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How hot is too hot to walk?

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onwayhome

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Ponferrada-Santiago,(c1986)
Frances SJPP-Santiago (2011)
Portuguese Porto- Finisterre (2016)
St Michaels Way (2016)
Just noticed it's looking super hot in central Europe and NE Spain this week, with 40degC forecast for Pamplona. This is unusual for June and pilgrims might not be expecting conditions that make walking potentially dangerous.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
Now from Oregon and before from Bay Area, my endurance and joy from walking starts deteriorating at 30c. Hence only shoulder season walks.
I used to live in Ashland and I know what you mean. I am starting later and later. One of the benefits of retirement. This year I will do the CF starting on October 29th. I will take a cold day anytime over 35+ (I think in Fahrenheit about 95F+). Pamplona 43 on Thursday, thats 109 and walking is insane.
 
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NorthernLight

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
Make sure you drink enough that your urine is pale and still frequent. I walked out of Bratislava a few years ago on the EPW and it was 38C before noon. I swear I drank 6 litres of fluids and still only peed once.

Hydrate, get out of the sun (a long sleeved shirt would be useful here), umbrella, hat, start before dawn where it's safe enough, shorten your days.
 

Dorpie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia 2013
Camino Frances May 2015, July 2017, October 2019
That is crazy hot, be safe out there pilgrims.

It's always amazed me given what evolutionary wonders we are that one of our most important impulses, the desire to drink, lags so far behind the need to drink. It may be a cliche but but always remember to drink before you're thirsty.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Every person is different and has different tolerance and physical ability to tolerate extreme heat and sunshine. IN GENERAL:
  • Hydrate, even forcing yourself to consume water regularly throughout the day. Personally, I consume .5 liters of water or electrolyte solution every hour, whether or not I feel I need it. In temperatures over 30 degrees (c) make that one-liter per hour.
  • If you stop having to pass urine, be careful, this is an early sign of heat exhaustion. Your body starts to send water to your vital organs to try to cool the body.
  • If you stop perspiring / sweating, this is also a sign of heat exhaustion.
  • Light-headedness and dizziness is a final sign of heat-exhaustion, just before you pass out. STOP IMMEDIATELY. Ask others to help you. Seek shade, cool-down, hydrate!
  • Start early, finish early for the day - well before noon.
The European weather maps for northern Spain, for today 26 June, show that Burgos and to the east is frighteningly hot, whereas Leon and points to the west are relatively cooler, but still hot. Thus, if you are attempting the Mesta from Fromista west, anytime soon:

  • Take double or triple the water you normally carry. Share it with others who need it.
  • Wear a broad-brimmed sun hat with appropriate ventilation. You need a hat with 360 degree, all-around, protection. A ball-cap is not enough, IMHO. The hat should be tan or light colored, NOT BLACK or another dark color that concentrates the sun's heat.
  • Obtain and use a light-colored umbrella to create your own shade. Stick it in your sternum strap to hold it in place while using hiking poles.
  • Wear a wet Buff, or similar microfiber tube accessory garment, head cover to aid evaporative cooling. A wet Buff can also be worn around your neck or wrists. Both are pressure points. Placing evaporative cooling there will aid in cooling your entire body. Absent having a buff, any microfiber towel will work nearly as well in some positions, like head cover.
If you find shade along the way, USE IT. Take a break. Take as many breaks as you feel you need.

When you stop, consume water. Try to lie down or otherwise elevate your feet and legs to allow / improve circulation to your brain and torso.

Listen to your body.

Take care of your feet. Change sweaty socks during the day to avoid friction and blisters. Pin the sweaty, wet socks to your rucksack to air dry.

Hope this helps. Vaya con Dios!
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2015) Frances
(2018) Portuguese
(2019) VdP Seville to Salamanca
(2020) VdP Salamanca to Santiago
I use a simple rule. If my age + the temp in Centigrade is greater than 100 I seriously think about it again. If it's greater than 110 it's taxi time :) BTW, this only works for 60+

Any temperature greater than about 30-35 poses a risk. Higher than that and it's just plain stupid to walk. If you've got any health condition like diabetes or high blood pressure that isn't under good control, I wouldn't walk long distances in anything higher than 26 or so.

