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Hiking shoes in the rain

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Roland49

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF2019, CP2022?
I had two rainy days on my CF, between Grañon and Villafranca and on the last leg walking into SdC.
The least problem was to take care of dry shoes / boots.

On my last day it rains cats and dogs after starting in A Rúa. I wore full leather boots on my CF, the same as on the E5 last year crossing the Alps, walking through streams. No problem at all.

BC
Roland
 
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I had two rainy days on my CF, between Grañon and Villafranca and on the last leg walking into SdC.
The least problem was to take care of dry shoes / boots.

On my last day it rains cats and dogs after starting in A Rúa. I wore full leather boots on my CF, the same as on the E5 last year crossing the Alps, walking through streams. No problem at all.

BC
Roland
Thanks Roland-;)
 

DoughnutANZ

I would rather be fishing
Past OR future Camino
2023
I use trail running shoes and wool socks. I choose shoes with good ventilation and some people even recommend sandals for the Camino.

When my shoes and socks get wet from puddles, streams or rain I ignore it until I am in a safe situation and then I take my shoes and socks off and wring out my socks. Usually my socks are dry within the hour, often sooner.

In normal conditions the ventilation and wool socks wick the moisture away from my feet.

I have seen a lot of people injuring themselves by rock hopping or puddle jumping trying to keep their feet dry when the wise walkers concentrate on always having safe footing and ignoring the water until it is safe to deal with it.
 
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DoughnutANZ

I would rather be fishing
Past OR future Camino
2023
The other thing to consider is weight. If you are walking the Camino Frances then that is about a million steps, plus or minus a couple of hundred thousand.

Each gram of extra weight on your feet is the equivalent of carrying a metric tonne.

It is also said by some people (I don't have a quotable source) that an extra gram on your feet is equivalent to an extra five grams on your back/backpack.

I once came across a young German pilgrim who was walking in what looked like WW2 military issue leather boots that each weighted about a kilogram each! I suspect that he was doing it as some sort of dedication to an older person.

I met him again about a week later and he was hobbling with huge blisters and had abandoned the leather boots.
 
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Future Camino
The other thing to consider is weight. If you are walking the Camino Frances then that is about a million steps, plus or minus a couple of hundred thousand.

Each gram of extra weight on your feet is the equivalent of carrying a metric tonne.

It is also said by some people (I don't have a quotable source) that an extra gram on your feet is equivalent to an extra five grams on your back/backpack.

I once came across a young German pilgrim who was walking in what looked like WW2 military issue leather boots that each weighted about a kilogram each! I suspect that he was doing it as some sort of dedication to an older person.

I met him again about a week later and he was hobbling with huge blisters and had abandoned the leather boots.
Really appreciate your thoughtful responses Roland-:)
 

Roland49

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF2019, CP2022?
I once came across a young German pilgrim who was walking in what looked like WW2 military issue leather boots that each weighted about a kilogram each! I suspect that he was doing it as some sort of dedication to an older person.

I met him again about a week later and he was hobbling with huge blisters and had abandoned the leather boots.
:D And me got the contrary experience. Most pilgrims I've met in July 2019 with severe blisters walked in Trailrunners and other lightweight shoes. Leather boots are fine (mine weighing 700gr. each), if you have the time and effort to break them in. And you need them 1-1.5 sizes larger, depending of the build of your feet.
 

woody66

This is my boy !
Past OR future Camino
2021
Hi Austin!
Walked my first Camino in September 21 Portuguese Coastal,Senda Litoral and Variente Espiritual from Porto! (only had one day of really heavy rain)

I agree with Doughnut NZ about getting wet feet i wore non waterproof/breathable Hoka trail runners (really comfy) but my darn tough socks were still wet through from sweat within a couple of hours or so as temps were 25 C! changed them and dried them hanging on my pack!

I wore waterproof socks in the rain which were surprisingly good at there job and kept my feet dry through hours of rain. When it stopped i changed my socks and in about an hour of walking my Hokas had dried out!
Here in the UK its winter and i wear goretex boots; but i have other options in footwear while they take a couple of days to dry!
I sent the vid below to my family as i was fed up in the rain ( please excuse the language);my gear did work well and i would happily use it on my next Camino it was hot humid and wet so i needed a moan!!!!
All the best
Woody
View attachment VID-20211002-WA0009.mp4
 
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Scott Sweeney

Active Member
From our experience, If you encounter a significant rain day there is very little you can do to keep your feet dry. Rain suits also keep body moisture in and makes walking horrible, rain ponchos pretty much makes sure you will be wet from the knees down. Trying to waterproof your boots will make your feet sweat boot and could lead to blisters. The only time we ever had any issues was on the Aragonese Way. We have been very fortunate. Just remember newspapers will dry your boots out overnight.
 
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Bama Hiker

Certified Peregrino
Past OR future Camino
Oct 5-Nov 5 2013 Frances
Apr 5-May 12 2022 Frances
Wondering if there are any novel suggestions to keep hiking shoes dry’ish in the raiin
Austin: Sorry that people don't really address your question and are obsessed with pack weight. It depends on when you are walking. Most assume you are walking in the dry summer months. My first camino was Oct/Nov and we had multiple periods of rain. I plan to walk again in April/May this year. We are planning on having to walk in the rain again. Last time and this time I will bring two pairs of trail shoes made with Goretex, rain gaiters, Arcteryx rain pants and jacket, and pack cover. Total weight of this, minus the shoes I'm wearing, is only 4.4 lbs (2 kilos). We wore gaiters a fair amount of time even when there was no rain. The trail conditions are often dusty or muddy, and gaiters help keep dirt and muck out of your shoes. After walking all day in the rain, the second dry shoes give you something to wear while the first pair dry out. Having to put on and walk in the same wet shoes can lead to foot problems. If you are in good physical shape, don't worry about having a fairy weight pack. Look at the average weather conditions for the period of when and where you are walking to determine if rain will be a concern and make your plan. I hope this information was a bit more helpful. You can see our wet weather days from 2013 on my YouTube channel "Bama Hiker." Buen Camino!
 
Past OR future Camino
Del Norte from Irun to Santander, Primitivo from Oviedo to Frances to Santiago September 2016

RJM

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino's Frances, Fisterre, Portuges. Over 180 day
When I walked the Frances in October though November I experienced quite a bit of rain and some snow. There's nothing I could have done to keep my shoes and feet dry because it's well, it's raining. So I didn't give it much thought and because the Camino Frances isn't a hike, it's a walk, I knew that when I got to an albergue or wherever I can take off the shoes, take care of my feet and be ready for the next day. I didn't carry a bunch of gear for the "just in case mentality". If I had I would have carried things I used for only about 25% of my Camino. The other 75% it sits in the pack. Not a good ratio. Besides, it's just water.
What was more important to me was keeping the contents of my pack dry. Dry feet is a moot point when all your clothes and sleeping bag are soaking wet.
 
