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Hokas

Espee84

...
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 2018
VdlP 2019
2020 Hatching plans
Fast approaching my next camino and struggling to find shoes that fit. My trusty Keens give me very hot feet so looking for something lighter and more breathable.

I have wide feet. Currently looking at Hokas as they come in wide fit too.

Questions:
1. Challenger vs speedgoat (vs bondi/ Clifton which look to be more suited to roads)?
2. Are they hard wearing enough? The soles on the speedgoats look similar to salomon speedcross which I’ve been advised to avoid as the soles wear down rapidly on road surfaces.
3. Are they true to size? (I am women’s EU40)

Thanks for help. I can’t be the only person in the world who can’t get outdoor shoes that fit comfortably! (I have literally tried almost every other brand).
 

linkster

Nunca dejes de creer!
Camino(s) past & future
CF (17) Sarria - Portomarín
CF (17) SJPdP - SdC
CF (18) SJPdP - Fisterra
CP (19) Porto - Muxia
I wore the Hoka One Bondi 6 last year on the CF. I have wide feet. I bought them 1.5 sizes larger than my actual foot size. I maybe could have gotten by with 1 size larger. The outers did not show any real signs of wear including the sole. However, I did wear holes on the inside vertical back heel along the achilles (back of heel cup), but I always do. I do think they can last the entire CF, but will need to be replaced at the end of your trip. 500 miles is about there lifespan.

I am now wearing some Altra Olympus 3.0. Kindof similar cushioning, but I think the toe box is a little more roomy. I wore through one pair training, and have downsized so that I am only 1 size larger than my normal shoe size.
 

gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CFx2, CPx1
The Speedgoats might just last, altho I have my doubts.
The "Vibram" lugs on the soles are, I think, designed for traction on slippery surfaces (evidenced by their 'sqeeking' on tiled/wooded floors), rather than for long distance walking. Mine have worn considerably on training walks.

I always buy one size larger shoes, 1/2 size larger if I can get wide fitting model.
I fine tune fitting using after-market inner soles, trying differing lacing techniques ("Ladder" lacing is a favourite) and varying sock thicknesses.
Regards
Gerard
 

Dorpie

RIP 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia 2013
Camino Frances May 2015, July 2017, October 2019
Hi @Espee84 seems like we go in for similar kit. When exactly are you leaving? If it's at a time when the weather is likely to be drier I'd recommend Keen Arroyo II's. Not pretty but very comfortable, cool and due to its sandal/shoe hybrid design actually not too bad when there is a little rain. Only downside for me was that they weren't super durable, after about 800 miles (1250kms) they were pretty much finished.
 

CaminanteLento

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
May (2019)
I have worn Hokas for over a year now and logged almost 600 miles of walking in them. I have wide feet also. (Actually the right foot is wide due to a foot surgery and hallux rigidus. The left is normal width. Ergo, I wear wides on both.)

The Speedgoat doesn’t come in Wide, so that option may not work for you. However, the Challenger ATRs come in Wide and I have worn a pair for about 50 miles (breaking them in and saving them for Camino in May). The Challenger is a nice shoe for trails and road, but not as plush as my preferred shoe, Bondi 6. For me, I need a more cushioned sole and the Bondi exceeds my expectations. Having said that, the Bondi is a road shoe and easy trails that don’t require a more aggressive tread or stability. What am I planning on taking for my May/June Camino this year? Both. 😁
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
The Bondi 6 fits wide and comes in a wide version, which according to reviews I've read is more like a 2E. Our resident gear expert, @davebugg wears Bondi 6 on camino.
 

Jan_D

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Aragones (2011)
Frances (2012)
Norte (2013, 2014)
Hospitalera (2014)
Portugues (2017)
I'm on my second pair of Hokas, most comfortable shoes I've ever owned. True to size, got them 1/2 size up and they've been great. First pair lasted a Camino and a bit, and only reason I replaced them was because the back heel bit was worn through (similar to what @linkster describes). Such a pity; the inner lining seems to be made of much cheaper material than the rest of the shoe.
 

linkster

Nunca dejes de creer!
Camino(s) past & future
CF (17) Sarria - Portomarín
CF (17) SJPdP - SdC
CF (18) SJPdP - Fisterra
CP (19) Porto - Muxia
I put some Engo heel patches in my Altras in an attempt to eliminate or reduce the wear on the inside heel. I wear orthotics which might exacerbate the wear on the inside of the heel. The heel patches are rated for 300 miles. :D:cool:
 

