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I walked from Almeria to Santiago this summer. Ask me anything.

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peregrina2000

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I started in May and ended in July. This forum was helpful to me in preparing, so I would like to give back.


Oh, wow, how terrific! Welcome to the forum @curanderoherido. I know that @AJGuillaume is planning to start in Almería in late September, so I am sure he will have questions.

Here are a few, just from my vantage point as someone who has already walked from Almería and absolutely loved it.

— Was the Association as kind and helpful to you as it has been for all of us (dumb question, I think)?

— Where did you stay in Guadix? AJ has noted that La Escultora is closed, which is unfortunate since it was one very unusual and atmospheric albergue.

— Favorite stages?
 

OzAnnie

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Oct/Nov 2022_Mozarabe from Almeria
I started in May and ended in July. This forum was helpful to me in preparing, so I would like to give back.
Wow - you have really asked for it. 😁❤️ Thankyou.

Q. Did you make a note of your stages and accommodation? I would love to see it. I’m tossing around a few possibilities for later this year when it could possibly ? be chilly up north. Starting in Almería late October is looking good but maybe also too lonely even though I’m used to lonely trails.

Q. Did you have a problem making contact with amigos ? Did you make contact well in advance?

Thankyou for anything you can share.
Annie 😘

Edit: Does this starting point mean you’ve chosen to walk through the stony river bed ? The thought of that is daunting.
 

WisTom

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Did you connect to the VdlP at Merida or Banos de Montemayor (via Trujillo)? After Merida, did you connect to the Camino Sanabrés or the CF at Astorga? I'm thinking of doing the Mozarabe/VdlP/Astorga-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo in February.
 
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AJGuillaume

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As @peregrina2000 has mentioned, we're planning to walk from Almería, starting on 22 September, but only walking as far as Mérida (we'll do the rest when we walk the VdlP).

Where did you stay in Guadix? AJ has noted that La Escultora is closed, which is unfortunate since it was one very unusual and atmospheric albergue.
My wife and I are celebrating a milestone, so we might be looking for something a bit nice, and we're spending 2 nights in Guadix. Still, I'd be interested in hearing about where you stayed.
I am wondering what you did between Medellín and San Pedro de Mérida. Did you go through Santa Amalia, or Yelbes and Torrefresnada, or Yelbes and the river crossing?
I have exactly the same question! We're hoping the river level will be low.

We're slow walkers and distance challenged, so your stages might have been different to those we're planning to do, but in case you stopped in Nacimiento, I'd love to know if you found accommodation.

Assuming you walked all the way from Villaharta to Alcaracejos, how was that stage?

Starting in Almería late October is looking good but maybe also too lonely even though I’m used to lonely trails.
@OzAnnie , you'll probably overtake us before we get to Mérida 😄
 

curanderoherido

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Mozárabe
Oh, wow, how terrific! Welcome to the forum @curanderoherido. I know that @AJGuillaume is planning to start in Almería in late September, so I am sure he will have questions.

Here are a few, just from my vantage point as someone who has already walked from Almería and absolutely loved it.

— Was the Association as kind and helpful to you as it has been for all of us (dumb question, I think)?

— Where did you stay in Guadix? AJ has noted that La Escultora is closed, which is unfortunate since it was one very unusual and atmospheric albergue.

— Favorite stages?
(1) Yes, the Association was amazing. Though their network of albergues ends in Granada, I stayed in touch with my liaison all the way through Santiago to send pictures of my arrival at the cathedral.

(2) I was too tired to venture into Guadix, so I stayed at Cuevas Abuelo Ventura. They were kind enough to offer me a discounted rate. I believe I slept 13 or so hours that night.

(3) So hard to choose. Alboloduy to Abla was most emblematic of the experience, I think. The stage took me 15 hours. By the end of was completely exhausted, unsure I could continue, and thrilled by the pictures I had taken.
 

curanderoherido

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Mozárabe
Hi! That would have been a long journey, but fabulous.

I am wondering what you did between Medellín and San Pedro de Mérida. Did you go through Santa Amalia, or Yelbes and Torrefresnada, or Yelbes and the river crossing?
Hello!

