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How to get from El Acebo to Molinaseca

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EmmaGrina

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2019)
I’m currently hobbling my way along the Frances owing to a painful ankle. I’m planning to walk from El Rabanal and maybe stay in el acebo.

Is this wise or is the descent to El Acebo too difficult?
Can I get a taxi from El Acebo down to Molinaseca?

I’d rather keep going than risk a slip!

Thanks for any advice you can give!
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Sorry to learn of your ankle problem. You can get a taxi to drive you down the road. The camino path down can be very slippery so ever since I first walked the camino path in 2004 for the next 9 times I followed the road LE 142 always staying on the left side verges.

Good luck and Buen camino!
 
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Camino(s) past & future
2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 (2019) CF
2013 Arles/Aragones
2015 & 2017 HærvejenDK
The trail surface is very rocky closer to El Acebo but you can walk on the side of the road facing traffic. You can also walk on the side of the road from El Acebo down to Molinaseca instead of on the official trail down a very rough and rocky descent. I have rarely seen much traffic on the road, so that is my plan when I walk that part in the fall. However, a taxi might be a better solution for you, as that is a lot of asphalt walking for your already painful ankle. Good luck!
 

MikeyC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - September 2016
CF - April May 2017
Shikoku - October 2017
Kumano Kodo - October 2017
CF - 2019
I second Marylynn's advice. We have just walked into Acebo. I had recalled the path from Acebo to Molinaseca as being rough but there are a couple of stretches before Acebo that anyone with an ankle issue should avoid. Make sure you have a local taxi number (ask your hospitalera) just in case you need it.
 

John Hawke

Leaving O'Cebreiro
Camino(s) past & future
May 2016, completed 1/6/2016
(April 2018)
In my memory that's a very difficult stretch and I advise going slow along the road. Don't hesitate to take a cab if your ankle is telling you to do so!
Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013)
San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
Actually I must have a very bad memory. Did I say this before? Maybe it was the wonderful breakfast we had in a bar on the left, where we copied the order of the 2 seasoned guys , except for the final spirits, that gave is the oomph to get down that hill. If ever you are afraid, go with wisdom, take the taxi. It will be the price of freedom to walk again tomorrow.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Well, my experience was different then most replies, but I was not dealing with any injuries. I had accidently gotten on the road down to Acebo where I stayed the night in 2015.
In May of 2017 I made sure I didn't miss the trail and walked it into the village, loving all of the white, yellow, pink and lavender flowers/bushes everywhere. I stayed in Acebo again and the next morning took the beautiful trail with blue slate from Acebo down to Molinaseca and continued on to Ponferrada for the next night. I loved these stretches of beautiful trails and have vivid memories. They were my personal favorites on the whole Frances route!
 

Felipe

Veteran Member
Just remember that after Rabanal there is a quite isolated section -Foncebadón is basically two or three albergues and some shops and houses. I suppose that eventually the albergue managers could call a taxi for you, but it will be more complicated.
I think you could walk along the Camino -a moderate climb, with no major problems, and in the descent after Manjarín go along the paved road -there is not much traffic, as mentioned above.
Next day, the last descent on Molinaseca is quite difficult -steep, with loose gravel. I (with a chronic bad knee) limped my way using my two poles in front of me before every step in some sections. On the other side, the real worst section is no more than a km, as I remember it.
After joining the paved road, I had a look of it, and did not have a good feeling -lot of curves, with narrow shoulders.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 (2019) CF
2013 Arles/Aragones
2015 & 2017 HærvejenDK
I checked my map. I found the trail just fine from Rabanal to about a km past Manjarin at the Collado de Las Antenas, a bank of radio antennas on your right along the top of the mountains. You can leave the trail there and easily get onto the road before the steep, rocky descent. The past few years, there has been a refreshment trailer with chairs and tables where you can take a break, then continue down on the road. At Riego de Ambros, about 4km past El Acebo, the Camino turns left down a steep, very rocky trail or on sheaths of rock almost to Molinaseca, but you can avoid the steep, rocky descent and continue walking on the road. I have encountered very little road traffic, so it is pretty safe road-walking.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Just wanted to add, not for the OP but for others looking at the stretch from El Acebo to Molinaseca and on to Ponferrada, that there is a truly beautiful route called Las Puentes de Malpaso. It is wooded and would avoid nearly all (I think) of the rocky descent from El Acebo to Molinaseca. You can either take it directly from El Acebo into Ponferrada or from El Acebo into Molinaseca. For both options, you would go from El Acebo to Riego de Ambrós and then turn off onto the Puentes de Malpaso path.


