central. I walked some of both and enjoyed the coastal route much more (probably because I live in a mountainous area).

Either way, Bom Caminho!
 

Maria Man

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 Astorga-Santiago;2016 Le Puy-Najera ; 2017 Najera -Santiago-Finisterre-Muxia & Lisbon-Fatima
If you really want a different and genuine experience in Portugal on th Camino and that you don't have much time to finish in Santiago, I would highly recommend to start from Guimarães, it is the birth place of Portugal, a very nice preserved city in the Old Town centre. You just need to take a bus from Porto and it's just around an hour ride. The distance from there to Santiago is 200km. The arrows are clear, and Santiago has been preaching there in the Praza de Santiago, you don't need albergue as there are good hostels there. Then in 25km you reached another big city called Braga where there is a albergue there near the cathedral but I am not sure it is open yet, but still to find accomodation in hostel there should not be a problem. After Braga, it will connects back to the Central route and then you will see many pilgrims which started from Porto. For me to start 2 or 3 days without pilgrims around is to prepare yourself on the camino as the camino is not always about meeting other pilgrims if you know what I mean...

Hope you enjoy your Camino in Portugal ~ Ultreia !!!
 

robou

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2018: Camino Primitivo (Oviedo)
2019: Camino Portugues (Lisbon)
2020: Camino Frances (SJPDP)
My partner and I walked the Portugues from Lisbon last year. To be honest, I'm not convinced by the poor reputation this section of the camino between Lisbon and Porto has. There are some lengthy sections with relatively few alburgues, but there are enough, particularly if you're happy with slightly longer days. It is true that the camino does more or less skirt around and alongside the National Highway 1 for a lot of the route, and there are some relatively unpleasant sections on busy roads (early on between Alverca do Ribatejo and Allhandra, and from Azinhaga to Golega stick in the mind particularly). There are also a few boring days early on when you'll see a LOT of very flat tomato fields. But, in my opinion, that is par for the course. Those sections help define your walk as much as the prettier ones. And once you're past Golega, the Portuguese interior is really very pretty - rolling hills, pine and eucalyptus forests. You also get to pass through Tomar, which is a UNESCO World Heritage site, home to a beautiful city on the river and a Templar castle, and Coimbra, which is a lovely city and well worth a rest day.

That said, if you're not too keen on being lonely, it may not be the route for you. We were fortunate to leave on a good day and had a nice little group of 6-9 people we saw most of the way. However, an Irish pilgrim we met after Porto had started a day after us, and saw virtually no one the whole way to Porto. The traffic was a noticable change of gear after Porto. We took the coastal route, and some places were a little overcrowded in terms of available beds.

The coastal route was great - the first few days we were coated in sea fog, which wasn't ideal, but after that dissipated, it was stunning. Highlights along the route were the church that sits above Viana do Castelo - get the funicular up from the town a) to get a funicular! b) see the church, which is beautiful, and c) take in the view! Also Baiona, a day out from Vigo, is a beautiful place to take a stop. Casa do Sardao, in Carreco, is also hands down one of the best albergue's we've experienced.

What I would recommend, either way, is taking the Variente Espiritual after Pontevedra. Not only is the walk one of the most beautiful bits of any camino I've experienced, but the boat ride from Villa Nova de Arousa to Pontesecures is a special experience!

I would also recommend, either way, staying at the monastery in Herbon, as opposed to staying in Padron, the day before going to Santiago. You'll struggle to find a more welcoming, peaceful place in the world!

Here's some photos, just as a for instance...

Flat farm fields between Santarem and Golega:

IMG_2126.jpeg

Leaving Santarem, sunrise over the Rio Tejo:

IMG_2110.jpeg

A typical view in the Portuguese interior highlands, taken between Golega and Tomar:

IMG_2263.jpeg

On the trail between Alvaiazere and Alvorge:

IMG_2328.jpeg

Getting the funicular up to see the church at Viana do Castelo:

IMG_2961.jpeg

Boat ride from Villanova de Arousa to Pontesecures:

IMG_3633.jpeg

The monastery at Herbon:

IMG_3737.jpeg

Which ever way you choose, I wish you Bom Caminho!