Jan_D

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Aragones (2011)
Frances (2012)
Norte (2013, 2014)
Hospitalera (2014)
Portugues (2017)
I put some Engo heel patches in my Altras in an attempt to eliminate or reduce the wear on the inside heel. I wear orthotics which might exacerbate the wear on the inside of the heel. The heel patches are rated for 300 miles. :D:cool:

I was actually going to ask whether anyone had ideas for a fix... so thanks, will try this out! 😃

p.s. this popped up as a recommended "older thread", so don't think we're the only ones: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...g-material-of-their-hokas-disintegrate.58960/
 

Re-tired

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances
Hoka Stinson ATR4 are a great choice also. I've put well over 600 miles on one pair and I'm on the second now. Most comfortable shoe I've ever owned. The cushion is similar to Bondi's but the shoe is built for all terrain.
 

Espee84

...
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 2018
VdlP 2019
2020 Hatching plans
Thanks all for advice. Hokas on order - bit of a pain having to order online, guess sizes and send back the pairs that don’t fit... Outdoor shops near me (big city in UK) just don’t keep a good range of sizes and styles in stock (usually they don’t have half sizes or wide fit). Is this the same in other countries or are we all online now?
 

WalkingJane

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May and October 2015
(2015 October)
June 2018 Portuguese
Fast approaching my next camino and struggling to find shoes that fit. My trusty Keens give me very hot feet so looking for something lighter and more breathable.

I have wide feet. Currently looking at Hokas as they come in wide fit too.

Questions:
1. Challenger vs speedgoat (vs bondi/ Clifton which look to be more suited to roads)?
2. Are they hard wearing enough? The soles on the speedgoats look similar to salomon speedcross which I’ve been advised to avoid as the soles wear down rapidly on road surfaces.
3. Are they true to size? (I am women’s EU40)

Thanks for help. I can’t be the only person in the world who can’t get outdoor shoes that fit comfortably! (I have literally tried almost every other brand).

I use Keen sandals. Camino, and here at home.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Thanks all for advice. Hokas on order - bit of a pain having to order online, guess sizes and send back the pairs that don’t fit... Outdoor shops near me (big city in UK) just don’t keep a good range of sizes and styles in stock (usually they don’t have half sizes or wide fit). Is this the same in other countries or are we all online now?

When you receive them, here is a guideline to help determine if they have a good fit. The nice thing about online ordering, is that you can take your time wearing them to make sure they work for your and feel good.

Although the directions are focused on someone at a store, they work just fine at home, too. :)

---------------------------------------------------------------

The most important theme for achieving a proper fit is: You do not choose a shoe based on measurements, you buy a shoe based on its Fit N Feel regardless of instrument measurements.
  1. When you go to the store, do so toward the end of the day.... you will have been up on your feet, so that will help with getting the correct fit. Additionally, you will need to wear the same backpack with the same gear you will be carrying... you want this additional weight on you as this will put the same downward pressure on the foot that you will be having while on Camino.
  2. Wear the exact same sock(s) you will be wearing while you are walking on the Camino. And if you have a special insole or orthotic, bring it with you.
  3. At the store, the measuring that will be done on your feet is only to get you in the ballpark for the correct shoe size.
  4. Start by standing up; never measure while sitting. You want the full weight of your body, with the pack on, to put the same pressure on your feet to spread them out as will happen while walking. That alone will increase the volume and size of your feet.
  5. Make sure those 'Camino' socks are on your feet; if you wear socks with liners while walking, do the same thing at the store.
  6. While standing, have someone near to you that you can use to steady yourself. With the measuring device on the ground, step onto the instrument and center all of your weight onto the foot being measured. Do the same for the other foot.
  7. Start with that size, but be aware that both the width and the length need to feel like there is adequate room for your feet. Ideally, like Goldilocks, everything will be just right. But, don't count on it. Be picky.
  8. If you have special insoles or orthotics, put them into any shoe you try on as they will take up space inside the shoe.
  9. When you find what you think will fit you well, you will need to see if your toes have enough clearance. Toes should not be able to be forced to the front of the shoe and touch the shoe. Not even a little. If they do, long walking and downhill grades on the trail or path or road will traumatize the bed of the nail, and that is when toenails can blacken and fall off.
  10. With your shoes tied securely, but not too tight, walk around the store with your pack on. Go up stairs and down stairs, scuff the shoes to the floor so that your feet are forced to do any movement they will do and see if your toes so much as butterfly kiss the front of the shoe. Kick the front of the shoe into a post or stair or wall or someone's shin.... does that make any of your toes touch the front of the shoe? That goes for all the little piggies.
  11. Next, pay attention to the width of the shoe. It shouldn't feel snug on the sides and there should be no rubbing or pressure points at all. They will not go away with "break in". They will create soreness, pain, and blistering. Even if it seems to be tolerable, it is like water torture; as your feet are continually exposed to those pressure points your feet will break down against them bit by bit, and bruising, blisters, and soreness will follow.
  12. You may need to go up a size to a size and a half in length, and go with a wider width to avoid those things I mentioned above. The notion that one avoids blisters by wearing snug footwear has been shown to do just the opposite.
 

