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How many days walking for Camino Frances

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Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
(2020) Camino Frances
Hello everyone 🙂

I am planning to buy my plane ticket from Canada to Paris (and then trains to get to St-Jean) and need to gauge number of days to allocate to walk to Santiago (allowing for 2-3 days rest) then from Santiago to Muxia-Finnestere-Santiago. Then travel back to Paris for return flight. Knowing this is fully subjective with regards to potential setbacks (blisters, sprain or strains) and pace, I value this forum's experience and knowledge base. Perhaps giving myself 32 days to Santiago and then 6 days-7 days to walk and visit Muxia and Finnistere...does this sound about right? Your valuable input is greatly appreciated :).

Thanks in advance to all who respond!! 🥰🙂
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
(2020) Camino Frances
Hello everyone 🙂

I am planning to buy my plane ticket from Canada to Paris (and then trains to get to St-Jean) and need to gauge number of days to allocate to walk to Santiago (allowing for 2-3 days rest) then from Santiago to Muxia-Finnestere-Santiago. Then travel back to Paris for return flight. Knowing this is fully subjective with regards to potential setbacks (blisters, sprain or strains) and pace, I value this forum's experience and knowledge base. Perhaps giving myself 32 days to Santiago and then 6 days-7 days to walk and visit Muxia and Finnistere...does this sound about right? Your valuable input is greatly appreciated :).

Thanks in advance to all who respond!! 🥰🙂
PS Will be taking bus back to Santiago from Finnistere.
 

Dochim

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 July - April 2018 Francés
June - July 2018 Primitivo
It depends on lots of things, but particularly your fitness level. We met a lady in her late seventies from Kansas on the Francés. She told us that she had a 90 day visitor’s visa and her flight was booked for day 90. She was walking about 10k a day and that was as much as she could manage, but I’m sure she made it to Santiago.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
Yes, your question is almost impossible to answer. Try to guess the distance you are capable of doing and add at least a week. If you get there early, no worries I am sure you will find something to doo in Spain or Europe.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Hello everyone 🙂

I am planning to buy my plane ticket from Canada to Paris (and then trains to get to St-Jean) and need to gauge number of days to allocate to walk to Santiago (allowing for 2-3 days rest) then from Santiago to Muxia-Finnestere-Santiago. Then travel back to Paris for return flight. Knowing this is fully subjective with regards to potential setbacks (blisters, sprain or strains) and pace, I value this forum's experience and knowledge base. Perhaps giving myself 32 days to Santiago and then 6 days-7 days to walk and visit Muxia and Finnistere...does this sound about right? Your valuable input is greatly appreciated :).

Thanks in advance to all who respond!! 🥰🙂
Sounds good. Depending, of course, on age, physical ability, etc. I am 65 and think your estimate sounds reasonable. Enjoy!

Buen Camino!
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
(2020) Camino Frances
It depends on lots of things, but particularly your fitness level. We met a lady in her late seventies from Kansas on the Francés. She told us that she had a 90 day visitor’s visa and her flight was booked for day 90. She was walking about 10k a day and that was as much as she could manage, but I’m sure she made it to Santiago.
I am in good physical condition and plan to train specifically with my pack and different duration and terrain walks as well as weight training. Even in our harsh winter conditions. Thanks for responding:)
 
But, I agree with previous posts, if this is your first Camino, give yourself a few extra days. Training in whatever conditions you are training now will not replicate the actual Camino. It is definitely a humbling experience for those of us who think/ thought we were or are well prepared! I live and hike and backpack in Colorado and got my butt kicked on the CF! Loved it, and the experience, nothing like it! Ha, thus the reason I am going back in August to the Primitivo for # 3. PS..... If you do end up with extra days before your flight back, there is PLENTY to keep you occupied!

Buen Camino!!!
Rosemary
 

jozero

Been there, going again...
Camino(s) past & future
CF
Not sure what time of the year you are considering but close to 1,000 kms total / 39 walking days (32+7) = +/- 25kms per walking day. Possible for sure but if you haven't done long distance walking and experienced a daily grind of >25kms per day, it can be tough to maintain those distances day-in and day-out, especially if you are in the 'off season' months where you distances can be dictated by availability of open Albergues (or peak of summer where availability of bed within Albergues can be equally challenging) and extra weight carried for environmental/weather variables.

