A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Luggage Transfer Correos

How long do your shoes last?

David from Freo

These are the best years of our lives
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago 2008; SJPP-Santiago (2014); Lisbon-Santiago-Muxia (2016); LePuy-Santiago (2018)
I am curious about how long members expect a new pair of walking shoes to last on the Camino. I bought a new pair of Salomons after finishing one Camino, broke them in with various preparatory walks in Australia over several months (probably walking a total of only a couple of hundred kilometres) and then wore them on a Camino from Le Puy to Santiago (1400 kms). I was very disappointed to find the stitching at the heel of both shoes started to pull apart only about a month into that walk. I finished that camino by putting tape on the heels of the shoes as the split stitching was giving me blisters. With that running repair, they served me well enough, although by the time we arrived in Santiago the soles and toes of the shoes were also quite worn down.

So, in effect, the shoes lasted only one Camino -- or perhaps about 2000 kms including preparatory walks. Is that what other walkers would expect from a good pair of walking shoes? I'm about to go out and buy a replacement pair for my next walk in August and am not sure whether to avoid that brand because of its performance, or whether that is pretty much all one can hope for from any comparable brand.
[By contrast, I'd pay only about half the price for a new tyre for my car and expect about 10 times the wear at far high speed!!].
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
My Keen Targhee II mid-high boots usually last about 1,000 km in total. So, some break-in conditioning and practice walking at home, then a full 799 km Camino Frances, and the midsoles start coming through.

That is as much as i’ve ever gotten from a set of soles. Fortunately, most name brand hiking boots and shoes can be resoled using factory “findings.” Search ‘Resoling hiking boots’ on Google.

Hope this helps.
 

Davey Boyd

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Seven Compostelas in Three years and counting......
I wear Lowa Camino GTX boots (yes camino boots)! Now on my third pair, each lasted about 1,700 - 2000km.

Edit: I read somewhere the soles will last for 'at least 1000km' so I may have been lucky. But less road use the better.

Davey
 
Last edited:

Mark Barnes

Old Engineer
Camino(s) past & future
Frances - September - November (2017)
I bought Cabelas brand (model name Grand Mesa) hiking boots and wore them for about 50 Miles training and then wore them from Pamplona to Santiago de Compostela. They have a lot of life left in them. If I was to start another Camino today I would wear the same pair. Love my boots.
 
Last edited:

Mugatu

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Finisterre, Muxia (2018)
Camino Frances or Norte (2019 , June 27-Aug 8)
All depends on load and other factors...I personally ditch shoes after the midsoles are toast regardless of anything else.

HYOH
 

Terri B

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
1998 St Cuthberts Way, 1999 West Highland Way
2016 & 2019 Camino Frances SJPDP to Santiago
My Keens boots I bought in early 2016 were broken in for 6 months before my first trip on the Camino France's route. They have been worn regularly since then and will be worn again in September for my second trip on Camino Fances. The soles are fine, but I replaced the inner sole on purchase with a more cushioning one. They seem to be holding up ok, but I may replace before I leave Oz.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
I have worn boots by Scarpa, Asolo and Keen on my pilgrimage walks. The Keens were the least durable, lasting just a few months in training and all the way from SJPP to Najera before the outer layer of the sole had worn through on one boot. By the time I reached Santiago, the mid-sole layer had lost all its resilience, and was not giving much if any compression. They were one-camino wonders! You might guess that they don't get a recommendation from me.

I have worn two pairs of both Scarpas and Asolos. Both have greater tread depth and different mid-sole approach, and both have had plenty of life left at the end, certainly enough to repeat the walk. They had to be replaced as my feet have lengthened and spread slightly over the nearly 10 years of longer distance walking that I have been doing.

Getting much more than 800-1000 km out of a training shoe style construction is a bonus for me, largely driven by the relatively thinner outer layer of the sole wearing through and the mid-sole losing its bounce. I have a pair of Scarpa trail running shoes that I wear occasionally that have deeper tread than trainers, but not as deep as their boots. They appear to be wearing well, but I couldn't really estimate how many kilometres they have done.
 

jcat

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria - Santiago 2016 Camino Ingles Nov 2019
I think that 2000km out of a pair of shoes is awesome!

