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I need some assistance on San Olav: Am I planning to walk backwards?

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Time of past OR future Camino
2009-2019: More than I remember...
Hello, you few who have taken this route,

I need to do this Camino, but I have a few questions:

OK, I arrive in Burgos on Sept.01 and plan to do the San Olav the next days. But: I was thinking of taking a bus to Covarubbias on Friday, stay the weekend there (as a Norw. I want to dive into this history of the princess Kristina) and walk back to Burgos, however:

  • this Camino is supposed to go from Burgos to Covarubbias, so I would be walking backwards; will that be a problem regarding markings, etc.?
  • I suppose there are not many albergues on this Camino; How do I find beds?
  • Where are the most convenient stopping points?
  • Being only 60 kms or so to Burgos, it is only 3 days of walking: Most convenient etappas? I can walk slow and short: Plenty of time.
I understand that for some, the SDdS is a sought-after starting point, but not being religious (I consider myself spiritual), I want to do the San Olav way, starting in Covarubbias.

Any help much appreciated.
 
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peregrina2000

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Hi, Alex,

The forum members I know who have walked this route (Alansykes, Viranani, Reb and I) have all walked "backwards." You will essentially be walking the same way we did, minus the stage from Santo Domingo de Silos to Covarrubias. When Reb and I walked, I had a GPS, and it was crucial in a few spots, at least for us. Viranani walked without one, but she wound up on the road a lot instead of on the path. The route is not heavily marked in either direction, but you will occasionally see some posts with the Cross of San Olav carved on top and painted red. I have a link to my gps tracks in my long post on the route, and I think maybe you can get those onto your phone somehow, if you are more technologically gifted than I am. Most of the way is off-road, but without the gps tracks you may just wind up on the road, as Vira did, at least from Quintanillas to Mondubar.

Here are the obvious three stages:

1. Covarrubias to Mambrillas de Lara. Here you have three options. Maybe Rincón de Alfoz will have a room for you. It's right in Mambrillas. Ana García Alonso, Tel. 645 90 00 30. If not, there are two places that will come pick you up and drop you off the next morning -- Taberna Moruga (in Hortigüela) Tel: 947 11 50 03 AND Pensión Julita (in Villaespasa). C/. San Jose, 10 Tel. 674 69 19 04 and 673 35 75 30.

2. Mambrillas de Lara to Mondúbar de San Ciprián. La Cerca de Doña Jimena is the only option, and it's a very nice casa rural. Tel. 637 85 35 66

3. Mondúbar to Burgos.

Vira and I have some detailed comments about the various alternatives, all around Mambrillas and Quintanillas, and I hope they will help clear up some questions you might have about the route. But if there is anything that is not clear from that thread, please let us know. It´s a very nice walk, I think you will like it, buen camino, Laurie
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Time of past OR future Camino
2009-2019: More than I remember...
I highly appreciate your guiding. As a matter of fact I was about to PM you but decided to check first if you had answered me here, and indeed you had! I feel very confident that I can make this: I want to go to Covarubbias by bus from Burgos: I want to stay there a couple of days due to the Norw. link, and then walk back to Burgos, and then continue my "ordinary" CF (When is a Camino ordinary!):) This all sounds like a good plan and "outside the box" thankfully.

BTW: I will not be using GPS or other technical devices. Believe it or not, but by education I hold an engineering degree in computer science, back from 1974, and I hate the stuff: Completely outdated, and happy with it! On later years I received a skipper grade, and am happy to navigate by the Sun, Moon, Stars and decent paper maps...:(

Thanks again, dear: Most helpful!

Edit: Most helpful by you to point out stops and phone nos.! I feel much more confident after getting your help and assistance! A BIG thank you!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I highly appreciate your guiding. As a matter of fact I was about to PM you but decided to check first if you had answered me here, and indeed you had! I feel very confident that I can make this: I want to go to Covarubbias by bus from Burgos: I want to stay there a couple of days due to the Norw. link, and then walk back to Burgos, and then continue my "ordinary" CF (When is a Camino ordinary!):) This all sounds like a good plan and "outside the box" thankfully.

BTW: I will not be using GPS or other technical devices. Believe it or not, but by education I hold an engineering degree in computer science, back from 1974, and I hate the stuff: Completely outdated, and happy with it! On later years I received a skipper grade, and am happy to navigate by the Sun, Moon, Stars and decent paper maps...:(

Thanks again, dear: Most helpful!

Edit: Most helpful by you to point out stops and phone nos.! I feel much more confident after getting your help and assistance! A BIG thank you!

Hi, Alex,
I understand the desire to avoid the GPS. I have used it for the past couple of years but only when I walk on very solitary caminos, it keeps my family happy and it has saved me a few times. But anyway... the only thing I would say is to make sure that when you leave Quintanillas de las Viñas, that you do not just stay on the road. You will see signs marking the "camino del Cid" on the road, but the Camino San Olav is an off-road path, though it is frequently parallel to the road. Based on my interactions with Viranani, who was mainly on the road during that day, the off-road alternative (which is actually the Camino San Olav) is much much nicer.