Sorry to provide so many pictures and opinions, but I really enjoyed the way! :D
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
(2015) Frances
(2018) Portuguese
(2019) VdP Seville to Salamanca
(2020) VdP Salamanca to Santiago
I walked the CP a year or so ago from Lisbon. The Lisbon to Porto section has its merits. There are some very nice towns and cities to visit along the way. It is more (much more) urban than the CF but it definitely has charms of its own. The CP from Porto to Santiago is more like the CF (particularly if you take the central route). The coastal route is level, nice, with very friendly people and great food. If you are looking for s spiritual experience the CP isn't really it (IMHO) but I loved walking it. Just the right mix of smaller numbers of tourists and great places to stay. Others have provided excellent pictures and advice as to the length of the walk.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Hi all!!

I need a little advice to choose which Camino Portugues I will follow.

I was planning to start CN or CF, but yesterday, I thought, why not choose the Camino Portugues? I have never walked that camino and I really have no idea about it.

The start of the Camino I had planned was delayed due to the need to fix some official documents before departing, but now it seems that in less than a week I will be able to start. Being optimistic, I think I could start the Camino on July 29.

As far as reaching Santiago takes more than 10 days, that the Camino is longer or shorter it is not the main issue to decide where to start. (I can always extend the Camino to Finisterre and Muxia or even walk in reverse through the Primitivo or Norte to my hometown). Whatever between 10 days and 1 month will be ok.

I would prefer a Camino that is not too lonely. Considering covid, I think it is better to stick to the more popular routes. Most likely, it will be difficult to find accommodation on the less traveled routes.

My first idea has been to start in Porto. Is that a good idea? Is it better to start in Lisbon? In some other city?

I chose Porto because I think I remember reading some publications that said that the section between Lisbon and Porto is more boring and with fewer facilities (albergues, etc.). Is that correct?

When walking on other caminos, I always recommend some alternative routes that I consider interesting (Samos in CF, Hospitales in Primitivo, etc.). Is there an alternative route that you think I can't miss?

Do you have a link to a site that shows which albergues are open in the Camino Portugues?

I apologize because I understand that I am requesting some kind of complete and personal guide to the Camino Portugues !! ;)

Even opinions about which starting point is best or about which alternative routes are important are highly subjective and personal opinions. But believe me ... your opinions will help me!!

In the meantime, I keep reading every guide I can find in internet, airplane schedules, etc...... And trying to resolve those official documents!!😅
If you want to stick to the more popular routes, I think starting from Porto is a good idea. Everything I've read suggests that the traffic (and consequently, infrastructure) picks up considerably after Porto. Of course, after Porto there are several options:
- The Senda Litoral, which is right along the coast
- The Coastal route, which heads north out of Porto and joins the coast at Vila do Conde. It doesn't always walk directly along the coast, but touches it regularly.
- The Central route, which is mostly through farmland, villages and small towns
The three routes join together in Redondela in Spain and become one after that point.

Of the three, the Central route is the most popular with the best infrastructure, but the Coastal route is rapidly gaining in popularity. There are several "connectors" between the routes, if you want to start on one and finish on another for a taste of both. That's what I did. I started on the Senda Litoral for the first day and a bit to give myself a taste of the seashore and then headed inland from Vila do Conde to join the Central route at Arcos. I walked the rest of the way on the Central route and wasn't unhappy with my choice. Another option I've heard, which sounds intriguing, is to start as I did but when you get to the Spanish border on the Central route, head west to Caminha and take the Coastal route through Spain to Redondela. This gives you about half and half Coastal and Central and is recommended by those who believe that the Spanish section of the Coastal route is the most beautiful and scenic.