I just retired my Solomon XA Pro 3D after 700 miles or 1126km and I was very happy with them. I will get another pair for my next time on the Camino. They were doing great until the heel notch/tab/collar wore out. It became rough and was wearing on the back of my upper heal or lower ankle. Tried to repair with a piece of thick tape, but it wasn't comfortable.

But they were the best pair of hiking shoes I have ever worn, so I will repeat.
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
I also have found that the stitching is the first to go, on two pairs of Eccos and on two pairs of Hanwags. I think the synthetic thread wears down due to UV deterioration.
I have now upgraded to boots with lesser degree of pach-on areas that will fail ( Meindl Borneo)
All my boots last 2000 - 2500 kms
 

RuediG

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Cammino di Assisi, Assisi-Rome (2019)
I am curious about how long members expect a new pair of walking shoes to last on the Camino. I bought a new pair of Salomons after finishing one Camino, broke them in with various preparatory walks in Australia over several months (probably walking a total of only a couple of hundred kilometres) and then wore them on a Camino from Le Puy to Santiago (1400 kms). I was very disappointed to find the stitching at the heel of both shoes started to pull apart only about a month into that walk. I finished that camino by putting tape on the heels of the shoes as the split stitching was giving me blisters. With that running repair, they served me well enough, although by the time we arrived in Santiago the soles and toes of the shoes were also quite worn down.

So, in effect, the shoes lasted only one Camino -- or perhaps about 2000 kms including preparatory walks. Is that what other walkers would expect from a good pair of walking shoes? I'm about to go out and buy a replacement pair for my next walk in August and am not sure whether to avoid that brand because of its performance, or whether that is pretty much all one can hope for from any comparable brand.
[By contrast, I'd pay only about half the price for a new tyre for my car and expect about 10 times the wear at far high speed!!].
Not every model of a brand is born equal. Out of which model of Salomons did you get 2,000 miles??? I want a pair.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
It varies enormously. These days I tend not to buy big brand-name hiking boots as I found out by accident a few years ago that my feet are equally happy in cheap solid work boots sold for the building trade plus gel insoles. My best performance so far was one pair which lasted for a short Camino in Spain, everyday wear at home for several months, then the 2000km or so from Canterbury to Rome. Pretty sad when I got there though and one of the first things I did in Rome was to visit a hardware shop and replace them with a near-identical pair.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
If your Solomon's were used for 2,000 km, that is darned good.
Indeed! My last three Salomon (trail runners) were shot with holes at heels and toes after only 500-600 km. On 2 occasions I was even given my money back. After the third time I decided that it might be me:D

I'm just back from 320 km on the Lana (Alicante - Cuenca) and 320 on the Primitivo (Oviedo - Santiago) and my La Sportiva trail runners are looking great, so good that I can use them again. I found them on sale in Ponferrada when I was there in January volunteering. Now all I need to do is find them here in The Netherlands.

p.s. I'm really tough on my shoes (and walk very long stages) so others may gave better luck.
 

celinehenriette

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Zwolle - Rome 2013
Jacobsweg Austria 2018
Camino Frances 2018
Camino Portugues 2018
Finisterre 2018
My Meindl boots started falling apart around 3500 km. The ones before that (also Meindl) lasted me 4000 km.
 

Juspassinthrough

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, May-June (2017)
Ingles, June (2019
Leon-Sarria, June (2019)
Le Puy-Santiago (2023)
I agree with T2andreo at the top, same boots, similar break in and the CF wore out the soles but no other problems and I bought the next generation Keens for my return in May. I firmly believe that the pavement walking did most of the damage.
 

lindam

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Via de La Plata, Portuguese, Camino Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan and Aragones, Norte
I love Salomon shoes for walking the Camino. I have found it necessary to purchase a new pair for each Camino, especially given the ware on the soles.
 