A very buen camino to you, would love to hear how it goes! Buen camino, Laurie
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Time of past OR future Camino
2009-2019: More than I remember...
Thank you so much, dear; yes, I most certainly want to be off-road, so I'll follow your advice, thank you ever so much. I intend to take a bus to Covarubbias, stay there for the weeken (talk to locals, get in-depth info on the story of Kristina) and then have a relaxed walk back to Burgos. I was just fearing that walking backwards wouuld get me into troubla, but as I understand, it, it won't be a problem. Or?

BTW: I am so happy to get some help here! You will most certainly get feedback from me on this adventure!
 
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peregrina2000

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Thank you so much, dear; yes, I most certainly want to be off-road, so I'll follow your advice, thank you ever so much. I intend to take a bus to Covarubbias, stay there for the weeken (talk to locals, get in-depth info on the story of Kristina) and then have a relaxed walk back to Burgos. I was just fearing that walking backwards wouuld get me into troubla, but as I understand, it, it won't be a problem. Or?

BTW: I am so happy to get some help here! You will most certainly get feedback from me on this adventure!
When we went to the tourist office in Covarrubias, the woman working there knew nothing about the Camino San Olav, and she told us she thought there was something online that would help. So don't expect too much help from the locals! Buen camino, Laurie
 
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Hi, Alex,
Yes, as Laurie says, it's 'backwards' but that as not so difficult (especially as you likely have a skipper's sense of direction?)
Where are the most convenient stopping points?
Being only 60 kms or so to Burgos, it is only 3 days of walking: Most convenient etappas? I can walk slow and short: Plenty of time.
There are a number of possibilities, combining the Lana and the St Olav--one different option is walking out from Burgos one way (mostly on the St Olav) and back another (On the GR82 and Lana) to make a 6-day loop. (See my post on your other thread about possible etapas...)

I suppose there are not many albergues on this Camino; How do I find beds?
I organized them ahead of time online and with Laurie's amazing assistance.
I'd highly recommend Casa Julita--friendly and very knowledgeable hosts asking only 15 Euros for a nice single upstairs room with bath, and they will pick you up and drop you off the next morning here you like--Quintanilla or Mambrillas.
There are albergues in Santo Domingo de Silos and Mecerreyes.

I have a link to my gps tracks in my long post on the route, and I think maybe you can get those onto your phone somehow
Viranani walked without one, but she wound up on the road a lot instead of on the path.
Yes, road walking on day 2, and 'lost' on day 1. :)
I'm a paper map person too, and intended to get a topo map in Burgos, but hadn't taken Siesta closings into account. So all I had was memory of Alan Syke's wikiloc tracks that I'd looked at before leaving, and a pretty good sense of direction. As back-up I had copied some screen shots of them onto my phone. Better than nothing, but a good topo map would be much better.
So I got 'lost' right off the bat by taking the GR82 out of SDdS towards Covarrubias. But I can honestly say that it made for one of the most stunning walks ever. It was glorious going onto the ridge above SDdS first thing in the morning with panoramic views in all directions. (Hence my babbling on about it here and in other threads. Further along, I also noticed that the GR82 went straight up the hill from the Visigothic church at Santa Maria de Lara, which would be an amazing adventure, if you wanted to go even farther off the beaten track.)
I'm happy you're thinking of doing this, Alex...it's another world but so close to the Frances! People like seeing pilgrims (because there are only a few), so it's like how people describe the Camino in the the 'old days'--townsfolk are very hospitable and interactions tend to be 'special'; you'll definitely have a chance to really practice your Spanish!

SDdS is stunning even if you're not religious--as is Vespers if you like Gregorian Chant. And the further from Burgos you get,the more amazing the landscape is.
All I can say is wow.
Buen Camino!
 
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C clearly

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Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012
@peregrina2000 , @Viranani , @alexwalker - For some reason, I cannot resist reading these threads describing your Camino adventures. Do you guys realize how impressive but intimidating your descriptions are?! :eek::eek: You claim to be techno-phobes, but I don't believe it for a minute. I am not sure whether I am longing to get out on the untrammeled routes (albeit with my beloved smartphone), or whether I prefer the security of the toilet paper trail! ;)
 
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SYates

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Just throwing my two pilgrim cents in here: Unless you have been already to Santo Domingo de Silos, and know it well, I would start there. In the end, what is one day more on the Camino :cool:
Buen Camino, SY
 

peregrina2000

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Just throwing my two pilgrim cents in here: Unless you have been already to Santo Domingo de Silos, and know it well, I would start there. In the end, what is one day more on the Camino :cool:
Buen Camino, SY

I think that's a great point. The weekday bus from Burgos to Santo Domingo will get you in in plenty of time for vespers. If you want to visit the cloister, though, you would have to wait till the next morning, but if you're going to stop walking in Covarrubias, it's only an 18 km walk so you would have plenty of time.

There is an albergue in Santo Domingo de Silos. I haven't stayed there, but Alansykes has. I assume that if you are walking the next morning, you can sleep the night before in the albergue.

