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Luggage Transfer Correos

I probably won’t do this again

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
May I prescribe a simple fix: walk 25km/ride 50km a day, drink vino tinto and insert silicon ear plugs at night. I never heard a thing, woke up at 7am and didn't even know most of the early risers had already left.
I've tried that................never heard a thing.
Except everyone complained I snored! :eek:
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
I have a case of rhinitis, I´ll grunt and take the whole house !!
 

RemysMimi

Hooked on the Camino!!
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018)
Frances or Portuguese (2020)
It’s unfortunate that you have not understood that the Camino has seen many people walk it for over a thousand years. Some of them are/were sick. If you needed a vacation then go to Hawaii.
Love it!! There are a couple of people in this forum who truly do not get the true meaning of the Camino and are perhaps a bit too snobbish for it (dirty hippies, loud snoring). I would suggest that people with such delicate sensibilities book private accommodations all along the way.
 

RemysMimi

Hooked on the Camino!!
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018)
Frances or Portuguese (2020)
@KinkyOne I don’t know...I’ve been an early riser since childhood and though I have been criticised for it a lot as though it’s a terrible moral failure, at 42 I have to resign myself that it’s not likely to ever change. I just wake up at 4:30/5am and feel bright eyed and bushy tailed and ready to go! But I can honestly say that I have never woken anyone up (unless I wanted to 😈).

But I flag early in the evening and very often find myself yawning my head off by 8pm.
Snoring can't be helped, but obliviousness is optional.
It's the people who live in their own little selfish bubbles that get me.
And. Loud snorers can definitely mean no sleep...so @Zordmot, why not take a few nights of well-earned rest in private accommodation?

The big picure is that things happen - and we have no choice in the matter.
But we have the choice to grow with the challenges that we face, or not.
So it's up to you @Zordmot , stay or go. But I bet if you find a way to stay the course, you won't regret it.
Well said!
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
I’ smell that gaseous release and raise it with a middle-of-night blood curdling nightmarish scream.
The last time that I stayed at the parish albergue in El Acebo, a young woman shouted out something in the middle of the night, which woke up everyone in the place, except herself and the hospitalero (at least, he didn't poke his nose out of his private room). Night time disturbances in albergues are fairly common, and often do not disturb those who make them. We have to get used to them.
 
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RemysMimi

Hooked on the Camino!!
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018)
Frances or Portuguese (2020)
I am surprised that everyone who replied to this post so far seems to consider that booking a private room will solve sleep problems. I do not do so frequently because of my budget and my preference for a long camino (more cost for a place to sleep); but I did so prior to my last camino, as I was waiting for the date to begin my time as a hospitalera. Inexpensive private rooms can be just as noisy as dormitories. This is partly because of the type of accommodation: wooden floors and doors etc., and partly because of the different daily schedules in Spain. Guests returning from late night meals do not keep their voices down in hostals. Why should they? Everyone else is on the same daily schedule. One couple was arguing so noisily that they woke the baby, who howled. On another occasion, in a hotel in Santo Domingo de Silos, the couple in the next room celebrated their weekend away with energetic coupling, which drew from me amused giggles rather than annoyance. I regret to state that the only place where you have any control as to the nighttime noise is your own bedroom at home, if you can afford to plan your housing with that in mind. I use earplugs, when I need to. They work, but they can cause problems: earaches and plugged ears for me. Still, I prefer to sleep and would be just as desperate as Zordmot if I could not do so. Two possible solutions: Are these the same group of champion snorers? If so, try to get out of synch with them. Let them go ahead while you take one night in a quieter off-camino hostal. Or you could transfer to a less-travelled route, where you would usually share your dormitory with a small number of people and have a better chance of getting some sleep. With ear plugs, of course, if you can tolerate them. I use wax ones and find that they do block out most noise. I wish you, and all those innocent snorers, a buen camino and a chance to choose to return, if this is right for you.
Sadly, I must agree. With the exception of my first night at Orrison, my travel buddy and I had private rooms (most very nice accommodations) all the way to Santiago. She was a snorer. I also had to contend with the pilgrims who would stay up late drinking in nearby bars, traffic, etc.