Espee84

...
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 2018
VdlP 2019
2020 Hatching plans
I use Keen sandals. Camino, and here at home.
Yes - I have keen sandals too. This is my back up option but haven’t got the courage to take sandals alone as I’m not properly used to walking in them.
 

josephmcclain

Active Member
Fast approaching my next camino and struggling to find shoes that fit. My trusty Keens give me very hot feet so looking for something lighter and more breathable.

I have wide feet. Currently looking at Hokas as they come in wide fit too.

Questions:
1. Challenger vs speedgoat (vs bondi/ Clifton which look to be more suited to roads)?
2. Are they hard wearing enough? The soles on the speedgoats look similar to salomon speedcross which I’ve been advised to avoid as the soles wear down rapidly on road surfaces.
3. Are they true to size? (I am women’s EU40)

Thanks for help. I can’t be the only person in the world who can’t get outdoor shoes that fit comfortably! (I have literally tried almost every other brand).
I love my HOKAS!! Second pair. Wore Cliftons on my first Camino Frances and now have Bondis which are wider in the toes and I love them. Amazing. My experience is that they do NOT wear down. I have also bought a pair of HOKA hiking shoes which I also like very much and will wear on the Primitivo in early May.
 

shefollowsshells

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several alone and with children
Fast approaching my next camino and struggling to find shoes that fit. My trusty Keens give me very hot feet so looking for something lighter and more breathable.

I have wide feet. Currently looking at Hokas as they come in wide fit too.

Questions:
1. Challenger vs speedgoat (vs bondi/ Clifton which look to be more suited to roads)?
2. Are they hard wearing enough? The soles on the speedgoats look similar to salomon speedcross which I’ve been advised to avoid as the soles wear down rapidly on road surfaces.
3. Are they true to size? (I am women’s EU40)

Thanks for help. I can’t be the only person in the world who can’t get outdoor shoes that fit comfortably! (I have literally tried almost every other brand).
sitting at a rest stop for lunch in Portugal and hiking in Hoka Stinson. I’m not certain I can do long distance hikes in anything but.
Especially in Portugal with the time and rocks.
 

Espee84

...
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 2018
VdlP 2019
2020 Hatching plans
Thanks all. No luck with finding Hokas to fit unfortunately. The women’s ones are too narrow and the wide fit are a funny shape and pinch on my little toe as they bend. (Someone has commented on bullet shaped shoes and diagonal shaped toes somewhere before). So frustrating all this ordering online and sending back. Will try men’s sizes next time.

For info they do look like super shoes. The soles are comfortable and look to be hard wearing. The challengers were a better fit for me than bondis and they have better arch support.

In the meantime I will stick with my not-so-breathable, heavier Keen’s. At least they will be a bit more waterproof in the rain. (The downpours in England over the last few days reminded me of this!)

Muchas gracias.
 

sjdaotearoa

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo (2018)
Hoka Stinson ATR4 are a great choice also. I've put well over 600 miles on one pair and I'm on the second now. Most comfortable shoe I've ever owned. The cushion is similar to Bondi's but the shoe is built for all terrain.
I agree the Stintson are great. I did the Primitivo in them and am still using them. The only negative I had about them is they were a bit slider on cobblestones - I guess less grip due too the shape. I’m a woman with size EU42 so I had to get the men’s version of them.
 