Chris Gi

Member
Camino(s) past & future
This upcoming May 31st through July 1st approximately.
My fairly unknown brand - AHNU Sugar Pine are just beginning to show signs of wear after 600+ miles. Not sure if I will replace them before my next short (100 miles) Camino next May. They were pretty inexpensive from Amazon $84 (I think that is a pretty decent price - anything under $100 works for me).
 
Camino(s) past & future
somewhere between "not enough" and "way too many"
Lowa Zephyr "Mid" style: 2012 to 2015 - 2,500 km before retirement

Merrell Moab "Mid" style: 2015 to 2016 - 600+ km, still used for casual walking around town and such but not serviceable for Camino-ing any longer. While I estimate the soles are good for another 500 km, my pair developed an unfortunate tendency to start absorbing water despite regular cleaning and waterproofing restoration. The usual trick of newspaper stuffing overnight was of little benefit. After a a short Winter Camino, they required nearly two weeks airing (in a very dry climate) to lose the damp.

Lowa Renegade "Mid" style: 2017 - ? They have 1,000 kms on them currently and seem to be in the same condition as the Zephyrs were at the same age.

(Edit: "Moab" distances converted to km for consistency. Had a "senior moment" after a phone call distracted me. Probably never happens to anyone else here.;))
 
Last edited:

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
I am curious about how long members expect a new pair of walking shoes to last on the Camino. I bought a new pair of Salomons after finishing one Camino, broke them in with various preparatory walks in Australia over several months (probably walking a total of only a couple of hundred kilometres) and then wore them on a Camino from Le Puy to Santiago (1400 kms). I was very disappointed to find the stitching at the heel of both shoes started to pull apart only about a month into that walk. I finished that camino by putting tape on the heels of the shoes as the split stitching was giving me blisters. With that running repair, they served me well enough, although by the time we arrived in Santiago the soles and toes of the shoes were also quite worn down.

So, in effect, the shoes lasted only one Camino -- or perhaps about 2000 kms including preparatory walks. Is that what other walkers would expect from a good pair of walking shoes? I'm about to go out and buy a replacement pair for my next walk in August and am not sure whether to avoid that brand because of its performance, or whether that is pretty much all one can hope for from any comparable brand.
[By contrast, I'd pay only about half the price for a new tyre for my car and expect about 10 times the wear at far high speed!!].
I find good quality, yet lightweight shoes/boots ( Lowa, Meindl, Adidas Terrex) last about 1200 to 1500 km. Hard out heavier duty hiking boots longer. Eventually the sole compacts and gets hard and the pain starts.
Some shoes/boots including Keens, Grisport and Teva boots were super comfy, but in each case the sole detached after a few days and I had to find new footwear on the trail, which was really difficult and inconvenient, let alone expensive.
I have been walking pilgrim trails basically annually since 2006 and this has been my experience.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
I walked almost about 2300k in my Brooks Cascadias and then I used them to train for the next Camino. I had 4 very small blisters over the two Caminos I used them.
 

J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
It actually depends on that particular pair of shoes. I have Keene winter hikers (snow and bad weather) that have more than 1200km on them. I use Altra trial runners to hike in other kinds of weather. I had 1 pair that lasted about 600 miles and another pair that wore through in 250 miles. In the U. S. we have Lemon Laws for cars that never work right while another of the same model never breaks down. The same with shoes you never know what you'll get till you got them.
 

Hilarious

Hilarious
Camino(s) past & future
Planning stage Camino Frances from SJPdP (Sept. 2019)
Great question and responses! I have been wearing Salomon X-Ultras since I started training for my September 2019 Camino about 12 months ago. My kms per week has increased from around 20kms at the start and am averaging 70-80kms now. My first pair of Salomon have worn through the soles in patches. I bought another pair which I am alternating between the old ones. Most of my walking has been on roads (some with quite a significant camber as I live in Mackay, Queensland and we can get torrential rain at times). I have also been fitted (size larger) with a pair of Hokas (Bondi 5) but have not worn them on a longer walk yet.

IMHO your Salomons seem to have done very well.
 