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BROWNCOUNTYBOB

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances: 2015, 2017, 2019, 2021
During our four CF caminos, we experienced pouring rain on several occasions. The last two caminos we've had good experience keeping our feet fairly dry. During a downpour, not even a goretex racket will keep you dry, so last camino we wore a poncho on top of our goretex jacket. In addition we wore rain pants and gaiters over our boots. Did a nice job keeping our entire bodies dry. We were not concerned about weight since we used Jacotrans to transport our backpacks every day. Bob
 
Past OR future Camino
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Wondering if there are any novel suggestions to keep hiking shoes dry’ish in the raiin
My ALTUS poncho keeps my feet pretty darned dry. If it's gushing rain, I step out of it until it stops. When I arrive at my albergue I stuff my shoes with dry newspaper and they're dry next morning. Boots or any leather shoe would probably still be cold, stiff, and wet.
 

El Gordo

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Wondering if there are any novel suggestions to keep hiking shoes dry’ish in the raiin
Here is what I did on my Camino Frances during September 22 - October 27, 2021. I hiked using an older pair of leather Keen hiking shoes for the most part. We had only 2 days of rain (yes we were blessed 😊) and during those two days of rain I wore my Keen sandals to hike. The Keen sandal is more rugged than most and was just fine for the terrain of the Camino. Thus, by hiking in my sandals on rain days I was able to keep my hiking shoes dry. It worked for me.
 
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Former member 99942

Guest
Austin: Sorry that people don't really address your question and are obsessed with pack weight. It depends on when you are walking. Most assume you are walking in the dry summer months. My first camino was Oct/Nov and we had multiple periods of rain. I plan to walk again in April/May this year. We are planning on having to walk in the rain again. Last time and this time I will bring two pairs of trail shoes made with Goretex, rain gaiters, Arcteryx rain pants and jacket, and pack cover. Total weight of this, minus the shoes I'm wearing, is only 4.4 lbs (2 kilos). We wore gaiters a fair amount of time even when there was no rain. The trail conditions are often dusty or muddy, and gaiters help keep dirt and muck out of your shoes. After walking all day in the rain, the second dry shoes give you something to wear while the first pair dry out. Having to put on and walk in the same wet shoes can lead to foot problems. If you are in good physical shape, don't worry about having a fairy weight pack. Look at the average weather conditions for the period of when and where you are walking to determine if rain will be a concern and make your plan. I hope this information was a bit more helpful. You can see our wet weather days from 2013 on my YouTube channel "Bama Hiker." Buen Camino!
Im going in April (of 23) and I’m doing something similar as Bama here with the exception of 1 goretex light weight trail runner and one non goretex running shoes.

If you are hiking in later March or April or in October (based on the rain and the temperatures) I don’t think goretex is a bad idea. And when you don’t need the goretex shoes on take them off and switch to a light weight breathable shoe that doesn’t make you sweat like the goretex and helps prevent blisters.

An example would be Brooks Cascadia GTX trail runners and another non goretex brooks road running shoe. This is only for the Camino Frances.

If weight was an issues then I’d only bring non goretex trail runners. Probably the Saucony xodus.
 
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good_old_shoes

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Francés ('15, '19)
Via Coloniensis ('16)
Trier-Nancy + Le Puy-Fisterra ('17)
Aragonés ('18)
I never found walking with wet feet to be a huge problem, as long as they can dry again after a while. I usually walk in sandals and socks on my caminos/hikes in all kinds of weather (except lots of snow), and therefore usually have wet feet constantly when it rains, sometimes for several walking days in a row. Important is to put on dry socks as soon as you stop walking (rest stops as well as end of day). While walking, wet wool socks still keep your feet warm, as long as you keep moving. They also dry quickly when it stops raining, and only get cold once you stop. The worst part is to put on the cold wet socks again after a break, but you get used to it.

In winter, especially when the weather is really bad, goretex boots, goretex socks in trail runners or waxed leather boots combined with wool socks are probably a good choice. Gaiters and ponchos will help also, as others said.

But in the warmer seasons I wouldn't worry too much.

Buen camino!
 

Mera

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF, El Norte, Primitivo, Porto, Madrid, Ingles
Wondering if there are any novel suggestions to keep hiking shoes dry’ish in the raiin
I wear waterproof hiking boots, raincoat, and rain pants. My boots can be covered by the rain pants, it works like wearing gators. As long as I walk carefully, and not step on any water deeper than my hiking boots, I can stay dry. Gators are good idea, but in my case, I didn't want to carry that extra weight. I was dry and toasty warm even during this windy hailstorm. 1643123427067.jpeg
1643123427067.jpeg
 
Past OR future Camino
Latest: Rota Vicentina '19; Portuguese '19.
While walking, wet wool socks still keep your feet warm, as long as you keep moving.
I have only experienced torrential pouring rain a couple of times on five Caminos. I do not worry about wet feet. I see the water squishing out of the mesh fabric of my lightweight trail runners and it feels rather like a foot massage and does not bother me at all. No blisters and my shoes are dry by morning.
 

calmeg

Member
In our opinion it depends on the weather. On EL Norte, El Primitivo, and the San Salvador, we hiked in May-June. They were cool (starts from 4C-14C when we started out each day), muddy, and rainy conditions. Even sunny days had lots of mud underfoot. We used Keen hiking shoes or trail runners with goretex, rain pants, and a rain jacket, and our feet stayed dry. That would be our gear again today. In hot, dry conditions perhaps sweating feet might pose a problem?
 
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Past OR future Camino
2019
I have encountered TORRENTIAL wind and rain at the beginning, middle and Galician areas of the Del Norte. My rain management is to start at the top with an umbrella (paragua) so I can keep my head and neck open and cool, then Gore-tex jacket, rain pants or kilt, gaiters and boots. Yes, then newspapers in the boots at night. When the umbrella is not needed for rain, it is great for sun (parasol). Buy a super light weight one in the US (I use Z-packs) or buy one local in Spain for 20 euros or less. Z-packs sells a tiny hitch system to clamp the umbrella to your pack shoulder strap for hands free use. But I recommend doubling them. And I use only one trekking pole (to keep a free hand) and in good blows the umbrella still needs a steadying hand. I experienced one day of fairly good rain on the Frances this past October. My Camino Amigos complained of getting soaked, even while wearing ponchos. I advised them to buy an umbrella before leaving Astorga. And, a waterproof pack cover AND pack liner are essential. When you see dark rain clouds approaching from the west, suit up immediately. They will dump upon you far sooner than you expect. Buen Camino
 

OnCamino

Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2013-2015)
Le Puy Route (2016-2019)
HWF (2019)
Gebennensis (2020)
People might suffer from sweaty feet, but from my own experience feet get far wetter from rain than from sweat. I walked part of my Camino on days where the temperature was 35+ Celsius, and shoes with a waterproof lining were not a problem in the heat, but worked well in the rain.
 

CA_Pilgrim

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
El Camino Real de California
Camino Frances (2017)
Wondering if there are any novel suggestions to keep hiking shoes dry’ish in the raiin
I hate hiking in the rain!! But it may be unavoidable on the Camino. I've been debating this waterproof/non-waterproof shoe issue for quite some time. My experience on a long hiking trip in Ireland a couple years ago is that my feet are very comfortable with waterproof (Gortex) shoes but I do like more breathable shoes better.