My average winter time frame is 34 days of walking and a few rest days. If I were going to tack on SdC-Muxia-Finisterre-SdC I would give myself fully 42 days for the walking plus at least 3 or 4 for resting and enjoying the attractions of several cities along the way.

Good luck with the planning and enjoy the walk.
 

AlexanderAZ

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 (Sept/Oct): CF: SJPdP-->Fisterra-->Muxia (solo)
2019 (late Sept): CF: SJPdP-->Leon (honeymoon!)
Take as much time away from home as your schedule will allow. I don't recall meeting anyone that said they'd wished they had an earlier date to fly home but I met plenty that said they wished they had more time in Spain.
 

Raymond

Member
Camino(s) past & future
St Jean-Sahagun'16' Sahagun Santiago Finisterre'18' Portugese'19'
25K a day without an odd rest day can be a bit of an ask. There are beautiful locations along the way that are worth stopping over. Burgos is a good example. 5 days walking will get you to Muxia and Finisterre from Santiago. Take your time and enjoy rather than pushing yourself. If you can take the extra few days you wont regret it.

Buen Camino!!
 

NorthernLight

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
I take closer to 42 days to get to Santiago, with a daily average of 19km. Some days I do 10 km, some days I do 27. I refuse to rush, I walk every step, and visit everything that looks interesting.

Consider an open jaws flight: home to Paris, Porto to home.
 

NorthernLight

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
Instead of a return ticket, search for a multiple destinations ticket.

1) Toronto or Calgary or wherever to Paris
2) Porto (OPO) to Toronto or Montreal

Porto is a three hour bus ride from Santiago.

Likewise, look at flights from Santiago ... Veuling goes to London Gatwick where you could switch to a flight to your home/nearby airport.
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
(2020) Camino Frances
Instead of a return ticket, search for a multiple destinations ticket.

1) Toronto or Calgary or wherever to Paris
2) Porto (OPO) to Toronto or Montreal

Porto is a three hour bus ride from Santiago.

Likewise, look at flights from Santiago ... Veuling goes to London Gatwick where you could switch to a flight to your home/nearby airport.
Thank you for taking the time to add this info. :)
 

LesR

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2017)
Hello everyone 🙂

I am planning to buy my plane ticket from Canada to Paris (and then trains to get to St-Jean) and need to gauge number of days to allocate to walk to Santiago (allowing for 2-3 days rest) then from Santiago to Muxia-Finnestere-Santiago. Then travel back to Paris for return flight. Knowing this is fully subjective with regards to potential setbacks (blisters, sprain or strains) and pace, I value this forum's experience and knowledge base. Perhaps giving myself 32 days to Santiago and then 6 days-7 days to walk and visit Muxia and Finnistere...does this sound about right? Your valuable input is greatly appreciated :).

Thanks in advance to all who respond!! 🥰🙂
Depends on a number of factors....

32+6 could be a tolerable minimum for a reasonably fit person with no averse events along the way AND NO WISH TO STOP AND SMELL THE ROSES!

My humble view is work out how much time you can spare, subtract a week for contingencies and sight-seeing, and adjust your ground speed over the 900 km to fill the time available...

If your objective is simply to walk the 900km without regard to the social, religious, cultural, spiritual, historic and landscape context of the camino and you are fit, 32+6 is doable, but....

Opportunity missed on my view.
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
(2020) Camino Frances
Depends on a number of factors....

32+6 could be a tolerable minimum for a reasonably fit person with no averse events along the way AND NO WISH TO STOP AND SMELL THE ROSES!

My humble view is work out how much time you can spare, subtract a week for contingencies and sight-seeing, and adjust your ground speed over the 900 km to fill the time available...

If your objective is simply to walk the 900km without regard to the social, religious, cultural, spiritual, historic and landscape context of the camino and you are fit, 32+6 is doable, but....

