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Hostel or B n B

Camino(s) past & future
CF 2013- 2015-2017
CP 2019
We are flying to Lisbon and spending 2 day before taking train to Porto. Where should we stay and is there easy transport from Lisbon to the airport?
Thx for your imput
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
Your question is a bit confusing. By "hostel" do you mean a multi-bed dormitory (hostel in English), or a small hotel ("hostal" in Spain)? Is B&B the only alternative? I'm guessing that you are just looking for a good/recommended place to stay in Lisbon. But why would you want easy transport from Lisbon to the airport if you are taking the train to Porto? o_O Maybe the other way around .
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
We are flying to Lisbon and spending 2 day before taking train to Porto. Where should we stay and is there easy transport from Lisbon to the airport?
Thx for your imput
Find with google hotel de Chile in Lisbon. In the heart of the center.
A bus goes from the airport to "Rossio" the trainstation in the center(btw not the start of your train to Porto)
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2013- 2015-2017
CP 2019
Yes C clearly, I did confuse you and me! Let’s try again. Is the train station in the city or close and a good suggestion for a semi private room easy access to town and the train station.
There. Did I do better ?
 

Terry Callery

Chi Walker
Camino(s) past & future
"Portuguese Camino - In Search of the Infinite Moment" Amazon/Kindle books authored
"Slow Camino"
This is from the book I just wrote about walking the Portuguese route in February from Lisbon.
The Poets Inn boasts the best location of any hostel in the city of Lisbon, surrounded by small art galleries, alternative designer décor shops, nightclubs, obscure concert venues, and trendy restaurants where customers can be found chain-smoking at the outside tables. I took the subway from the Lisbon Airport, switching from the red line to the green line and exiting from the metro underground at the Largo do Chiado exit. I walked in the wrong direction for two blocks before asking a Lisbon policeman for directions: he pointed me back in the direction from which I had come, toward A Brasileira, or the “Brazilian Lady Café.” Later, I was to learn that Café A Brasileira was one of the oldest and most famous cafés in Lisbon. A native of Brazil, Adriano Telles opened his shop in 1905 in order to sell “genuine Brazilian coffee,” which was an underappreciated luxury at the time. Telles offered a free cup of strong espresso-like coffee called a “bica” to any customer buying a kilo of ground beans. In time, the café became a nexus for intellectuals, poets, writers, and academics. As I approached the café, I could see the bronzed figure of the famous Portuguese writer Fernando Pessoa among the outdoor tables in front of A Brasileira’s iconic façade. The sculpture includes a bronzed table and chair as well as Pessoa sitting in his usual spot where he was known to drink absinthe as he wrote. Both the theater and the school of fine arts (Faculdade de Belas-Artes) are nearby, giving the trendy area a decidedly upbeat, youthful, and bohemian flavor.
The Poets Inn takes up the fourth and fifth floors of the same building that houses Café A Brasileira on the ground floor. There are shared accommodations in small dorm rooms (two, four, and six people to a room) running sixteen to twenty euros. However, on the fourth floor there are pension-style rooms with shared baths where I took a private room for forty euros. I had discovered on my Camino Francés that I could not get a good night’s sleep in a dorm room with other people. At my age, a full night’s sleep is pretty much a requirement after a day of walking twenty kilometers. After checking in, I was given a little tour around the hostel, which had photos and paintings and posters of famous writers hanging everywhere. I liked the literary theme and the feeling that I had just become a member of a club.
Terence Callery
 

Sixwheeler

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Arles Route (2013/2014 onwards)
Transport from Lisbon to the airport is very easy indeed, use the Metro. It's cheap, efficient and straightforward to use. I seem to remember that there are some YouTube videos explaining how to use it. Lisbon is great by the way.
 

petitewalker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014 fall), Camino Portuguese (fall 2017)
This is from the book I just wrote about walking the Portuguese route in February from Lisbon.
The Poets Inn boasts the best location of any hostel in the city of Lisbon, surrounded by small art galleries, alternative designer décor shops, nightclubs, obscure concert venues, and trendy restaurants where customers can be found chain-smoking at the outside tables. I took the subway from the Lisbon Airport, switching from the red line to the green line and exiting from the metro underground at the Largo do Chiado exit. I walked in the wrong direction for two blocks before asking a Lisbon policeman for directions: he pointed me back in the direction from which I had come, toward A Brasileira, or the “Brazilian Lady Café.” Later, I was to learn that Café A Brasileira was one of the oldest and most famous cafés in Lisbon. A native of Brazil, Adriano Telles opened his shop in 1905 in order to sell “genuine Brazilian coffee,” which was an underappreciated luxury at the time. Telles offered a free cup of strong espresso-like coffee called a “bica” to any customer buying a kilo of ground beans. In time, the café became a nexus for intellectuals, poets, writers, and academics. As I approached the café, I could see the bronzed figure of the famous Portuguese writer Fernando Pessoa among the outdoor tables in front of A Brasileira’s iconic façade. The sculpture includes a bronzed table and chair as well as Pessoa sitting in his usual spot where he was known to drink absinthe as he wrote. Both the theater and the school of fine arts (Faculdade de Belas-Artes) are nearby, giving the trendy area a decidedly upbeat, youthful, and bohemian flavor.
The Poets Inn takes up the fourth and fifth floors of the same building that houses Café A Brasileira on the ground floor. There are shared accommodations in small dorm rooms (two, four, and six people to a room) running sixteen to twenty euros. However, on the fourth floor there are pension-style rooms with shared baths where I took a private room for forty euros. I had discovered on my Camino Francés that I could not get a good night’s sleep in a dorm room with other people. At my age, a full night’s sleep is pretty much a requirement after a day of walking twenty kilometers. After checking in, I was given a little tour around the hostel, which had photos and paintings and posters of famous writers hanging everywhere. I liked the literary theme and the feeling that I had just become a member of a club.
Terence Callery
We also stayed in the private room at the Poets Inn with an amazing view of the Porto Cathedral. Loved this place with its literary vibe and super location.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
If you are going to be staying in central Lisbon for a couple of days, you will want to get on the train to Porto at the Santa Apolonia train station. It is much closer to downtown than the newer (Calatrava designed) Oriente station.