My trip between Campanario and Merida took place during a heat wave with highs between 105 and 110 degrees. As such, I chopped my stages into very small parts to avoid walking past 10:30 or 11:00 a.m. Here is where I stopped:
  • Campanario
  • Magacela
  • La Haba
  • Medellin
  • Torrefresneda
  • Merida
So, to answer your question, I must have gone through Yelbes and Torrefresnada.
 

curanderoherido

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Mozárabe
Wow - you have really asked for it. 😁❤️ Thankyou.

Q. Did you make a note of your stages and accommodation? I would love to see it. I’m tossing around a few possibilities for later this year when it could possibly ? be chilly up north. Starting in Almería late October is looking good but maybe also too lonely even though I’m used to lonely trails.

Q. Did you have a problem making contact with amigos ? Did you make contact well in advance?

Thankyou for anything you can share.
Annie 😘

Edit: Does this starting point mean you’ve chosen to walk through the stony river bed ? The thought of that is daunting.

(1) Sadly, I did not have the foresight to keep track of those things. In my journals I make reference to where I am staying sometimes but not always. I had a list of where I planned to stop each day in my notes app, but I would erase the stops as I made it to them. If it makes you feel better, I did not differ much from the Association's suggested stages except when heat caused me to shorten my walking goals. Past Merida, I used the Gronze website to find accomodations.

(2) Amigos as in those who oversee the albergue network from Almeria to Granada? No, no problem at all. I sent an email a week in advance and maintained contact throughout my walk as needed. I have to admit that I became very fond of Nely, who picked me up from the train station in Almeria to escort me to the start of the trail, and sent her pictures of myself once I made it to Santiago.

(3) Yes. I was incredibly amused by my first riverbed. Two day in, the wonder had faded away. Though I have to say the riverbeds were ultimately easier to walk than the roadside stretches in Extremadura, especially given the heat I was encountering.
 

curanderoherido

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Mozárabe
Did you connect to the VdlP at Merida or Banos de Montemayor (via Trujillo)? After Merida, did you connect to the Camino Sanabrés or the CF at Astorga? I'm thinking of doing the Mozarabe/VdlP/Astorga-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo in February.
Hello!

I did the Camino Mozarabe until Merida, the VdLP, and the Camino Sanabres.
 
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curanderoherido

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Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Mozárabe
As @peregrina2000 has mentioned, we're planning to walk from Almería, starting on 22 September, but only walking as far as Mérida (we'll do the rest when we walk the VdlP).


My wife and I are celebrating a milestone, so we might be looking for something a bit nice, and we're spending 2 nights in Guadix. Still, I'd be interested in hearing about where you stayed.

I have exactly the same question! We're hoping the river level will be low.

We're slow walkers and distance challenged, so your stages might have been different to those we're planning to do, but in case you stopped in Nacimiento, I'd love to know if you found accommodation.

Assuming you walked all the way from Villaharta to Alcaracejos, how was that stage?


@OzAnnie , you'll probably overtake us before we get to Mérida 😄

(1) I stayed in Cuevas Abuelo Ventura because it is the first accommodation as you enter the town and I was too tired to walk any farther. They were generous as to give me a steep discount, probably because of how rough I looked. There is kindness all over the Camino.

(2) Yelbes and Torrefresneda. I enjoyed Torrefresneda very much when I stayed there owing to the view from the backyard of the albergue municipal. Plus there was a fan.

(3) I don't recall staying in Nacimiento, sorry!

(4) Anything over 30 km was as brutal as you would expect. I also chose to walk during summer, which exacerbated the heat problem. My only advice is to leave as early as possible if you find yourself in high temperatures. After an exceptionally late start in Cordoba (something like 12:30 p.m.), I dedicated myself to 6:00 a.m. start times every day. It helped immensely with preserving energy. However, I consider Hinojosa del Duque to Monterubio de la Serena to have been the most difficult stage because of the very limited shade between the two towns. Of course, after the first few days of walking, I settled into the routine and developed a taste for the grueling days (they usually have the best sights, too!).
 

pelerine

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Mozárabe
We're slow walkers and distance challenged, so your stages might have been different to those we're planning to do, but in case you stopped in Nacimiento, I'd love to know if you found accommodation.