I decided (I think) to going with the non-waterproof shoes and bring along some good gaiters in case of rain......I think.
 
Past OR future Camino
Latest: Rota Vicentina '19; Portuguese '19.
I advised them to buy an umbrella before leaving Astorga. And, a waterproof pack cover AND pack liner are essential. When you see dark rain clouds approaching from the west, suit up immediately. They will dump upon you far sooner than you expect. Buen Camino
I used an umbrella on the Norte for the intermittent spitting of
light rain occasionally that never became a downpour. It kept me from needing my rain jacket quite a few times. I use a pack cover, but also line my backpack with a robust white trash compactor bag, which is excellent. As a side note, the trash compactor bag, in addition to no woorries of wet gear in rain, rolled up and secured at night in albergues assured that all my things stayed bedbug free while sleeping.
 
Past OR future Camino
April 11 2019
Wondering if there are any novel suggestions to keep hiking shoes dry’ish in the raiin
We walked the Camino française in April May 2019 and had only a few periods of rain. I did notice many pilgrims using petroleum jelly, a light coating on their bare feet before putting on socks; this reduced blisters from perspiration. I did change my darn tough socks at noon every day. I wore low top Keens. Miguel
 
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winewalker3

New Member
Past OR future Camino
VF(2005), CF(2006), CF(2008), VF(2011), CF(2015), CF(2016)
Wondering if there are any novel suggestions to keep hiking shoes dry’ish in the raiin
I agree somewhat with Harland. I have found gaitors to shed the water from a greater distance on your leg and then run down onto your shoe. GoreTex lined hiking shoes work great, you can walk in water upto the laces or the opening without leaking. Your socks and feet remain dry but the outside of the shoe maybe wet !! I've walked through streams or fast running flash draining water through the city streets on the CF.
 
Past OR future Camino
2022
Two problems with wet boots on the Camino:

1. Blisters
2. Getting the boots dry before the next day.

For blisters, there is much advice on this forum on how to prevent and treat blisters. We each have our own trial-and-error methods that work best. Just don't ignore those little "hot spots" that quickly develop into something painful and potentially dangerous. Your feet are your most important pieces of equipment.

For drying your boots before the next day, I walked a very wet and muddy Camino. My boots, Merrill Moabs, are not waterproof and usually were wet through and through by the end of each day and very muddy.

Upon arriving at the day's albergue, I immediately took the boots out and removed the insoles. I then stuffed the boots as solidly as possible with old newspapers, which were available at the albergue for just such a purpose. I "stood" the insoles in the boots so they wouldn't get lost.

After showering and before preparing for a rest or for a walk around town, I went back to my boots. I replaced the now wet newspaper and stuffed them with another round of dry newspaper. I was surprised by how much moisture newspaper could absorb in such a short amount of time.

I usually checked on my boots before calling it a night and could stuff it again (usually not needed).

By the way, when my boots were really caked with mud, I sometimes literally ran my boots under running water to rinse off the mud. They were soaked anyway, I couldn't get them wetter - I could only get them cleaner.

Amazingly, my boots were ALWAYS dry by the next morning - although sometimes soaked within the next 30 minutes on the Camino.
 
Past OR future Camino
CF 2019. SJPdP 14 April 2022 to Finisterre
Wondering if there are any novel suggestions to keep hiking shoes dry’ish in the raiin
Not novel but I use Sealskinz socks for wet days, which have a weird waterproof liner between two layers of merino.

Only one day of belting rain but I waded through ankle deep water that flooded my Altra shoes but kept my feet completely dry.

This April I will be hiking the CF with Altra Lone Peak 6s, which have even better drainage than predecessors.
 
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pasiño a pasiño

sin dolor no hay gloria
Past OR future Camino
2018 Via de la Plata | next Francés again....
are we talking about walking in rain right? I mean rain like rain for hours not just a drizzle for 30min or an hour, cause for drizzling I'm not even bothered to cover my rucksack.

i tried all types of shoes, with or without gaiters, with a poncho or instead of, raincoat with rain trousers and I was always wet, always! If you are walking for example 8h in the rain, there is in my opinion, based on my experiences and related to my sweating body, nothing what keeps your feet and body dry!

How should this even be possible, if you are rapped up like a "birthday present" to keep the rain away, what happens with the sweat?
If i just walk (not sauntering) 1h (5-6km) with 10kg gear I am wet from my sweat!

If i wouldn't be annoyed by holding an proper umbrella I would suggest this, but I don't mind water, so I walk always in shorts (also in winter) in a shirt and with my current shoes and I just use a raincover for my rucksack. I just keep walking and don't stay still until I arrive in the accommodation. What also helps me is to accept the rain and be positive about ;)

This Theme seems like includes a lot of mysteries where you can find more opinions as people. :)

Enjoy your next Raindance....splish+ splash pavement dash..

Dennis
 
Past OR future Camino
Latest: Rota Vicentina '19; Portuguese '19.
I just keep walking and don't stay still until I arrive in the accommodation. What also helps me is to accept the rain and be positive about ;)
I walk continuously in pouring rain, too, but luckily I think I can count on one hand the all day drenches I've had to endure. I do take a break for a coffee or snack indoors, but I never stop to "wait it out"; I prefer to keep on going.
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
Water can enter trail runner shoes, hiking shoes, or backpacking boots through any opening during a rainstorm, when walking through wet grass and brush, or drench into them if you walk through puddles or other standing water along the Camino.

There are two potential remedies to this problem, neither of which is always effective.
  • First, you can try keeping rain pants over the tops of shoes, so the water runs down the pants past the opening. But this system can be uncomfortably hot in warm weather during rain-soaked conditions. It offers no protection for puddles or having to cross water runoffs on the pathway.
  • You can try using a footwear with a waterproof gaiter or some other waterproof cobbles -- like thick plastic bags. I have not often seen a gaiter or other waterproof trapping that would both keep the water out and keep the feet dry.
“Waterproof” shoes are a misnomer for several reasons.
  • They can fail because the materials simply don’t work over the near and long term because it is difficult to apply and cover all areas of the footwear sufficiently.
  • The waterproof coating or laminate in the shoes does not last. Some manufacturers of the lightweight trail shoes, which are usually constructed as a hybrid of fabric and leather, have treated them with a coating which can quickly wear off. It also keeps sweat in the shoe and your feet get soaked in sweat. Fairly quickly, coatings break down and will no longer be waterproof.
  • Footwear which relies on a “Gore-Tex” style of waterproof/breathable laminate will break down through both wear and tear and dirt buildup on the material which renders it ineffective.
When I’ve tested so-called waterproof / breathable fabrics in shoes for various manufacturers, their actual performance never matched what was claimed. My reports to their QA departments have always reflected these weaknesses as found during testing. Sometimes a shoe will start the test period working fairly well under a narrow range of wet conditions, but as the testing progresses the failures increase.

Waterproof/breathable membranes, like Gore-Tex, are only marginally breathable — water vapor from perspiration does not pass through the fabric as efficiently as is claimed. It can't. Unlike outerwear, the shoe material radically inhibits the ability of the membrane to allow water vapor to escape, thereby trapping it in the shoe.