Opportunity missed on my view.
Thank you LesR. Your all caps were heard in the best of ways. You’ve given me valuable food for thought. I am self employed and run my own practice in the field of manual therapy, taking April and May off. I do need to factor in time to reconnect with family and the reality of starting a more routine life once I get back home. Your words as well as the other valued comments from other forum members have shed some excellent and new thoughts about this important time in my life. Reflection and visualization in full swing. ☺
 

Rick M

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
April ('16,'18, '19)
You have been given some great advice here. If you can, plan a longer trip, not a shorter one. Nearly everyone plans a walk to the Brierly stages, and begins to regret it as they settle in to the routine. For the record, I always seem to take 35 days to SdC. I did Finisterre in 4 days once, but enjoyed it a lot more in a leisurely five. If you turn out to be a road runner and have no injuries, the worst you are facing is a few extra days in Porto drinking the local wine and enjoying the local cuisine.

Buen Camino!
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
(2020) Camino Frances
Thanks to all who have responded. I knew your experience and advice would help me in my decision and planning. With the time I am able to set aside, excluding travel time to and from, I can spend 46 days on the Camino.

Very grateful for your help! Merci, thank you, gracias :) 🙏
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Buen camino, @Dani7 !

I second the posts where people have said to give yourself some flex.
And consider that you may wany to take a few rest days, or just have a slower camino. 33 or 34 days to get to Santiago is more easeful.

And to add in day or so once you get there. I love Santiago, and it's always fun to re-meet people you've walked with.

You can shorten the travel time by flying out of Santiago on a multi-city open-jaw ticket - flying in to (say) Biarritz and out of Santiago. There are direct flights from Santiago to many European cities, so you can just transit to your flight home. Last year I flew Santiago-Dublin-Vancouver, for example. Thinking outside the box can be very useful here.
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
(2020) Camino Frances
Thank you :). I’m exploring the travel options to what works best time wise and Expense and these options are what worth looking into.
 

TaijiPilgrim

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2011), Camino Frances (2015), Camino Ingles (2017), Camino Muxia (2017), LePuy(2019)
I also wanted to suggest booking a multi-city - sometimes called "open jaw" ticket. It often costs the same as a roundtrip fare and it saves the added cost of returning to your round trip departure city. I have in the past booked multi-city ticket from Iberia Airlines Boston to Pamplona and then Santiago to Boston. Each transited through Madrid and I made sure I had enough time in between the connection to get through security to the connecting terminal and gate. You don't say when you are doing your camino, but be aware that cheaper prices for fall travel are beginning to appear.
 

HelenVanW

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2007, 2012, 2014, 2x in 2015, 2016
Hello everyone 🙂

I am planning to buy my plane ticket from Canada to Paris (and then trains to get to St-Jean) and need to gauge number of days to allocate to walk to Santiago (allowing for 2-3 days rest) then from Santiago to Muxia-Finnestere-Santiago. Then travel back to Paris for return flight. Knowing this is fully subjective with regards to potential setbacks (blisters, sprain or strains) and pace, I value this forum's experience and knowledge base. Perhaps giving myself 32 days to Santiago and then 6 days-7 days to walk and visit Muxia and Finnistere...does this sound about right? Your valuable input is greatly appreciated :).

Thanks in advance to all who respond!! 🥰🙂
I always suggest padding the number of days to allow adjusting to a slower walk in the beginning. SJPDP to Santiago, I would recommend 35-45 days depending on how much of this type of activity you are used to. Walking long distances day after day is VERY different from an occasional weekend hike. Your fitness level and stamina is a big determining factor. Plus, we always suggest that you go at your own pace and savor the beauty you will encounter. Yes, people do it faster, but if you don't have to, we suggest that you allow for rest and enjoying the journey. The Camino Francés has many more places to stop with shorter distances between, so you will be able to tailor it for yourself. The Santiago-Muxia-Fisterre-Santiago doesn't have as many options. By then you will be in great shape, and will be in better shape to do this. Wishing you all the best, Buen Camino!
 