David from Freo

These are the best years of our lives
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago 2008; SJPP-Santiago (2014); Lisbon-Santiago-Muxia (2016); LePuy-Santiago (2018)
My Meindl boots started falling apart around 3500 km. The ones before that (also Meindl) lasted me 4000 km.
Wow! Now THAT is serious durability in a hiking shoe/boot! I am not familiar with that brand. Perhaps it is not readily available in Western Australia where I live. I must keep my eye out for it when I am next in Europe. Thanks to everyone who is responding to my query. I am finding all responses enlightening.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Wow! Now THAT is serious durability in a hiking shoe/boot! I am not familiar with that brand. Perhaps it is not readily available in Western Australia where I live. I must keep my eye out for it when I am next in Europe. Thanks to everyone who is responding to my query. I am finding all responses enlightening.
It will depend on the category Meindl. They go from lightweight soft boots to hard out mountain climbing boots. These will last longer than the soft ones.
Also later model shoes are less durable.
 

celinehenriette

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Zwolle - Rome 2013
Jacobsweg Austria 2018
Camino Frances 2018
Camino Portugues 2018
Finisterre 2018
Wow! Now THAT is serious durability in a hiking shoe/boot! I am not familiar with that brand. Perhaps it is not readily available in Western Australia where I live. I must keep my eye out for it when I am next in Europe. Thanks to everyone who is responding to my query. I am finding all responses enlightening.
They are serious hiking boots, that I also use for hiking in mountains with a large backpack. So for many people a bit much for a camino. But for me, the only shoes that do not give me blisters and are comfortable.
Meindl is a German brand, very durable and popular in Europe. They are not cheap, but because they last for a very long time, they pay back in that way.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
They are serious hiking boots, that I also use for hiking in mountains with a large backpack. So for many people a bit much for a camino. But for me, the only shoes that do not give me blisters and are comfortable.
Meindl is a German brand, very durable and popular in Europe. They are not cheap, but because they last for a very long time, they pay back in that way.
As I said before, the lightweight Meindls dont last much longer than Lowa or other good brands. The mountaineering heavy Meindl do. There are a lot of categories in between. Rated ABC etc which indicate the sturdiness of the boots.
 

Raggy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
My last pair of boots - Scarpa GTX - I estimate that I got over 1,500km out of them. In Ourense it looked like they wouldn't last all the way to Santiago so I bought a pair of Aku boots with Michelin soles. They needed new soles after less than 400km. Those Michelin soles were definitely not worthy of a star.
 

Tom Raftery

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2013
(May 2015)
I am curious about how long members expect a new pair of walking shoes to last on the Camino. I bought a new pair of Salomons after finishing one Camino, broke them in with various preparatory walks in Australia over several months (probably walking a total of only a couple of hundred kilometres) and then wore them on a Camino from Le Puy to Santiago (1400 kms). I was very disappointed to find the stitching at the heel of both shoes started to pull apart only about a month into that walk. I finished that camino by putting tape on the heels of the shoes as the split stitching was giving me blisters. With that running repair, they served me well enough, although by the time we arrived in Santiago the soles and toes of the shoes were also quite worn down.

So, in effect, the shoes lasted only one Camino -- or perhaps about 2000 kms including preparatory walks. Is that what other walkers would expect from a good pair of walking shoes? I'm about to go out and buy a replacement pair for my next walk in August and am not sure whether to avoid that brand because of its performance, or whether that is pretty much all one can hope for from any comparable brand.
[By contrast, I'd pay only about half the price for a new tyre for my car and expect about 10 times the wear at far high speed!!].
I used North Face shoes on my first Camino. They lasted through the training and then the Camino. I tried a new model two years later, but despite NF's assurances they were better, they were not. In Astorga when my new NFs wore out, I bought some Mammuts which I loved. Now I have Salomon low cuts and Merrell high tops. Love them both, but probably prefer latter.

Tom
 

Stroller

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2015), Frances (2016)
Merrell Moabs lasted a couple of hundred kM. wearing in, the camino Frances, and still had a bit of life in them, although the soles had a become thin so only usable for flat surfaces. I think that's about all you can expect from trail shoes. Good boots, Scarpa, Brasher, Asolo etc. will last longer in my experience but are more robustly built particularly in the sole.
 

