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Luggage Transfer Correos

Hyperlite Mountain Gear 2400 Windrider Pack?

Camino(s) past & future
Camino France, Camino del Norte, Camino de Madrid
I bought Hyperlite Mountain Gear 2400 Windrider Pack because it is waterproof and light. Anyone ever used this backpack? Any thoughts? I also considered Osprey Eja 48. Any reviews on Eja 48?
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
I bought Hyperlite Mountain Gear 2400 Windrider Pack because it is waterproof and light. Anyone ever used this backpack? Any thoughts? I also considered Osprey Eja 48. Any reviews on Eja 48?
The important thing is how does it feel on you? Have you loaded it up and gone on a walk with it? What works for someone else isn't what's important.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France, Camino del Norte, Camino de Madrid
Thanks! Yes, I tried it and was comfortable but I can't be sure until I walked a long distance. I wanted to hear from someone who actually used it.
 

david marquez

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte ( Irun to Luarca), Camino Primitivo-Fisterra: April-May 2018
Via de la Plata 2019
I purchased a Hyperlite windrider 3400 last March to use specifically for the Camino del Norte/Primitivo/Fistere last year. I used it for the entire Camino and spent 4 months in Colombia tramping around the Cordillera Central this fall/winter. As of this moment, I consider it to be the best backpack, bar none, that I have ever used. The first real revelation for me was that the windrider is the first and only backpack I have ever used that was almost automatic to adjust to ride on my hips properly..I’ll be 70 next year, and I did a 52K day on the primitivo...that would not have been possible with other packs I have used.
The comfort of the windrider for me, has been simply exceptional
It was a very wet spring last April in northern Spain, and I never had a single drop of water get in the pack.
I have heard lots of folks complain about toploading packs, and some about lack of a frame...all pluses for me. I use several lightweight stuff and compression sacks to keep various types of gear separate, and after about 3 days on the del Norte I had my packing system down. Side pockets are great for snacks and water, and the fact that the 3400 is what, about 1/4 lb heavier than the 2400 made it a no brainer. I just roll the top down farther if I am not loaded up.
So far this backpack has stood up extremely well to daily use, lots of miles, airports, gorillas masquerading as baggage handlers, and the Colombian jeep transport system.
If I ever need another backpack Hyperlite will definitely be my go to. I also encoutered 3 other people using Hyperlight packs on the Primitivo section and we were all in agreement that they make extremely well designed and constructed packs, and the cuben fiber material wears like iron and is basically waterproof to boot. FYI, I do not bother with a raincover for my pack and have never needed it. And when it is empty, it fits in the bottom of my cavernous wheeled duffelbag nicely. Makes it easy to take a quality backpack along whenever I travel
 

O Peracha

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago (2014)
Annapurna Base, Nepal (2014)
GR 5 - Holland to Pompey, France (2015)
Lisbon to Finesterre (2016)
Thanks for the detailed report, David. Did you use a trash compactor or liner with your bag? And were you able to carry it on? Thanks.

edit: And if you come back (hopefully), how bad was it that the pack rests directly on your back and there is no airflow.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France, Camino del Norte, Camino de Madrid
Dear David,
Thank you so much for your kind and detailed response. It was very reassuring. I first bought a Hyperlite Mountain Gear 2400 Southwest Pack, but then I started having this nightmarish thought that the back pocket might save all the rain water it receives and I would end up carrying all that water reservoir or end up constantly emptying it. So, I exchanged it with the windrider, which has mesh pocket that will just drain the water. I am so close to leaving for Norte and it feels good to know that I bought the right backpack. Last backpack I bought was okay but didn't quite hold up. The frame bent, probably when I fell backward trying to get out of the way from oncoming bikers. Thank you again!
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
Those packs looks great, if a little pricey. Can you comment on the padding on the hip belt and shoulder straps? It looks minimal, but OK for 7 kg loads.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France, Camino del Norte, Camino de Madrid
Without walking 40 Kilometers for several days first, I can't say for sure. I tried with 15 pounds weight and it felt fine but again, I am not qualified to comment, yet. In fact I went to REI today and tried other well known and frequently mentioned backpacks. All I can say is that I immediately felt the differences. I kept the Hyperlite.
 