Hurry Krishna

Indian on the Way
Camino(s) past & future
2009 (from Sarria), 2014 from St Jean Pied de Port, 2016 from Porto, 2018 from Le Puy to Santiago.
Hello everyone 🙂

I am planning to buy my plane ticket from Canada to Paris (and then trains to get to St-Jean) and need to gauge number of days to allocate to walk to Santiago (allowing for 2-3 days rest) then from Santiago to Muxia-Finnestere-Santiago. Then travel back to Paris for return flight. Knowing this is fully subjective with regards to potential setbacks (blisters, sprain or strains) and pace, I value this forum's experience and knowledge base. Perhaps giving myself 32 days to Santiago and then 6 days-7 days to walk and visit Muxia and Finnistere...does this sound about right? Your valuable input is greatly appreciated :).

Thanks in advance to all who respond!! 🥰🙂
We took a long time on our first camino Frances, but the second time we did it we took just on 30 days. So 32 sounds good to me - especially if you are used to long-distance walking. The Munia part is right too - but both Munia and Finistere are really pretty - though Finistere is quite touristy these days. You might want to spend an extra day in one of those two. Have fun.
 

Terry Callery

Chi Walker
Camino(s) past & future
"Portuguese Camino - In Search of the Infinite Moment" Amazon/Kindle books authored
"Slow Camino"
My advice on getting physically prepared for the Camino would be this. You will need to get yourself to the point where you can walk more or less continuously for close to three hours, perhaps with a few short breaks for water or to catch your breath after climbing up a steep hill. To me this three-hour walk represents the morning portion of your walk on the Camino. While I was walking about three miles per hour on paved roads in Maine during my training (about 5 km per hour), my pace on the Camino was slower, more like 4 km per hour. Understand that on the Camino, in addition to carrying a 20-pound backpack, the terrain is sometimes steep and sometimes rocky. When walking the Camino, you stop a lot…you stop to take photos, to put on or take off rain gear, to reference your map, to relieve yourself, to talk with other pilgrims, to fill up your water bottle, to get out the chocolate bar for some instant energy, to take more photos.

The morning three-hour walk would cover about 12 km on the Camino, given the 4-km-per-hour pace. Walking two hours after lunch would add an additional 8 km for the day, so a 20-km day was what I began to plan for on the long journey I was about to begin.

Most of the Camino de Santiago guidebooks, including the foremost one, John Brierley’s A Pilgrim’s Guide to the Camino de Santiago: The Way of St. James, allow 33 days to complete the journey. Divide the total distance of 776.2 km by this number of days, and one would need to average 23.5 km per day. One leg, from Molinaseca to Villafranca, the Brierley guidebook puts at a grueling 30.6 km. No, I do not think I will follow the pace suggested by the guidebook. I am going to do a Slow Camino.

From "Slow Camino - My Adventure on the Camino de Santiago" by Terence Callery
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2015) Frances
(2018) Portuguese
(2019) VdP Seville to Salamanca
(2020) VdP Salamanca to Santiago
All the comments are valid, but I'd like to add the recommendation that, if possible, you take longer to walk than you calculate. You may never get the opportunity to do this again and the area that you are going to walk through is rich in history, culture, food, and new friends. It's not just about the walk and how far you go per day, it's what you do with your other time - so make sure you have other time. Schedule more days of rest in interesting cities or areas. You will have regrets about not spending more time once you reflect after getting back home, so spend more time than you might if you were just walking. Buen Camino.
 

nickpellatt

Member
Camino(s) past & future
French 2015 Portuguese 2018 Norte May 2019 Finesterre and Muxia April 2019
I'll add something to the mix that nobody else has mentioned.

Jetlag.

I travel east often, and in my experience, flying east is terrible for jetlag. On that basis I'd be tempted to add 3 days in Paris to allow yourself time to adjust. Albergues can be hard (for some) to sleep in ... I'd hate to be suffering jetlag and be unable to sleep all night. And because they are shared you can't really turn a light on and read for a few hours at 3am.