Hi, AJGuillaume! I walked with my daughters from Almería to Granada in 2019. I try to keep my stages reasonably short. So we stayed overnight in Nacimiento. The owner of the then only bar, Santiago, Argentinian, had renovated two old houses as casas rurales. Very well done. I do not remember the name of the bar, but I think it was right on the camino. Probably the very helpful camino amigos know about this.

Buen camino!
 

Bad Pilgrim

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Time of past OR future Camino
Yes
I consider Hinojosa del Duque to Monterubio de la Serena to have been the most difficult stage because of the very limited shade between the two towns.

This is my impression as well. I am surprised how much the different guides talk about other difficult stages, but they rarely say much about this one! I do think it is the most difficult stage of the Mozárabe, with a few others coming close to it of course.
 

Rita Flower

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2022 Via del la Plata
Wow, wow and wow! Sounds gruelling and wonderful and fulfilling. I guess my question is around capacity. I am an older, slower, solo, English speaking walker and am drawn to the Mozarabe. For my third Camino I am planning VdlP this September but maybe Mozarabe next year. Any thoughts? @AJGuillaume gives me hope. And I have a Camino friend who might be interested.
 
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I started in May and ended in July. This forum was helpful to me in preparing, so I would like to give back.
I live in Almeria and so plan to walk this route one day. I am interested to know if you meet many / any other pilgrims on the stretch from Almeria to Granada. How frequent are the albergues? Is it well signposted? Thank you!!!
 

C clearly

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I just want to know about where are the river beds and what footwear I need to traverse these
The first few days from Almeria (to about Huéneja) have most of the river bed walking. I'm not sure what footwear would help, but not anything lined with Goretex. I had Goretex (maybe even light boots, I think), and this contributed to hot, sweaty and uncomfortable feet in those conditions.
 

curanderoherido

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Mozárabe
This is my impression as well. I am surprised how much the different guides talk about other difficult stages, but they rarely say much about this one! I do think it is the most difficult stage of the Mozárabe, with a few others coming close to it of course.
Glad to know you feel similarly! I did not consult any detailed guides on my walk, but I certainly was not expecting that stage to give me so much trouble.
 

curanderoherido

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Mozárabe
Thank you for giving back. I just want to know about where are the river beds and what footwear I need to traverse these
Riverbeds are ubiquitous on the trail through Granada. They are physically tiring (think about walking on the beach) and can tire the eyes due to how they reflect sunlight. Luckily, some have shade on either side, and some are not completely dry.

I purchased a pair of Keen sandals. They served me well throughout the journey, but I got them specifically for the riverbeds. They are lightweight, comfortable, supportive, and quick to dry. I advise against anything advertised as water proof, because they can trap moisture around your foot that causes irritation.

Early on, I wore a pair of flip-flops in the evenings. These broke within two weeks, forcing me to keep my Keen sandals on at all times. That ended up being just fine. My feet stopped blistering by then, and I was fine for the rest of the way.
 
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curanderoherido

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Camino Mozárabe
Wow, wow and wow! Sounds gruelling and wonderful and fulfilling. I guess my question is around capacity. I am an older, slower, solo, English speaking walker and am drawn to the Mozarabe. For my third Camino I am planning VdlP this September but maybe Mozarabe next year. Any thoughts? @AJGuillaume gives me hope. And I have a Camino friend who might be interested.
I am a male in my early 20s with little walking experience prior to the Camino. I also had recovered a year or so prior from an illness that left me unable to walk. My only training was regular weightlifting in the months leading up to me setting off.

The first few days were difficult because my pace kept me walking for 10-15 hours at a time. By two weeks in, however, I was doing much better. I encourage you to eat as many calories as possible while walking to fuel yourself. You will drop weight if you aren't careful. I lost 10 pounds of body mass overall (more in water weight).

My Spanish is near-fluent. That said, I encountered several pilgrims who spoke only their native language (Swedish, French, German, Korean) and were managing. If you can manage on the Via de la Plata, don't worry about the Mozarab Way. In my mind, the biggest problem of not speaking Spanish would be its compounding effect on any loneliness you might feel.
 