Viranani walked a different route from Santo Domingo to Covarrubias than Reb and I did. We followed the Camino del Cid to Retuerta, a small town where there is a bar. From there, we were told by locals that we could choose between a walk along the river, or a walk higher up through the vineyards. We chose the river, as it was very obvious. Vira walked a GR, which she describes in that long San Olav thread I started. If you're planning to spend a few days in Covarrubias anyway, adding in this walk will hardly detract from that, since you'll arrive well before lunchtime and still have plenty of time on day 1 to visit it!

Buen camino, Laurie
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Time of past OR future Camino
2009-2019: More than I remember...
Yes, I have all the time I need. I have started to contemplate simply walking out of Burgos(it seems to be the right direction; Covarrubias being the ending point of this short Camino, similar to SdC being the ending point of CF) and south, arriving in Covarrubias, then on to SDdS based on (all of you) your recommendations, and simply walk back to Burgos. Due to the Norw. connection, I would like to spend some time in Covarrubias. It could also be an interesting interaction with the locals, since I'm Norw.

Anyhow, since I have all the time; no stress, What does a day or two-three more matter? Nothing. It is all about living in the now and not be stressing according to a "plan".

FYI, and as a teaser: I have just enjoyed a solid caserole meal of bacalao, done with Norw. cod, but according to a Spanish recipe: Really stuffed now..Nice and hot with chili!:) The blank stuff is Aquavit (Water of life; Norw. herb liqueur) to melt down the food. I have the faith that it works that way, and I don't take any chances, so I drink the stuff ;)
 

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peregrina2000

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Yes, I have all the time I need. I have started to contemplate simply walking out of Burgos(it seems to be the right direction; Covarrubias being the ending point of this short Camino, similar to SdC being the ending point of CF) and south, arriving in Covarrubias, then on to SDdS based on (all of you) your recommendations, and simply walk back to Burgos. Due to the Norw. connection, I would like to spend some time in Covarrubias. It could also be an interesting interaction with the locals, since I'm Norw.

Anyhow, since I have all the time; no stress, What does a day or two-three more matter? Nothing. It is all about living in the now and not be stressing according to a "plan".

FYI, and as a teaser: I have just enjoyed a solid caserole meal of bacalao, done with Norw. cod, but according to a Spanish recipe: Really stuffed now..Nice and hot with chili!:) The blank stuff is Aquavit (Water of life; Norw. herb liqueur) to melt down the food. I have the faith that it works that way, and I don't take any chances, so I drink the stuff ;)

This is a GREAT idea, make it a circle! You'll have to let us know if walking in the "right direction" on the San Olav is better than our "backwards" walk! You can walk back to Burgos from Santo Domingo de Silos on the Ruta de la Lana, one day to Mercerreyes (24 km), and then Burgos (33). Only thing is, the Ruta de la Lana, from Santo Domingo to Burgos, will take you back to Covarrubias and then on to Mercerreyes. :confused:

http://www.mundicamino.com/los-caminos/45/ruta-de-la-lana-ii/
 
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alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Time of past OR future Camino
2009-2019: More than I remember...
This is a GREAT idea, make it a circle! You'll have to let us know if walking in the "right direction" on the San Olav is better than our "backwards" walk! You can walk back to Burgos from Santo Domingo de Silos on the Ruta de la Lana, one day to Mercerreyes (24 km), and then Burgos (33). Only thing is, the Ruta de la Lana, from Santo Domingo to Burgos, will take you back to Covarrubias and then on to Mercerreyes. :confused:

http://www.mundicamino.com/los-caminos/45/ruta-de-la-lana-ii/
Yes, I think I simply start out of Burgos and do a roundtrip. If I end up in Covarrubios twice, I don't care: On the contrary. What's another day? Do not care. My walk ends when it walks, and SdC is always there for me.

But: I need a credential for the San Olav: the website http://www.caminodesanolav.es/no/contenido/?idsec=561 has a picture of the credential: Do anyone know where it can be obtained?

I will take a good deal pictures to document the Way. Maybe we can cooperate in setting up a guide if there is none existing...

BTW: Did you "like" my bacalao? ;):)
 

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peregrina2000

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Yes, I think I simply start out of Burgos and do a roundtrip. If I end up in Covarrubios twice, I don't care: On the contrary. What's another day? Do not care. My walk ends when it walks, and SdC is always there for me.

But: I need a credential for the San Olav: the website http://www.caminodesanolav.es/no/contenido/?idsec=561 has a picture of the credential: Do anyone know where it can be obtained?

I will take a good deal pictures to document the Way. Maybe we can cooperate in setting up a guide if there is none existing...

BTW: Did you "like" my bacalao? ;):)
Hi, Alex, Although I spend two weeks in Portugal every year, bacalao is not high on my list of favorite foods. Sorry, hope that's not an insult. :) It does raise the eyebrows of some of my Portuguese friends, though.