As others have said, it's all a part of the experience and the learning process. Each day as I walked, I prayed to God for "patience, kindness, tolerance and love". It was my mantra. It worked!
 

suze.ross

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
October (2016) Final Stage
May/June (2017)
As I lay here in my 7th albergue awake at 2 am after walking 27 km yesterday, each night has been the same: the room is dominated not by snorers but by people with sleep apnea- a severe medical untreated medical condition. The asleep person 4 ft away from me is in a marathon struggle for survival and sounds at as loud as a chain saw. I can hear two others in this room in the same boat. Why oh why do these people who know what their sleeping does to others stay in albergues? We all sympathize for their condition—although it is treatable-but this lack of consideration for others is mind boggling to me. For this reason I won’t be walking again and I can’t recommend the Camino to others.
I had considerable trouble sleeping with all the snoring, bathroom runs, and early early risers as I am a light sleeper. So much so that I started having nightmares for the lack of sleep and eventually ended up waking others up with my nightmare noises, LOL. Twice was enough for me - after about 1/2 way I started staying in private rooms, casa ruals, and 2 star hotels. No more sleep problems!! Magic!!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(12), Portuguese(13), Finisterre(13), Norte(14Partial), Ingles(17),Via de la Plata(19partial)
As I lay here in my 7th albergue awake at 2 am after walking 27 km yesterday, each night has been the same: the room is dominated not by snorers but by people with sleep apnea- a severe medical untreated medical condition. The asleep person 4 ft away from me is in a marathon struggle for survival and sounds at as loud as a chain saw. I can hear two others in this room in the same boat. Why oh why do these people who know what their sleeping does to others stay in albergues? We all sympathize for their condition—although it is treatable-but this lack of consideration for others is mind boggling to me. For this reason I won’t be walking again and I can’t recommend the Camino to others.
Such a shame you have so many alternatives for accommodations on the Camino if you just try one you might change your mind and they are relatively inexpensive
 

Paulh

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Only done the 1st 3 days
Ok... here is my two cents and a question. In 2017 I walked the Camion from SJPP putting up with rain, freezing temps, snoring, farting, rustling, and all the above "annoyances". I loved sleeping in albergues. I really did. Do I snore? I've never been told I do, but I have another "annoying" problem that I worry about disturbing others... I have to get up several times a night to go you know where? I try my best to be quiet but short of wetting the bed, I have no choice. I try to be as quiet as I can. Anyway, I understand we, as humans, are not perfect. My above Camino was cut short in Astorga due to bursitis in both heels (some of you may remember me writing about it). I swore I would never do a Camino again. I came back very angry and feeling like a failure. Not because someone was snoring, or farting, or anything else, only because of my own body. Well, the Camino has called me back. I originally was going to start in Astorga but have decided to start over at SJPP. I will train harder, see what I can do about my feet, and yes, will stay in albergues. Here is my question. Can anyone suggest a good earplug? Or are they all good, just not for me. I tried several different ones and they always fall out (perhaps my ears are shaped funny). Have a year to experiment... going back to SJPP in 2020 if the good Lord is willing and my body holds out. I apologize to anyone in advance if my night time bathroom runs disturb you. Seriously, because I can't afford, and don't want, private accommodations
As I lay here in my 7th albergue awake at 2 am after walking 27 km yesterday, each night has been the same: the room is dominated not by snorers but by people with sleep apnea- a severe medical untreated medical condition. The asleep person 4 ft away from me is in a marathon struggle for survival and sounds at as loud as a chain saw. I can hear two others in this room in the same boat. Why oh why do these people who know what their sleeping does to others stay in albergues? We all sympathize for their condition—although it is treatable-but this lack of consideration for others is mind boggling to me. For this reason I won’t be walking again and I can’t recommend the Camino to others.
 

Paulh

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Only done the 1st 3 days
Hi zordmot. Sorry to here of your decison not to do another Camino. I completed the Camino last Oct 18. And I snored the whole way Thu it. I often get embarrassed about my snoring.i also got sleep apnea. I can snore for Ireland. When I went to the alburgues. I also said I snored. Always got a bed far away. But as they pack up people get nearer. I plan to do the complete Camino in Oct/Nov 19. And I plan to use my CPAP machine. I will carry this. I even got an operation. Which made this worce. I also know now that I'm not the only one who snores. And even not the loudest. So don't give up. For me the Camino has be one of the best things I have ever done. And met the most fantastic people. And had some of the best laughs I ever had.i can't wait but I'll have to. Beun Camino.
 