Cary

Member
Camino(s) past & future
del Norte/Primitivo May 2019
I purchased a Hyperlite windrider 3400 last March to use specifically for the Camino del Norte/Primitivo/Fistere last year. I used it for the entire Camino and spent 4 months in Colombia tramping around the Cordillera Central this fall/winter. As of this moment, I consider it to be the best backpack, bar none, that I have ever used. The first real revelation for me was that the windrider is the first and only backpack I have ever used that was almost automatic to adjust to ride on my hips properly..I’ll be 70 next year, and I did a 52K day on the primitivo...that would not have been possible with other packs I have used.
The comfort of the windrider for me, has been simply exceptional
It was a very wet spring last April in northern Spain, and I never had a single drop of water get in the pack.
I have heard lots of folks complain about toploading packs, and some about lack of a frame...all pluses for me. I use several lightweight stuff and compression sacks to keep various types of gear separate, and after about 3 days on the del Norte I had my packing system down. Side pockets are great for snacks and water, and the fact that the 3400 is what, about 1/4 lb heavier than the 2400 made it a no brainer. I just roll the top down farther if I am not loaded up.
So far this backpack has stood up extremely well to daily use, lots of miles, airports, gorillas masquerading as baggage handlers, and the Colombian jeep transport system.
If I ever need another backpack Hyperlite will definitely be my go to.
I have seriously considered buying this pack but the price tag was a deterrent. Your review/experience with it is making me think it is well worth the price. Hmmm...
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France, Camino del Norte, Camino de Madrid
Do you have a REI membership? If not, you can pay $20 to purchase the membership and then get 20% off for joining. You will be about $45 ahead. If you do have a membership, you can have someone in your family/friend join and buy it under his/her name. BTW, I didn't mind paying the price because it is made in America.
 

Cary

Member
Camino(s) past & future
del Norte/Primitivo May 2019
just purchased it...I just have to try it! I do have a membership and like that it's easily returned if it doesn't workout.

Thanks!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France, Camino del Norte, Camino de Madrid
Congratulations! I found lots of YouTube videos showing how to use it, pros and cons etc. I saw some durability issues but overall I am very happy with my choice. I look forward to starting the Norte.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Those packs looks great, if a little pricey. Can you comment on the padding on the hip belt and shoulder straps? It looks minimal, but OK for 7 kg loads.
I agree with much of what David wrote about the Hyperlite backpack. Most folks will find them a good workhorse.

These backpacks are designed for ultralight backpacking where normal load weights for extended backpacking trips normally would be from under 15 pounds up to around 25 pounds. So for 15 pound loads, it should be fine. However, it is hard to quantify what someone will find comfortable.

When I gear tested two of the HMG packs, including the 2400 series, I found them to be competent. They never really drew my focus of attention to themselves when I was backpacking, which is how I judge the wearability of a backpack.

If the pack takes me out of my thoughts - - which sort of just wander and flit around while walking - - and I am finding myself thinking about how to adjust the pack to overcome some niggling issue of comfort or pressure points, etc to make the backpack feel better, then it is NOT a backpack that I want to keep. Keep in mind, that this is different than the normal thing of doing slight adjustments to hipbelts and shoulder harnesses while walking. All packs will be adjusted in tiny increments on the fly as pack loads settle a bit, or tension of the straps is used to shift from shoulder straps to hipbelt or visa versa.

My experience in it over the course of a summer and 600+ miles in the Cascades and Rockies, is not so much that the HMGs are uncomfortable, but that it has a lot less padding than many of the backpacks I've gear tested for manufacturers or have used for myself.

The areas that might be more noticeable for some are in the hip belt, shoulder straps, and back panel. It also seemed that as I used it over the course of a few weeks, it seemed to "break in" and became more comfortable. Or maybe I just got used to its 'personality'. :)

My assessment would be that if someone is looking for a well cushioned backpack, this might not feel as good as some of the mid-weight backpacks like the Osprey's.