I don't know about the credential. I just used the credential I had been using since I started at the mouth of the Ebro, and Rebekah didn't even have one. Since you are continuing on the camino, I would just use the one you plan to use then, unless you fancy getting a special credential for those days. I can tell you it's unlikely you'll get it in the tourist office in Covarrubias, but maybe there is somewhere in Burgos where you can get it, but I'm stumped. Buen camino, Laurie
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Time of past OR future Camino
2009-2019: More than I remember...
Hi, Alex, Although I spend two weeks in Portugal every year, bacalao is not high on my list of favorite foods. Sorry, hope that's not an insult. :) It does raise the eyebrows of some of my Portuguese friends, though.

I don't know about the credential. I just used the credential I had been using since I started at the mouth of the Ebro, and Rebekah didn't even have one. Since you are continuing on the camino, I would just use the one you plan to use then, unless you fancy getting a special credential for those days. I can tell you it's unlikely you'll get it in the tourist office in Covarrubias, but maybe there is somewhere in Burgos where you can get it, but I'm stumped. Buen camino, Laurie
I suspect I will get one in Burgos. But anyhow, this year, I will carry a Bible (it is a special edition; not for my religousness; I am more of a spiritual nature; it is for leisure reading, because so much in it is essential thruths of life), and I will use its blank start & end pages for overflow stamps. So will use it to collect San Olav stamps on a single page :)

You most certainly do not offend me by not endorsing bacalao: It is your loss!;):):)
 
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alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Time of past OR future Camino
2009-2019: More than I remember...
Hi, Alex, Although I spend two weeks in Portugal every year, bacalao is not high on my list of favorite foods. Sorry, hope that's not an insult. :) It does raise the eyebrows of some of my Portuguese friends, though.
But of course not. But, how uncivilized of you, they must think.;):)
 
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Time of past OR future Camino
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Do you guys realize how impressive but intimidating your descriptions are?! :eek::eek: You claim to be techno-phobes, but I don't believe it for a minute. I am not sure whether I am longing to get out on the untrammeled routes (albeit with my beloved smartphone), or whether I prefer the security of the toilet paper trail! ;)
@C clearly, you must know this: I'm a total scardey-cat. This little romp as my compromise--wanting to go off the beaten track, but not having the courage to do that for several weeks!
(And I'm pretty tech-competant, but vastly prefer an old-fashioned paper map because I have to think, rather than giving that function over to a device.)

Anyhow, since I have all the time; no stress, What does a day or two-three more matter? Nothing. It is all about living in the now and not be stressing according to a "plan".
Yes!
This is a GREAT idea, make it a circle! You'll have to let us know if walking in the "right direction" on the San Olav is better than our "backwards" walk! You can walk back to Burgos from Santo Domingo de Silos on the Ruta de la Lana, one day to Mercerreyes (24 km), and then Burgos (33). Only thing is, the Ruta de la Lana, from Santo Domingo to Burgos, will take you back to Covarrubias and then on to Mercerreyes. :confused:
Here's what I posted yesterday on Alex's other thread:
And to plant further seeds of inspiration, since you have the luxury of no fixed date of return, here's what I'm thinking for next time I'm able to walk in this area (an out-and-back figure-eight starting in Burgos and more or less centred on Covarrubias):
Day 1 Burgos to Modubar San Ciprian
Day 2 Modubar San Ciprian to Mambrillas
Day 3 Mambrillas to Covarrubias (Days 1, 2, & 3 0n the St. Olav)
Day 4 Covarrubias to Santo Domingo de Silos (on the Ruta de Lana),
Day 5 Santo Domingo de Silos to Mecerreyes (on the GR82 to Covarrubias then the Ruta de Lana)
Day 6 Mecerreyes to Burgos (on the Ruta de Lana)

It has the benefit of walking the St Olav in the intended direction, which may make the navigation marginally easier.
For best effect, the GR82 leg should be done in the morning the northerly direction (from SDdS to Covarrubias)-the vistas are gorgeous at that time of day--and the direction makes for an easier climb, gradual and steady.
This leg has some interesting things to visit--the Bad Hill Cemetery set from The Good The Bad And The Ugly, and not far off route are the ruins of San Pedro de Arlanza.
 

C clearly

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Time of past OR future Camino
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@C clearly, you must know this: I'm a total scardey-cat. This little romp as my compromise--wanting to go off the beaten track, but not having the courage to do that for several weeks!
(And I'm pretty tech-competant, but vastly prefer an old-fashioned paper map because I have to think, rather than giving that function over to a device.)
Haha! As you posted, I was starting to compose a PM to say that I didn't mean a criticism in my comment. :p Rather, I was thinking that I would have been more intimidated by the thread if I hadn't met you and realized that you were a normal person! (Other readers might wonder ;).) I am impressed by how you have taken on these challenging routes by yourselves! Although I am quite an independent person, not needing constant company, I am wondering whether I would do it. I remind myself that on the road, one step at a time, it always works out beautifully, and there is great satisfaction in figuring it out!
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Time of past OR future Camino
2009-2019: More than I remember...
I have decided: I need to find my way out of Burgos the afternoon I arrive. I'll walk the next morning, heading south. (details must be cleared). I will arrive in Covarrubias 2 days later. I'll stay there some time. Then on to SDdS due to your recommendations. There should be an albergue there, so that will be my bed. Then walking back to Burgos, going through Covarrubias one more, staying there, and hitting the Frances for Hornillos del Camino, on the good old CF track. Am I right here oldtimers? (speaking methaphorically, of course) :):);)
 