The comment about water that others have made is spot on. Not needing to pee is not a good thing. I find myself going through 4 to 5 liters of water a day in very hot weather. If there are places to stop along the way, that's not too bad since you can always pick up some water. But, if there are not watering spots you have to carry that water (and perhaps a little more). So, the distance between rest stops becomes an exponential issue. If there are only 3-5 miles between watering and rest stops it's much much more doable than say 10-15 miles with no places to stop for water.
 

Mera

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France, Camino del Norte, Camino de Madrid
Camino Porto, Camino Primitivo
Every person is different and has different tolerance and physical ability to tolerate extreme heat and sunshine. IN GENERAL:
  • Hydrate, even forcing yourself to consume water regularly throughout the day. Personally, I consume .5 liters of water or electrolyte solution every hour, whether or not I feel I need it. In temperatures over 30 degrees (c) make that one-liter per hour.
  • If you stop having to pass urine, be careful, this is an early sign of heat exhaustion. Your body starts to send water to your vital organs to try to cool the body.
  • If you stop perspiring / sweating, this is also a sign of heat exhaustion.
  • Light-headedness and dizziness is a final sign of heat-exhaustion, just before you pass out. STOP IMMEDIATELY. Ask others to help you. Seek shade, cool-down, hydrate!
  • Start early, finish early for the day - well before noon.
The European weather maps for northern Spain, for today 26 June, show that Burgos and to the east is frighteningly hot, whereas Leon and points to the west are relatively cooler, but still hot. Thus, if you are attempting the Mesta from Fromista west, anytime soon:

  • Take double or triple the water you normally carry. Share it with others who need it.
  • Wear a broad-brimmed sun hat with appropriate ventilation. You need a hat with 360 degree, all-around, protection. A ball-cap is not enough, IMHO. The hat should be tan or light colored, NOT BLACK or another dark color that concentrates the sun's heat.
  • Obtain and use a light-colored umbrella to create your own shade. Stick it in your sternum strap to hold it in place while using hiking poles.
  • Wear a wet Buff, or similar microfiber tube accessory garment, head cover to aid evaporative cooling. A wet Buff can also be worn around your neck or wrists. Both are pressure points. Placing evaporative cooling there will aid in cooling your entire body. Absent having a buff, any microfiber towel will work nearly as well in some positions, like head cover.
If you find shade along the way, USE IT. Take a break. Take as many breaks as you feel you need.

When you stop, consume water. Try to lie down or otherwise elevate your feet and legs to allow / improve circulation to your brain and torso.

Listen to your body.

Take care of your feet. Change sweaty socks during the day to avoid friction and blisters. Pin the sweaty, wet socks to your rucksack to air dry.

Hope this helps. Vaya con Dios!
I have done all of these and were very helpful. Please listen to your body. You are not there to prove anything to anyone. You don't hve to keep up with anyone. Please do what is comfortable to you.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Walked CF September/October 2015
It all really depends on your personal constitution really. Factors like age, heat sensitivity, conditions for training, and conditions that you’re used to will all affect it. Of course, staying hydrated is the most important thing. Keeping your electrolytes up, resting often, knowing the signs for heat exhaustion, and listening to your body are all key. Be safe!
 

William Marques

Moderator
Staff member
I can agree wholeheartedly that personal constitution and conditioning are important. Having walked part of the Via Francigena with a local young Italian on a very hot day - he was a fresh as a daisy and I was sweating like a pig. I drank all the water I had and stopped at the first town we came to for the day while he strolled on.
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
The Frances from Pamplona and part VF, first-aid helper and hospitalera
I’m walking in these very hot conditions at the moment - it was 40deg c when I walked into Burgos earlier this afternoon. At EVERY fountain today I’ve dunked my head (something I know other Forum members do) and soaked a very light and filmy cotton shawl in the water. I’ve draped the sodden shawl over my head, shoulders and arms and replaced my broad brimmed hat. It’s working well. I’m also drinking a lot of water and have Hydralite tablets.

