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How do you say "Bon camino" in your language?


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#3
I think that in English you would have to say 'Have a good pilgrimage'. Saying 'Buen Camino' or 'Bom Caminho' is so much better I think.

Also could some-one translate into English etc please the phrases:-
Utreia
Suseia
Ondo Ibili

Thank you
HH
 

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falcon269

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yes
#8
Hey. We're just getting ways to say "hello" now!:)Buen caminois more nuanced and specific to the pilgrimage than is "may the road rise." "Good way" is a literal translation in English, but it somehow sounds stilted. "Bon chemin" in French seems to be Camino specific. The generic is "bonne route," which applies to a walk of any sort.

Bona vojo.

ondo ibili - "walk well" (Basque, and you will hear it from the Pyrenees to Pamplona)

ultreia is French, and is a word of encouragement a bit like "bon courage," but also a bit like "rise to the challenge."

animo as you will see often painted on walls in Spain means "encouragement" (I encourage).
 
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falcon269

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#11
For suseia:

Ultreia
or ultreya (from Latin ultra beyond-and-eia-interjection-to move) is a greeting between Pilgrims, also serves to encourage one another in their journeys on foot (or bicycle or horse) by Roads to Santiago.Comes to mean "going beyond", "Go forward", "Hurry, go ahead" (to Santiago de Compostela). At present it is not a very common greeting, the most common being the "good way!".

This Jacobean greeting took the Codex Calixtinus. Appears in Appendix II musical part, within the"Dum pater familias"("As the parent" or "When that good Father"), known as "Song of the Flemish pilgrims" or "Song of Ultreya" anthem or singing pilgrims to Santiago.It appears the stanza:

Herru Santiagu,
Got Santiagu,
E ultreia, and suseia,
Deus adiuva us.

That can be translated as:

Santiago Oh Lord!
Santiago Good Lord!
Eultreya! Euseya!
Protect us, God!
 

Pelegrin

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#14
In the part of Scotland where I come from if it's not a straight forward 'Buen Camino' (because we can learn quickly;)) it would be..................' Goan yerself wee man' (to a male) and 'Goan yerself hen' (to a female).[/quote]

Very interesting:
It seems like a mixture between gaelic (Goan=camino?, that is similar to the gaelic irish from Wayfarer) and an english old dialect (yerself wee man)
 

Iriebabel

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#21
No literal translation in Jamaican Potois (pot-wah) But
Gwan buoy or Gwan Gal (gwaan boy/girl) Meaning “Go on girl/boy” might suffice
Gwan go waak it good fi you (go on go walk it’s good for you)
 

peregrina2000

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#22
Since the average American walks less than 3 miles a day in total steps, and hops in the car to go anywhere further than 1/4 mile away, it is not surprising that we don't have a colloquial phrase for this (well, ok, it's also because the Camino is not in the US).

Totally off topic, but I remember walking the LePuy route and having dinner with a multinational group. Everyone was supposed to say "bon apetitit" in his/her own language to start the dinner off. When I said there is no real phrase in English, and that an American would usually use "bon apetitt", one of the French pilgrims at the table told me that was not surprising. Since don't eat well in the US, he said, why would we have a phrase celebrating eating well. :rolleyes:
 

Kiwi-family

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#23
Walking in NZ I’ve noticed.....
On a city street it is all too common for my smile or friendly “hi” to be ignored. Runners especially do not deign to acknowledge walkers (except when I’m walking with a pack and poles - I’m guessing that puts one into the category of “athlete”!)
In the bush/On hiking trails it’s a different matter. But we are more likely to comment on the weather than wish each other a Buen Camino.
“Nice day for it” OR “Hope you beat the rain” OR if you haven’t beaten the rain “Good on you mate” or “You must be serious”
 
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Oravasaari

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#24
In Finnish / Suomi: Hyvää matkaa!
 