I love the Lisbon metro and use it a lot when I am there, but would never use it from the airport. It is cheap, but it is a very long ride. It makes the most circuituous route possible, 9 stops on the red line, change in Alameda, 5 more stops to Baixa-Chiado. A cab to Chiado (where your hostel is) would cost around 12-15 euros. It is true that taxi drivers at the Lisbon airport have been known to cheat unsuspecting tourists, so I guess you have to be prepared for how you deal with that. It is not infrequent, I have to admit.
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
If you are going to be staying in central Lisbon for a couple of days, you will want to get on the train to Porto at the Santa Apolonia train station. It is much closer to downtown than the newer (Calatrava designed) Oriente station.

I love the Lisbon metro and use it a lot when I am there, but would never use it from the airport. It is cheap, but it is a very long ride. It makes the most circuituous route possible, 9 stops on the red line, change in Alameda, 5 more stops to Baixa-Chiado. A cab to Chiado (where your hostel is) would cost around 12-15 euros. It is true that taxi drivers at the Lisbon airport have been known to cheat unsuspecting tourists, so I guess you have to be prepared for how you deal with that. It is not infrequent, I have to admit.
So Laurie, that's why we take the airportbus to Rossio allways when we are in Lisbon.
Abraço e bom caminho
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
So Laurie, that's why we take the airportbus to Rossio allways when we are in Lisbon.
Abraço e bom caminho
I have never taken that bus, here is some info.

https://www.aerobus.pt/en-GB/Home-2.aspx Most tourists will take bus number 1.

It’s 7.20 euros for two people to the center and a 40 minute, not very direct, ride. Cheaper (about half what a cab would cost) but much longer. But I have to say it’s a nice scenic route the bus takes from the airport to get down to the center.
 

Stephen F.

carpintero de Colorado
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho Português 2015
Via de la Plata 2016
You might consider Pensao Londres, Rua D. Pedro V 53, 2, Misericordia, € 55 / night. It's a great location, in the Bairro Alto, very near the top of the Finicular, with an excellent breakfast, very clean and nice rooms. I stayed there on my way home from my Camino.
 

Stephen F.

carpintero de Colorado
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho Português 2015
Via de la Plata 2016
I would take a taxi from the airport if you are going anywhere near downtown. I have done it numerous times and € 10 always covered the fare (I usually tip a little too).
 

Pilger99

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
addicted since 1999 (Aragones, CF), lots of caminos in Spain and Portugal since then
I do not recomment hotels, even if I liked them, since I don't know what you're really looking for. You can have a cheap hostel with many beds separated by a curtain in one room or even a 5 star hotel suite. Make your own choice! A hotel booking site usually shows you the location, distances, opinions of many others and of course prices. If that's absolutely not yours, ask your local travel agent.

Moving around:
If you choose your accomodation in the city centre you may only need to go there from the airport and to the train station while leaving. Then a single ride ticket may have the best value.
Usually tourists want to go with the old trams and Santa Justa elevator, which is rather expensive as a single ticket. Buy the 24h tickets for Carris/Metro (6,40€) and you can do as many rides as you want. The so called "zapping" is probably more interessing if you stay a week or so.

If you like to visit a lot of museums Lisboncard (19€/24h) might be better for you. Make your own math.

Moving from Lisbon to Porto can be done by train and bus (rede-expressos ~20€) or even plane, but I doubt that flying to Porto is faster than the 3,5h busride, which let you out in central Porto. The train is perfect to get to the cathedral of Porto (a short walk from Sao Bento station).

Public transport in Portugal often uses electronic cards, which you pay with the first ticket price. Unfortunately you have one for Lisbon, another for Porto, a different for the trains to Braga ... and after some months you need to buy a new one too. A rather complicated system if you move around for some weeks or if you come back the next year. You always have the wrong card :(.
 

Kiwijock

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese Coastal Caminho (2018)
Note the Poets has moved
Same great folk
Lisbon Poets Hostel
R. Heliodoro Salgado 4, 1170-176 Lisboa, Portugal
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Note the Poets has moved
Same great folk
Lisbon Poets Hostel
R. Heliodoro Salgado 4, 1170-176 Lisboa, Portugal
That is a much less centrally located place. Fine neighborhood but far from things you would want to see. Wonder why they moved?

For a cheap, clean, centrally located pension, try Pensao Prata. It’s not a hostel but for those who were going for the double rooms, this is probably comparable.
 

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