In terms of "alternative routes", there are several, especially on the way into towns. Usually there is the older route along the road and past the businesses and a newer one that the pilgrim associations made that is through woods and more natural scenery. Sometimes there are marking wars as the business owners try and re-route pilgrims away from the new routes back to their establishments. Personally, I generally preferred the new routes. The other major alternative to consider is the Variante Espiritual, which has its own sub-forum here. I'm not sure how challenging that will be in these covid times in terms of infrastructure. I sort of recall hearing that the boat that many pilgrims rely upon for part of this route may not be running at the moment. Finally, there is a small detour available to the Monastery of Herbon, shortly before Padron, where you can stay the night if that kind of accommodations and ambiance is your thing (as it is for many).

Of course, time permitting, you may want to start before Porto. If you don't want to walk all the way from Lisbon, Santarem, Tomar, and Coimbra are all good potential starting points.
 

Walking Lover

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CdS from Leon to Santiago, June 16, 2016 to June 30, 2016.
Hi all!!

I need a little advice to choose which Camino Portugues I will follow.

I was planning to start CN or CF, but yesterday, I thought, why not choose the Camino Portugues? I have never walked that camino and I really have no idea about it.

The start of the Camino I had planned was delayed due to the need to fix some official documents before departing, but now it seems that in less than a week I will be able to start. Being optimistic, I think I could start the Camino on July 29.

As far as reaching Santiago takes more than 10 days, that the Camino is longer or shorter it is not the main issue to decide where to start. (I can always extend the Camino to Finisterre and Muxia or even walk in reverse through the Primitivo or Norte to my hometown). Whatever between 10 days and 1 month will be ok.

I would prefer a Camino that is not too lonely. Considering covid, I think it is better to stick to the more popular routes. Most likely, it will be difficult to find accommodation on the less traveled routes.

My first idea has been to start in Porto. Is that a good idea? Is it better to start in Lisbon? In some other city?

I chose Porto because I think I remember reading some publications that said that the section between Lisbon and Porto is more boring and with fewer facilities (albergues, etc.). Is that correct?

When walking on other caminos, I always recommend some alternative routes that I consider interesting (Samos in CF, Hospitales in Primitivo, etc.). Is there an alternative route that you think I can't miss?

Do you have a link to a site that shows which albergues are open in the Camino Portugues?

I apologize because I understand that I am requesting some kind of complete and personal guide to the Camino Portugues !! ;)

Even opinions about which starting point is best or about which alternative routes are important are highly subjective and personal opinions. But believe me ... your opinions will help me!!

In the meantime, I keep reading every guide I can find in internet, airplane schedules, etc...... And trying to resolve those official documents!!😅
We did the P in '17, starting in Lisbon. Although enjoyable in its own right, it was lonely in July. We had to skip a couple of stages for lack of accommodations. I remember how happy I was to cross that bridge into Spain and arrive in Tui. I did love the two long days we spent on the coastal route.
 

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo, Norte, Francés, Volunteer Hospitalero.
Thank you very much for all your answers !! Now I have a lot of homework to do! 😅 😅

At first glance, what surprised me a bit were the prices of the albergues. I had the idea that the albergues were a little cheaper in Portugal than in Spain. Following the Excel sheet with the albergues, it seems the opposite. Anyway the difference seems irrelevant.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Lycra tribe.
CF (2017/8), VF (2018/9), Old Way (2020), VFnS (2020), CP (rebooked) (2021), VdT (ToDo)
Choosing....

I had planned to do the Via Francigena nel Sud in 2020 but with each twist and turn of the virus, I had to change plans. At one point I had 5 caminos planned - Italy, France, Spain and Portugal. My wife got so fed up with my switching back and forward that she told me to chose one, so I'll be doing the CP from Porto in mid September.

I've bookmarked this thread hoping for lots of pics and advice.
 

jungleboy

Spirit of the Camino (Nick)
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 2017
Primitivo 2018
Madrid 2019
Kumano Kodo 2019
Português 2020
My wife got so fed up with my switching back and forward that she told me to chose one, so I'll be doing the CP from Porto in mid September.