Pelegrin

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#25
Walking in NZ I’ve noticed.....
On a city street it is all too common for my smile or friendly “hi” to be ignored. Runners especially do not deign to acknowledge walkers (except when I’m walking with a pack and poles - I’m guessing that puts one into the category of “athlete”!)
In the bush/On hiking trails it’s a different matter. But we are more likely to comment on the weather than wish each other a Buen Camino.
“Nice day for it” OR “Hope you beat the rain” OR if you haven’t beaten the rain “Good on you mate” or “You must be serious”
In Spain it is almost the same that you describe for NZ and we only say "Buen Camino" on Caminos de Santiago. Anywhere else out of cities we simply say "Hola" or Buenos días/Buenas tardes, Bo dia/Boa tarde in Galicia, Bon dia/Bona Tarda in Cataluña. In Basque Country and Navarra they say "Aupa".
 
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#26
In Spain it is almost the same that you describe for NZ and we only say "Buen Camino" on Caminos de Santiago.
Thank you for the info, I had been wondering about this.

Elsewhere in the thread the German expression for "buen camino" is given as "Guten Weg" but that's a literal translation and no Germann speaker would say that anywhere unless that's a new fad on the Spanish caminos. When two walkers or pilgrims meet they would say "Hallo" (hello) or "Guten Tag" (Good day) or "Grüß Gott" (Southerners only :cool:). And if it's meant as a word of encouragement/good wishes said by the person who stays behind to the person who leaves, there's no standard expression.

Although I heard it dozens of times, I am sometimes still amused when someone says "Bon courage" to me in French. The literal translation is "good courage" but I don't know of an equivalent in other languages. What you would say in English/German/Spanish/etc would really depend on the particular situation. And it's a bit similar with "Bon appetit/Guten Appetit/Buen provecho". Depending on the situation and the speaker, it would be "Enjoy your meal, sir" or "Let's stop talking and start digging in" in English :).
 
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Kiwi-family

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#27
In Spain it is almost the same that you describe for NZ and we only say "Buen Camino" on Caminos de Santiago. Anywhere else out of cities we simply say "Hola" or Buenos días/Buenas tardes, Bo dia/Boa tarde in Galicia, Bon dia/Bona Tarda in Cataluña. In Basque Country and Navarra they say "Aupa".
You know the big difference? You actually say *something*. On the street, in the bars, in tiendas....and the one that really surprised me, in all the different waiting rooms we visited at the medical centre and hospitals we were sent to when my daughter broke her arm at O’Cebreiro (Triacastela, Sarria and Lugo). Everyone greeted us. When we got back to NZ and she had to have her cast removed I decided to try some Spanish friendliness in the hospital waiting room. I didn’t say hola, just a cheery HI! Recipients of my greeting fell into three categories:
1) stare at the ground or their phone
2) stare at me as if I had three heads
3) one dear old lady asked, “Do I know you? I’m getting a bit forgetful”
Now I just smile at people!
 

Rick of Rick and Peg

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#28
Can you post how do you say "Bon Camino" in your language, please?
keep-ontruckin.png
Totally off topic, but I remember walking the LePuy route and having dinner with a multinational group. Everyone was supposed to say "bon apetitit" in his/her own language to start the dinner off. When I said there is no real phrase in English, and that an American would usually use "bon apetitt", one of the French pilgrims at the table told me that was not surprising. Since don't eat well in the US, he said, why would we have a phrase celebrating eating well.
Chow down!
 

LesBrass

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#29
... one of the French pilgrims at the table told me that was not surprising. Since don't eat well in the US, he said, why would we have a phrase celebrating eating well. :rolleyes:
haha... we have had this sooo many times since moving to France but I love cooking and my neighbours and french friends have discovered this and love to drop by and try our food. We have a little association/club in the village and every year we cook a traditional English christmas dinner and everyone comes and loves it... one neighbour drops by on a saturday afternoon as she knows I often bake a cake... she loves tea and cake...and my other neighbour adores my raspberry trifle. I like to think I'm doing my part in changing their beliefs ;):D
 

Anamiri

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#30
You know the big difference? You actually say *something*. On the street, in the bars, in tiendas....and the one that really surprised me, in all the different waiting rooms we visited at the medical centre and hospitals we were sent to when my daughter broke her arm at O’Cebreiro (Triacastela, Sarria and Lugo). Everyone greeted us. When we got back to NZ and she had to have her cast removed I decided to try some Spanish friendliness in the hospital waiting room. I didn’t say hola, just a cheery HI! Recipients of my greeting fell into three categories:
1) stare at the ground or their phone
2) stare at me as if I had three heads
3) one dear old lady asked, “Do I know you? I’m getting a bit forgetful”
Now I just smile at people!
I force people to respond to me, I walk to the beach each day, and say 'Good morning' and look them in the eye. They feel obliged to return the greeting. Now everyone says good morning to me.
But I think living near the beach, and meeting other dog walkers etc, they are more relaxed and likely to greet others.
 