Kathie Morton

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
5/2017
I am curious about how long members expect a new pair of walking shoes to last on the Camino. I bought a new pair of Salomons after finishing one Camino, broke them in with various preparatory walks in Australia over several months (probably walking a total of only a couple of hundred kilometres) and then wore them on a Camino from Le Puy to Santiago (1400 kms). I was very disappointed to find the stitching at the heel of both shoes started to pull apart only about a month into that walk. I finished that camino by putting tape on the heels of the shoes as the split stitching was giving me blisters. With that running repair, they served me well enough, although by the time we arrived in Santiago the soles and toes of the shoes were also quite worn down.

So, in effect, the shoes lasted only one Camino -- or perhaps about 2000 kms including preparatory walks. Is that what other walkers would expect from a good pair of walking shoes? I'm about to go out and buy a replacement pair for my next walk in August and am not sure whether to avoid that brand because of its performance, or whether that is pretty much all one can hope for from any comparable brand.
[By contrast, I'd pay only about half the price for a new tyre for my car and expect about 10 times the wear at far high speed!!].
I’m from Oregon and used timberland hiking boots for the first 100km and developed blisters due to overheating...from there I used my Chaco hiking sandals for over 700km and I am still using these same sandals 2 years later. Holding up quite well. Breaking in a new pair of Chaco’s to wear this June on Portuguese camino. No hiking boots for these feet 🦶🏽
 

cbacino

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte - Primitivo (2018)
Via Francigena (2017)
Appalachian Trail (2016)
I am curious about how long members expect a new pair of walking shoes to last on the Camino. I bought a new pair of Salomons after finishing one Camino, broke them in with various preparatory walks in Australia over several months (probably walking a total of only a couple of hundred kilometres) and then wore them on a Camino from Le Puy to Santiago (1400 kms). I was very disappointed to find the stitching at the heel of both shoes started to pull apart only about a month into that walk. I finished that camino by putting tape on the heels of the shoes as the split stitching was giving me blisters. With that running repair, they served me well enough, although by the time we arrived in Santiago the soles and toes of the shoes were also quite worn down.

So, in effect, the shoes lasted only one Camino -- or perhaps about 2000 kms including preparatory walks. Is that what other walkers would expect from a good pair of walking shoes? I'm about to go out and buy a replacement pair for my next walk in August and am not sure whether to avoid that brand because of its performance, or whether that is pretty much all one can hope for from any comparable brand.
[By contrast, I'd pay only about half the price for a new tyre for my car and expect about 10 times the wear at far high speed!!].
A pair cheap ($50 US) New Balance 481 lasted over 2000 km on the Via Francigena. No break-in period; worn straight from the box. Works with trainers that fit. I don't understand why people wear boots, i.e. big and relatively heavy. Pilgrimage isn't talus slope scrambling, it's mostly easy trail and road walking.
 
Last edited:

Csutak

Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances, Norte, Ingles, Primitivo, Aragones, Vasco, SanSalvador, Fisterre, Muxia - more than once
After some pieces of unsuccessful experience with Raichle (Swiss) and Columbia walking shoes, I only walk in Merrell shoes. They are perfect for me even without any preparatory walks. Once I started with a broken toe but had no problems during the whole Way. One pair of these shoes usually last for two Caminos.
After the second I always buy new ones because by that time the sole has become thinner and I can feel the stones. 🥾;)
 

jdickson

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis 2014, Camino Portugues 2016
Call me silly, but to me it is all about your feet.....not the boot. Two Caminos (Francis, Portugal) plus numerous day hikes with Keens. No blisters, no boot breakdowns, no problems. Preparing for my next Camino and will wear the same boots with confidence. I think it's the person/feet not the boot.
 

jimmyc

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015
I got more than 2000 kms out of my Merrells. I walked the C to C in England, the CF from SJPP and the PC from Lisbon. Add to that many kms at home in Oz.
I am now wearing Scarpa which are also very good.
 

jdpiguet

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past? Not enough.
Future? Sure!
I am using Lowa Renegade Mid since 15 years.
The sole are almost dead after 700-800 km, but I am walking quite a lot on macadam ways.
When I give them a new sole, they are good for a new 600-700 km.
The cushioning will be dead anyhow after 1500 km, so the soles cannot be replaced a second time.
I know they are not lasting very long, but as I nver had a blister with them, I keep buying the same every time a new pair is needed.
Buen Camino,
Jacques-D.
 