So, on warm days the experience of having sweat being trapped in the shoe is common. Combined with the fact that the fabric waterproofing is quickly damaged by dirt, sweat, grime, and abrasion and it’s only a matter of time before exterior moisture begins penetrating the fabric and allowing feet to get wet from outside moisture as well.

This is why most experienced trekkers and backpackers no longer go to great lengths to keep feet dry. They accept that when the weather is wet, feet will also get wet. Even the US military uses footwear for wet conditions which is not waterproof. The strategy is how to minimize any problems when feet are wet.

In working with folks new to backpacking who ask about waterproof footwear recommendations, I have asked why they wanted waterproof shoes. Sometimes, they will look at me as if I had spaghetti sticking out of my nose. Most will answer that they think their feet will stay dry, and that having wet feet is akin to getting into horrible trouble.

This post is meant to help inform, reassure, and give a different line of thought and reasoning to this issue.

I like to have dry feet. I always try to avoid wet feet. I have tried many ways to keep my feet dry:

  • “Waterproof” shoes, which, as I’ve said, don’t work well.
  • “Waterproof” socks, which don’t work for similar reasons: shoes still get wet, and feet soak with sweat. However – In cold weather these soaks can be the basis for using vapor barrier warmth conservation of the feet.
  • Wearing multiple pairs of socks, frequently changing from wet to dry, which eventually all get wet.
  • Carrying multiple pairs of shoes, which eventually all get wet, too.
I have never had total success at keeping my feet dry in very wet conditions, which led me to research what has been done to develop effective strategies. If I can’t keep my feet dry, then I need to try and eliminate or minimize the risk of any of the bad things that could occur to my wet feet when walking.

Some of these lessons I learned while in Vietnam…. Like the fact that our boots had fabric tops and numerous holes in the thin leather bottom portions so that water drained out quickly and never sat in the boots.

What are the most frequent and problematic 'bad' things?
  • Maceration is the medical term for pruning, where the skin’s outer layer absorbs a lot of moisture and gets “soggy” from that moisture. The skin gets sore and extremely soft which makes it more prone to blistering and developing other problems.
  • Cracking of the skin when the macerated feet dry. The natural moisture and oiliness of the skin is gone. The severity depends on how much stress the skin is exposed to after it is dried out.
So, what does work for me, and others, if I am going to be walking or backpacking in wet weather?
  • Apply a good, thick coating of a Goop (ointment or salve) to my feet and between toes before putting on socks and shoes in the morning. If rain occurs later in the day, then remove shoes and socks and do the same. This helps protect from external moisture.
Goop which has a high content of wax – either bee or paraffin – is most ideal, especially if it also has a high lanolin content.
  • Wear non-waterproof shoes which can drain and then dry out quickly. This minimizes the amount of puddling in the shoe that bathes the feet in moisture. Modern trail running shoes, and trail shoes often have nice open mesh fabric which is terrific for draining water.
Non-waterproof shoes will also eliminate moisture from sweaty feet. Remember, it doesn’t matter what the source of the moisture is that feet are exposed to: be it rain or sweat, each can cause the same problems.
  • Wear thin, light-cushioned merino wool socks, which don’t absorb as much water as thicker socks. Merino wool will also keep wet feet warm and comfortable in most seasons and temperature ranges, unless the weather is frigid winter-cold.
  • Take off shoes and socks to let feet air dry during rest stop that will be longer than 20 minutes.During this time, I will wring out any excess moisture from the socks, but I will not put on either of my dry pairs (I take three). I will also wipe off moisture on my feet and then reapply a goodly amount of Goop to my feet to help keep them from becoming macerated.
  • When stopping for the day, apply Goop to the bottoms of feet, both before and after showering.
  • Carry an extra pair of insoles. These insoles do not have to be your preferred “walking” insoles that you may have purchased separately. These can be the lightweight pair which came with your shoes. These will be the barrier between your wet footwear and your dry socks when you are done for the day and if your shoes are a bit damp come morning.
I find that at days end, I can remove the wet insoles and use absorbent paper or toweling to sop up as much moisture as is possible while I am showering and dealing with end of the day chores.

When I get ready to go to dinner or wander around town, I put on a pair of dry Merino wool socks, insert the extra pair of dry insoles into my shoes, and put the shoes back on to walk around in. This accelerates drying out the shoes. Depending on the shoe’s material, within a couple of hours the shoes are mostly dry.
  • At bedtime, I remove the insoles and stuff absorbent material into the shoes to continue the drying out process, if need be, during the night.
  • Apply more salve or ointment and wear dry and warm socks at while sleeping; this gives feet 8-9 hours of recovery.
 
Past OR future Camino
Latest: Rota Vicentina '19; Portuguese '19.
All your advice sounds excellent to me, @davebugg. Next time I will try adding some type of Goop like you suggest, even though I had no problem without using any so far. I notice you make no mention of any lightweight evening sandal/croc shoes. Do you choose to not bring a pair on the Camino?
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
All your advice sounds excellent to me, @davebugg. Next time I will try adding some type of Goop like you suggest, even though I had no problem without using any so far. I notice you make no mention of any lightweight evening sandal/croc shoes. Do you choose to not bring a pair on the Camino?
🙂. Yeah, only one pair of shoes. Two insoles, though.
 
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Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
A "Tourigrino" trip once Covid has passed, so 2023
In the days when I wore leather hiking boots and the going was wet it was thick wollen socks + plastic breadbags (tip from cousin in the British Army from the days of their all leather "Ammunition" boots) and then the boots. Feet usually stayed dry and the leather moulded itself to foot shape - never worried about how wet they got and I've never had a problem with sweaty feet (oh the things we talk about in this forum!)

Now I "do as @davebugg does" - and wear trail runners or hiking shoes that breath (ie leak) and I put up with the wetness until I've finished walking then it's hot shower, dry feet and a fresh pair of socks and get spare insoles ready for the next day.

If you're in Spain and need some new ones, insoles are "las plantillas".
 

OTH86

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2017
My ALTUS poncho keeps my feet pretty darned dry. If it's gushing rain, I step out of it until it stops. When I arrive at my albergue I stuff my shoes with dry newspaper and they're dry next morning. Boots or any leather shoe would probably still be cold, stiff, and wet.
@Anniesantiago , on my first Camino when I had to walk thru a largish stream (not a river) some distance before Melide, I stuffed my boots (Gortex) with newspaper - changing the "stuffing" once, and the boots were dry by morning. I LOVED those boots - tho' I don't bother with Gortex anymore! ...that stream is now bridged!
Buen Camino, Annie!
 
Past OR future Camino
2018
From our experience, If you encounter a significant rain day there is very little you can do to keep your feet dry. Rain suits also keep body moisture in and makes walking horrible, rain ponchos pretty much makes sure you will be wet from the knees down. Trying to waterproof your boots will make your feet sweat boot and could lead to blisters. The only time we ever had any issues was on the Aragonese Way. We have been very fortunate. Just remember newspapers will dry your boots out overnight.
Stuffing wet shoes with newspaper really helps them dry...
 