Pelegrin

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#31
You know the big difference? You actually say *something*. On the street, in the bars, in tiendas....and the one that really surprised me, in all the different waiting rooms we visited at the medical centre and hospitals we were sent to when my daughter broke her arm at O’Cebreiro (Triacastela, Sarria and Lugo). Everyone greeted us. When we got back to NZ and she had to have her cast removed I decided to try some Spanish friendliness in the hospital waiting room. I didn’t say hola, just a cheery HI! Recipients of my greeting fell into three categories:
1) stare at the ground or their phone
2) stare at me as if I had three heads
3) one dear old lady asked, “Do I know you? I’m getting a bit forgetful”
Now I just smile at people!
Yes I agree. In Spain is quite normal saying "something" in the different places you mentioned, especially in rural areas.
But don't give up and continue saying "something" in NZ . Maybe your are the seed for next generations!.
 

stgcph

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#32
Norwegian: God tur!
I think there is no way of saying ‘Buen Camino’ in Danish. We would say like the Norwegians ‘God tur’ but that is a general phrase that can be used no matter if it is about a walk, a car trip or an overseas travel.

I think the closest we could come would be something like ‘Ha’ en god spadseretur’ (meaning something like ‘Have a nice promenade’), but it would sound artificial and unusual and a little old fashioned.

So when it’s about going on a Camino ‘Buen Camino’ would be the best option.
 

AlwynWellington

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#33
Hi @Kiwi-family , I agree with you on the street and in packed trains and buses - we are all in little world and our outdoor pursuits seldom bring us out of the hills or sports fields.

But on my training routes I encounter many runners and a few walkers or cyclists. It is very seldom that we do NOT acknowledge one another - even if it is just a nod.

Again, when training and I have stopped and encounter others the farewell from me is 'kia kaha' = take care, be strong, get going (Te Reo = speech, talk - NZ Maori)

And in Spain / France my response to Buen Camino / Bon Chemin is also 'Kia Kaha'
 

Prentiss Riddle

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#34
Americans: are there specific greetings used on the Appalachian Trail / PCT / etc.?
 

Prentiss Riddle

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#35
Did medieval English pilgrims in Chaucer’s day use any specific greetings or parting wishes? Did they swap “ultreias” in Latin? Better still, is there a Middle English phrase we can revive?
 
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#36
Did medieval English pilgrims in Chaucer’s day use any specific greetings or parting wishes?
Chaucer's pilgrims said: "Good gallop". Remember that they did not walk, they all rode on their horses. :cool:

On a slightly more serious note, it is far from certain that medieval pilgrims said ultreia / suseia to each other in the same way contemporary pilgrims so frequently buen camino each other. And ultreia may also well be a war cry of the crusaders which gives quite a different spiritual note to the expression ... it's all about context :cool:.
 
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Prentiss Riddle

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#37
Chaucer's pilgrims said: "Good gallop". Remember that they did not walk, they all rode on their horses
You had me going for a minute there! But a quick google confirmed that poor folk did indeed walk to Canterbury. Though perhaps the Wife of Bath did it all at a canter...
 

Prentiss Riddle

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#38
Google tells me that in Gallego it is “bo xeito”!

Are there any Galicians in the house who can confirm?

If so, then after O Cebreiro we should all switch over...
 
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#39
Has anyone noticed that Bon camino is actually French, not Spanish? I'm not trying to make fun of the title and initial message, there was a thread about the expression "bon camino" some time ago. I just discovered that Amazon carries a book, written in French, with the title "Bon camino". Ah, it all makes sense now :).
 

Prentiss Riddle

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#40
And ultreia may also well be a war cry of the crusaders which gives quite a different spiritual note to the expression...
That makes me sad. I love the self-referential St. James the Pilgrim, but St. James the Moor-Killer makes me shudder. (Topic for another thread, sorry.)
 