TheSparrow

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese (2019) Walking Lisbon North
As I lay here in my 7th albergue awake at 2 am after walking 27 km yesterday, each night has been the same: the room is dominated not by snorers but by people with sleep apnea- a severe medical untreated medical condition. The asleep person 4 ft away from me is in a marathon struggle for survival and sounds at as loud as a chain saw. I can hear two others in this room in the same boat. Why oh why do these people who know what their sleeping does to others stay in albergues? We all sympathize for their condition—although it is treatable-but this lack of consideration for others is mind boggling to me. For this reason I won’t be walking again and I can’t recommend the Camino to others.
snoring may in fact be an adaptation to protect humans from animal harm at night - group snoring may in fact deter more effectively than single snoring - we are just returning to our human communal form perhaps and it is not easy. OR, as this quote suggests“Snorers in herds may have a selective advantage, sleeping soundly while the rest are disturbed“ lol, I never would have thought of that one! But, like others have said, you can just stay at an inexpensive hotel - but maybe you are just not a fan of the camino and that is cool too.
 
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Just Karin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Vía de la Plata 2019
Just back from 7 weeks of albergues.
I was extremely surprised that I seemed to be able to sleep with snorers, farters, coughers, stinkers, pukers, squeaking beds, people who set their alarm at 5 am and many other things. Oh yes things woke me up. And sometimes I was surprised that all beds around me were empty when I woke up. The most quiet night I had in a room with 90 beds, all full, with even children sleeping there.
It was my Camino. The Camino where I learned to accept. I wish you many great nights - awake or asleep 😉
 

Delphinoula

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C Franconia 2019
Camino desde Algeciras Sevillia (2019)
Horizontal learning curve or just venting. We are all with you.
I did not get drafted into the Camino. Did you sign up for it?
No being able to sleep does not bring in out the best in me, on the other hand had many of sleepless nights for far more serious reasons. But that is me..
So hope you find a way to make it work for you. Be good to yourself. Less ks nap along the way. Go to sleep early, before the hordes come. Earphones with Natur sounds....
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2014
VDLP 2017
Camino de Levante (2018)
As I lay here in my 7th albergue awake at 2 am after walking 27 km yesterday, each night has been the same: the room is dominated not by snorers but by people with sleep apnea- a severe medical untreated medical condition. The asleep person 4 ft away from me is in a marathon struggle for survival and sounds at as loud as a chain saw. I can hear two others in this room in the same boat. Why oh why do these people who know what their sleeping does to others stay in albergues? We all sympathize for their condition—although it is treatable-but this lack of consideration for others is mind boggling to me. For this reason I won’t be walking again and I can’t recommend the Camino to others.
When we have have had a bad night, we try and find a small hotel or b and b to get a good night's sleep. Things always feel better when you have had a good sleep.
 

Rpeet1

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Starting in Porto may 2019
We never stayed in an albergue just for that reason, thankfully our budget allowed us a room with a toilet every night. However, I think we may have missed the camaraderie of meeting people.
 

truthseeker

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés, (fall, 2018)
Even if you think you aren't guilty of snoring and disturbing others, you probably do. In a youth hostel in Paris on my way home, I was awakened by a woman who gently shook me and said, "Madame, you are snoreeeng, please change your position!" Still mostly asleep, I remember replying, "Oh dear me, I am terribly sorry." And turned over. There weren't other complaints that night. I think a little polite reminder can do wonders. Also, remember that the chances of your really not being a snorer are miniscule.
 

RemysMimi

Hooked on the Camino!!
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018)
Frances or Portuguese (2020)
“I will never do this again”. Yes that is what I said also after completing the Frances. Then within two months of being back home started thinking about doing it again.
OMG. This is so me. Though I did not say it because I was annoyed. It was the idea of 44 days away and walking everyday, etc. But as soon as I got home I changed my tune within a matter of weeks. I long to be back there for another 44 days, walking everyday, etc.
 