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cbacino

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino del Norte - Primitivo (2018)
Via Francigena (2017)
Appalachian Trail (2016)
Wondering if there are any novel suggestions to keep hiking shoes dry’ish in the raiin
Every shoe, no matter how “waterproof“ it claims to be, will eventually get wet inside during protracted rain. If it were truly waterproof (think rubber boots), imagine how wet your feet would eventually get from the inside. There is no perfect solution. Avoid leather - once it gets wet, it stays wet long time. Looks for all-synthetic materials, which dry relatively quick. I’ve switched to synthetic sandals, Keens. Soaking wet, they dry in no time.
 
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Past OR future Camino
Future Camino
Every shoe, no matter how “waterproof“ it claims to be, will eventually get wet inside during protracted rain. If it were truly waterproof (think rubber boots), imagine how wet your feet would eventually get from the inside. There is no perfect solution. Avoid leather - once it gets wet, it stays wet long time. Looks for all-synthetic materials, which dry relatively quick. I’ve switched the synthetic sandals, Keens. Soaking wet, they dry in no time.
Good thought … thanks
 

LakeMcD

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances 15' Portuguese 16' GR10/Norte/Primitivo 17' Chemin LePuy 18' Salvador/Prim/Kerry Way 19'
I'm also of the opinion of using as breathable a shoe as possible and just let the feet get wet when the conditions are such. I don't like shoes that tend to hold heat in, as such I look for shoes that have minimal padding in the uppers and tongue while still maintaining a comfortable supportive fit for my needs. I think of the padding as insulation, the more there is the more it holds in heat. I tend to favor shoes if it has a lot of nice breathable mesh material.

Many trail runners will now include a description about the shoes ability and features that allow for drainage. One of the features of modern trail runners and runners is to use some kind of thermal plastic type overlay of the mesh to improve abrasion resistance and provide for more structured support. I stay away from a shoe that has such a thermal plastic overlay in the form or a rand that completely surrounds the base of the uppers. The rand can only be 3/4 of an inch high, but unless there are provisions for drainage inside of shoe below the footbed and through the midsole, that area will tend to hold moisture in even though the uppers can continue to breathe.
 
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Past OR future Camino
2018
are we talking about walking in rain right? I mean rain like rain for hours not just a drizzle for 30min or an hour, cause for drizzling I'm not even bothered to cover my rucksack.

i tried all types of shoes, with or without gaiters, with a poncho or instead of, raincoat with rain trousers and I was always wet, always! If you are walking for example 8h in the rain, there is in my opinion, based on my experiences and related to my sweating body, nothing what keeps your feet and body dry!

How should this even be possible, if you are rapped up like a "birthday present" to keep the rain away, what happens with the sweat?
If i just walk (not sauntering) 1h (5-6km) with 10kg gear I am wet from my sweat!

If i wouldn't be annoyed by holding an proper umbrella I would suggest this, but I don't mind water, so I walk always in shorts (also in winter) in a shirt and with my current shoes and I just use a raincover for my rucksack. I just keep walking and don't stay still until I arrive in the accommodation. What also helps me is to accept the rain and be positive about ;)

This Theme seems like includes a lot of mysteries where you can find more opinions as people. :)

Enjoy your next Raindance....splish+ splash pavement dash..

Dennis
I had a memorable rainy day with fleece jacket, semi-rainproof jacket and poncho. As there was some wind, the poncho tried to lift me up, it was warm so I was sweating and wet from inside out as well as outside in.... Keen sandals so of course my feet were wet. And the hood on the jacket - turning head to see the side gave a view of inside hood.... Funny now, and actually was then when I was so wet it just didn't matter anymore...
 
Past OR future Camino
2018
But in cold temperatures too? Or do you pair them with wool socks for these occasions? And won’t grit and dirt get into the sandals? I’m serious; I really want to know.
wool socks, yes. My keens have a closed toe. Had an occasional pebble get in but really rare. Before my first camino I tried lace-up boots, as so much I was reading mentioned boots. Me feet rebelled! So actually began in sneakers and got my first Keens in Spain - Burgos? They are what I use now at home as "everyday" shoes.
 

trecile

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
PAST - Francés, Norte, Salvador, Portuguese
But in cold temperatures too? Or do you pair them with wool socks for these occasions? And won’t grit and dirt get into the sandals? I’m serious; I really want to know.
I have only walked the Camino between May and September, so not too cold.
But I think that thick wool socks would probably keep my feet plenty warm in sandals. I also have a pair of SealSkinz waterproof socks for really soggy days.
An occasional small stone will get in my sandal, but it's easy to get out - usually without removing the sandal. I have seen pilgrims sit by the side of the trail and dump multiple pebbles out of their boots!
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2013)
wool socks, yes. My keens have a closed toe. Had an occasional pebble get in but really rare. Before my first camino I tried lace-up boots, as so much I was reading mentioned boots. Me feet rebelled! So actually began in sneakers and got my first Keens in Spain - Burgos? They are what I use now at home as "everyday" shoes.
I have only walked the Camino between May and September, so not too cold.
But I think that thick wool socks would probably keep my feet plenty warm in sandals. I also have a pair of SealSkinz waterproof socks for really soggy days.
An occasional small stone will get in my sandal, but it's easy to get out - usually without removing the sandal. I have seen pilgrims sit by the side of the trail and dump multiple pebbles out of their boots!
Thank you both. This is enormously helpful.
 
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Antananarivo

Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances
I had two rainy days on my CF, between Grañon and Villafranca and on the last leg walking into SdC.
The least problem was to take care of dry shoes / boots.

On my last day it rains cats and dogs after starting in A Rúa. I wore full leather boots on my CF, the same as on the E5 last year crossing the Alps, walking through streams. No problem at all.

BC
Roland
What month did you do the Camino?
 

good_old_shoes

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Francés ('15, '19)
Via Coloniensis ('16)
Trier-Nancy + Le Puy-Fisterra ('17)
Aragonés ('18)
But in cold temperatures too? Or do you pair them with wool socks for these occasions? And won’t grit and dirt get into the sandals? I’m serious; I really want to know.

I've used Teva sandals (+ wool socks) down to temperatures of 2-3°C and snowy rain.

Take off the wet socks during rest stops and put on dry ones. When you continue walking, remove the dry socks and put on the wet ones again. Uncomfortable for a minute, but then your feet get warm quickly again while walking and you save the dry socks for the next rest stop. One pair of socks for walking, one for rest stops, one for evenings.

Worst dirt stays off the feet because of the socks (ankle deep mud can be problematic, but that's a rare extreme). To get rid of small stones that went into the sandal, just shake your foot and it will fall out, very easy.

Never really had a problem this way.

If you expect horrible weather constantly and/or snow, especially up in the mountains, sandals wouldn't be a wise choice, especially if you're not used to it, but in moderate terrain and weather, they can be a very good option (among many others).

Just be prepared for the judgement of the fashion police!
 

Harland2019

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF April/May 2019, CF May 2022
I know that there are no stupid questions on this forum BUT I see from a photo near the start of this thread that the pilgrims have put their trainers upside down on the radiator to dry out. My thinking was always to put their soles down on the radiator, with the inserts taken out, on the basis that the damp would rise up out of the shoe. I suppose if the radiator was too hot it could damage the soles but I've never been that lucky to have a red hot radiator!
 