Here are some tracks that show the Puentes de Malpaso route going into Molinaseca.

I did this route in the other direction as part of a three day circle from Ponferrada to El Acebo to Peñalba de Santiago back to Ponferrada, but if I ever find myself on the Francés again, I would not hesitate to walk this route to avoid that rocky descent.
 

Ahhhs

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Santiago, May 2015
Porto to Santiago, April 2016
Muxia-Finisterre-Santiago, April 2016
Camino Del Norte, April 2017
I just did the portion of the route from Manjarin to El Acebo and it was pretty rough. Very steep and rocky so you really have to watch your step. That day the wind was also very fierce and right in our faces. My friend was really limping and uttering curse words I hadn’t heard from her before. 😎
Buen Camino!
 

Bella2017

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014,2015,2016.
March 2017 Oct 2018 Camino ingles june 2019
The bit before reaching acebo was agony for my feet hard downhill on stones. If I had been offered a horse i would have riden it. I remember having a well deserved alcohol ic drink in Acebo. Take a taxi.
 

maraja

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
St Jean to Los Arcos (2015)
Los Arcos to Burgos (2016)
Thank you folks for all this very valuable information.Hopefully the alternatives are marked as I will be on that stretch mid 1st week June & I have 1 knee which I fear will bother me on a steep descent.
 

alhartman

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Hope so!
El Acebo to Molinaseca is probably the worst, most difficult, most dangerous (slips) on all the Camino Frances. There is a slab of rock just outside RiegoAmbros that is sloped perfectly for a slip and very dangerous if wet--footing feels like descending a glacier with no crampons. The road is okay and not too heavily traveled.
But a poor ankle probably demands a taxi in this section no matter what. There is a lot of beautiful camino after Ponferada that you will not want to miss if you can nurse your ankle along.
Taxi is wisest decision for a long and happy Camino.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Thank you folks for all this very valuable information.Hopefully the alternatives are marked as I will be on that stretch mid 1st week June & I have 1 knee which I fear will bother me on a steep descent.
It's been years since I walked on that rocky descent from El Acebo to Molinaseca, but a few years ago I took the Puentes de Malpaso alternative. For anyone with knee issues, I would very highly recommend that. You would leave the Camino Francés at Riego de Ambrós, and from there it is in green forests, over a couple of ancient bridges, and the out to the road to take you into Ponferrada. Or, if you wanted to visit Molinaseca, I have also posted tracks that would show you how to leave the trail and head into Molinaseca and from there continue on to Ponferrada.

Some info and pictures here. You will see the terrain bears no resemblance to that rocky horror story on the Frances:

a video:
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
It's been years since I walked on that rocky descent from El Acebo to Molinaseca, but a few years ago I took the Puentes de Malpaso alternative. For anyone with knee issues, I would very highly recommend that. You would leave the Camino Francés at Riego de Ambrós, and from there it is in green forests, over a couple of ancient bridges, and the out to the road to take you into Ponferrada. Or, if you wanted to visit Molinaseca, I have also posted tracks that would show you how to leave the trail and head into Molinaseca and from there continue on to Ponferrada.

Some info and pictures here. You will see the terrain bears no resemblance to that rocky horror story on the Frances:

a video:
@peregrina2000
As my next camino approaches, I am still interested in taking a side-route from El Acebo to Ponferrada, where I plan on beginning the Invierno. I have no particular interest in visiting Molinaseca again. I spent some time a while ago looking at all that I could find on the route through the Valley of Silence, but could not make a successful plan. My challenges were: 1. route planning. I use maps.me and not a gps, and I could not clearly distinguish where the route is after El Acebo. 2. Nor am I clear as to whether this alternate route would be longer or shorter than the usual route. I cannot afford much additional distance, as my route on the Madrid to the Frances, to Ponferrada and on the Invierno to Santiago is promising to use up all the time that I have for it in Spain. I had been looking at the route from El Acebo, but perhaps a route from Riego de Ambros would be preferable. How do I find it? I am concerned about getting lost or behind on my schedule. I have had a quick look at the route shown on the websites, which appears to be mainly a longer route from Riego de Ambros to Molinaseca but shown as starting in Molinaseca. What would be the best alternate route from El Acebo to Ponferrada which I could walk in one day and (preferably) not get lost? 3. I shall be walking in late October and do not want to try to find accommodation off the camino, as it might be closed because it is late in the season.
I love the video, but where is the access to the route? Is there an access from El Acebo as well as from Riego de Ambros? Is the route well marked? Can I continue on to Ponferrada without getting routed on to the main camino at Molinaseca? I know that you are leaving soon, but I would appreciate further information on these points if you have the time to offer it. And Buen Camino to you as you depart for your latest adventure.
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean May/June 2017. Plans to walk Porto 2020
I’m currently hobbling my way along the Frances owing to a painful ankle. I’m planning to walk from El Rabanal and maybe stay in el acebo.