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#41
That makes me sad. I love the self-referential St. James the Pilgrim, but St. James the Moor-Killer makes me shudder. (Topic for another thread, sorry.)
It has nothing to do with images of Saint James and the reconquista in this case. The crusaders went to Jerusalem and as far as I know Saint James did not play any particular role for them.

It's a bit like people singing "500 miles". They sing it on the camino but not only there and when the Proclaimers wrote the lyrics in 1988, they and most other people didn't even know anything about a camino.
 
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nycwalking

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#42
Since the average American walks less than 3 miles a day in total steps, and hops in the car to go anywhere further than 1/4 mile away, it is not surprising that we don't have a colloquial phrase for this (well, ok, it's also because the Camino is not in the US).

Totally off topic, but I remember walking the LePuy route and having dinner with a multinational group. Everyone was supposed to say "bon apetitit" in his/her own language to start the dinner off. When I said there is no real phrase in English, and that an American would usually use "bon apetitt", one of the French pilgrims at the table told me that was not surprising. Since don't eat well in the US, he said, why would we have a phrase celebrating eating well. :rolleyes:
We, many Americans, also pray over our food viciating need for an eat well expression.
 

Pelegrin

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#44
Google tells me that in Gallego it is “bo xeito”!

Are there any Galicians in the house who can confirm?

If so, then after O Cebreiro we should all switch over...
Yes I am Galician. For the expression "bo xeito" a native would understand "do the things very good" wich is confusing.
The right expression is "bo camiño"
 

KinkyOne

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#47
... "Grüß Gott" (Southerners only :cool:). And if it's meant as a word of encouragement/good wishes said by the person who stays behind to the person who leaves, there's no standard expression.
That could be translated as "Praise the God" I think but it is used much more profanely for everyday use.

Although I heard it dozens of times, I am sometimes still amused when someone says "Bon courage" to me in French. The literal translation is "good courage" but I don't know of an equivalent in other languages.
Although I don't really speak French I always understood this expression as "Be brave (on your way)" or "Stay firm (in what you decided)"
 

KinkyOne

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#49
Thanks for trying but I can't find my language.
I guess they tried to put up Serbian and Croatian (Pravom putu & Pravi put which would be translated as "on the Right way" & "the right way") but they failed miserably...
When you do business you can't do it with Google translate, sorry.

Shame on them...

I can see the German translation is also very "anything" but I'll let that to others to respond. And I hope they won't because this doesn't deserve the respond at all.
 

caminka

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#50
another lovely thread (revived)!

In Irish it is "Go n-éirí an bóthar leat"
can anyone explain how to pronounce this, please?

Although I heard it dozens of times, I am sometimes still amused when someone says "Bon courage" to me in French. The literal translation is "good courage" but I don't know of an equivalent in other languages. What you would say in English/German/Spanish/etc would really depend on the particular situation. And it's a bit similar with "Bon appetit/Guten Appetit/Buen provecho". Depending on the situation and the speaker, it would be "Enjoy your meal, sir" or "Let's stop talking and start digging in" in English :).
Although I don't really speak French I always understood this expression as "Be brave (on your way)" or "Stay firm (in what you decided)"
I would venture that in slovenian the equivalent used widely would be 'srečno' without anything added to the word. that way it encompasses the broadest possible meaning and could be used in all kinds of circumstances. 'srečno' simply means 'luck'.
but the closest expression which is not used that often, would be 'le pogumno'. it loosly means 'carry on bravely'.
 
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#51
Shame on them...I can see the German translation is also very "anything" but I'll let that to others to respond. And I hope they won't because this doesn't deserve the respond at all.
Don't be so harsh with them ;), the list looks very pretty and photogenic. It deserves an A+ for trying. I think there are quite a few howlers in that list. Juiste spoor for Buen camino sounds very funny to my (albeit non-Dutch) ear. I have visions of trains in danger of being on the wrong track :cool:.

The line for Basque is Bide ona instead of Ondo Ibili ... they didn't get that wrong in the city of Iruña/Pamplona, did they??!!

The Italian Buona strada doesn't sound right to me.

Richtigen Weg for Buen camino is even odder than Guten Weg in German.