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Icacos

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2013)
Perhaps that’s why I asked the question in the first place. 😉 😆
Sorry, back to being serious now. This was my dilemma the one time I walked; do I bring two or three pairs of footwear. Next time, besides my boots, I will bring sandals. Sandals for walking - with wool socks if necessary - and the same sandals to be worn in the shower.
 
Past OR future Camino
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
I have only walked the Camino between May and September, so not too cold.
But I think that thick wool socks would probably keep my feet plenty warm in sandals. I also have a pair of SealSkinz waterproof socks for really soggy days.
An occasional small stone will get in my sandal, but it's easy to get out - usually without removing the sandal. I have seen pilgrims sit by the side of the trail and dump multiple pebbles out of their boots!
I must shuffle my feet because when I tried walking in sandals the little pebbles drove me mad.
 
Past OR future Camino
cf (2), de la plata, cp. (2003 -2018)
Technology used to keep moisture out also tends to keep moisture in. Your feet, along with the rest of your body, will sweat as you walk.

Moisture resistant fabrics will ensure that you have to deal with wet feet every day that you walk.
which is why I use merino wool socks. they keep your feet warm even when wet!

Samarkand.
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2013)
I know that there are no stupid questions on this forum BUT I see from a photo near the start of this thread that the pilgrims have put their trainers upside down on the radiator to dry out. My thinking was always to put their soles down on the radiator, with the inserts taken out, on the basis that the damp would rise up out of the shoe. I suppose if the radiator was too hot it could damage the soles but I've never been that lucky to have a red hot radiator!
I expect the thinking is that the heat, rising up from the radiator, would enter the shoes and dry out the interiors. The speed of drying out would diminish the higher up the stack one’s shoes happen to be. But you are right about removing the insoles, and I don’t see any insoles in this picture.

As others have indicated, newspaper works beautifully for drying out shoes, and when I walked there was always a box of newspaper around on a rainy day. I wonder now, with more and more people reading news online, how abundant newspapers are these days; they are certainly not abundant anymore where I live.
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
I know that there are no stupid questions on this forum BUT I see from a photo near the start of this thread that the pilgrims have put their trainers upside down on the radiator to dry out. My thinking was always to put their soles down on the radiator, with the inserts taken out, on the basis that the damp would rise up out of the shoe. I suppose if the radiator was too hot it could damage the soles but I've never been that lucky to have a red hot radiator!
It does damage the shoe, specifically the glues that fasten the outer sole to the shoe. It can also weaken nylon fabrics in the uppers…making them more ‘brittle’.
 
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OTH86

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2017
I usually take 3 pairs of sox - 2 pairs of liners and one heavy (wear 2, 1 in the backpack) - merino wool since they are warm and dry fast. Then mix and match depending on weather conditions, but never wearing the heavy without the liner first. This has worked for me on 8 caminos (wearing Salomon boots and mostly in the Fall) and 2 long walks in the UK (Salomon boots, Spring & Fall) -- and hundreds of walks around Seattle (Merrell Trail Runners) all seasons. YMMV ;)
 
Past OR future Camino
2019 Frances
2021 Primitivo
I expect the thinking is that the heat, rising up from the radiator, would enter the shoes and dry out the interiors. The speed of drying out would diminish the higher up the stack one’s shoes happen to be. But you are right about removing the insoles, and I don’t see any insoles in this picture.

As others have indicated, newspaper works beautifully for drying out shoes, and when I walked there was always a box of newspaper around on a rainy day. I wonder now, with more and more people reading news online, how abundant newspapers are these days; they are certainly not abundant anymore where I live.
Well, pilgrims, we tired the newspaper fix the day and all night before and since we are clever pilgrims, we rotated the radiator shoes 😍🚶🏼‍♀️Buen Camino all
 
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zzotte

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2012 Camino Frances, 2014 Lourdes to SDC, 2016 Camino del Norte
Of course I did read all the comments ( way too many) anyway here is my two cents, I found that walking the Camino with a proper fitted shoes, NON water proof and carrying at least a 6 pairs of socks it’s the best, shoes dries faster while walking ( after stops raining) LOL with a clean dry pair of socks :)
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ),Via San Francesco(2017) Camino Portugese (2018 )Camino Ingles(2019) CF
From our experience, If you encounter a significant rain day there is very little you can do to keep your feet dry. Rain suits also keep body moisture in and makes walking horrible, rain ponchos pretty much makes sure you will be wet from the knees down. Trying to waterproof your boots will make your feet sweat boot and could lead to blisters. The only time we ever had any issues was on the Aragonese Way. We have been very fortunate. Just remember newspapers will dry your boots out overnight.
Except when there is not a newspaper or paper towel to be found in the entire small town after 8 straight days of rain on the CF...lol It was horrific, but an experience nonetheless. Everyone's hands were like wrinkled corpses and boots were put on wet in the morning...there was little else to do but pray for sun.
 

Karl G

Member
Past OR future Camino
August and September 2019 - Arles
Technology used to keep moisture out also tends to keep moisture in. Your feet, along with the rest of your body, will sweat as you walk.

Moisture resistant fabrics will ensure that you have to deal with wet feet every day that you walk.
This is a long running area of divergent opinions. I wore Asolo GoreTex hiking shoes and my feet stayed dry, they were never any damper than normal, even in the occasional rain. Perhaps it was the lower cut of shoes vs. boots that allowed my feet to breathe? Of course, shoes vs boots, is a debate for another day - surely one that will be no easier resolved than this one. 🙂

I did have a pair of lightweight, mesh crocs to use had the shoes become soaked but it never happened. They were great to wear when not on the trail.
 
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Heal_to_toe

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Portuguese
Wondering if there are any novel suggestions to keep hiking shoes dry’ish in the raiin
For me, a pair of waterproof walking shoes, whether that be Gore-Tex, OutDry.... or equivalent. Gore-tex gaiters and a poncho. If, halfway through the day the rain appears, the gaiters are quick to get on and vica versa when the rain abates. Small and light in the pack, quick to dry and keeps most of the rain off of your footwear uppers. 👌

Patrick
 
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Heal_to_toe

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Portuguese
Wondering if there are any novel suggestions to keep hiking shoes dry’ish in the raiin
For me, a pair of waterproof walking shoes, whether that be Gore-Tex, OutDry.... or equivalent. Gore-tex gaiters and a poncho. If, halfway through the day the rain appears, the gaiters are quick to get on and vica versa when the rain abates. Small and light in the pack, quick to dry and keeps most of the rain off of your footwear uppers. 👌 Patrick
 

Marcus-UK

Old Git
Past OR future Camino
Camino Ingles 2016 Camino Portuguese 2017
Wondering if there are any novel suggestions to keep hiking shoes dry’ish in the raiin
What type of shoes are you using?
Leather
Suede
Man made Fabric.
Leather and suede you can use proprietary waxes and spray on sealants. I am not sure with man made fabrics.
However if you block water comming in, your perspiration going out will also be blocked. Over a period of time your shoe interior will become damp and smelly.