Eleonore

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese
Ingles
I wore Clifton 2 on the Portugues, and they were great. Wore Stinson 3 on the Ingles and they were a bit tight. Switched to Keen sandals and had no problems.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Spring 2016: Camino Frances, Finisterre and Muxia
April 2019: Frances, Salvador, Primitivo
You may want to try Altra Timps or Lone Peaks if the Hokas do not work. They have a wide toe box. I wear a size 8 in Keens but a 9 in Altras.

Whatever you wear, I hope they work well for you.
 

paul thibault

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
future-june 2016
I have foot issues ( metatarsalgia ), and my Podiatrist did recommend Hokas, I am starting the Camino Frances on 24- April and I am questioning whether I really need to buy shoes which are waterproof. Hokas Speedgoat 3 do come in GTX (goretex) also. Is it necessary to wear waterproof shoes during the period starting late April??? If yes I will go with these. Thank you
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
Either way your feet will get wet: sweat or rain water. You'll sweat every day, it likely won't rain every day, so I vote for breathable non-gortex.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
Many of us do it. Wool socks will keep wet feet warm. Non-gortex will dry out better over-night.

May I suggest, do a search for some posts by @davebugg who is a gear expert and has posted some detailed info on wet footwear recently in another thread.
 

Eleonore

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese
Ingles
Yes but how much of a problem is it to walk with breathable shoes when its rainy and muddy?
I walked with the Keen sandals in rain and mud almost daily. By morning they were dry. And, if you have the luxury of a hairdryer 😎 they will be dry in minutes
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: 2016, Del Norte: (2018), Finisterre: (2018), Olvidado (to Bonar): (2019): Bonar on 2020
Fast approaching my next camino and struggling to find shoes that fit. My trusty Keens give me very hot feet so looking for something lighter and more breathable.

I have wide feet. Currently looking at Hokas as they come in wide fit too.

Questions:
1. Challenger vs speedgoat (vs bondi/ Clifton which look to be more suited to roads)?
2. Are they hard wearing enough? The soles on the speedgoats look similar to salomon speedcross which I’ve been advised to avoid as the soles wear down rapidly on road surfaces.
3. Are they true to size? (I am women’s EU40)

Thanks for help. I can’t be the only person in the world who can’t get outdoor shoes that fit comfortably! (I have literally tried almost every other brand).
I am walking the Olvidado in the Speedgoat. Today will be our second day. I will follow up on this and let you know how they are holding up.
 

bthomas

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: May 2019
I also have had problems with finding shoes for my wide foot.

After 2 pairs of Hoka ATRs that served me well, I switched to Altra Lone Peak 4. Altra has a wider toe box. I just got a pair of Altra Olympus. Just the little bit I worn the Olympus (it has more cushion than the Lone Peak), it feels like I'm walking on clouds.
 

bthomas

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: May 2019
BTW, both the Hokas and Altras dry quickly, much quicker that the "waterproof" shoes once they get soaked.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
I've been wearing Merrells on my caminos, but I've read so much about the Hokas on these forums that I had to give them a try. They don't sell them at the outdoor/adventure equipment stores where we usually shop, so I looked up where they were and went to a running shoe store that had them. Wow! What a difference. I can see why people have been recommending them. My wife has wide feet and a narrower heel so she often has trouble finding shoes that fit but they worked for her, too.
 

RumAndChupacabras

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jul-Sept 2019: Six weeks in Northern Spain.
Apr 2018 Asturias
May 2016 CP: Portuguese
I am walking the Olvidado in the Speedgoat. Today will be our second day...
I just learned of Camino Olvidado today and am very interested. I'm going to be following your posts. Buen Camino!
 

Cary

Member
Camino(s) past & future
del Norte/Primitivo May 2019
You may want to try Altra Timps or Lone Peaks if the Hokas do not work. They have a wide toe box.

I used to wear Hokas and loved them but I kept having problems with toe damage so I switched to Altra Lone Peak for trail running. They solved my continual lost toe nail issue from all the trauma running downhill. They are not to be transitioned into too quickly though as they are a zero balance shoe which means they do not have an elevated heel. This can create sore achilles and calves so a gradual approach is recommended. I have switched to the Altra Timp now and am loving them! A little narrower than the Lone Peak and a bit more cushion.
 

Iriebabel

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2018
Camino Del Norte & part of Lebaniego 2019
Thanks all. No luck with finding Hokas to fit unfortunately. The women’s ones are too narrow and the wide fit are a funny shape and pinch on my little toe as they bend. (Someone has commented on bullet shaped shoes and diagonal shaped toes somewhere before). So frustrating all this ordering online and sending back. Will try men’s sizes next time.

