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Historical Importance of Ribeiro Wine

Past OR future Camino
From Braga to Santiago
I thought I'd share a couple of Blog Post's especially for my British and American friends who like history and wine as it's about Ribeiro wines.

See https://englishresourcecentre.com/e...n-of-ribeiro-wine-ribadavia-to-great-britain/


Judging by the amount of international prizes Ribeiro wines are achieving some of us might like to learn more about what all the fuss is about. Those of you who do like a wine probably have already tried a Ribeiro wine usually a white wine with a mix of grapes but with treixadura being the star grape. The are generally light, fruity,fresh,dry, aromatic and lower in alcohol than many other types and cheap but tasty so particularly appealing to the discerning pilgrim! The reds are gaining recognition too and with over 100 different white and red grape varieties most unique to Ribeiro it's worth shouting about.

But my main purpose for reaching out is to try to convey to everyone the historical importance of Ribeiro wines, its relationship to the Camino de Santiago and its historical importance especially in the USA and UK. These are mainly covered in the detailed Blog Posts. But by way of summarising every year in the decade from 1389 to 1399 several English ships with pilgrims arrived at the Port of A Coruña (for example 25 in 1395), that what they used to bring back the most was wine. Despite not being entirely sure of its origin, we can be pretty confident that it was indeed from Ribeiro, as it is one of the few wines with enough body to survive the journey. The first documented record was from 1527 and during the following centuries wine sales boomed. From the 19th century vine diseases meant a long decline in the fortunes of Ribeiro. But from 1932 with the formation of the Ribeiro Denomination of Origin (although there was regulation of wine producers here from 1589) and especially more recently things are back again on the up.

Routes from Ribeiro to Santiago (and other Galician Ports) was established from the 11th Century to transport the wine, usually by mules. Monasteries like San Martiño de Pinario in Santiago were major instigators along with monks who resided in Monasteries in the Ribeiro area like at San Clodio in Leiro. This wine route was also used by pilgrims who came from Portugal via Braga so perhaps it's no coincidence that the fortunes of both the Camino from Braga that passes through Ribeiro whose capital is Ribadavia and its wines are looking positive. I'll drink to that !!
 
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dick bird

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
Despite not being entirely sure of its origin, we can be pretty confident that it was indeed from Ribeiro, as it is one of the few wines with enough body to survive the journey.
Indeed. Wines from Portugal were evidently less robust (or the journey was longer) because it was at around this time that the English throne lost its possessions in France and was forced to import wine from Iberia. Wines from Oporto were cut with brandy to stop them going bad. This idea vastly appealed to the English aristocracy who developed a powerful liking for what was termed 'port wine'.
 

dick bird

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
I thought I'd share a couple of Blog Post's especially for my British and American friends who like history and wine as it's about Ribeiro wines.

See https://englishresourcecentre.com/e...n-of-ribeiro-wine-ribadavia-to-great-britain/


Judging by the amount of international prizes Ribeiro wines are achieving some of us might like to learn more about what all the fuss is about. Those of you who do like a wine probably have already tried a Ribeiro wine usually a white wine with a mix of grapes but with treixadura being the star grape. The are generally light, fruity,fresh,dry, aromatic and lower in alcohol than many other types and cheap but tasty so particularly appealing to the discerning pilgrim! The reds are gaining recognition too and with over 100 different white and red grape varieties most unique to Ribeiro it's worth shouting about.

But my main purpose for reaching out is to try to convey to everyone the historical importance of Ribeiro wines, its relationship to the Camino de Santiago and its historical importance especially in the USA and UK. These are mainly covered in the detailed Blog Posts. But by way of summarising every year in the decade from 1389 to 1399 several English ships with pilgrims arrived at the Port of A Coruña (for example 25 in 1395), that what they used to bring back the most was wine. Despite not being entirely sure of its origin, we can be pretty confident that it was indeed from Ribeiro, as it is one of the few wines with enough body to survive the journey. The first documented record was from 1527 and during the following centuries wine sales boomed. From the 19th century vine diseases meant a long decline in the fortunes of Ribeiro. But from 1932 with the formation of the Ribeiro Denomination of Origin (although there was regulation of wine producers here from 1589) and especially more recently things are back again on the up.

Routes from Ribeiro to Santiago (and other Galician Ports) was established from the 11th Century to transport the wine, usually by mules. Monasteries like San Martiño de Pinario in Santiago were major instigators along with monks who resided in Monasteries in the Ribeiro area like at San Clodio in Leiro. This wine route was also used by pilgrims who came from Portugal via Braga so perhaps it's no coincidence that the fortunes of both the Camino from Braga that passes through Ribeiro whose capital is Ribadavia and its wines are looking positive. I'll drink to that !!
And let's not forget the excellent Mencía. There are not many places in Sydney where you can buy it, but I know most of them.
 
Past OR future Camino
From Braga to Santiago
And let's not forget the excellent Mencía. There are not many places in Sydney where you can buy it, but I know most of them.
Yes there are some fine mencia wines especially from D.O. Ribeira Sacra, Valdeorras & Monterrei in Galicia and in Bierzo too normally oak matured there at higher altitudes. We also cultivate the mencia grape in Ribeiro. In fact, this year the Spanish Wine Tasters Union awarded the winery Mónica Albor the prize for the best, young red wine in Spain! The best white wine in Spain was also a Ribeiro!! See https://www.lavozdegalicia.es/notic...egun-premios-baco/00031626187060990277853.htm
 
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