However, I think this list fully satisfies the most important requirement: "Say (or write) something in your language". And it is pretty. :cool:
 
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#52
The Italian Buona strada doesn't sound right to me.
Yeah, you are right, that sounds weird to us. :D
The classical wish is Buon cammino! (with two "m", because "camino" in Italian means "chimney" :oops: ),
but it's also quite common and less formal Buona passeggiata!
 

bhavagrahidasa

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#53
In Aotearoa we say many farewells such as Haere atu and Kia Kaha which is especially used as " Be stong" but for me the most comparable to Buen Camino is;
Haere tu atu, hoki tu mai. Go well and return in good health, have a safe trip-farewelling friends and hoping that they will return in good health.
Mā te Atua koutou hei manaaki. Haere tu atu hoki tu mai. May God protect you all. Have a safe trip.
 

Prentiss Riddle

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#54
When you do business you can't do it with Google translate, sorry.
So true!

“Good way” in English just doesn’t cut it. It’s a good example of the fact that a literal translation is rarely the best translation.

In truth, English is so fond of adopting foreign vocabulary that the best way to say “buen camino” in English is probably “buen camino.”
 

Jakke

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#56
Can you post how do you say "Bon Camino" in your language, please?

Portuguese - Bom Caminho
Finnish: Hyvää matkaa! Dutch: Goeie reis!
(Use Google Translate for the pronunciation)
Note: those are normal greetings. I would use the Bom caminho / buen camino recognized by all pilgrims
 

Jakke

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#57
another lovely thread (revived)!



can anyone explain how to pronounce this, please?




I would venture that in slovenian the equivalent used widely would be 'srečno' without anything added to the word. that way it encompasses the broadest possible meaning and could be used in all kinds of circumstances. 'srečno' simply means 'luck'.
but the closest expression which is not used that often, would be 'le pogumno'. it loosly means 'carry on bravely'.
Google Translate is not very good at translating, but you can listen to the pronunciation
 
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#59
So to sum up, don't expect a buen camino kind of reply if you use the following terms from the list:
  • Bide ona
  • Buona strada
  • Juiste spoor
  • Richtigen Weg
  • Oikealla tellä
  • Pravom putu
  • Pravi put
You are unlikely to understand the reply anyway but it will probably be something along the lines that the path is in fact in good condition or that you are indeed not lost. :cool:
 
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Rick of Rick and Peg

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#61
Ooh, I just thought of a candidate translation for my variety of English in the southwestern United States:

“Happy trails!” :)
Of course! Excellent.

For youngsters or non-southwesterners the song "Happy Trails" was the theme of the "King of the Cowboys," Roy Rogers, a singing cowboy of the movies, radio and television and his co-star and real wife, Dale Evans. Here is the song:

YouTube id = XcYsO890YJY
 
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#62
路顺风 祝野地放尿顺利
@Jun Meng, thank you! It looks lovely. Can you describe what the words express? I'm sure it is not what Google Translate makes of it o_O. And is your language in the list quoted earlier in this post ?

I can't identify all the languages in the list but I think Arabic is missing? One of the few Arabic words I know in the context of walking/hiking is "Yallah!". It's funny how you pick up words and expressions in languages you don't know. Long before I started to learn Spanish, I knew what "Vamos!" means. I like to think that this is how the Flemish pilgrims picked up "Ultreia!" on their way through France. :)
 
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Jun Meng

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#63
@Jun Meng, thank you! It looks lovely. Can describe what the words express? I'm sure it is not what Google Translate makes of it o_O. And is your language in the list quoted earlier here: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...bon-camino-in-your-language.22153/post-594827 ?

I can't identify all the languages in the list but I think Arabic is missing? And would it be Yallah? It's funny how you pick up words and expressions in languages you don't know. Long before I started to learn Spanish, I knew already what "Vamos!" means. I like to think that this is how the Flemish pilgrims picked up "Ultreia!" on their way through France. :)
It means Safe journey and Hope You can find a good place to pee privately (i add the second phrase.)
 

grayland

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Yes
#66
It has been posted above in several ways...but most of the Spanish names and phrases are simply used in English..not literal translations. The use of the Spanish is the norm in my experience. The translations are usually odd sounding...and very often silly.