Ideally you need a shoe that will allow natural perspiration to transpire but block water droplets eg gortex lined shoes.

If your shoe does become waterlogged avoid the temptation to dry out with an air drier or oven. This can ruin the shoe. Use scrunched up newspapers or kitchen tissue to absorb the damp and change after a few hours.
 
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2012, 2015, Portugues 2013, 2019, 2020, Ingles 2014, Norte 2016/2017/2018, Primitivo 2020
Wondering if there are any novel suggestions to keep hiking shoes dry’ish in the raiin
to help dry my boots when particularly wet i carry a few winter 'glove warmer' sachets; this of course to remedy not prevent the moisture; but has been a helpful aid a few times for
 

Heal_to_toe

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Portuguese
Wondering if there are any novel suggestions to keep hiking shoes dry’ish in the raiin
Must say that some of the writers may be getting carried away. If you walk the CF between early May to late September, you may have some cool days, certainly many warm days and a few wet days, particularly the one day in the Pyrenees and the region of Galicia. Some of the writers seem to be describing tropical monsoon conditions. In my opinion this is misleading. It would be unwise to half fill your pack with wet weather gear for the CF. Northern Spain is not a rain forest. Also, the majority of the CF is flat. If it is hot, you may sweat in some short sections where it rises. If it is raining, it won't be hot enough for you to sweat profusely. If heavy rain is forecast for weeks ahead (which I very much doubt), pop into a tienda and purchase an umbrella to augment what you already have.

Patrick
 

alhartman

2005-2017 Delightful 346 days in Spain and France.
Past OR future Camino
2017
It may be urban myth, but coming from years of sea kayaking my understanding is that 'dirt' ruins the water proof/vapor passing abilities of GoreTex. Which has always made me wonder about its use on shoes/boots. There are lots of internet articles on when and how to clean; none seem practical on a long camino. It is somewhat a moot issue for me and my feet as I sweat so much that no vapor passing technology has the capacity to keep my feet dry on a normal walking day. So I am of the school of BagBalm, silk sock, heavy wool sock to keep my skin dry. And sock changes 1-3 times per day on either very hot or very wet conditions.
I gave up trying to stay dry with hours in the rain many years ago. I just want to keep my feet from getting 'macerated' and blister prone. Was in rain gear 13 straight days of LePuy 2013 with no problems. My Altus was my first line of protection from the real gully-washers. My feet were constantly wet but never a blister.
 
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RosemaryMcG

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2016 León a Santiago de Compostela
For me, big mistake wearing expensive waterproof hiking boots. They were fine for hiking here in Canada in the mountains and they were broken in for a year but for some reason I got blisters right away. I had a hard time giving $300 boots away but I did. Super light weight hiking shoes waterproof, good hiking sandals and breathable good walking/hiking shoes, and for good measure waterproof socks as needed. The light waterproof shoes have slightly higher ankle support which I need. Also I found time when slogging through mud often with cow dung thrown in I want something I can walk through these sections. I saw people hugging fences and trees trying to puddle jump these slews. I could walk straight through and I didn't have to wear heavy duty hiking boots. They are the worst I think for this type of terrain. Back home in upper mountain hikes yes but not here.
 

PilgrimPillar

Rota Vicentina, fisherman’s trail, is sweet...
Past OR future Camino
Francigena Sud
Shikoku 88
St Olav Waterways
It’s in reality the opposite

Challenge is not how long the feet stay dry - they get «bath tub» soaked in Gore tex fabric eventually, trust me on that

Challenge is how fast the shoes dry up - Gore tex ones «never» do

Use light weight plastic bag over the socks in a stinge instead

Ultreia🙏🏼

if there are any novel suggestions to keep hiking shoes dry’ish in the raiin
 
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ijerry

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances late Sept 2016
Novel suggestions? If it's very temporary - such as to manage a flooded crossing, then plastic bags over the shoes, or over your socks inside the shoes. For more duration, it depends on the season. Crossing the Pyrenees in April we walked through snow - often into a stream of icy meltwater below a thin layer of snow. I was fine in Goretex boots, arriving in Roncesvalles with dry comfortable feet. My wife wore non-waterproof trainers and within moments was walking with soaking frozen feet — for some hours. Yes, the shoes dried out rapidly after we arrived, and with a change of socks and footwear my wife was fine too. So it might depend on your tolerance for the combination of water and ice. My boots were dry by morning and at no time had a water invasion. Perhaps my feet were protected by two layers of merino socks that wicked away the sweat I don't know, but whether through icy water or ankle-deep mud I had no problems with the boots. I think I would have struggled with trainers whether waterproof or not.
 

Karl G

Member
Past OR future Camino
August and September 2019 - Arles
It’s in reality the opposite

Challenge is not how long the feet stay dry - they get «bath tub» soaked in Gore tex fabric eventually, trust me on that

Challenge is how fast the shoes dry up - Gore tex ones «never» do

Use light weight plastic bag over the socks in a stinge instead

Ultreia🙏🏼
In reality everyone has different feet. Hundreds of miles in Gore-Tex hiking shoes and no such thing as “bath-tub soaked” feet for me. And, I walked through puddles of standing water on dirt and gravel roads without any water seeping in. Never a problem with them drying overnight.
 

PilgrimPillar

Rota Vicentina, fisherman’s trail, is sweet...
Past OR future Camino
Francigena Sud
Shikoku 88
St Olav Waterways
In reality everyone has different feet. Hundreds of miles in Gore-Tex hiking shoes and no such thing as “bath-tub soaked” feet for me. And, I walked through puddles of standing water on dirt and gravel roads without any water seeping in. Never a problem with them drying overnight.
I feel you Karl, I do…

…when the right rainstorm hits….they get soaked from the top in…..I’ve experienced that to that degree….»never Gore tex again»….and by then a overnight dry up is NOT enough…it’s how the membrane works….cause they just do not….sorry Karl…it’s factual…

Another point is warm weather…?.venting feet to prevent excess foot sweat/stretching of skin/avoiding blisters/swelling/promote circulation….

Weight…??

The best cushioning….???

In summary/pro et contra ?

It’s a watershed difference between general advice and personal experience….and in in the end we all make individual desicions..

Video of path in Sicily this autumn ….a syclone hit the south coast, affecting the whole island with overflow/standing water…?...the shoes had to bee on and was glad they where easy to dry up..

I’ve walked with pilgrims that have been a sucess in flip flops even…all under the sun….

Ultreia🙏🏼
 
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Karl G

Member
Past OR future Camino
August and September 2019 - Arles
I feel you Karl, I do…

…when the right rainstorm hits….they get soaked from the top in…..I’ve experienced that to that degree….»never Gore tex again»….and by then a overnight dry up is NOT enough…it’s how the membrane works….cause they just do not….sorry Karl…it’s factual…

Another point is warm weather…?.venting feet to prevent excess foot sweat/stretching of skin/avoiding blisters/swelling/promote circulation….

Weight…??

The best cushioning….???

In summary/pro et contra ?

It’s a watershed difference between general advice and personal experience….and in in the end we all make individual desicions..