Is this wise or is the descent to El Acebo too difficult?
Can I get a taxi from El Acebo down to Molinaseca?

I’d rather keep going than risk a slip!

Thanks for any advice you can give!
Hola @EmmaGrina . A question and suggestion: where are you now? If in or near Leon / Astorga - visit one of the medical clinics and have the ankle strapped/taped. This will stablise your ankle and give you more confidence. Now for tackling the Rabanal - Molinaseca section: if its raining or wet/slippery then even with poles my recommendation - give it a miss. You should be able to handle the section from Rabanal to the Cruz de Ferro and even to Manjarin but the next section is the start of the slippery slope (you drop over 400 metres). So if there is any doubt then its the taxi ride for you. Hope this helps. Cheers
 

Trude

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francais 2013 Finnestere, Muxia 2013, 2017
Norte 2014, Francais, 2015, 2016, VDLP 2017
I’m currently hobbling my way along the Frances owing to a painful ankle. I’m planning to walk from El Rabanal and maybe stay in el acebo.

Is this wise or is the descent to El Acebo too difficult?
Can I get a taxi from El Acebo down to Molinaseca?

I’d rather keep going than risk a slip!

Thanks for any advice you can give!
It is a tough walk into Acebo very steep, you can get a taxi from Manjarin to Molinaseca.....don’t risk injury....there is no bus
 

twh

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances May/June, 2018
Porto-Muxia-Finisterre Oct (2019)
I’m currently hobbling my way along the Frances owing to a painful ankle.
If you get to El Acebo and you want a "spa like" experience at normal private Albergue prices, spending a few nights at Albergue La Casa del Peregrino is your ticket. If you arrive walking, the first building in town on the right is an Albergue but not the one you are looking for. It's a very nice looking place with a lot of charm and appeal. The signage out front was very confusing on the wet foggy day I arrived there, exhausted, last spring 2018. This first Albergue in town appeared to have the name of the new place I was looking for (google maps shows it with the same name minus the word Albergue in front of it). Maybe it was an advertisement/sign for the NEW place right in front of the older Albergue that is the first position in town? I walked in, they were full. We then saw the donativo/religous Albergue and were told it was the last option. Tired and hungry, we took it thinking if there was some brilliant new Albergue awaiting us, it was much further along the road and we'd already had enough for the day.

The town is about 5 blocks of ancient stone buildings and then you walk out of town. After a few hundred meters, there is a large modern building set back a ways on the left, built in 2016. This building or it's assortment of tall flag poles may be visible on a clear day before you leave the 5 block area with the traditional stone buildings but it was not visible the day we walked in. It has good food, modern facilities, lots of hot water, a huge outdoor swimming pool, a masseuse, etc...completely self contained. If I was sick or trying to recover from an injury I would want to be there.

This building looks completely out of place in this cute tiny ancient town and it has no charm or history to it. While approaching town on the trail there are several "modern" signs and advertisement for this place that were a bit loud and unappealing...it felt like highway billboards along the highway back home. But if you need an escape for a night or two (they allow pilgrims 2 consecutive nights), you won't find better for the price on the Camino. You can also stay there as a non pilgrim and pay higher rates and get private rooms. The dorms have 8 beds per room.

Good luck with your ankle and the rest of your camino! Oh, the walk to Acebo was a good workout and sketchy in places on a cold, wet day. The walking poles really helped. After spending the night in El Acebo we woke to another cold, wet rainy day and were advised to NOT take the trail and instead take the paved road. The weather conditions that we'd had for 3 or 4 consecutive days made for an uninspiring and never ending walk downhill to Molinaseca even though it was a beautiful curvy road in the lush green mountains. I was really looking forward to that road walk being over. Molinaseca was a great place to arrive at where we found something to eat and some hot coffee before going back out into the cold and rain and then mud around Ponferrada. If I had it to do over and I had an injury, I'd have taken a taxi down that hill to Molinaseca especially in those weather conditions. That road is narrow. Like others said walk on the left, you will see car parts and wreckage in the canyons below where someone lost control of their car and probably lost their life too. It was not heavily traveled but it could be very dangerous walking in some places if there was a lot of traffic. It only takes one car and one careless distracted driver so make yourself visible when a car approaches.
 