For info they do look like super shoes. The soles are comfortable and look to be hard wearing. The challengers were a better fit for me than bondis and they have better arch support.

In the meantime I will stick with my not-so-breathable, heavier Keen’s. At least they will be a bit more waterproof in the rain. (The downpours in England over the last few days reminded me of this!)

Muchas gracias.
I’m on the Norte currently I ave a major heel spur on my right and wear a metal brace on my left knee. I could not walk without the HOKA Tor hi waterproof...they fit true to size but if you need more room go half size up. Last year I had Lowa aeox gortex no issues just needed more padding. HOKA tors are working great and my feet are dry no issues very comfortable I pad the heelspur with moleskin and tape it along with superfeet orange insoles With Wright socks double lined socks . Good luck
 

James X

Caminhos with a h
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho Central Português: October 2017
Caminho: Coastal / Litoral / Lost: September 2018
When you receive them, here is a guideline to help determine if they have a good fit. The nice thing about online ordering, is that you can take your time wearing them to make sure they work for your and feel good.

Although the directions are focused on someone at a store, they work just fine at home, too. :)

---------------------------------------------------------------

The most important theme for achieving a proper fit is: You do not choose a shoe based on measurements, you buy a shoe based on its Fit N Feel regardless of instrument measurements.
  1. When you go to the store, do so toward the end of the day.... you will have been up on your feet, so that will help with getting the correct fit. Additionally, you will need to wear the same backpack with the same gear you will be carrying... you want this additional weight on you as this will put the same downward pressure on the foot that you will be having while on Camino.
  2. Wear the exact same sock(s) you will be wearing while you are walking on the Camino. And if you have a special insole or orthotic, bring it with you.
  3. At the store, the measuring that will be done on your feet is only to get you in the ballpark for the correct shoe size.
  4. Start by standing up; never measure while sitting. You want the full weight of your body, with the pack on, to put the same pressure on your feet to spread them out as will happen while walking. That alone will increase the volume and size of your feet.
  5. Make sure those 'Camino' socks are on your feet; if you wear socks with liners while walking, do the same thing at the store.
  6. While standing, have someone near to you that you can use to steady yourself. With the measuring device on the ground, step onto the instrument and center all of your weight onto the foot being measured. Do the same for the other foot.
  7. Start with that size, but be aware that both the width and the length need to feel like there is adequate room for your feet. Ideally, like Goldilocks, everything will be just right. But, don't count on it. Be picky.
  8. If you have special insoles or orthotics, put them into any shoe you try on as they will take up space inside the shoe.
  9. When you find what you think will fit you well, you will need to see if your toes have enough clearance. Toes should not be able to be forced to the front of the shoe and touch the shoe. Not even a little. If they do, long walking and downhill grades on the trail or path or road will traumatize the bed of the nail, and that is when toenails can blacken and fall off.
  10. With your shoes tied securely, but not too tight, walk around the store with your pack on. Go up stairs and down stairs, scuff the shoes to the floor so that your feet are forced to do any movement they will do and see if your toes so much as butterfly kiss the front of the shoe. Kick the front of the shoe into a post or stair or wall or someone's shin.... does that make any of your toes touch the front of the shoe? That goes for all the little piggies.
  11. Next, pay attention to the width of the shoe. It shouldn't feel snug on the sides and there should be no rubbing or pressure points at all. They will not go away with "break in". They will create soreness, pain, and blistering. Even if it seems to be tolerable, it is like water torture; as your feet are continually exposed to those pressure points your feet will break down against them bit by bit, and bruising, blisters, and soreness will follow.
  12. You may need to go up a size to a size and a half in length, and go with a wider width to avoid those things I mentioned above. The notion that one avoids blisters by wearing snug footwear has been shown to do just the opposite.
What great advice
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I love Hoka's and on five various caminos they were my favorite of the lot...like walking on marshmellows!
 

tjb1013

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2017)
Portugués (2019)
My experience:

Hoka Speedgoat 4 wide (non waterproof version) is wider than the Bondi 6 wide.

The new Bondi 7 has an "ultra wide" version that I've not tried.

I prefer the Bondi for its cushioning (although the Speedgoat has plenty), which is great for hard surfaces, the Speedgoat for its Vibram sole and lugs.

I wore the Tor Ultra Hi WP on two Caminos, but they got very hot.
 

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