Video of path in Sicily this autumn ….a syclone hit the south coast, affecting the whole island with overflow/standing water…?...the shoes had to bee on and was glad they where easy to dry up..

I’ve walked with pilgrims that have been a sucess in flip flops even…all under the sun….

Ultreia🙏🏼
https://fb.watch/aVRrMiAb0B/
…and yet I walked in the September heat wave in France in 2019 without problems. Can’t speak to the right rainstorm as I haven’t had that happen. The rainstorms I walked in didn’t create any problems.

As others have mentioned there are always gaiters to keep rain out and I carried some lightweight mesh Crocs that could have been back-up if needed. Of course, if it rains that hard one can always opt for a rest day as well.

Like I said, everyone’s feet are different. Some have issues with Gore-Tex and some enjoy the benefits. That’s factual.
 
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PilgrimPillar

Rota Vicentina, fisherman’s trail, is sweet...
Past OR future Camino
Francigena Sud
Shikoku 88
St Olav Waterways
…and yet I walked in the September heat wave in France in 2019 without problems. Can’t speak to the right rainstorm as I haven’t had that happen. The rainstorms I walked in didn’t create any problems.

As others have mentioned there are always gaiters to keep rain out and I carried some lightweight mesh Crocs that could have been back-up if needed. Of course, if it rains that hard one can always opt for a rest day as well.

Like I said, everyone’s feet are different. Some have no issues with Gore-Tex and some enjoy the benefits. That’s factual.
All the best Karl….see you in the wind🙏🏼
 

Viva Terlingua

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Partial Frances (2018)
Full Frances 2022 (May-Jun)
…and yet I walked in the September heat wave in France in 2019 without problems. Can’t speak to the right rainstorm as I haven’t had that happen. The rainstorms I walked in didn’t create any problems.

As others have mentioned there are always gaiters to keep rain out and I carried some lightweight mesh Crocs that could have been back-up if needed. Of course, if it rains that hard one can always opt for a rest day as well.

Like I said, everyone’s feet are different. Some have issues with Gore-Tex and some enjoy the benefits. That’s factual.
I recently got a pair of Gortex trail runners and have only worn them in 60 degree dry weather and I can already tell they're not going to work for me. My feet get too sweaty. It's too bad because I really like the shoes otherwise. (They have a non Gortex version but I haven't been able to find it in my size). Unfortunately I've worn them too much to send them back. New Balance Fresh Foam Hierro V6 GTX
 

Viva Terlingua

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Partial Frances (2018)
Full Frances 2022 (May-Jun)
@davebugg Thanks for a great post Dave. Can you provide a link to the goop you use? Also, what is your recommendation for shoe sizing? Buy larger than your normal size? Even if you've been walking a lot before going?
 
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davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
😀 The ‘goop’ is a generic term I use for an ointment that contains both lanolin and a wax based on beeswax or paraffin. This creates a longer lasting wear layer than a petrolatum like Vaseline which is more quickly both rubbed off and absorbed.

If Vaseline is the only available choice, than it requires much more frequent application as you walk.

I never recommend automatically going a size larger. Only a proper fitting can determine if, or by how much to increase a shoe size or width.

Shoes are created on various moulds and ‘lasts’. Manufacturers have leeway to state what their version of a size 9 is, for example.

A leather shoe for work will fit differently to a trail runner for sport. A size 9 in a work shoe could be the effective equivalent to a size 7 trail runner.

Then we have the fact that there can be serious size differences between each outdoor footwear manufacturers trail runner (or boot or hiking shoe). That’s why a wide width New Balance shoe will feel roomier than an Asics or Asolo.

So to get a good fit, each shoe buying expedition benefits from the tips below.
—————
As you go looking for shoe, here are some tips which I have posted before that may help you.
  1. When you go to the store, do so toward the end of the day.... you will have been up on your feet, so that will help with getting the correct fit. Additionally, you will need to wear the same backpack with the same gear you will be carrying... you want this additional weight on you as this will put the same downward pressure on the foot that you will be having while on Camino.
  2. Wear the exact same sock(s) you will be wearing while you are walking on the Camino. And if you have a special insole or orthotic, bring it with you.
  3. At the store, the measuring that will be done on your feet is only to get you in the ballpark for the correct shoe size.
  4. Start by standing up; never measure while sitting. You want the full weight of your body, with the pack on, to put the same pressure on your feet to spread them out as will happen while walking. That alone will increase the volume and size of your feet.
  5. Make sure those 'Camino' socks are on your feet; if you wear socks with liners while walking, do the same thing at the store.
  6. While standing, have someone near to you that you can use to steady yourself. With the measuring device on the ground, step onto the instrument and center all of your weight onto the foot being measured. Do the same for the other foot.
  7. Start with that size, but be aware that both the width and the length need to feel like there is adequate room for your feet. Ideally, like Goldilocks, everything will be just right. But, don't count on it. Be picky.
  8. If you have special insoles or orthotics, put them into any shoe you try on as they will take up space inside the shoe.
  9. When you find what you think will fit you well, you will need to see if your toes have enough clearance. Toes should not be able to be forced to the front of the shoe and touch the shoe. Not even a little. If they do, long walking and downhill grades on the trail or path or road will traumatize the bed of the nail, and that is when toenails can blacken and fall off.
  10. With your shoes tied securely, but not too tight, walk around the store with your pack on. Go up stairs and down stairs, scuff the shoes to the floor so that your feet are forced to do any movement they will do and see if your toes so much as butterfly kiss the front of the shoe. Kick the front of the shoe into a post or stair or wall or someone's shin.... does that make any of your toes touch the front of the shoe? That goes for all the little piggies.
  11. Next, pay attention to the width of the shoe. It shouldn't feel snug on the sides and there should be no rubbing or pressure points at all. They will not go away with "break in". They will create soreness, pain, and blistering. Even if it seems to be tolerable, it is like water torture; as your feet are continually exposed to those pressure points your feet will break down against them bit by bit, and bruising, blisters, and soreness will follow.
  12. You may need to go up a size to a size and a half in length, and go with a wider width to avoid those things I mentioned above. The notion that one avoids blisters by wearing snug footwear has been shown to do just the opposite.
 

FlechaCadaDia

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances ('05)
Hi Austin!
Walked my first Camino in September 21 Portuguese Coastal,Senda Litoral and Variente Espiritual from Porto! (only had one day of really heavy rain)

I agree with Doughnut NZ about getting wet feet i wore non waterproof/breathable Hoka trail runners (really comfy) but my darn tough socks were still wet through from sweat within a couple of hours or so as temps were 25 C! changed them and dried them hanging on my pack!

I wore waterproof socks in the rain which were surprisingly good at there job and kept my feet dry through hours of rain. When it stopped i changed my socks and in about an hour of walking my Hokas had dried out!
Here in the UK its winter and i wear goretex boots; but i have other options in footwear while they take a couple of days to dry!
I sent the vid below to my family as i was fed up in the rain ( please excuse the language);my gear did work well and i would happily use it on my next Camino it was hot humid and wet so i needed a moan!!!!
All the best
Woody
View attachment 117215
What were your waterproof socks?
 
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