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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
@peregrina2000
As my next camino approaches, I am still interested in taking a side-route from El Acebo to Ponferrada, where I plan on beginning the Invierno. I have no particular interest in visiting Molinaseca again. I spent some time a while ago looking at all that I could find on the route through the Valley of Silence, but could not make a successful plan. My challenges were: 1. route planning. I use maps.me and not a gps, and I could not clearly distinguish where the route is after El Acebo. 2. Nor am I clear as to whether this alternate route would be longer or shorter than the usual route. I cannot afford much additional distance, as my route on the Madrid to the Frances, to Ponferrada and on the Invierno to Santiago is promising to use up all the time that I have for it in Spain. I had been looking at the route from El Acebo, but perhaps a route from Riego de Ambros would be preferable. How do I find it? I am concerned about getting lost or behind on my schedule. I have had a quick look at the route shown on the websites, which appears to be mainly a longer route from Riego de Ambros to Molinaseca but shown as starting in Molinaseca. What would be the best alternate route from El Acebo to Ponferrada which I could walk in one day and (preferably) not get lost? 3. I shall be walking in late October and do not want to try to find accommodation off the camino, as it might be closed because it is late in the season.
I love the video, but where is the access to the route? Is there an access from El Acebo as well as from Riego de Ambros? Is the route well marked? Can I continue on to Ponferrada without getting routed on to the main camino at Molinaseca? I know that you are leaving soon, but I would appreciate further information on these points if you have the time to offer it. And Buen Camino to you as you depart for your latest adventure.
Hi, Albertagirl, I will try to help.

I have walked the Puentes de Malpaso route from Ponferrada to El Acebo “in reverse”, that is, as day 1 of the Circle. (The Valley of Silence Circle days I walked were Ponferrada to El Acebo, El Acebo to Peñalba de Santiago, and Peñalba de Santiago back to Ponferrada).

For someone who will be on the Francés in El Acebo, and who wants to get to the Invierno, and who doesn’t care whether she gets back to Molinaseca, I see three options.

First would be to walk El Acebo to Ponferrada on the Puentes de Malpaso. That will be 19 km. The track I made when I walked is here on wikiloc. I believe that about the last 5 km into Ponferrada will be road-walking, but mainly on very low traffic country roads. https://www.wikiloc.com/wikiloc/spatialArtifacts.do?event=setCurrentSpatialArtifact&id=7544208


Second would be a two-day version. Day one, walk El Acebo to Peñalba de Santiago on the Valley of Silence trail. That is about 22 km. https://www.wikiloc.com/hiking-trails/el-acebo-to-penalba-de-santiago-7544511 Day two, from Peñalba you would walk to Ponferrada. That’s 24 km. https://www.wikiloc.com/wikiloc/spatialArtifacts.do?event=setCurrentSpatialArtifact&id=7544531

Third would be to walk the same day one as above, but from Peñalba de Santiago to walk directly to As Médulas, which puts you at the end of the first day of the Invierno. I have not yet walked that segment, but hope to this summer and can report back. Rebekah has said it is really hard. And remote.

These are all ways to incorporate the Valley of Silence into a linear camino walk, without doing the three day “circle” that Rebekah and I did. The circle was wonderful, as I detailed in my post years ago, but I know that there aren’t many people who want to take a three day detour off route as they are walking on a camino.

The El Acebo to Ponferrada route on the Puentes de Malpaso goes through Riego de Ambrós (you can see it on my wikiloc tracks). The route from El Acebo to Peñalba de Santiago goes straight down into the valley from in front of the Casa Rural La Trucha and does not go back to Riego.

I cannot help with maps.me, but even if you don’t use gps, looking at the wikilocs tracks I have posted will give you an idea of the route. I definitely would have some kind of electronic guide because these routes are remote. Company would be ideal, of course.

Let me know if I didn’t clear things up, buen camino, Laurie
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
Hi, Albertagirl, I will try to help.

I have walked the Puentes de Malpaso route from Ponferrada to El Acebo “in reverse”, that is, as day 1 of the Circle. (The Valley of Silence Circle days I walked were Ponferrada to El Acebo, El Acebo to Peñalba de Santiago, and Peñalba de Santiago back to Ponferrada).