I am hoping to start from Lisbon on Sep 1 so our paths may cross!
 

WalkingJane

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May and October 2015
(2015 October)
June 2018 Portuguese
Hi all!!

I need a little advice to choose which Camino Portugues I will follow.

I was planning to start CN or CF, but yesterday, I thought, why not choose the Camino Portugues? I have never walked that camino and I really have no idea about it.

The start of the Camino I had planned was delayed due to the need to fix some official documents before departing, but now it seems that in less than a week I will be able to start. Being optimistic, I think I could start the Camino on July 29.

As far as reaching Santiago takes more than 10 days, that the Camino is longer or shorter it is not the main issue to decide where to start. (I can always extend the Camino to Finisterre and Muxia or even walk in reverse through the Primitivo or Norte to my hometown). Whatever between 10 days and 1 month will be ok.

I would prefer a Camino that is not too lonely. Considering covid, I think it is better to stick to the more popular routes. Most likely, it will be difficult to find accommodation on the less traveled routes.

My first idea has been to start in Porto. Is that a good idea? Is it better to start in Lisbon? In some other city?

I chose Porto because I think I remember reading some publications that said that the section between Lisbon and Porto is more boring and with fewer facilities (albergues, etc.). Is that correct?

When walking on other caminos, I always recommend some alternative routes that I consider interesting (Samos in CF, Hospitales in Primitivo, etc.). Is there an alternative route that you think I can't miss?

Do you have a link to a site that shows which albergues are open in the Camino Portugues?

I apologize because I understand that I am requesting some kind of complete and personal guide to the Camino Portugues !! ;)

Even opinions about which starting point is best or about which alternative routes are important are highly subjective and personal opinions. But believe me ... your opinions will help me!!

In the meantime, I keep reading every guide I can find in internet, airplane schedules, etc...... And trying to resolve those official documents!!😅

Having lived in Portugal, loving this country, and having walked the Caminho from Porto, I could not go back to Portugal without going to Lisbon for a few days, then doing whatever else seemed appropriate with the time I had. Lisbon is the place from which all the "discoverers" embarked. Steeped in history, but also modern. Music - classical, fado, etc. Museums. Cobblestone streets, trams, also modern Metro.
There is a fast train between Lisbon and Porto so it would not be obligatory to walk that stretch that is, to me too, not very interesting. Having a disturbing case of "wish I were there..." right now. Sorry.
 

firstshirt

Member
Camino(s) past & future
November (2018)
My partner and I walked the Portugues from Lisbon last year. To be honest, I'm not convinced by the poor reputation this section of the camino between Lisbon and Porto has. There are some lengthy sections with relatively few alburgues, but there are enough, particularly if you're happy with slightly longer days. It is true that the camino does more or less skirt around and alongside the National Highway 1 for a lot of the route, and there are some relatively unpleasant sections on busy roads (early on between Alverca do Ribatejo and Allhandra, and from Azinhaga to Golega stick in the mind particularly). There are also a few boring days early on when you'll see a LOT of very flat tomato fields. But, in my opinion, that is par for the course. Those sections help define your walk as much as the prettier ones. And once you're past Golega, the Portuguese interior is really very pretty - rolling hills, pine and eucalyptus forests. You also get to pass through Tomar, which is a UNESCO World Heritage site, home to a beautiful city on the river and a Templar castle, and Coimbra, which is a lovely city and well worth a rest day.

That said, if you're not too keen on being lonely, it may not be the route for you. We were fortunate to leave on a good day and had a nice little group of 6-9 people we saw most of the way. However, an Irish pilgrim we met after Porto had started a day after us, and saw virtually no one the whole way to Porto. The traffic was a noticable change of gear after Porto. We took the coastal route, and some places were a little overcrowded in terms of available beds.