I walked for 28 days to complete the French Camino. 32 walking days is reasonable I think. The route to Muxia is best done over 4 days I think, then 1 to Finesterre. Day 6 would be taking the bus back to SdC.
 

James2019

James McCosh
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Sep/Oct/Nov 2019
It depends on lots of things, but particularly your fitness level. We met a lady in her late seventies from Kansas on the Francés. She told us that she had a 90 day visitor’s visa and her flight was booked for day 90. She was walking about 10k a day and that was as much as she could manage, but I’m sure she made it to Santiago.
I will be 77 a few days in to my proposed CF from the end of September. I have allowed 43 days so an average of 18.5 Km per day. In my training I have yet to manage as much as that, but my traing schedule should get me to 22Km. As I have never before been fit it's very daunting, but with occasional pack forwarding I should make it. In any case it's a challenge I look forward to.

But am I being too ambitious?
 
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t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Having done this a couple of times:

1. I suggest the open jaw airplane ticket as more efficient. Fly into Paris and take the trains to SJPDP. From Santiago, fly, bus or train to Madrid, and fly home from Madrid.

2. I recommend 42 days total. That is two days on the front to get positioned, rested, and provisioned at SJPdP, two days AFTER Santiago on the back, and 38 days to complete the Camino and see Santiago.

The 38 days are based roughly around the 33 days in Mr. Brierley’s Guide. I would add one night to stay at Orisson the first night, shortly after leaving SJPdP. Once you do it you will understand why.

The remaining four (4) days are for a rest day (one each) at Burgos, Leon and maybe Astorga. This allows one extra day at Santiago. It means you would have to leave the day after you arrive.

Personally, I would manage the 42 days to allow more time at Santiago and none at Madrid. For example, you can arrive by air at Paris, as discussed above. Afterwards you can fly from Santiago to Madrid and make a connection to your home country that day. That is how I am returning to Florida on 16 August.

I use Iberia, American Airlines, or a combination of both to ensure my connections at Madrid are in the same terminal. This saves a lot of time, drama, and stress.

If you are compelled to use Air Canada (AC) from Canada to Paris, and from Madrid back to Canada, I am CERTAIN they can book your flight from Santiago to Madrid on a codeshare partner.

Be very careful of allowing enough time to get from one Madrid terminal to another. Some terminals are a 10-15 minute bus / shuttle ride from the others. This is a seriously huge airport. Just allow more time than they suggest. Remember, once you leave the secure zone, you will have to wait and go through security again.

That is why I prefer my AA / IB connections. All flights are in and out of Madrid terminal #4.

Hope this helps.
 
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Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
(2020) Camino Frances
My advice on getting physically prepared for the Camino would be this. You will need to get yourself to the point where you can walk more or less continuously for close to three hours, perhaps with a few short breaks for water or to catch your breath after climbing up a steep hill. To me this three-hour walk represents the morning portion of your walk on the Camino. While I was walking about three miles per hour on paved roads in Maine during my training (about 5 km per hour), my pace on the Camino was slower, more like 4 km per hour. Understand that on the Camino, in addition to carrying a 20-pound backpack, the terrain is sometimes steep and sometimes rocky. When walking the Camino, you stop a lot…you stop to take photos, to put on or take off rain gear, to reference your map, to relieve yourself, to talk with other pilgrims, to fill up your water bottle, to get out the chocolate bar for some instant energy, to take more photos.

The morning three-hour walk would cover about 12 km on the Camino, given the 4-km-per-hour pace. Walking two hours after lunch would add an additional 8 km for the day, so a 20-km day was what I began to plan for on the long journey I was about to begin.

Most of the Camino de Santiago guidebooks, including the foremost one, John Brierley’s A Pilgrim’s Guide to the Camino de Santiago: The Way of St. James, allow 33 days to complete the journey. Divide the total distance of 776.2 km by this number of days, and one would need to average 23.5 km per day. One leg, from Molinaseca to Villafranca, the Brierley guidebook puts at a grueling 30.6 km. No, I do not think I will follow the pace suggested by the guidebook. I am going to do a Slow Camino.