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Alex, yes. Grand idea.
The way out is along a via verde--an old railway right of way turned into a bike and walking track. Hang on a sec and I'll post a screenshot of how to get there in another message.
Haha! As you posted, I was starting to compose a PM to say that I didn't mean a criticism in my comment. :p Rather, I was thinking that I would have been more intimidated by the thread if I hadn't met you and realized that you were a normal person! (Other readers might wonder ;).)
I took it that as you meant, Claire--it made me chuckle, in fact. But...normal...I am? :D:D
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Time of past OR future Camino
2009-2019: More than I remember...
About accomodation: I may be naive, but I take it that I can find hostals & cafes & bars along this way? I also take it that I can talk myself into private/bar accomodation (After 1 month Spanish language school in Alicante this April, I am able to approach the natives with basic skills). But I don't mind sleeping under the skies: My sleeping bag is with me all the time, so no prob.
 
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Alex, here's the official via verde site with map links:
http://www.viasverdes.com/itinerarios/itinerario.asp?id=36
Here's what I did: Via Verde out of Burgos.JPG
And here's the screenshot of Alan's wikiloc track:
Modubar to Burgos 2.JPG
(I have a bunch of images of his tracks like this that I put on my phone; I can send them to you if you like--jut PM me with your email address.)

I can find hostals & cafes & bars along this way?
They're few and far between--this is near the Frances but a different universe! So that's the reason to book pensions etc ahead of time.
Covarrubias and SDdS have lots of options but much of the way is a good deal more remote.
At least on the scaredy-cat scale.
:D:D
 
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peregrina2000

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@peregrina2000 , @Viranani , @alexwalker - For some reason, I cannot resist reading these threads describing your Camino adventures. Do you guys realize how impressive but intimidating your descriptions are?! :eek::eek: You claim to be techno-phobes, but I don't believe it for a minute. I am not sure whether I am longing to get out on the untrammeled routes (albeit with my beloved smartphone), or whether I prefer the security of the toilet paper trail! ;)

Hi, C, just saw this post. I have to tell you that I am not intrepid, impressive, or intimidating. I am not a risk taker, but have become kind of a nut case when it comes to solitary caminos. Even though I frequently say, never again, I know that I will be drawn back. It was a slow progression for me-- after doing the Frances a few times and the Norte, always with friends, one year I had days from Pamplona to Burgos alone (I had walked from France with some Dutch friends who had to stop in Pamplona). I saw that that I really liked being alone on the Camino, so then I did the Vdlp alone. Of course, "alone" on the Vdlp is relative. But it wasn't till I walked the Salvador back in 2009, two stages with forum friends, and then met no one, that I realized how great for the soul, the mind, and the attitude these solitary caminos are for me. Anyway, if you are tempted, the Camino San Olav is a great way to test the waters -- three days, beautiful scenery and interesting places. Who knows, you may be hooked, too!
Buen camino, Laurie (p.s., I love your description of the Frances!)
 
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Now you're both making me chuckle...
Frankly I think we've all gone a bit off the deep end, in the best possible way. ;)

And Laurie, I want to publicly thank you once again for your incredible help in before my St Olav journey--as in your case it was a 'baby step'. I had wanted to do the Invierno but was too scared to do that first, all by myself--and so I was very glad this came up as an option. It was just right as a way to test the water of walking solo on a remote Camino. I'm not afraid of being alone...but alone without language skills is what spooked me, and still does a little. But now I'm sure it's possible.

(BTW...thinking of spring also--March or May, depending on my schedule. Bookmarking threads all over the place.)
 

peregrina2000

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Now you're both making me chuckle...
Frankly I think we've all gone a bit off the deep end, in the best possible way. ;)

And Laurie, I want to publicly thank you once again for your incredible help in before my St Olav journey--as in your case it was a 'baby step'. I had wanted to do the Invierno but was too scared to do that first, all by myself--and so I was very glad this came up as an option. It was just right as a way to test the water of walking solo on a remote Camino. I'm not afraid of being alone...but alone without language skills is what spooked me, and still does a little. But now I'm sure it's possible.

(BTW...thinking of spring also--March or May, depending on my schedule. Bookmarking threads all over the place.)

Those of you who venture off with little or no Spanish are the real troopers -- I speak good Spanish and it has helped me numerous times. But I guess what gives you comfort, Viranani (aside from your good sense of direction, which is something I do NOT have) is knowing that you are never far from "civilization" and that hand gestures and a knowledge of basic words will get you from one place to the next. I don't hesitate to flag down cars if I need one, and they have never failed me, either for directions or for a ride. Would you feel comfortable doing that, Viranani?