AnnaG

So many Caminos; so little time.
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese Caminho from Porto-Santiago late September/early October 20 2013
As I lay here in my 7th albergue awake at 2 am after walking 27 km yesterday, each night has been the same: the room is dominated not by snorers but by people with sleep apnea- a severe medical untreated medical condition. The asleep person 4 ft away from me is in a marathon struggle for survival and sounds at as loud as a chain saw. I can hear two others in this room in the same boat. Why oh why do these people who know what their sleeping does to others stay in albergues? We all sympathize for their condition—although it is treatable-but this lack of consideration for others is mind boggling to me. For this reason I won’t be walking again and I can’t recommend the Camino to others.
I understand your frustration! I walked my first (so far only) Caminho before I discovered I have MSA (Mixed Sleep Apnea). I probably kept others up and didn't even realize it.

On my Caminho, I stayed one night in a dorm-style setting albergue. That was enough for me. It's not my "thing." I found relatively inexpensive places to stay and enjoyed them much better. But then, I was on a quest to be alone, so the purpose in your journey makes a difference.

Back to the apnea...in general I found the Caminho much like flying these days - anyone can fly, and anyone can walk a Camino! In other words, "It's all out there!" I don't recommend you give up but rather find the journey that more aligns with who you are as best you can.
 

John Ferguson

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
The French Way May/June (2015) Complete.
Proposed - Porto Way from Lisbon May(2017).
As I lay here in my 7th albergue awake at 2 am after walking 27 km yesterday, each night has been the same: the room is dominated not by snorers but by people with sleep apnea- a severe medical untreated medical condition. The asleep person 4 ft away from me is in a marathon struggle for survival and sounds at as loud as a chain saw. I can hear two others in this room in the same boat. Why oh why do these people who know what their sleeping does to others stay in albergues? We all sympathize for their condition—although it is treatable-but this lack of consideration for others is mind boggling to me. For this reason I won’t be walking again and I can’t recommend the Camino to others.
I think perhaps you should have continued with your Camino and stayed in other private accommodation and hopefully you would have found the peace and solace to understand others?
 

Moll1e

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 St. jean to Logrono
As I lay here in my 7th albergue awake at 2 am after walking 27 km yesterday, each night has been the same: the room is dominated not by snorers but by people with sleep apnea- a severe medical untreated medical condition. The asleep person 4 ft away from me is in a marathon struggle for survival and sounds at as loud as a chain saw. I can hear two others in this room in the same boat. Why oh why do these people who know what their sleeping does to others stay in albergues? We all sympathize for their condition—although it is treatable-but this lack of consideration for others is mind boggling to me. For this reason I won’t be walking again and I can’t recommend the Camino to others.
Ear plugs and an eye mask are essential when staying in albergues, in my experience. I know the frustration of not being able to sleep with the noise from others.
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Also, remember that the chances of your really not being a snorer are miniscule.
I am definitely not a snorer ........... many nights. I know this because I check it on my snoring app. Other nights my snoring can get to ‘epic’ levels. I can find neither rhyme nor reason for this fluctuation; I have tried everything. Staying in a private room is no guarantee that I will not disturb those in adjacent rooms. That I might disturb others is mortifying to me.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Geneva to Irun then Norte to SDC 2015, Piemont Pyreneen 2018
Wow, what a thread. Snorers, farters, grunters are just background noise. This conversation has reminded me of hiking the West Coast Trail on Vancouver Island, Canada. I was sitting on a log next to my campfire one morning enjoying my cowboy coffee as two young woman walked by and I greeted them with a happy " good morning". One of the women stopped and snarled "what's so good about this morning?"
I was a bit taken aback and said "well, the sun is shining, my coffee tastes great" and she blurted out " but did you sleep last night with the roar of the waves constantly sounding as if they were going to wash you away?"
She turned and headed off and I wanted to yell " why are you here?" But I didn't. You take what the trail/camino gives you. Be thankful that you are out there.
I think just about every solution to the problem has been posted so far.
Buen camino
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
In my youth, we lived under a church tower in a sleepy town.
Many of our family guests said they´d never come back again for that blasted racket of the bells every quarter of an hour.
further down in town there was the sound of the diesel trains going south every hour on the hour...starting and stopping at the station.....
you can get used to a lot of things.
 