Let’s hope this weather breaks soon!

Cheers - Jenny
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
I am reminded of one of my favorite Camino sayings. I do not remember if I first coined the saying, or if I may have heard it somewhere else. Anyway, here goes...

"On the Camino, there are days to be brave and days to be smart."

Being brave means sucking it up and continuing on, through rain, wind, cold, mud, pain, ennui, and to some extent heat.

Regarding walking in heat, I am reminded that one can always add a layer, but there is a practical limit to what one can strip off while on Camino...

Being smart means assessing, adapting and overcoming any challenge. This requires flexible thinking and situational awareness. We should all have that capability.

On a given Camino day, this could mean starting at first light (usually about 30 minutes before before listed sunrise and ending the day's walk early - before noon.

It might mean trimming the day's planned walking to stop at a closer reached albergue.

It also might mean taking a cab or bus to arrive at your day's destination especially if you have a reservation, and provided you are NOT within the final 100 km before Santiago (as this could spoil eligibility for a Compostela). It is not a sin or crime to leapfrog ahead earlier in your Camino. Many of use have done it due to injuries, crappy weather, or extreme fatigue. It happens.

KNOW WHEN TO BE BRAVE, AND WHEN TO BE SMART...

Hope this helps.
 

Hurry Krishna

Indian on the Way
Camino(s) past & future
2009 (from Sarria), 2014 from St Jean Pied de Port, 2016 from Porto, 2018 from Le Puy to Santiago.
Just noticed it's looking super hot in central Europe and NE Spain this week, with 40degC forecast for Pamplona. This is unusual for June and pilgrims might not be expecting conditions that make walking potentially dangerous.
For me anything above 25 is too hot to walk! On 30 degree days, where the path has no shade I have had to take rather unusual steps :) And here’s the blog to prove it <https://readingontheroad54893552.wordpress.com/2018/09/02/blogging-the-slog/>
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
EVERY Pilgrim is different and tolerates heat and bright sun differently.

One thing that affects me is that I take several prescription medications daily. The side effects include increased sensitivity to sunshine and heat.

Doh!? And I live in South Florida! The daily temperatures here now range from 33 - 38, with humidity over 75%. In fact, as I write this it is 35 Celsius... Yikes!

This is one reason I leave for Santiago in two weeks. The July - August weather in Galicia is about what it is here in the winter... perfect!

Hope this helps the dialog.
 
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Chrisb50

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria to Santiago, 2017
St Jean to Santo Domingo 2018
Just noticed it's looking super hot in central Europe and NE Spain this week, with 40degC forecast for Pamplona. This is unusual for June and pilgrims might not be expecting conditions that make walking potentially dangerous.
Tomorrow I’ve got one of the more difficult days ahead of me, Villafranca to O’Cebreiro- and it might be 40 degrees plus strong wind. I guess the bail-out plan would be to get a taxi from Herrerias for the last 8km. Does anyone know if that’s feasible?
 

NorthernLight

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
Tomorrow I’ve got one of the more difficult days ahead of me, Villafranca to O’Cebreiro- and it might be 40 degrees plus strong wind. I guess the bail-out plan would be to get a taxi from Herrerias for the last 8km. Does anyone know if that’s feasible?
There are many villages between Villafranca & O Cebreiro. Consider doing this over two days instead. And a taxi is possible.
 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
Ime just thinking also that meds are supposed to be stored in 25 or under degrees so would the extreme weather render youre meds useless?
Depends on the medication and the form it is in, but generally speaking medication becomes less effective.

Best to use a smal cooler bag and hide it deep in your backpack. You can test this with a bar of chocolate. If he chocolate is still firm after the hike, the spot is probably good for meds too.
You might add a cooling element, but not all meds react well to cold (fluids for instance). Ask your pharmacist about specific medication and how to store it while hiking in the heat.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Ime just thinking also that meds are supposed to be stored in 25 or under degrees so would the extreme weather render youre meds useless?
Who knows? But I do pack them well insulated within my rucksack. So they are not exposed to direct sunlight. it's not like I have a lot of choice in the matter.