Dorpie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia 2013
Camino Frances May 2015
Camino Frances July 2017
[By contrast, I'd pay only about half the price for a new tyre for my car and expect about 10 times the wear at far high speed!!].
But would you want your footwear made out of tyre rubber? I'm guessing not! The fact is that durability and comfort are pretty much always mutually exclusive. My heavy Keen boots are great for the odd day bog trotting around Wales and have lasted years but I'd never use them on camino, meanwhile my Keen Arroyo IIs barely made it through a Frances but they were incredibly comfortable and for me that's a price worth paying.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
Just shows how much is down to personal preference and individual needs. It might be conditioning after years of hard wear but I find my feet are very happy in cheap and cheerful boots. These days I usually buy a pair of cheap safety boots - probably Dunlop branded from Sports Direct - and wear them with gel insoles more or less exclusively until they eventually wear out: for ordinary daily wear at home, short walks locally or longer walks for several weeks at a time. I average about 30km per day on a longer walk, not unusual for me to walk a few 40km stages, and now and again I might walk a 50km stage when my mood and the conditions are right. In anything from -5C to +38C. No serious foot issues to report. I suppose I might travel slightly faster and further with equal comfort some days if I spent £150 rather than £25 on a pair of boots but my past experience of both is that it makes very little difference for me.
 

Marcus-UK

Old Git
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles (2016) Camino Portuguese (2017) Considering Invierno 2019
I am curious about how long members expect a new pair of walking shoes to last on the Camino. I bought a new pair of Salomons after finishing one Camino, broke them in with various preparatory walks in Australia over several months (probably walking a total of only a couple of hundred kilometres) and then wore them on a Camino from Le Puy to Santiago (1400 kms). I was very disappointed to find the stitching at the heel of both shoes started to pull apart only about a month into that walk. I finished that camino by putting tape on the heels of the shoes as the split stitching was giving me blisters. With that running repair, they served me well enough, although by the time we arrived in Santiago the soles and toes of the shoes were also quite worn down.
I have had traditional hiking boots last 30 plus years with the occasional resole. In 2008 i bought a pair of Merrells MOAB basic suede shoes that have finally wore out after 11 years of weekend hillwalking/Vacations/Gym/General use. I bought a new pair of Merrels Gortex this year and sent them back since the shoe "last" appears to have changed and caused me blisters with only five minutes of walking.
From past posts the ultra lightweight trail running shoes do seem to last a short time compared to traditional boots and even modern lightweight walking shoes.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Trail and street runners absolutely will not last as long as a boot or heavier hiking shoe. As was pointed out in the thread, when a lighter weight and cushioning for the feet are the primary focus, the materials are more friable than those used on heavier footwear. The actual reasons for choosing a trail or road running shoe is what makes their overall lifespan shorter.

I used 5 pairs of trail runners on my thru-hike of the 2,650 mile long Pacific Crest Trail. I bought 6 pairs ahead of time and mailed one pair to a resupply point at defined intervals. Only one pair was truly trash-worthy when replaced; the other 4 pair had some good life left to them. I did not have the luxury of waiting for the BEST and optimal time for replacement of shoes as the hike proceeded, so I had to be exceedingly conservative on determining the margin for usability before replacement.

Why would I choose that type of footwear? Significantly lighter weight, lessened risk for injury, comfort with the cushioning, and the lessened drain on energy levels caused by lifting the weight on my feet while walking 24 to 26 mile days.

Those are my reasons. They are shared by the majority of backpacking enthusiasts in the US (I do not know about the rest of the world). Others prefer heavier footwear including more traditional hiking boots.