Leibniz

Peregrina
Camino(s) past & future
Frances from Astorga (2018)
Frances/Invierno from SJPP (2019)
In my youth, we lived under a church tower in a sleepy town.
Many of our family guests said they´d never come back again for that blasted racket of the bells every quarter of an hour.
My mum also lives right by the church in a sleepy town renowned for its artful bell ringing. So not only it happens every quarter of an hour but it’s practically a full concert every time. 😂

But it’s funny how you get so used to it that you don’t notice it at all when you live there.
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
- but when I hear my fat tomcat hits the floorboars downstairs after he´s scoured the kitchen table, I sit up and go downstais to check for burglars !!
I am a sleeping nightduty staff in an institution and I hear everything irregular!!

Strrrange !!
 

TaraWalks

Peregrina without a skateboard
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016 & 2018, planning for Le Puy 2019/2020ish and for some shorter Caminos stacked
My mum also lives right by the church in a sleepy town renowned for its artful bell ringing. So not only it happens every quarter of an hour but it’s practically a full concert every time. 😂

But it’s funny how you get so used to it that you don’t notice it at all when you live there.
I used to live under a flight path and planes would literally shake my house. I got used to it and slept through it often. Regarding snoring, yes I snore - I know because I have woken myself up! I also invest in earplugs whenever I travel. At least my snoring is nowhere near my father’s ability. He once had his pillow pulled out from under his head and was hit with it due to his racket!
 

Hal

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
si
I have stayed in a hostel with a CPAP user who stored his machine on the floor next to his bunk. I’m the early hours one man stumbled over it on the way for an urgent bathroom visit and it went flying. Both men were in tears. In this case unless you have some kind of bedside table to hog, a private room may be an ultimately cheaper solution for the CPAP user.

And I also have to say though I don’t mind the white noise, the occasional alarm beep was quite startling.
 

Julie Ressler

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017
As I lay here in my 7th albergue awake at 2 am after walking 27 km yesterday, each night has been the same: the room is dominated not by snorers but by people with sleep apnea- a severe medical untreated medical condition. The asleep person 4 ft away from me is in a marathon struggle for survival and sounds at as loud as a chain saw. I can hear two others in this room in the same boat. Why oh why do these people who know what their sleeping does to others stay in albergues? We all sympathize for their condition—although it is treatable-but this lack of consideration for others is mind boggling to me. For this reason I won’t be walking again and I can’t recommend the Camino to others.
?earplugs? ?Cellphone on YouTube channel for soothing sleep sounds? Small tape recorder with earplugs?
 