For someone who will be on the Francés in El Acebo, and who wants to get to the Invierno, and who doesn’t care whether she gets back to Molinaseca, I see three options.

First would be to walk El Acebo to Ponferrada on the Puentes de Malpaso. That will be 19 km. The track I made when I walked is here on wikiloc. I believe that about the last 5 km into Ponferrada will be road-walking, but mainly on very low traffic country roads. https://www.wikiloc.com/wikiloc/spatialArtifacts.do?event=setCurrentSpatialArtifact&id=7544208


Second would be a two-day version. Day one, walk El Acebo to Peñalba de Santiago on the Valley of Silence trail. That is about 22 km. https://www.wikiloc.com/hiking-trails/el-acebo-to-penalba-de-santiago-7544511 Day two, from Peñalba you would walk to Ponferrada. That’s 24 km. https://www.wikiloc.com/wikiloc/spatialArtifacts.do?event=setCurrentSpatialArtifact&id=7544531

Third would be to walk the same day one as above, but from Peñalba de Santiago to walk directly to As Médulas, which puts you at the end of the first day of the Invierno. I have not yet walked that segment, but hope to this summer and can report back. Rebekah has said it is really hard. And remote.

These are all ways to incorporate the Valley of Silence into a linear camino walk, without doing the three day “circle” that Rebekah and I did. The circle was wonderful, as I detailed in my post years ago, but I know that there aren’t many people who want to take a three day detour off route as they are walking on a camino.

The El Acebo to Ponferrada route on the Puentes de Malpaso goes through Riego de Ambrós (you can see it on my wikiloc tracks). The route from El Acebo to Peñalba de Santiago goes straight down into the valley from in front of the Casa Rural La Trucha and does not go back to Riego.

I cannot help with maps.me, but even if you don’t use gps, looking at the wikilocs tracks I have posted will give you an idea of the route. I definitely would have some kind of electronic guide because these routes are remote. Company would be ideal, of course.

Let me know if I didn’t clear things up, buen camino, Laurie
Thanks, Laurie,
I should like to walk Riego de Ambros to Ponferrada on the Puentes de Malpaso route, if I can find it. It would be helpful to know where it starts in Riego de Ambros. At the moment, I cannot find any useful information as to this route, and I don't really feel currently that I have enough information available to walk it. But I shall continue to research it and perhaps will be confident enough when I leave to try it out. Thanks again for your help.
 

Leibniz

Peregrina
Camino(s) past & future
Frances from Astorga (2018)
Frances/Invierno from SJPP (2019)
This is the Camino between Acebo and Molineseca. I found it tough going on my knees. Road or taxi would be the easier options. I would have walked on the road if I had known what it was like beforehand
When I was walking that section I had never read about it and did not know what to expect. For a (long) while I did wonder if I had taken a wrong turn and was in fact walking on a dried up river bed.

Then two your girls who had stayed with me in Manjarin the night before caught up with me and I walked with them for a while then told them to go on ahead as I was going to slow down a bit and did not want to hold them back. They looked at me as if to say “slow down?! How can you get EVEN SLOWER?!” 😂. They were running down that path like young goats.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Thanks, Laurie,
I should like to walk Riego de Ambros to Ponferrada on the Puentes de Malpaso route, if I can find it. It would be helpful to know where it starts in Riego de Ambros. At the moment, I cannot find any useful information as to this route, and I don't really feel currently that I have enough information available to walk it. But I shall continue to research it and perhaps will be confident enough when I leave to try it out. Thanks again for your help.
Hi, Albertagirl,
The easiest way would be with a GPS, which is what Rebekah and I used. I recorded my tracks, and you can see where it comes into Riego just by zooming in. (You can also see that we made a little loop there in town, to go up to the bar on the road for something to drink). For someone who is good with maps, you could probably get enough info by just studying the tracks to locate the turn-off in Riego, because it shows exactly where in town it is. But having the GPS would be very handy.

https://www.wikiloc.com/wikiloc/spatialArtifacts.do?event=setCurrentSpatialArtifact&id=7544208

I know lots of people object to the use of GPS devices on the camino, but on these off-camino routes, I personally wouldn’t go without one.

Buen camino, Laurie
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
Hi, Albertagirl,
The easiest way would be with a GPS, which is what Rebekah and I used. I recorded my tracks, and you can see where it comes into Riego just by zooming in. (You can also see that we made a little loop there in town, to go up to the bar on the road for something to drink). For someone who is good with maps, you could probably get enough info by just studying the tracks to locate the turn-off in Riego, because it shows exactly where in town it is. But having the GPS would be very handy.

https://www.wikiloc.com/wikiloc/spatialArtifacts.do?event=setCurrentSpatialArtifact&id=7544208

I know lots of people object to the use of GPS devices on the camino, but on these off-camino routes, I personally wouldn’t go without one.