I do not let longevity of footwear determine what I wear. I focus on on comfort of the footwear's fit and feel, and what the overall energy expenditure will be in using them. Then I consider what the conditions are expected to be like (cold, snow, ice). From there, I make my decision.

My Lowa boots. . Camino GTX. . are used when cold weather conditions in late fall and winter demand a change. They are stiff enough and insulated enough for snow shoes and lite partial crampons. For mountaineering and ice climbing, I have used (and still have) an even stiffer and heavier boot that can take and hold onto full length crampons.

I have had a long history of wearing hiking boots and hiking shoes. I was overjoyed when I switched over to road or trail runners, and gladly trade the shorter life cycle for happier feet.

Your mileage may vary :)
 
I am curious about how long members expect a new pair of walking shoes to last on the Camino. I bought a new pair of Salomons after finishing one Camino, broke them in with various preparatory walks in Australia over several months (probably walking a total of only a couple of hundred kilometres) and then wore them on a Camino from Le Puy to Santiago (1400 kms). I was very disappointed to find the stitching at the heel of both shoes started to pull apart only about a month into that walk. I finished that camino by putting tape on the heels of the shoes as the split stitching was giving me blisters. With that running repair, they served me well enough, although by the time we arrived in Santiago the soles and toes of the shoes were also quite worn down.

So, in effect, the shoes lasted only one Camino -- or perhaps about 2000 kms including preparatory walks. Is that what other walkers would expect from a good pair of walking shoes? I'm about to go out and buy a replacement pair for my next walk in August and am not sure whether to avoid that brand because of its performance, or whether that is pretty much all one can hope for from any comparable brand.
[By contrast, I'd pay only about half the price for a new tyre for my car and expect about 10 times the wear at far high speed!!].
My new Merrill lasted a third of the Norte trail from Irun to Santiago. Ending in Santiago I had 3 pairs of inner soles in them. They now hang in my garden with plants in them. Didn't need to make to holes for drainage as the were holier than my watering can. Must say I didn't have even the tiniest of blisters...
 

Richmond Gardner

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2017)
Lowa Zephyr "Mid" style: 2012 to 2015 - 2,500 km before retirement

Merrell Moab "Mid" style: 2015 to 2016 - 600+ km, still used for casual walking around town and such but not serviceable for Camino-ing any longer. While I estimate the soles are good for another 500 km, my pair developed an unfortunate tendency to start absorbing water despite regular cleaning and waterproofing restoration. The usual trick of newspaper stuffing overnight was of little benefit. After a a short Winter Camino, they required nearly two weeks airing (in a very dry climate) to lose the damp.

Lowa Renegade "Mid" style: 2017 - ? They have 1,000 kms on them currently and seem to be in the same condition as the Zephyrs were at the same age.

(Edit: "Moab" distances converted to km for consistency. Had a "senior moment" after a phone call distracted me. Probably never happens to anyone else here.;))
I like and have had three consecutive Moab’s, and they have been very good to me. I wear them daily in my construction business, so who knows how many miles that is, but I am walking 7,500-10,000 steps a day. When I walked from SJPP to Santiago in 2017, I broke in a new pair for a month and then wore them, happily, on the Camino. Plus, I wore them all summer and fall after that - probably at least 2,000 km. At that point, all the cushion was gone and the stitching beginning to unravel. I will take that performance anytime...
 

Richmond Gardner

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2017)
Trail and street runners absolutely will not last as long as a boot or heavier hiking shoe. As was pointed out in the thread, when a lighter weight and cushioning for the feet are the primary focus, the materials are more friable than those used on heavier footwear. The actual reasons for choosing a trail or road running shoe is what makes their overall lifespan shorter.

I used 5 pairs of trail runners on my thru-hike of the 2,650 mile long Pacific Crest Trail. I bought 6 pairs ahead of time and mailed one pair to a resupply point at defined intervals. Only one pair was truly trash-worthy when replaced; the other 4 pair had some good life left to them. I did not have the luxury of waiting for the BEST and optimal time for replacement of shoes as the hike proceeded, so I had to be exceedingly conservative on determining the margin for usability before replacement.