I have a small foam insulated plastic box to help keep the meds at a constant temperature. So far, I have not experienced any issues.

Thanks for raising this frequently overlooked point.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
I’m walking in these very hot conditions at the moment - it was 40deg c when I walked into Burgos earlier this afternoon. At EVERY fountain today I’ve dunked my head (something I know other Forum members do) and soaked a very light and filmy cotton shawl in the water. I’ve draped the sodden shawl over my head, shoulders and arms and replaced my broad brimmed hat. It’s working well. I’m also drinking a lot of water and have Hydralite tablets.

Let’s hope this weather breaks soon!

Cheers - Jenny
Safe Journey Jenny!
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
Tomorrow I’ve got one of the more difficult days ahead of me, Villafranca to O’Cebreiro- and it might be 40 degrees plus strong wind. I guess the bail-out plan would be to get a taxi from Herrerias for the last 8km. Does anyone know if that’s feasible?

Yes, there is,for sure, a taxi service in OCebriero that will come and pick you up.
When you get to a bar in Las Herrerias, just asked Locals...they will know whom to call. It’s not like getting a taxi in a city, you may have to wait an hour before they can get you....but in the meantime you can rehydrate.
 
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Roland49

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2019 June/July/August
I'll start on Monday, 1st July in SJPdP. I'm used to hot weather, do not sweat a lot and been called "the camel of the family", due to my endurance and the little water I consume on the road.

Ih the weather-forecast is right, there will be a temperature-drop on my second week, just before I reach Logrono.

Buen Camino!
Roland
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Walked CF September/October 2015
Needing to pee is VITAL. I ended up with heat exhaustion very early on in my Camino because I didn’t realize just how key it was. A pilgrim told me the day I got sick that if you aren’t peeing every hour you aren’t drinking enough water. That advice got me through the rest of my Camino without another (heat-related) incident.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
Personally I was forced into a Camino break this year by temperatures at about 32°C, even though about 20 years ago I could hike in 40°.

So "too hot to walk" is a variable -- be sensible, and take care with your own personal limitations
 

Bob from L.A. !

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis 2012, 2014, 2016. Camino Norte 2018. Many more to come in my future God willing !
So "too hot to walk" is a variable -- be sensible, and take care with your own personal limitations
Great advice. Knowing this weather is upon you this week one might also want to add an extra water bottle to their pack, drink frequently until it is gone, fill the bottles frequently and take a break hourly (or when you feel you need one). Walk on the shaded side of the path/road as often as possible, wear head coverings, but remove during breaks in the shade. By plotting in hydration and timed break intervals in your daily course in this weather it will provide you small goals to help break up your day.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
Light-headedness and dizziness is a final sign of heat-exhaustion, just before you pass out. STOP IMMEDIATELY. Ask others to help you. Seek shade, cool-down, hydrate!
Not always good advice on the Camino in particular -- certainly stop as soon as possible in the first reasonable place, but stopping "immediately" when you might be in a location with no relief whatsoever from the blazing sun would be a big mistake.

Keep on until a location with at least shade if not cool -- or if not possible call emergency services immediately and seek immediate assistance from *everyone* else.

---

Otherwise as a general rule, the best environment in which to heal from sunstroke is quiet, cool, and in the shade. Hospitals do not typically provide it, but quite a few refugios can and will. A rest day or two or three can be necessary.

Actual heatstroke is a lot worse than "just" a sunstroke as it can kill you -- so whatever you do, don't just "carry on" supposing that your body will "adapt".
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Not always good advice on the Camino in particular -- certainly stop as soon as possible in the first reasonable place, but stopping "immediately" when you might be in a location with no relief whatsoever from the blazing sun would be a big mistake.

Keep on until a location with at least shade if not cool -- or if not possible call emergency services immediately and seek immediate assistance from *everyone* else.

---

Otherwise as a general rule, the best environment in which to heal from sunstroke is quiet, cool, and in the shade. Hospitals do not typically provide it, but quite a few refugios can and will. A rest day or two or three can be necessary.