Sorry, not meaning to hijack this San Olav thread, but for those who are hesitant to try something like the San Olav, these comments may encourage you! The rewards are great and the freedom and self-confidence you get will propel you! Buen camino, Laurie
 
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Would you feel comfortable doing that, Viranani?
Truthfully, probably not. I am a bit shy as well as being a chicken.;)

But here's a story that shows how little Spanish one needs.
I'd followed the GR82 from SDdS into the tiny village of Contreras--where a few of the locals were cleaning up after the fiesta that had happened the night before. Mostly they were elders. When they saw me and learned that I was trying to go to Covarrubias, there was a general concerned clucking...it was sooooo far away! (For them, anyway...).
I wanted to forge ahead but one old lady there stopped me and kept saying "Tranquillo, tranquillo," which of course I understood to mean "Chill, please". As she was saying this, she found a few guys who were on their way to tend the pine plantations nearby and got them to draw me a map, making sure I wouldn't go the wrong way. The kindness was palpable even if I only understood one word in 10.
I guess I'd have made it without their help...but sure was grateful, because I could just relax and walk without any further concern about directions.
Alex, you'll have it a bit easier since you have more Spanish!:)

And what Laurie says cannot be more true:
! The rewards are great and the freedom and self-confidence you get will propel you!

This is how we go from being chickens to being eagles, I guess! Little by little learning to disbelieve those fearful voices. At the moment I'm contemplating my next adventure with a bit more confidence...going it solo is still a daunting idea, but I can just imagine a longer time alone. The bar is (slightly) higher.
 
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alexwalker

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Alex, you'll have it a bit easier since you have more Spanish!:)
Yes, my one month of Spanish intensive school at www.enforex.com in Alicante in April (plus numerous Caminos) has paid off very nicely! Highly recommended! I am able to ask for directions, understanding way and turn instructions, y mucho mas (and much more)! I am now only worrying about finding the right way out of Burgos: After that, I shall be well off. However, the help you all have already posted should get me right on. And as a skipper I know I should head straight south where the sun is at noon. :) This Viking will not stop until the Viking princess has been found! :)

And yes, I know how to ask for help. If i don't find a place to stay I have a sleeping bag and can look at the Milky Way. Will see to it that I always have some food and drink in my pack (I am not neccessarily talking water here!):)
 

Tulle

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
1999 Burgos-SDC, 2003 Leon-SDC, 2007-2012 Le Puy-SDC, 2014 Burgos-Covarrubias, Camino Ingles 3 times
Yes, I think I simply start out of Burgos and do a roundtrip. If I end up in Covarrubios twice, I don't care: On the contrary. What's another day? Do not care. My walk ends when it walks, and SdC is always there for me.

But: I need a credential for the San Olav: the website http://www.caminodesanolav.es/no/contenido/?idsec=561 has a picture of the credential: Do anyone know where it can be obtained?

I will take a good deal pictures to document the Way. Maybe we can cooperate in setting up a guide if there is none existing...

BTW: Did you "like" my bacalao? ;):)
We asked for a credential in the Burgos cathedral, but it seemed to me that the people there didn't recognize this little Camino. We got the credential in the tourist office.
 

alexwalker

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We asked for a credential in the Burgos cathedral, but it seemed to me that the people there didn't recognize this little Camino. We got the credential in the tourist office.
MOST HELPFUL!!!! I owe you a beer, or whatever makes you happy, sing and dance!

Tusen takk!!!

Edit: Maybe the tourist office in Burgos has some maps/extra info?
 
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alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Time of past OR future Camino
2009-2019: More than I remember...
This is how we go from being chickens to being eagles, I guess! Little by little learning to disbelieve those fearful voices. At the moment I'm contemplating my next adventure with a bit more confidence...going it solo is still a daunting idea, but I can just imagine a longer time alone. The bar is (slightly) higher.
How well put! And when alone, new avenues open: As in life; when you close one door, two new doors open for you.
 
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alexwalker

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More and more falls into place for me it seems, with the good (extraordinary, actually) help I have got here. As it seems for me now, I will be arriving in Madrid at 1.30PM on Sept.01, finding the train that leaves at 4.00PM from the airport (I assume), and ending up in Burgos at 6.30PM where I have booked a hostel room for the night: Settling down, see if the tourist office is open; if not go there next morning, get my credential (thanks, Tulle), and simply start walking & see what happens. Easy. I think/hope. If not, no damage: one more day will lapse. Tha's all.