loumura

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues March 2019
As I lay here in my 7th albergue awake at 2 am after walking 27 km yesterday, each night has been the same: the room is dominated not by snorers but by people with sleep apnea- a severe medical untreated medical condition. The asleep person 4 ft away from me is in a marathon struggle for survival and sounds at as loud as a chain saw. I can hear two others in this room in the same boat. Why oh why do these people who know what their sleeping does to others stay in albergues? We all sympathize for their condition—although it is treatable-but this lack of consideration for others is mind boggling to me. For this reason I won’t be walking again and I can’t recommend the Camino to others.
My husband and I, age 66 and 69, did our first camino ever on the Costa Portugale in March of this year (2019). Fortunately, neither of us snore, but at our age, we never, ever considered sharing sleeping facilities dormitory-style because after all, we have to make sure we get a good sleep if we are to go 15 miles a day. Why anyone would choose to stay in a dormitory with tons of others and noise I didn't understand. Waiting in line for a hot (hopefully) shower isn't my idea of a fun adventure. I get it though...a lot of folks see this trek as a spiritual journey, so part of that is suffering (sacrificing maybe a nicer word?). My daughter-in-law's 65 yr old mom did just that in Poland.: 160 miles sleeping on the ground or in people's barns or on the floor in homes...all strictly dependent on the generosity of the locals, including volunteers that feed them. Personally, there is no way I would like that. But for those of us who don't worry about the Compostella or certificate stamping, it is just a lovely way to be in touch with the countryside and foreign cities. I totally understand your annoyance, and I too, believe it is inconsiderate of these folks. Albergaues are best left to the younger folks as they are noisy, excited and can do with a lot less sleep! For those who say they can only afford that, it is totally not true! We carefully perused the B&B's and found very cheap ones for as little as 30 euros a night (for two) in Portugal. Often it was only the difference of $10 more a day, so multiply that by 15 days and that's an extra $150. Anyone investing in a trip like this can afford that little bit more to get privacy and a good sleep. Of course you miss the socializing, but you can get that on the road at cafes if you like. I hope you reconsider trying it again but staying in B&B's instead. We had a mix of B&B's and apartments with washing machines even and all 12 were fabulous with the exception of one (no hot water and bad food but the beauty of the property made up for it!) You can sleep in, get going when you want and have a peaceful rest ( promising that in some towns you'll be glad you have earplugs). Almost all these places serve a nice breakfast to get you going. 5 euros for coffee and pasteries, the European breakfasts. You pay more if you want a big breakfast The 145 miles we did was definitely challenging but we loved every day of it! We didn't socialize or hang with others except for a few chats here and there at cafes, and that's how we like it. Everyone was friendly and the challenge of progressing each day was a thrill for us. The coast of Portugal was exquisitely beautiful and the food delicious. Take a pause and consider doing it differently. We spent somewhere between 35-55 euros for our lovely places. In Portugal you can get a 3-course meal for two and a bottle of wine for $20 (American). We will have wonderful memories for the rest of our lives. We are actually thinking we would love to do another sometime if our health holds out. Good luck!
 

Bad Pilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Far too many...
May I prescribe a simple fix: walk 25km/ride 50km a day, drink vino tinto and insert silicon ear plugs at night. I never heard a thing, woke up at 7am and didn't even know most of the early risers had already left.
If I did all that, I would be the one to have snored…! :Oo
 

loumura

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues March 2019
But may keep people who won't enjoy it from walking - which is good.

I prefer to have several snorers in the room rather than just one, because they tend to fill in the gaps between the other snorers, and (hopefully) it becomes more like white noise. 😊
Just your handle "Dancing Rain" is enough to tell me you are a happy person..ha! The glass is always half full. You probably stand in front of the mirror every morning and say positive affirmations to yourself (and that is OK!) You are the perfect person for the Camino. I myself would go stark raving crazy listening all night to snorers but I have sense enough to find a B&B rather than deciding I will never do another Camino.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
Why anyone would choose to stay in a dormitory with tons of others and noise I didn't understand. Waiting in line for a hot (hopefully) shower isn't my idea of a fun adventure.
I think that if you read a lot of threads on this forum with an open mind, you should be able to get a sense of what value and interesting joys there can be in the albergue experience. No one is saying it is always wonderful, but please don't dismiss it as being a black-and-white choice of suffering versus modern comfort. By the way, I am 70, a light sleeper, like my own space, and I am very pragmatic. I use a mix of accommodation.
 

loumura

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues March 2019
Totally agree with you.

I know that I sleep poorly walking Caminos, (yes, all 20+!) for whatever reason that may be. I am consoled by the fact that I sleep perfectly when at home and so I accept the broken nights. In April I took the experience to the next level:

I was staying in the municipal in Arzúa, joining the Francés after walking the Primitivo. The albergue was packed with young Spanish in a partying mood, hoping to reach Santiago by Easter .10 p.m. curfew? Don't think so. Across the street locals were chatting till about 1 a.m., then began the Flamenco singing! To top it all off I was sleeping between 2 snorers, me awake from 9:30 till 2 a.m. I finally gave up the prospect of sleeping and actually got up and walked to Santiago at 3 a.m. :eek: By 6:30 I had coffee in Pedrouzo and at 10:30 I was standing in front of the Cathedral after a 39 km stroll ;).Granted, this might not be your cup of tea but it was an interesting experience. The previous night had been a full moon so I rarely even needed by head lamp. Just me, the moon, the occasional barking dog, birds chirping and frogs...hmm, what do frogs do?
Somehow I gather you are not a senior hiker! Pretty funny. But I wouldn't recommend walking the Portugal camino in the moonlight as the uneven cobblestones would be very,very dangerous Once in Spain though, the going is easier. You certainly took this annoyance gracefully!
 

