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Luggage Transfer Correos

Hiking poles

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taigirl

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2019
Hi all,
There seems to be a lot of discussion whether to risk poles in carry on luggage or pack in the hold. Is it not possible to just buy poles in STPDP? Or are they real expensive?
Thanks guys.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
They are more expensive than shopping for them at home.

Poles violate the rules for carry-on, but they often are let through. It is a risk for confiscation or gate-check. About the only agreement is that you cannot get them through Santiago airport! Also Baltimore and Newark.
 

Margaret Butterworth

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013 (Pamplona to Burgos)
2014 (Burgos to Villafranca del Bierzo)
2015 (Villafranca to Santiago)
2016 (Le Puy to Conques; SJPP To Pamplona)
Certain preferred poles (eg Pacer Poles) cannot be bought in any old shop. They must be ordered online from the Lake District. I put my poles and backpack inside a cheap IKEA bag and check it in. Never any problem!
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
You CAN buy inexpensive, tourist grade hiking poles at SJPdP. However, if you are particular as to brand, style, or technology, OR if you have a favorite pair (as I do), you should bring them from home. DO NOT presume you can carry them on.

This forum is replete with stories of how one pilgrim or another managed to get it through airport security and carried these potential weapons on board a commercial aircraft. Personally, I do not ascribe to this sort of behavior. But, I allow for individual choice.

With the tungsten steel tips installed on these poles, they are considered potential stabbing weapons... a spear. This is NOT normally permitted in an airplane cabin.

Without the tips installed, Black Diamond tips can be removed... Without the tips, and with rubber tips in their place, one might be able to make the case that these are walking aids, to assist balance. But, I would not rely on this supposition.

I always check my poles, collapsed and stored in my rucksack. Use a trash compactor bag, IKEA zip tote bag, or large nylon laundry bag to protect the rucksack in transit and prevent snags on luggage handling machinery.

Hope this helps.
 

J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
I have never had an issue carrying on poles (knock on wood), I break down my poles and put them in my kit. They fit really well. On the other hand I end up purchasing a cheap pocket knife as soon as I get in country. I have had checked baggage lost in transit.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
They are more expensive than shopping for them at home.

Poles violate the rules for carry-on, but they often are let through. It is a risk for confiscation or gate-check. About the only agreement is that you cannot get them through Santiago airport! Also Baltimore and Newark.
That depends on where you live. I found poles to be significantly cheaper on Camino than at home.
 

AlexanderAZ

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 (Sept/Oct): CF: SJPdP-->Fisterra-->Muxia (solo)
2019 (late Sept): CF: SJPdP-->Leon (honeymoon!)
My rubber tipped poles go inside my pack which is carried onboard with me. I’ve never had any issues in myriad of trips (foreign & domestic) and on various airlines.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
I have never been able to carry-on trekking poles on an airline, and the times that did occur I simply abandoned them at the security check. No worries for me, though. They were inexpensive ones I purchased in Saint Jean or Pamplona. I got my use from them and then some.
I have also put my trekking poles in a cardboard box for the flight to the Camino, but at the end of the walk simply left them at an albergue. Again, inexpensive trekking poles. I have used expensive and inexpensive trekking poles. I honestly noticed no noticable difference or advantage in the expensive ones. Being that the Camino, especially the Frances route, is on a technical scale of 1-10, a zero, I would say expensive, high tech poles not needed. My opinion, of course.
I like my airline flights hassle free and I like to carry-on my backpack every time, so to me simply buying a cheap set at home and checking them in separately in a box or bag or buying a set on the Camino is the way to go.
 

Margaret Butterworth

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013 (Pamplona to Burgos)
2014 (Burgos to Villafranca del Bierzo)
2015 (Villafranca to Santiago)
2016 (Le Puy to Conques; SJPP To Pamplona)
Young people can get away with cheap poles, but "oldies" like myself - 75 years - are better off with Pacer Poles or similar, on which you can really lean on rather like a walking stick.
 

Aussiemum3

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
French
Young people can get away with cheap poles, but "oldies" like myself - 75 years - are better off with Pacer Poles or similar, on which you can really lean on rather like a walking stick.
Margaret, I'd love to hear more about your poles. Whilst I'm a bit younger than you, I have fibromyalgia and some spinal issues, so want to walk with good supportive poles. I'm trying to get as many opinions as I can before buying some. I live in a small country town, so trying them out in advance is u possible.
 