So many people are so desperate with their planning. We need to be more relaxed. I am actually beginning to appreciate the Spanish mantra: Manana: Tomorrow.:)

However, I believe I have a good plan now. As some of you have stressed, going to SDdS is a must: OK, I believe you, and it will be done. Here's my take on it:

I am there. Why not take the time? Why not make the most of it? It is 2-3 more day. So what? I may be amply rewarded. If not, I have done it, and I am sure it will be a peaceful, joyous walk and stay anyway. Even if my main target is seeing the Princess in Covarrubias!:):);)
 

alexwalker

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Time of past OR future Camino
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Hi, Alex,

The forum members I know who have walked this route (Alansykes, Viranani, Reb and I) have all walked "backwards." You will essentially be walking the same way we did, minus the stage from Santo Domingo de Silos to Covarrubias. When Reb and I walked, I had a GPS, and it was crucial in a few spots, at least for us. Viranani walked without one, but she wound up on the road a lot instead of on the path. The route is not heavily marked in either direction, but you will occasionally see some posts with the Cross of San Olav carved on top and painted red. I have a link to my gps tracks in my long post on the route, and I think maybe you can get those onto your phone somehow, if you are more technologically gifted than I am. Most of the way is off-road, but without the gps tracks you may just wind up on the road, as Vira did, at least from Quintanillas to Mondubar.

Here are the obvious three stages:

1. Covarrubias to Mambrillas de Lara. Here you have three options. Maybe Rincón de Alfoz will have a room for you. It's right in Mambrillas. Ana García Alonso, Tel. 645 90 00 30. If not, there are two places that will come pick you up and drop you off the next morning -- Taberna Moruga (in Hortigüela) Tel: 947 11 50 03 AND Pensión Julita (in Villaespasa). C/. San Jose, 10 Tel. 674 69 19 04 and 673 35 75 30.

2. Mambrillas de Lara to Mondúbar de San Ciprián. La Cerca de Doña Jimena is the only option, and it's a very nice casa rural. Tel. 637 85 35 66

3. Mondúbar to Burgos.

Vira and I have some detailed comments about the various alternatives, all around Mambrillas and Quintanillas, and I hope they will help clear up some questions you might have about the route. But if there is anything that is not clear from that thread, please let us know. It´s a very nice walk, I think you will like it, buen camino, Laurie
Actually, Laurie, that gives me my stages, in revere (correct) order, and vice versa on my walk back to Burgos. I am very thankful for you setting up phone numbers & all: From your (and the others) help, I am confident it is straight doable. I even know how to obtain a credential, thanks to Tulle!

I will take the walk south from Burgos: If I thread wrong I can talk to locals; No need to worry! I will however print out this whole thread and put it in my pack; then my walk should be safe.

If you have more info you feel that I need, please post it here: I have some work to do next week (skippering a boat with sports fishermen up here in the Arctic) and then only 36 hours at home before I take off for Spain...
 

alansykes

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Time of past OR future Camino
Except the Francés
Actually, Laurie, that gives me my stages, in revere (correct) order, and vice versa on my walk back to Burgos. I am very thankful for you setting up phone numbers & all: From your (and the others) help, I am confident it is straight doable. I even know how to obtain a credential, thanks to Tulle!

I will take the walk south from Burgos: If I thread wrong I can talk to locals; No need to worry! I will however print out this whole thread and put it in my pack; then my walk should be safe.

If you have more info you feel that I need, please post it here: I have some work to do next week (skippering a boat with sports fishermen up here in the Arctic) and then only 36 hours at home before I take off for Spain...
Can I put in a word for going to matins at Santo Domingo de Silos as well as vespers? The morning congregation (four of us, I think) was heavily outnumbered by the monks. When I was there it was dark as the service started and the light gathered as it went on, quite unforgettable. The monastery albergue is small but excellent - ask for Fray José-Alfredo, the friendly and helpful brother hospitaler.

Also, if you're staying at the (huge and well equipped) albergue in Mecerreyes, it's a comfortable day from a casa rural at Revilla del Campo, going via the Visigothic church. Unfortunately it was a holiday when I was there, so I had to go on to the casa rural at Modúbar de San Cibrián, which is owned by the same family.
 
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Even if my main target is seeing the Princess in Covarrubias!
Off topic, sort of, but am I the only one who finds her story incredibly touching?
In her time to make the very long journey of no return to an entirely different land and culture--how homesick she must have been! Or maybe that's all my projection, who knows. Living in this global village with so much mobility it's hard to imagine the distance from home she must have felt.
 
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Would love to! Where in Norway are you from? I am a Tromsø native. https://www.visittromso.no/en I will be in Burgos at Sept.01, then doing Olav, then back to Burgos and hammering towards SdC Would love to offer a cold drink for your tip!
I come from Sunnmøre:) and will arrive in Santiago September 23. I'm going to walk Camino Ingles for the second time together with two friends.
 

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hola amigo! I was in Covarrubias two months ago, guess what... for a Viking wedding! Marina, the girl in the tourist office in Covarrubias is a fan of all things Viking, she will be more than helpful, she speaks very good French, I believe, not sure about here English, though. The Shrine for Saint Olav is at walking distance from Covarrubias. If you have time, go to the "Piélago" bar/restaurant by the river, you can swimming in the river, and the pizzas are cooked in a proper stone oven with wood, it may look like a cheap burger gaff, but it is actually amazing.

I stayed in casa rural Castro

www.loscastroscovarrubias.es

the landlord, Ramiro, is really helpful and nice too. In fact, Covarrubias is a most welcoming stunningly beautiful town.

I am sorry I cannot help much about actual walking, but I do have great memories of Covarrubias.