loumura

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues March 2019
I think that if you read a lot of threads on this forum with an open mind, you should be able to get a sense of what value and interesting joys there can be in the albergue experience. No one is saying it is always wonderful, but please don't dismiss it as being a black-and-white choice of suffering versus modern comfort. By the way, I am 70, a light sleeper, like my own space, and I am very pragmatic. I use a mix of accommodation.
Sounds reasonable. But I did my purgatory when I was younger and now I love a little more luxury. It doesn't reduce the level of fun or enjoyment. I am glad there is a solution for everyone ha ha!
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
I did my purgatory when I was younger and now I love a little more luxury.
I don't know about purgatory, but who doesn't enjoy some luxury? Again, this is a statement of either-or, as if everything is black-and-white.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
I thought that @loumura understands the reasons why people stay / are advised / like to stay in dormitory style albergues and sleep in dormitory beds quite well and also explained why she isn’t convinced by any of them for herself:
  • religious-Christian reasons (austere life, ideas of penance - not sure how up to date these concepts are in today’s theology and doctrine, not every branch of Christianity views it the same way but it doesn’t matter, the idea as such is still alive in popular faith and popular views)
  • spiritual reasons (similar to above, ascetic life gets you to a higher level or closer to your inner core or fosters personal growth)
  • economic reasons (cheap)
  • socialising/bonding reasons
  • it’s the thing to do on a camino, embodies the spirit of the camino.
Did I miss something?
 
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LTfit

Veteran Member
Somehow I gather you are not a senior hiker! Pretty funny. But I wouldn't recommend walking the Portugal camino in the moonlight as the uneven cobblestones would be very,very dangerous Once in Spain though, the going is easier. You certainly took this annoyance gracefully!
Turning 63 in July so I guess I would fit the "senior" bill ;)
 

wayne smith

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF June 2016
Yes, and having carried one in 2016, I was disappointed to find that people were intolerant of the relatively low level of white noise it made. There was no apparent consideration of the fact that I was lumping almost another kg of CPAP equipment with me with in order to avoid the disruption my snoring might have caused.

The experience reconfirmed my simple position on this matter. The albergues are for everyone. If you don't find anything about them to your liking, you are the one that needs to address that. If that means that you have to pay for a private room, that is the price of your preferences. Don't ever think that you have some entitlement to move those costs to someone else.

It also confirmed that I am not going to lump that thing around with me except when I am travelling with my spouse, for whom I am prepared to make the extra effort. The rest of you have now been tarred with the brush of a couple of really intolerant and inconsiderate pilgrims. Unfair? Clearly. But that is how it is!
I too carried my cpap on my camino, only 2.5 kilos more weight, but lots of extra room in my pack I still pray for the American nurse who in a Sarria hostel was awakened by the hiss from my mask and in the early hours tried to block the air hose with her hand I slept on a bench in a cenral hallway for the rest of the night without my cpap and woke the world. My reply to complaints in the morning was to ask her..
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
I too carried my cpap on my camino, only 2.5 kilos more weight, but lots of extra room in my pack I still pray for the American nurse who in a Sarria hostel was awakened by the hiss from my mask and in the early hours tried to block the air hose with her hand I slept on a bench in a cenral hallway for the rest of the night without my cpap and woke the world. My reply to complaints in the morning was to ask her..
What an appalling story!
Shame, shame, shame on her. I wouldn't expect anyone to act so thoughtlessly, especially not a nurse :mad:
 

RemysMimi

Hooked on the Camino!!
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018)
Frances or Portuguese (2020)
I too carried my cpap on my camino, only 2.5 kilos more weight, but lots of extra room in my pack I still pray for the American nurse who in a Sarria hostel was awakened by the hiss from my mask and in the early hours tried to block the air hose with her hand I slept on a bench in a cenral hallway for the rest of the night without my cpap and woke the world. My reply to complaints in the morning was to ask her..
WTH!!! are you kidding me. A frigging nurse. That is absolutely appalling.
 