From "Slow Camino - My Adventure on the Camino de Santiago" by Terence Callery
My advice on getting physically prepared for the Camino would be this. You will need to get yourself to the point where you can walk more or less continuously for close to three hours, perhaps with a few short breaks for water or to catch your breath after climbing up a steep hill. To me this three-hour walk represents the morning portion of your walk on the Camino. While I was walking about three miles per hour on paved roads in Maine during my training (about 5 km per hour), my pace on the Camino was slower, more like 4 km per hour. Understand that on the Camino, in addition to carrying a 20-pound backpack, the terrain is sometimes steep and sometimes rocky. When walking the Camino, you stop a lot…you stop to take photos, to put on or take off rain gear, to reference your map, to relieve yourself, to talk with other pilgrims, to fill up your water bottle, to get out the chocolate bar for some instant energy, to take more photos.

The morning three-hour walk would cover about 12 km on the Camino, given the 4-km-per-hour pace. Walking two hours after lunch would add an additional 8 km for the day, so a 20-km day was what I began to plan for on the long journey I was about to begin.

Most of the Camino de Santiago guidebooks, including the foremost one, John Brierley’s A Pilgrim’s Guide to the Camino de Santiago: The Way of St. James, allow 33 days to complete the journey. Divide the total distance of 776.2 km by this number of days, and one would need to average 23.5 km per day. One leg, from Molinaseca to Villafranca, the Brierley guidebook puts at a grueling 30.6 km. No, I do not think I will follow the pace suggested by the guidebook. I am going to do a Slow Camino.

From "Slow Camino - My Adventure on the Camino de Santiago" by Terence Callery
Great advice Terry. Thank you. :)
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
(2020) Camino Frances
Having done this a couple of times:

I suggest the open jaw airplane ticket as more efficient. Fly into Paris and take the trains to SJPDP. From Santiago, fly, bus or train to Madrid, and fly home from Madrid.

2. I recommend 42 days total. That is two days on the front to get positioned, rested, and provisioned at SJPdP, two days AFTER Santiago on the back, and 38 days to complete the Camino and see Santiago.

The 38 days are based roughly around the 33 days in Mr. Brierley’s Guide. I would add one night to stay at Orisson the first night, shortly after leaving SJPdP. Once you do it you will understand why.

The remaining four (4) days are for a rest day (one each) at Burgos, Leon and maybe Astorga. This allows one extra day at Santiago. It means you would have to arrive the day after you arrive.

Personally, I would manage the 42 days to allow more time at Santiago and none at Madrid. For example, you can arrive by air at Paris, as discussed above. Afterwards you can fly from Santiago to Madrid and make a connection to your home country that day. That is how I am returning to Florida on 16 August.

I use Iberia, American Airlines, or a combination of both to ensure my connections at Madrid are in the same terminal. This saves a lot of time, drama, and stress.

Hope this helps.
Up until a few weeks ago I had never heard of Iberia airlines.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Iberia (IB) is the national airline of Spain, and a One World codeshare partner with American Airlines (AA), British Airways (BA), and host of others. I found over decades of global travel that using codeshare relationships can result in more convenient connections and more flight combinations to more places.

Coming from Canada, I believe you can get one or another One World partner to get from Toronto. - Pearson (YYZ) to Paris (CDG) then back via Madrid (MAD). Several airlines fly into Santiago (SCQ).

Just for yucks, go to www.rome2rio.com to explore ALL possibilities. THEN consult the appropriate airline or travel agency, armed with information.

Hope this helps.
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
(2020) Camino Frances
They are the national airline of Spain, and a One World codeshare partner with American Airlines, British Airways, and host of others. I found over decades of global travel that using codeshare relationships can result in more convenient connections and more flight combinations to more places.
Thank you t2andreo. I was reluctant to try then thinking they may be a substandard airline as their pricing is so much cheaper in certain flights. :)
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Nope, they have been in business for many, many decades. They fly a mostly Airbus fleet.