Actual heatstroke is a lot worse than "just" a sunstroke as it can kill you -- so whatever you do, don't just "carry on" supposing that your body will "adapt".
I meant, and hereby clarify, stop immediately GET INTO SHADE. If there is none, use your poncho and hiking poles to make some.

Hope this helps
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
I am reminded of one of my favorite Camino sayings. I do not remember if I first coined the saying, or if I may have heard it somewhere else. Anyway, here goes...

"On the Camino, there are days to be brave and days to be smart."

Being brave means sucking it up and continuing on, through rain, wind, cold, mud, pain, ennui, and to some extent heat.

Regarding walking in heat, I am reminded that one can always add a layer, but there is a practical limit to what one can strip off while on Camino...

Being smart means assessing, adapting and overcoming any challenge. This requires flexible thinking and situational awareness. We should all have that capability.

On a given Camino day, this could mean starting at first light (usually about 30 minutes before before listed sunrise and ending the day's walk early - before noon.

It might mean trimming the day's planned walking to stop at a closer reached albergue.

It also might mean taking a cab or bus to arrive at your day's destination especially if you have a reservation, and provided you are NOT within the final 100 km before Santiago (as this could spoil eligibility for a Compostela). It is not a sin or crime to leapfrog ahead earlier in your Camino. Many of use have done it due to injuries, crappy weather, or extreme fatigue. It happens.

KNOW WHEN TO BE BRAVE, AND WHEN TO BE SMART..

Hope this helps.
Or if you have the luxury to be able to do it, walk in March/April Late October/November. As you say you can only subtract clothes to a point. It is alot easier to add. Please be SMART!
 

nycwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF: (2001, 2002, 2004, 2014). Hospitalera: 2002, Ponferrada. 2004, Rabanal del Camino.
My first camino started August 4,2001 during long and hot days, day after day.

I started in Roncesvalles with completely black hair. Upon Santiago arrival my hair was light brown with blond highlights and a platinum blonde hairline.

I loved it.
 

MichelleElynHogan

Veteran Member
This is a killer heat wave across Europe right now. People have and are dying as I write. This is not a time to underestimate the heat.

I have walked in 39-40 C temps and do not recommend it at all. The weather, however, is what it is where you are. If adapting is possible, then adapt. If adaptation is not possible, the prime directive is survival. And, that line can be drawn usually within +/- 5 C, from workable to deadly.

Hydration is paramount but once it is so hot that perspiration is wicked away by the air around you, salt pills need to be added.
 

VeganCamino

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Future Frances from Saint Jean Pied du Port to Burgos, starting in June.
Just noticed it's looking super hot in central Europe and NE Spain this week, with 40degC forecast for Pamplona. This is unusual for June and pilgrims might not be expecting conditions that make walking potentially dangerous.
I left Pamplona for the coast. In Comillas now. It's chilly and I like it. I miss the connection on the Frances and the heat was too much for me.
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean May/June 2017. Plans to walk Porto 2020
I’m walking in these very hot conditions at the moment - it was 40deg c when I walked into Burgos earlier this afternoon. At EVERY fountain today I’ve dunked my head (something I know other Forum members do) and soaked a very light and filmy cotton shawl in the water. I’ve draped the sodden shawl over my head, shoulders and arms and replaced my broad brimmed hat. It’s working well. I’m also drinking a lot of water and have Hydralite tablets.

Let’s hope this weather breaks soon!

Cheers - Jenny
G'day Mate. Now we know that you and company are still alive and have not been cooked by the 45'C days. Stay safe ;)🙏
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean May/June 2017. Plans to walk Porto 2020
Tomorrow I’ve got one of the more difficult days ahead of me, Villafranca to O’Cebreiro- and it might be 40 degrees plus strong wind. I guess the bail-out plan would be to get a taxi from Herrerias for the last 8km. Does anyone know if that’s feasible?