The coastal route was great - the first few days we were coated in sea fog, which wasn't ideal, but after that dissipated, it was stunning. Highlights along the route were the church that sits above Viana do Castelo - get the funicular up from the town a) to get a funicular! b) see the church, which is beautiful, and c) take in the view! Also Baiona, a day out from Vigo, is a beautiful place to take a stop. Casa do Sardao, in Carreco, is also hands down one of the best albergue's we've experienced.

What I would recommend, either way, is taking the Variente Espiritual after Pontevedra. Not only is the walk one of the most beautiful bits of any camino I've experienced, but the boat ride from Villa Nova de Arousa to Pontesecures is a special experience!

I would also recommend, either way, staying at the monastery in Herbon, as opposed to staying in Padron, the day before going to Santiago. You'll struggle to find a more welcoming, peaceful place in the world!

Here's some photos, just as a for instance...

Flat farm fields between Santarem and Golega:

View attachment 79183

Leaving Santarem, sunrise over the Rio Tejo:

View attachment 79184

A typical view in the Portuguese interior highlands, taken between Golega and Tomar:

View attachment 79185

On the trail between Alvaiazere and Alvorge:

View attachment 79186

Getting the funicular up to see the church at Viana do Castelo:

View attachment 79187

Boat ride from Villanova de Arousa to Pontesecures:

View attachment 79188

The monastery at Herbon:

View attachment 79189

Which ever way you choose, I wish you Bom Caminho!

Sorry to provide so many pictures and opinions, but I really enjoyed the way! :D
I resemble his remark except I enjoyed the interior route.
 

firstshirt

Member
Camino(s) past & future
November (2018)
I walked the CP a year or so ago from Lisbon. The Lisbon to Porto section has its merits. There are some very nice towns and cities to visit along the way. It is more (much more) urban than the CF but it definitely has charms of its own. The CP from Porto to Santiago is more like the CF (particularly if you take the central route). The coastal route is level, nice, with very friendly people and great food. If you are looking for s spiritual experience the CP isn't really it (IMHO) but I loved walking it. Just the right mix of smaller numbers of tourists and great places to stay. Others have provided excellent pictures and advice as to the length of the walk.
I resemble this remark also except I enjoyed the interior route. Wanted to do the CP "ssoup to nuts" Wouldn't change a thing.
 

Mycroft

Active Member
My partner and I walked the Portugues from Lisbon last year. To be honest, I'm not convinced by the poor reputation this section of the camino between Lisbon and Porto has. There are some lengthy sections with relatively few alburgues, but there are enough, particularly if you're happy with slightly longer days. It is true that the camino does more or less skirt around and alongside the National Highway 1 for a lot of the route, and there are some relatively unpleasant sections on busy roads (early on between Alverca do Ribatejo and Allhandra, and from Azinhaga to Golega stick in the mind particularly). There are also a few boring days early on when you'll see a LOT of very flat tomato fields. But, in my opinion, that is par for the course. Those sections help define your walk as much as the prettier ones. And once you're past Golega, the Portuguese interior is really very pretty - rolling hills, pine and eucalyptus forests. You also get to pass through Tomar, which is a UNESCO World Heritage site, home to a beautiful city on the river and a Templar castle, and Coimbra, which is a lovely city and well worth a rest day.

That said, if you're not too keen on being lonely, it may not be the route for you. We were fortunate to leave on a good day and had a nice little group of 6-9 people we saw most of the way. However, an Irish pilgrim we met after Porto had started a day after us, and saw virtually no one the whole way to Porto. The traffic was a noticable change of gear after Porto. We took the coastal route, and some places were a little overcrowded in terms of available beds.

The coastal route was great - the first few days we were coated in sea fog, which wasn't ideal, but after that dissipated, it was stunning. Highlights along the route were the church that sits above Viana do Castelo - get the funicular up from the town a) to get a funicular! b) see the church, which is beautiful, and c) take in the view! Also Baiona, a day out from Vigo, is a beautiful place to take a stop. Casa do Sardao, in Carreco, is also hands down one of the best albergue's we've experienced.