Elle Bieling

Elle Bieling, PilgrimageTraveler
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés, '14 '17 Finisterre, '14 '17 '18 Primitivo, '15 '18 Portuguese, '17, '18 San Salvador, '18
To my dismay and embarrassment, as I have got older, I have started snoring. I always carry extra earplugs and offer them to anyone in a bunk nearby who does not have them. My 14 year old daughter has come up with a solution, however. I take the top bunk, she takes the bottom one, and when I start snoring, she pushes my bunk from underneath, I turn over and the snoring stops. If I start the process loud enough to wake her, she repeats the action. My own method of dealing with snorers is to enjoy enough vino tinto and a shot or two of oroujo.. to produce a deep sleep. I would suggest you get mildly sozzled each night before bed...
This is so funny! This is exactly what my husband and i do! He takes the top bunk, and I jostle him when he snores. He always stops when he rolls over. However, I am known, on occasion (very infrequent, I might add) to snore.... 😂😂
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
this is an old quote of mine from Oct ´17

My interference with a snorer was a once-off:
At the dormitory at the nuns in Leon, the one just at the cozy little square, we had at last heard the last visitors going home as this wiry Italian in a small group of chirpy bycycling pilgrims started to snore like a wild boar!!
A surge of desperation hit me and I quickly got out of my sleeping bag and shook his bedpost violently 5-6 times ! And he abruptly stopped !!
I immediately regretted my actions, but too late, - and chances were that his mates had seen me and my stunt.
So next morning I asked him if he had a wife that complained of his snoring?
Oh yes, why? - because you obediently shut up as soon as I shook your bed last night!!
His mates laughed hard - he was a champion snorer, they said, and I felt I got some absolution when he smilingly confessed his wife was a stern critic of his nocturnal practise....

That is why, I will think twice before I would ever do this again !!
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Le Puy (2016)
Vézelay (2019)
Norte (2019)
Wow.
This has sparked a flurry of opinions. Not surprised.
So this is to the OP.
I’m not in the comfort of my home, I’m in Oreña. I’ve spent 57 days walking since Vézelay. Some nights in Albergues, last night in Boo, but mostly in more personal comfort.
I’d like to be judgmental based on your inexperience and your profile.
I’d like to give you some advice like “suck it up, bro”, but what just screams at me is a question:
Why are you on a Camino?
No, two:
What were you expecting?
No, three:
Why raise this on the forum?
There are people on the Camino with MS, with cancer, with Kidney failure, with heart disease, with PTSD, with depression, some of them are going to die on the Camino. Getting on with it (and perhaps complaining).
Yes, and some with sleep apnoea.
Just saying.
(I hope I didn’t keep anyone awake last night).
 

samba

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francesca(2007),de la Plata /Sanabres ( May 2015),Mozarabe ( 2016) Norte (2018)
La Lana((2019)
As I lay here in my 7th albergue awake at 2 am after walking 27 km yesterday, each night has been the same: the room is dominated not by snorers but by people with sleep apnea- a severe medical untreated medical condition. The asleep person 4 ft away from me is in a marathon struggle for survival and sounds at as loud as a chain saw. I can hear two others in this room in the same boat. Why oh why do these people who know what their sleeping does to others stay in albergues? We all sympathize for their condition—although it is treatable-but this lack of consideration for others is mind boggling to me. For this reason I won’t be walking again and I can’t recommend the Camino to others.
Hi try the ruta de la Lana . We had every albergue/ or room with bed on floor in sports centre sometimes , tonourselves . Just ended walking I SanEstaban, about 3/4 days for me as slow walker , from Burgos . 500 about km of varied, sometimes hard ,,but so interesting and such great people and friendliness
But I know what you mean , sometimes it’s like a earth shattering sound which rises and falls , subsided and then comes again out of the blue
Had that experience on last Camino, but then made sure did not stay in same Albergue as the guy again . Ordinary snoring is fine to sleep through
Yes don’t let it stop you as things change very rapidly when caminoing and shit days or times are transformed unexpectedly into a wonder . Buen camino whatever you decide
 

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