Start early and truly consider stopping at La Faba (or once the temp passes 35c)
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean May/June 2017. Plans to walk Porto 2020
Thank you Marbe2! It’s very kind of you to send your good wishes.
Cheers from Hornillos - Jenny
Ah so you have started the Meseta - if it stays bloody hot might be short days. Will pass on your news to the Syd Pilgrims. M
 

Chizuru

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
We walked in September/October last year and had some punishing days. My saviour was my Handsfree Euroschirm umbrella with sun reflective surface. Using this also meant that I didn't need to wear a hat so instead of having a hat keep heat in, my head could let out heat. We also left before dawn each morning to be able to finish our walk by 2 pm at the latest which was when the day was really beginning to heat up. It could be a good idea to buy a face mist such as Evian from a pharmacy to spritz your face with mist, and also to wet your buff.
 

jrenner

camino Frances SEPT 18
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Sept - Oct (2018)
Last September, on a 30+ day well into the Meseta, we came upon a lone shade tree that was casting enough shadow to harbor 12-14 pilgrims. Ten minutes rest and one group leaves as another take up residence.
I will never forget that live sombrero.
 

Stellaluna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Coast to Coast (2015)
Frances (July 2016)
Tomorrow I’ve got one of the more difficult days ahead of me, Villafranca to O’Cebreiro- and it might be 40 degrees plus strong wind. I guess the bail-out plan would be to get a taxi from Herrerias for the last 8km. Does anyone know if that’s feasible?
Yes, I did it.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
At EVERY fountain today I’ve dunked my head (something I know other Forum members do) and soaked a very light and filmy cotton shawl in the water. I’ve draped the sodden shawl over my head, shoulders and arms and replaced my broad brimmed hat.
If you stop to hydrate at a bar, getting some ice to put under the hat helps too.
A couple of people have mentioned umbrellas...a very good idea, especially the kind with a silver reflective top.

Buen camino, Jenny!
 

CaminoMatt73

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances & Portuguese 2016. Via de la Plata & to Porto Mar-June 2017, Norte Way in Sept.
Just noticed it's looking super hot in central Europe and NE Spain this week, with 40degC forecast for Pamplona. This is unusual for June and pilgrims might not be expecting conditions that make walking potentially dangerous.
Just finished Portugues coastal and visited Zaragoza afterwards. Ouch, 45C. Spent my time in the shade beside the swimming pool. Coastal weather was nice. No rain for two weeks though.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Jul-Sept 2019: Ruta Asturianos Lebaniego / Apr 2018 Asturias / May 2016 CP: Portuguese
Last September, on a 30+ day well into the Meseta, we came upon a lone shade tree that was casting enough shadow to harbor 12-14 pilgrims. Ten minutes rest and one group leaves as another take up residence.
I will never forget that live sombrero.
Hoping that you all gave it some of your water. God bless that tree, right?
 

Stellaluna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Coast to Coast (2015)
Frances (July 2016)
I've been following theWeather Network forecasts for Porto (I start walking Saturday) and it doesn't look too bad? Am I in denial?
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
I'm down in the South East of France, French Riviera, very close to where the Provençal Camino joins the Aurelia variant of the Francigena at the Italian border, and in the part of the country where this episode of dog days lasted longest but where the temps never went higher than the lower 30s °C (which were roughly the temps I had found on the Cami Catalan a month earlier and which forced me to take a break) ... and here at least it's abated to the point that the heat should not be too troublesome to any pilgrims walking here about now. Well, at this point in time anyway, though the Summer is far from over ...

But my guess is that the Summer is more or less going to carry on like this 'til it's over.

Of course it will always be easier temp-wise (albeit wetter) on the Norte or the Portugues from the Atlantic climate --

Having said that, the usual Italian advice towards the dog days is to hunker down inside somewhere and wait 'til the weather starts to cool down some time after about 15th August.

Then again, those who are as resilient in the heat as I used to be in my Camino-spent youth need really only worry about the risk of sunstroke. And so be careful to think about rest days.
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
The Frances from Pamplona and part VF, first-aid helper and hospitalera
If you stop to hydrate at a bar, getting some ice to put under the hat helps too.
A couple of people have mentioned umbrellas...a very good idea, especially the kind with a silver reflective top.

Buen camino, Jenny!
Great idea VNwalking - thank you. This will be part of my routine when I start walking again on Tuesday. ‘Currently on a mid-Camino break with my family.
 
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