The story of Princess Kristina is very special, sad, but special at the same time
 

alexwalker

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hola amigo! I was in Covarrubias two months ago, guess what... for a Viking wedding! Marina, the girl in the tourist office in Covarrubias is a fan of all things Viking, she will be more than helpful, she speaks very good French, I believe, not sure about here English, though. The Shrine for Saint Olav is at walking distance from Covarrubias. If you have time, go to the "Piélago" bar/restaurant by the river, you can swimming in the river, and the pizzas are cooked in a proper stone oven with wood, it may look like a cheap burger gaff, but it is actually amazing.

I stayed in casa rural Castro

www.loscastroscovarrubias.es

the landlord, Ramiro, is really helpful and nice too. In fact, Covarrubias is a most welcoming stunningly beautiful town.

I am sorry I cannot help much about actual walking, but I do have great memories of Covarrubias.

The story of Princess Kristina is very special, sad, but special at the same time
Thank you very much! Most helpful! Here is the deal: On Tuesday I fly further north in The Arctic Norway (close to North Cape Europe) for a 6-day assignment as skipper for a pack of sports fishing fanatics; http://havcruise.no/. BTW: It is not me you see in the pictures: It is my friend and his wife, who own and run the business. I am only a hired hand in emergencies. In the evenings I have my own cottage with wifi :))) where I will sort out and copy/paste all info you guys all have been kind enough to provide me. Back in my town, I have 36 hours to print/sort all I need with me before heading for Burgos.

I have now understood that in Burgos I can get a San Olav credential at the tourist office. I assume I can get even more info/road choices/sleep info; but I appreciate every bit of info from you in here. I need to read more closely all your responses/advice above; but my time is hectic right now. I hope I can have some quiet evenings the coming week in my skipper cottage.

Marina, the girl in the tourist office in Covarrubias is a fan of all things Viking, she will be more than helpful, she speaks very good French, I believe, not sure about here English, though.
Your info about the tourist office in Covarubbias is most helpful: I will give Marina a try. If it's going to be French, I need finger/sign language... Maybe she will appreciate the arrival of a Viking? My limited Spanish may do the trick... ;)

Edit: www.loscastroscovarrubias.es may very well be my place, although at 35 Euros/night. I plan on staying a couple of days there.Will call them ahead. Many thanks!
 
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Right:

It is close to take off, Wednesday. Thanks to all of you (and esp. Viranani) who has helped me here, I have compiled and printed all help you have given me, +++ I have this address on my iPhone:

http://www.wikiloc.com/wikiloc/view.do?id=11388073

This will be a great aid in navigating San Olav. It will be the first of 7 Caminos where I will use wifi... Hmmm... Mixed feelings...

So, tomorrow: Finding my walking gear and start some packing. However, as some of you oldtimers know, what's going into the pack is now routine. Should take 30 mins.

I am looking forward to reach Castrojeriz ca. Sept-12-13-14, because a small shop near the last albergue (my favorite) sell walking socks of extraordinary quality. I am wearing one pair now; will buy 2 more pairs there. The first I bought lasted for 5 walks!!! Incl. one VdlP!!!

It is printed "Lorpen TCT" on the wrist. Look out for them.

Will stay well in SDdS and esp. Covarubbias, of course, being a Norw.

My intention is to take pics all along and post with text in here, as to maybe manage to give a mini-guide for San Olav.

However, as I understand it, the tourist office in Burgos issues a credencial for San Olav. Will buy it. If they do, I suspect they may have maps/info/whatever, that can further assist me on my way.

So, Wed. evening I go to Oslo. Sleep at (in) the airport. Don't care; a chair will do. Thursday 7.15AM to Gatwick. New plane to Madrid, landing 1.30PM. Train from airport to Burgos 4.00PM. Arriving 6.30PM. Hostel booked. Heading for SDdS via Covarrubias on Friday morning. Taking same route back to burgos, and continue on CF to SdC. Or maybe I switch to Portuguese. Who knows. But I feel comfortable in Spain, speaking a little Spanish. Arriving some day in SdC.... No return ticket.

No more planning. I am hitting the road.
 
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alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Time of past OR future Camino
2009-2019: More than I remember...
Countdown continues. I have put together a list of stopping places and distances in between, using wikiloc.com. I have done this for myself, but also because the idea of producing a camino guide for San Olav with lots of pictures has arisen.

I have plugged in some lodging possibilities, cafes, etc. I carry a notebook and will write all I can.

See the attached pdf file for all what I know by now....

I know I said no more planning, but for the San Olav, I need to be prepared. This is not the CF which I know well. I must say I look forward to crossing the Meseta once more after San Olav. But first, I will pay my dues to the Norwegian princess who sleeps in Cuvarrubias... :)
 

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Who better to do a San Olav guide than a Norwegian??

Buen Camino @alexwalker!
May you have a wonderful journey...I will be thinking of you out there.

(And you may not need the WiFi...I managed. There's a map store in Burgos that you could visit before you set out--I missed it because of siesta time, so I can't recommend it one way or the other...)
 

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