What I would recommend, either way, is taking the Variente Espiritual after Pontevedra. Not only is the walk one of the most beautiful bits of any camino I've experienced, but the boat ride from Villa Nova de Arousa to Pontesecures is a special experience!

I would also recommend, either way, staying at the monastery in Herbon, as opposed to staying in Padron, the day before going to Santiago. You'll struggle to find a more welcoming, peaceful place in the world!

Here's some photos, just as a for instance...

Flat farm fields between Santarem and Golega:

View attachment 79183

Leaving Santarem, sunrise over the Rio Tejo:

View attachment 79184

A typical view in the Portuguese interior highlands, taken between Golega and Tomar:

View attachment 79185

On the trail between Alvaiazere and Alvorge:

View attachment 79186

Getting the funicular up to see the church at Viana do Castelo:

View attachment 79187

Boat ride from Villanova de Arousa to Pontesecures:

View attachment 79188

The monastery at Herbon:

View attachment 79189

Which ever way you choose, I wish you Bom Caminho!

Sorry to provide so many pictures and opinions, but I really enjoyed the way! :D
I enjoyed your photos, robou! Thanks for adding them!
I was on the CP last September. It was so very hot. Locals were saying that the previous 5 years were hotter in September than is August.
Unlike others, I did not care for the Variante Espiritual, although I am glad I did it; I would not do it again.
I agree with others that Porto is a city worth visiting. I would go back there to explore more than the three days I spent.
The other thing I would mention is beware the cobblestones. I still feel panic rising when I think of them! My feet were happy to leave them behind.
 

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo, Norte, Francés, Volunteer Hospitalero.
I arrived Porto and contacted 3 of the possible albergues for the next stage (1 in the Camino de la costa 2 un Camino central). The 3 of them told me that they have, as an average, 2 or 3 pilgrims per day. As this looked to me too few pilgrims, I decided to jump to Tui.

This makes a Camino that already was too short in a REALLY short Camino. Ok .... I will see how to extend it a little ... Fisterra and Muxia? ... Primitivo backwards up to Oviedo? .... We will see!

For what I saw, most albergues are open, It is not necessary to make reservation, but always is a good idea to pay a phone call to confirm that they are open and that are not fully booked.

By the way, I found out that yesterday arrived Santiago 502 pilgrims .... Not bad at all!:D
 
Last edited:

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo, Norte, Francés, Volunteer Hospitalero.
I am already in Tui. The hospitalera told me that now they have 5/6 pilgrims per day. Taking into consideration the number of albergues and hotels in Tui, that means as a minimum 50 pilgrims sleeping in Tui every day. Really not bad at all!! The Camino won't be crowded, but more than enough pilgrims!

BTW, all bars, shops, etc are open.
 

Lirsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo, Norte, Francés, Volunteer Hospitalero.
I am already in Redondela. Not any problem finding albergue (even if I didn't make any reservation).

As an exception to what I said yesterday, it looks like most municipal and parroquial albergues are closed. They told me that the reason is not to make competition to private albergues in these difficult times.
 

Trick

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguesa por la costa 2018
Via de la plata 2020
I would seriously advise the coastal route from porto and if you have the time extend it with the variante espirtual taking the boat from vilanova de arousa (I didn’t and had a long day of traffic instead, a pity) i am walking right now from lisbon to porto as I wanted to ‘complete’ my camino, but I am enjoying this part way less!! Long parts with no shade, no possibilty to sit, and also no place to get some water or anything, especially hard in these summerhot days. On the coastal route you won’t have that. And abovE all its just a camino! Enjoy!!
 

John H.

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - 2017
CP Central - 2017
CP Coastal - 2018
CF - [hopefully again someday]
I've walked both CP routes from Porto to Santiago. Both can be wonderful. The coastal route seemed to have more pavement walking which can be really hard of the feet. To do again I would either do the Central route or start on the Coastal route and cross over to the Central route about half way through. I met many people who took that combined route. Just go and have fun!
 

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