I really liked the HMG backpacks, including the 2400 series. They can be counted on, as long as there are not tiny holes in the material, to stay water tight in rain. The seams are sealed and the Cuben Fiber composite materials are waterproof.

That said, there are backpacks which are much less expensive, under 2 pounds, and also fairly water tight against weather which work just as well and that I also find comfortable. There are some backpacks which I find more comfortable than the HMG, too.

Bottom line from my perspective: if you are interested in the HMG packs, they are likely to not disappoint, but I would definitely make sure that you have ample time to test it out with wearing it under load.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Congratulations! I found lots of YouTube videos showing how to use it, pros and cons etc. I saw some durability issues but overall I am very happy with my choice. I look forward to starting the Norte.
A lot of the criticisms of durability center around the Cuben Fiber packbag material. But the material itself is no more fragile, in general, than the ripstop grid nylon materials. The difference is that a lot of folks spend the extra money for a backpack made of the Cuben Fiber with the expectation that it will be water proof. And it IS waterproof.

However, backpacks get wear and tear. The material can develop tiny holes and abrasions which allow small leakage points. For those with regular nylon materials for the pack bag, their has never been an expectation of that backpack being waterproof. Those spending the dollars for Cuben Fiber do have that expectation, and are disappointed when it turns out that this normal wear and tear takes away the waterproofing.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France, Camino del Norte, Camino de Madrid
Update on Hyperlite Mountain Gear 2400 Windrider Pack
F.Y.I.
After testing a loaded pack for a week, I ended up returning it. It is definitely lighter than any packs I've tried, however, it does not feel/fit right to my petite frame. I even purchased a few sternum strips and tried to adjust it but none could help. Because it is not distributing its weight in a balanced manner, I kept getting a backpain after only about 5 miles. I then purchased a REI Flash 45, 2019, version. Although it weights about 3 pounds, I immediately felt the difference. I felt like I could even run. Had I not tested the pack extensively, it could have hampered my Camino, which is to start next week.
 

Cary

Member
Camino(s) past & future
del Norte/Primitivo May 2019
I look forward to starting the Norte.
Mera...When are you starting on the Norte?

I bought the Hyperlight and the ULA cdt to test out both and I am going with the ULA. The cons of the Hyperlight for me were the stiffness of the pack and the price tag. The ULA felt just as light, the material is tough, more flexible and costs much less than the Hyperlight. I took it to Moab over the weekend and hiked with it loaded exactly as it will be on the Camino and it felt great. Very satisfied with it which is a relief because I was having trouble settling on the right pack.

I'll be on the Norte beginning May 7th from Irun. Hope I see you out there.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France, Camino del Norte, Camino de Madrid
Hello Cary, the Hyperlite didn't work out for me, either. I am so glad that I extensively tested it before the Camino. I am arriving in Madrid on the 30th afternoon and intend to start the Camino de Madrid. When I reach Sahagún, I will take a train to Irun to start the Norte. My guess is, if everything goes reasonably well, I will be in Irun around 12th give or take. I will be at least a week behind from you. Espero que todo vaya bien para ti. Buen Camino.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Mera...When are you starting on the Norte?

I bought the Hyperlight and the ULA cdt to test out both and I am going with the ULA. The cons of the Hyperlight for me were the stiffness of the pack and the price tag. The ULA felt just as light, the material is tough, more flexible and costs much less than the Hyperlight. I took it to Moab over the weekend and hiked with it loaded exactly as it will be on the Camino and it felt great. Very satisfied with it which is a relief because I was having trouble settling on the right pack.

I'll be on the Norte beginning May 7th from Irun. Hope I see you out there.
The ULA CDT is an excellent pack, I'm not surprised that you like it. :) The few times that I saw a ULA backpack on Camino was the CDT model worn by Europeans; which surprised my at first because ULA is a cottage manufacturer. But it seems their are resellers for ULA gear in several countries in Europe.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France, Camino del Norte, Camino de Madrid
I totally agree. I wish there were an online portal that sells things manufactured in the United States only. I am so willing to pay extra to support our manufacturers.
 

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