I find Iberia planes well maintained. I also assess their cabin service and meal service as vastly superior to American flag carriers (American, Delta, United). Personally I have zero reservations flying on Iberia.

Hope this helps.
 

Simon B

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles and Camino Frances. VDLP Spring 2019
I’ll be a few months shy of 64 and in good shape :). Thanks for responding.
I did it when I was 64 and took 28 days which seemed to be be very comfortable.

SImon
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
(2020) Camino Frances
Nope, they have been in business for many, many decades. They fly a mostly Airbus fleet.

I find Iberia planes well maintained. I also assess their cabin service and meal service as vastly superior to American flag carriers (American, Delta, United). Personally I have zero reservations flying on Iberia.

Hope this helps.
It most certainly does. Thanks so much :). Really appreciate the info.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Hello everyone 🙂

I am planning to buy my plane ticket from Canada to Paris (and then trains to get to St-Jean) and need to gauge number of days to allocate to walk to Santiago (allowing for 2-3 days rest) then from Santiago to Muxia-Finnestere-Santiago. Then travel back to Paris for return flight. Knowing this is fully subjective with regards to potential setbacks (blisters, sprain or strains) and pace, I value this forum's experience and knowledge base. Perhaps giving myself 32 days to Santiago and then 6 days-7 days to walk and visit Muxia and Finnistere...does this sound about right? Your valuable input is greatly appreciated :).

Thanks in advance to all who respond!! 🥰🙂
As many have said, it depends on a lot of things: fitness level, whether you come down with an injury requiring a few days rest, etc. When I (early 50s) walked with my son (15/16 - his birthday was on the Camino) we took 37 days to get from Roncesvalles to Santiago and another 4 to Finisterre. It would have taken us one more to Muxia. But we hadn't trained at all. We found that when we walked day after day for over 25 km, he got terrible blisters. When we kept it under 25 they stayed at bay.

My advice would be to book some extra days, if possible, to allow for illness, injury, or the possibility that shorter days work best for you. If you have extra days at the end, there is plenty to see in Spain. The last thing you want to be doing if it takes more of a toll than you expect is to be racing to Santiago to catch a flight home.

If that isn't possible, the training regimen before you go will help. Before my most recent Camino I did a lot of walking with my loaded backpack, including up and down hills, until I was very comfortable doing 20+ km for at least 3 days in a row.

Ultimately, many people have done it successfully in 32 days and 6 is plenty to walk on to Finisterre and Muxia and provides a little buffer if the pre-Santiago camino takes a bit longer than expected.
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
(2020) Camino Frances
All the comments are valid, but I'd like to add the recommendation that, if possible, you take longer to walk than you calculate. You may never get the opportunity to do this again and the area that you are going to walk through is rich in history, culture, food, and new friends. It's not just about the walk and how far you go per day, it's what you do with your other time - so make sure you have other time. Schedule more days of rest in interesting cities or areas. You will have regrets about not spending more time once you reflect after getting back home, so spend more time than you might if you were just walking. Buen Camino.
Very much agree :)
 

John Ferguson

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
The French Way May/June (2015) Complete.
Completed Porto Way from Lisbon May(2017).
Hello everyone 🙂

I am planning to buy my plane ticket from Canada to Paris (and then trains to get to St-Jean) and need to gauge number of days to allocate to walk to Santiago (allowing for 2-3 days rest) then from Santiago to Muxia-Finnestere-Santiago. Then travel back to Paris for return flight. Knowing this is fully subjective with regards to potential setbacks (blisters, sprain or strains) and pace, I value this forum's experience and knowledge base. Perhaps giving myself 32 days to Santiago and then 6 days-7 days to walk and visit Muxia and Finnistere...does this sound about right? Your valuable input is greatly appreciated :).