Why would I choose that type of footwear? Significantly lighter weight, lessened risk for injury, comfort with the cushioning, and the lessened drain on energy levels caused by lifting the weight on my feet while walking 24 to 26 mile days.

Those are my reasons. They are shared by the majority of backpacking enthusiasts in the US (I do not know about the rest of the world). Others prefer heavier footwear including more traditional hiking boots.

I do not let longevity of footwear determine what I wear. I focus on on comfort of the footwear's fit and feel, and what the overall energy expenditure will be in using them. Then I consider what the conditions are expected to be like (cold, snow, ice). From there, I make my decision.

My Lowa boots. . Camino GTX. . are used when cold weather conditions in late fall and winter demand a change. They are stiff enough and insulated enough for snow shoes and lite partial crampons. For mountaineering and ice climbing, I have used (and still have) an even stiffer and heavier boot that can take and hold onto full length crampons.

I have had a long history of wearing hiking boots and hiking shoes. I was overjoyed when I switched over to road or trail runners, and gladly trade the shorter life cycle for happier feet.

Your mileage may vary :)
I like your brief mileage disclaimer- much shorter than pharma commercials!
 

Lance Chambers

Lance Chambers
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria (2015), SJPdP (2016), Burgos (2017), SJPdP (2018), Burgo (2019), SJPdP (2023?).
...
These days I tend not to buy big brand-name hiking boots as I found out by accident a few years ago that my feet are equally happy in cheap solid work boots sold for the building trade plus gel insoles. My best performance so far was one pair which lasted for a short Camino in Spain, everyday wear at home for several months, then the 2000km or so from Canterbury to Rome. Pretty sad when I got there though and one of the first things I did in Rome was to visit a hardware shop and replace them with a near-identical pair.
I do the same and I use them in the garden, walking around town, local hikes/walks, etc. since I started my first Camino and they are still being used and ready for my planned '23 on the Frances again - just love the place.

But I am very particularly parsimonious (50% Scottish blood in my veins) and will not waste money on an expensive but relatively useless pair of boots/shoes when a well fitting pair of industrial ones will do the trick for around AUD$60 - 70. For those in the know, I bought a pair of very good ones from Rivers but the heel stitching gave up after about 5 years of regular use - regular gardening can really mess up a good pair of boots. They cost about AUD$40 at the time I seem to remember.
 

Cicada

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances St Jean -Santiago April -June 2017
Portugues September 2018
I am curious about how long members expect a new pair of walking shoes to last on the Camino. I bought a new pair of Salomons after finishing one Camino, broke them in with various preparatory walks in Australia over several months (probably walking a total of only a couple of hundred kilometres) and then wore them on a Camino from Le Puy to Santiago (1400 kms). I was very disappointed to find the stitching at the heel of both shoes started to pull apart only about a month into that walk. I finished that camino by putting tape on the heels of the shoes as the split stitching was giving me blisters. With that running repair, they served me well enough, although by the time we arrived in Santiago the soles and toes of the shoes were also quite worn down.

So, in effect, the shoes lasted only one Camino -- or perhaps about 2000 kms including preparatory walks. Is that what other walkers would expect from a good pair of walking shoes? I'm about to go out and buy a replacement pair for my next walk in August and am not sure whether to avoid that brand because of its performance, or whether that is pretty much all one can hope for from any comparable brand.
[By contrast, I'd pay only about half the price for a new tyre for my car and expect about 10 times the wear at far high speed!!].
I'd say 2000k is pretty darn good
My Merrill Moabs are just about done they have a Frances a portugues and some other stuff so i guess arond the 2000 k mark
 

OLDER threads on this topic


Book your lodging here

Booking.com



Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 12 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 5 0.5%
  • March

    Votes: 41 4.2%
  • April

    Votes: 146 14.9%
  • May

    Votes: 245 25.0%
  • June

    Votes: 75 7.7%
  • July

    Votes: 20 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 16 1.6%
  • September

    Votes: 284 29.0%
  • October

    Votes: 118 12.1%
  • November

    Votes: 12 1.2%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.5%
Top