Buen camino, Laurie
Hello again, Laurie,
I understand about gps and I used it offline with maps.me on my iphone two years ago, from Seville to Santiago on the VdlP. I downloaded the route overlay onto maps.me from the camino routes provided by Dutch camino group on this forum. My only concern about using gps for walking the alternate route from El Acebo to Ponferrada is the necessity of buying a new gps device and possibly paying a charge for the routing. I don't want to carry it, I can't afford it, and more critically, I don't feel that I would have the time to become really familiar with it before my departure. In addition to my phone, I also have a SPOT emergency beacon, and I am hoping that I have a sufficiency of devices to carry and be competent with. I am learning my new iphone right now, and it is a challenge for someone not used to carrying a mobile phone for daily use. My use of the previous phone on my last camino was not successful, except for functions which only needed wifi. I have printed one of the maps which you provided above, which shows the route from Riego de Ambos to Ponferrada. But I don't suppose that the trail is marked with yellow arrows, or with various coloured stripes, like French routes. I don't want to get lost, so I shall probably stay on the main camino route unless I find some way to become more confident in trail finding. Thanks again for help and encouragement.
Mary Louise
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
I am always in awe reading of Laurie's off route detours involving gps to map and cross "new back country".

However an easier way to walk off the camino path from
El Acebo or Riego de Ambros to Ponferrada is to simply follow the LE 142 road downhill walking on the left side verges facing traffic.

Happy choice/ planning and Buen camino!
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
This building looks completely out of place in this cute tiny ancient town and it has no charm or history to it. While approaching town on the trail there are several "modern" signs and advertisement for this place that were a bit loud and unappealing...it felt like highway billboards along the highway back home. But if you need an escape for a night or two (they allow pilgrims 2 consecutive nights), you won't find better for the price on the Camino. You can also stay there as a non pilgrim and pay higher rates and get private rooms. The dorms have 8 beds per room.
I have strong feelings about this place. They are beloved of those in search of a Holiday Inn experience, but the huge steel advertising signs they've bolted onto trees and waymarks all the way from Rabanal are not just eyesores and offenses to the senses, they are in violation of UNESCO norms protecting the camino's Patrimony of Humanity status. Businesses that do this are out to take your money, period. They do not respect the law, and they do not respect the integrity of the Camino. I appeal to all pilgrims to "vote with your wallet" and boycott businesses that plaster ads along the trail.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
I am always in awe reading of Laurie's off route detours involving gps to map and cross "new back country".

However an easier way to walk off the camino path from
El Acebo or Riego de Ambros to Ponferrada is to simply follow the LE 142 road downhill walking on the left side verges facing traffic.

Happy choice/ planning and Buen camino!
The Bridges of Malpaso is a beautiful set of trails, but they are quite hilly, and parts are pretty isolated. If your ankle is hurting, you'll do better sticking to a better-traveled route.
 

darealdeal77

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014 Camino Frances
I’m currently hobbling my way along the Frances owing to a painful ankle. I’m planning to walk from El Rabanal and maybe stay in el acebo.

Is this wise or is the descent to El Acebo too difficult?
Can I get a taxi from El Acebo down to Molinaseca?

I’d rather keep going than risk a slip!

Thanks for any advice you can give!
Hi There,
Sorry to hear your having issues, it happens to the best of us! I had a similar incident with a bad foot and found the best of the best Taxi Service in the area his name is “LUIS” he works out of Molinaseca, I did my Camino in 2014, don’t know if he is still in service, he had a page on Facebook and all! Awesome guy, not only is he fair and professional, he gives you the history of the area you’re traveling to.
330A5583-64D0-44FE-879C-70E30D9FF3D6.jpeg
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
The Bridges of Malpaso is a beautiful set of trails, but they are quite hilly, and parts are pretty isolated. If your ankle is hurting, you'll do better sticking to a better-traveled route.
Reb, I have to disagree a bit here. The Malpaso route is "hilly" but the stony descent after Riego is "hellish." If you're going to choose which route is easier to walk down, I would vote for the Malpaso route hands down. BUT... without a GPS, I would say the odds of getting lost are much greater on the Malpaso route than on the camino.
 

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