Thanks in advance to all who respond!! 🥰🙂
I walked from St JPdP in May / June 2016. I trained from Paris to Bordeaux, and then bused to ST JPdP. With two rest days it was 36 days to Santiago. Enjoyed Santiago for 2 or three days, then continued on to Finisterrre.
For me Finisterre was 4 days, but most do it in three. I didn't make it to Muxia, but I will one day. Like Finisterre, you can easily spend a few days in Muxia.
Ultreia.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances/SJPP 2015,2016,2018,2019
Way of St. Francis, Italy 2017
Portuguese/Finisterre 2018, 2019
I’ll be a few months shy of 64 and in good shape :). Thanks for responding.
Personally, after 7 Camino’s (4 Franes) I think you are cutting it tight. Yes, there are plenty of people who walk it in 32 days, but it doesn’t allow for issues that might arrive... blisters, tendonitious, weather or just wanting to walk with a Camino family. I always have taken between 38-40 days including rest days. I arrived in Santiago within a day (either side) of most people that I started with in SJPdP. So yes it’s possible but unless you’re used to walking 15+ miles a day, up and down hill, carrying a pack in any type of weather I would add a few days.
 

Vaughan

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francais
I think 32 is a fair estimate BUT only if you are fit and have done a reasonable amount of training. I took 32 days in May this year having done several hundred training miles in the 4 preceding months so knew my feet and joints were up to it. I found the first week was hardest but by the second week any soreness had disappeared and it was no issue to walk 30 or 40 kms a day. Remember we are all different though so my experience counts for little when considering your chances. So my advice is to train, increasing a little each week with an increasing number of consecutive long walks thrown in. That will give you a fair idea of your capability. Also the fitter you are the more you will enjoy it! Good luck and Buen Camino!
 

Cicada

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances St Jean -Santiago April -June 2017
Portugues September 2018
Hello everyone 🙂

I am planning to buy my plane ticket from Canada to Paris (and then trains to get to St-Jean) and need to gauge number of days to allocate to walk to Santiago (allowing for 2-3 days rest) then from Santiago to Muxia-Finnestere-Santiago. Then travel back to Paris for return flight. Knowing this is fully subjective with regards to potential setbacks (blisters, sprain or strains) and pace, I value this forum's experience and knowledge base. Perhaps giving myself 32 days to Santiago and then 6 days-7 days to walk and visit Muxia and Finnistere...does this sound about right? Your valuable input is greatly appreciated :).

Thanks in advance to all who respond!! 🥰🙂
My wife and I were 67 when we walked in 2017. We took 41 days all up that included 2days in Burgos and 2 days in Leon
Buen camino
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
Thanks to all who have responded. I knew your experience and advice would help me in my decision and planning. With the time I am able to set aside, excluding travel time to and from, I can spend 46 days on the Camino.

Very grateful for your help! Merci, thank you, gracias :) 🙏
Then use it all ;);)

It really is all about the journey...........

You'll understand in the first few days.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Plan on walking the Camino Frances May 2019, God willing
Open jaws flight?? Porto to home?
My husband and I (68 and 72, good condition but not athletic!) are starting the CF in September and have only booked our flight there. When we get a better picture of our pace, etc, we will plan our flight home. Burn Csmino
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
(2020) Camino Frances
My husband and I (68 and 72, good condition but not athletic!) are starting the CF in September and have only booked our flight there. When we get a better picture of our pace, etc, we will plan our flight home. Burn Csmino
Sounds like a good plan. Buen Camino.
 

taigirl

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2019
Hello everyone 🙂

I am planning to buy my plane ticket from Canada to Paris (and then trains to get to St-Jean) and need to gauge number of days to allocate to walk to Santiago (allowing for 2-3 days rest) then from Santiago to Muxia-Finnestere-Santiago. Then travel back to Paris for return flight. Knowing this is fully subjective with regards to potential setbacks (blisters, sprain or strains) and pace, I value this forum's experience and knowledge base. Perhaps giving myself 32 days to Santiago and then 6 days-7 days to walk and visit Muxia and Finnistere...does this sound about right? Your valuable input is greatly appreciated :).

Thanks in advance to all who respond!! 🥰🙂
I have given myself 45 days (49 including flight time from Australia).I am flying in and out of Barcelona. Any extra days will be spent sightseeing in Barcelona before I go home.
 

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