Ricardo Moretti

Camino Frances x 2: Apr./May 2018 & Apr./May 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Two Camino Frances:
April-May 2018
April-May 2019
I share with you my limited knowledge on poles.
*If you are a very heavy person, I recommend aluminium poles such Black Diamond Trail. I am a healthy person and that is what I used even though I own and have tried several different types.
*If you are on approximate regular weight and wish to conserve some energy then I recommend carbon fiber poles such Leki foldable poles.
*One study on the usage of walking poles that I've read states that you can reduce the impact on your joints by up to 20% (especially downhill) and another study stated that you may consume up to 20% more energy using poles while walking.
*Using heavier aluminium poles will require slightly more energy than carbon poles since they are slightly heavier.
*Do note that you don't need to buy known brand names to get quality. For example, MEC or REI or Pacemaker or many others sell good poles.
*I am not a big fan of "anti-shock" or "anti-vibration" poles as some of the energy transference is loss and they feel weaker in construction.
*To reduce vibration, use large rubber tips. I recommend using such rubber tips for the Camino Frances.
*If you don't plan to use your poles for most of the hours that you walk everyday, then I would go with the carbon fiber poles since they will be lighter to carry strapped to your backpack.
*I strongly recommend that you try them locally where you live, no matter where you live.
*I strongly recommend that you visit some web sites on HOW TO USE WALKING POLES PROPERLY.
*Grips are very important. Make sure they feel comfortable and are built for sweaty hands.
*Handle straps should be cushioned.
*Try using the mechanism to adjust and lock the poles. Beware of those that require a screwdriver.
*Unless travelling in winter, late fall or very early spring, you do NOT need the end pole snow or mud baskets.
 

Margaret Butterworth

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013 (Pamplona to Burgos)
2014 (Burgos to Villafranca del Bierzo)
2015 (Villafranca to Santiago)
2016 (Le Puy to Conques; SJPP To Pamplona)

Aussiemum3

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
French
Thank you Ricardo, some very useful tips.
Thanks for the ink Margaret, I'll check them out
 

Aussiemum3

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
French
Margaret, the pacer poles look very interesting, especially the hand grip. It looks great for downhill, but was it comfortable and supportive for up hill?
Sorry to bombard you with questions, but I really live hours away from testing out poles.
 

stinmd

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - May 2015; Camino del Norte/Primitivo - July/August 2016; Camino Portugues - Sept 2017
Bought a pair for 19 euros in St Jean. Cheaper than at home and they served me well.
That's certainly cheaper than the 25 euros that Easyjet charges for each checked bag!
 

bobbogram

Member
Camino(s) past & future
El Norte San Sebastián to Santiago; Portuguese Lisbon to Porto; Porto to Santiago; Geneva west
Three full and two partial Caminos into the program, here is my opinion and experience:
(1) The rubber tips will eventually wear out, so save their physical integrity with some duct tape.
(2) The poles with shock absorbing tips are the best, easier on the repeated impact with the ground on your arms and shoulders after several weeks.
(3) They might keep you from fall into the stream you must cross; mountain goats never evolved into upright travelers
 

BobM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances; Via Podensis; Via Francigena; Via Portugues; Via Francigena del Sud; Jakobsweg.
I share with you my limited knowledge on poles. . . . .
*I strongly recommend that you visit some web sites on HOW TO USE WALKING POLES PROPERLY.
*Grips are very important. Make sure they feel comfortable and are built for sweaty hands.
*Handle straps should be cushioned.
.
Ricardo is being too modest re his 'limited knowledge'.

The grip and strap are the two things that I find most important.

I prefer 'bent' grips - ie grips that are not just a straight extension of the pole (see photo). The bent grip takes a bit of the strain off my wrist.

The strap is even more important for unloading the wrist on ascents or clambering up rough terrain for example. You can allow the strap to take a lot of the load with your hand and fingers relaxed instead of clenching the grip tightly. Hope that makes sense!

Then there is the vexed question of one or two poles. Theory says two are best. I have tried both approaches without coming to a fixed conclusion. One pole allows me to have one hand free, which I like. But I have to change the pole from one hand to the other regularly, to avoid asymmetric stress on the body, which can cause back/muscle pain.

The length of the pole is important. I prefer to have my forearm parallel to the ground when holding the pole vertically on the ground, so I adjust it accordingly. It's the same principle for ski poles.

Hope that is useful.
Bob M
 

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