Buen Camino is used by English Speakers. Not translated into something that is never heard.
Camino Frances is used by English Speakers...not translated into "French Way" or something else
Camino del Norte is usually referred to as the "Norte" or "del Norte"...not the Northern Way
The Via de la Plata is usually called the same......not anything to do with "Silver"
The Primativo is normally called the "Primativo" by English speakers....not "Primitive". It is accepted by most veteran pilgrims that the name refers to the translation as "original" not "primitive."

At least the above holds true in my experience. I never hear experienced pilgrims using the odd sounding translations.
 
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#67
I agree that the list I found outside the Pamplona Cathedral is a bit sub-par in terms of good translations/expressions that people might actually say, but I think the idea is fun.

@Kathar1na Yes, you're right that Arabic is missing--a big omission in my opinion. I love that you've heard "Yallah!" in walking/hiking contexts--it translates roughly to "Come on!" or "Let's go!" and is a fabulous expression to have in your back pocket for use with Arabic speakers.
 

RJM

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A few times, but soon again I hope....
#68
I think most of the time on the Camino I simply say "good morning" or "hello" and the occasional "buenos dias".
 
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'
#70
I agree that the list I found outside the Pamplona Cathedral is a bit sub-par in terms of good translations/expressions that people might actually say, but I think the idea is fun.

@Kathar1na Yes, you're right that Arabic is missing--a big omission in my opinion. I love that you've heard "Yallah!" in walking/hiking contexts--it translates roughly to "Come on!" or "Let's go!" and is a fabulous expression to have in your back pocket for use with Arabic speakers.
I am glad you posted the list, it led to some enjoyable and interesting exchanges.

I wondered about the languages that had been chosen for the list. After I had posted the message mentioning Arabic I feared that this would be picked up by someone to rage about one thing or another and the thread would be closed soon. It wasn't my intention. I just thought of it because I had hiked in Morocco, Libya and Jordan and because it's a next door neighbour language, so to speak. Googled the number of Christians in this part of the Mediterranean space and was amazed to discover that it's millions, mainly in Egypt. Yet you don't see them on the Camino and neither many from Africa, with the exception of South Africa basically. A reminder that the contemporary Camino is quite global today but it's a privilege of the affluent who seek the simple life for a while ... ?

PS: I'm still curious about the languages that are not written in Latin or Cyrillic script. Can anyone decipher them? Is Greek there (I'm not sure).
 
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Prentiss Riddle

Aprendiz de todo, maestro de nada
Camino(s) past & future
Poco a poco: we're nibbling away at the Francés. (2015, 2016 & 2017)
#71
PS: I'm still curious about the languages that are not written in Latin or Cyrillic script. Can anyone decipher them? Is Greek there (I'm not sure).
Good question! I found a clearer pic of the same sign, below.

I believe Greek is the one under GOOD WAY.

60% of the way down under UDHË TË DRËJTË I see Amharic (from Ethiopia), then Georgian? Looks like Georgian except for the first character. Hm.

https://goo.gl/images/wqx5Gy C06DB5AB-1868-4059-AD11-0C17190427FC.jpeg
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#72
The Via de la Plata is usually called the same......not anything to do with "Silver"
On the contrary. Plata is Spanish for silver and the route is named this way because Romans transported silver (and gold and other goods) from the hills in the Northern Spain to the Mediterranean shore.

The Primatvo is normally called the "Primativo" by English speakers....not "Primitive". It is accepted by most veteran pilgrims that the name refers to the translation as "original" not "primitive."
Or even "Primativo" :)
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
#73
but...my point is that most English speakers call the Via de la Plata by it's Spanish name.
Not by a translation of "Plata" into "silver".
Most native English speakers on the Caminos normally use the Spanish names for the routes without translation.
There are, no doubt, some who use translated names and phrases but I have seldom encountered it.
 

Prentiss Riddle

Aprendiz de todo, maestro de nada
Camino(s) past & future
Poco a poco: we're nibbling away at the Francés. (2015, 2016 & 2017)
#74
Most native English speakers on the Caminos normally use the Spanish names for the routes without translation.
That’s my experience too. By any chance, is it different among Brits? Do they ever talk about “the French Way,” “the English Way,” etc. or am I just being influenced by the retro tone of the Contrafraternity of St. James?
 

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