C clearly

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Time of past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012
Riverbeds are ubiquitous on the trail through Granada. They are physically tiring (think about walking on the beach) and can tire the eyes due to how they reflect sunlight.
The river beds were like walking on a rocky beach - not a sandy one - which usually means a slower pace and constant need for the feet and legs to balance and adjust! This contributed to the tiring of the eyes, because of the need to watch foot placement continuously.
 

curanderoherido

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Mozárabe
Thank you for your offer and for all the answers above! I've been looking at the Mozárabe. Wondering if you'd like to share some pictures? If so, I'd love to see them!
I am working on putting together an album with captioned photos from the Camino. I'll consider sharing that once it's complete. In the meantime, here are some shots:
 

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curanderoherido

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Mozárabe
I live in Almeria and so plan to walk this route one day. I am interested to know if you meet many / any other pilgrims on the stretch from Almeria to Granada. How frequent are the albergues? Is it well signposted? Thank you!!!
I started on the same day as an older gentleman who decided to quit walking three days in. After that, I met a pilgrim who was doing the way on bike. He outpaced me the next day, so we never saw each other again. The next pilgrims I met were in Merida.

You will not struggle to find accommodations, trust that, but they come every 10 to 25 kilometers depending on the stage. Some stages have them at each stop, others have no stops and so you cannot find somewhere to stay except for 25 kilometers away. Donativos/municipal lodgings are common through Granada, then they become sparser. Sometimes to stay in them you must break from the suggested stage plan, stopping early one day and walking late the next.

I got lost in one place on the Camino: in Guadix. Try as I might, I kept ending up right back where I started. I had to rely on a taxi to get me to the edge of town so I could continue to La Peza (beautiful town, I might add). The signposting is excellent throughout the trail, especially in nature. I found myself absentmindedly finding and following arrows as I went. In general, you will follow the path of least resistance with a few comforting arrows here and there until there is an obvious fork or choice for you to make, at which point the correct way will be clearly signaled.
 

curanderoherido

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Mozárabe
The river beds were like walking on a rocky beach - not a sandy one - which usually means a slower pace and constant need for the feet and legs to balance and adjust! This contributed to the tiring of the eyes, because of the need to watch foot placement continuously.
This is a great explanation!
 
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AJGuillaume

Pèlerin du monde
Time of past OR future Camino
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
Thank you for your photos, @curanderoherido . They are beautiful!

The river beds were like walking on a rocky beach - not a sandy one - which usually means a slower pace and constant need for the feet and legs to balance and adjust!
A former member of the Forum, knowing we're slow walkers and distance challenged, suggested we do short stages leaving Almería. It might sound ridiculous to some healthier pilgrims, on my planning we're averaging 14 km per day between Almería and Granada, precisely to allow for that slower pace.

You will not struggle to find accommodations, trust that, but they come every 10 to 25 kilometers depending on the stage. Some stages have them at each stop, others have no stops and so you cannot find somewhere to stay except for 25 kilometers away. Donativos/municipal lodgings are common through Granada, then they become sparser.
In our plan, (I have to have one, otherwise I would be walking alone), I have found that I may have to rely on taxis for a number of stages after Granada. In fact, between Villaharta and Alcaracejos, we have to. And after Hinojosa del Duque, we're walking to the Ermita de la Virgen de la Alcantarilla, and calling a taxi from there.

I consider Hinojosa del Duque to Monterubio de la Serena to have been the most difficult stage because of the very limited shade between the two towns.
And I'm guessing it will be the most difficult for us too. I'm glad I bought the UV reflecting umbrella to give my darling some shade as we walk.

I got lost in one place on the Camino: in Guadix. Try as I might, I kept ending up right back where I started. I had to rely on a taxi to get me to the edge of town so I could continue to La Peza
We're celebrating a milestone in Guadix, and I wouldn't want getting lost to mar the experience, so I'll make sure I have my GPS tracks ready 😄
 

OzAnnie

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Oct/Nov 2022_Mozarabe from Almeria
The river beds were like walking on a rocky beach - not a sandy one - which usually means a slower pace and constant need for the feet and legs to balance and adjust! This contributed to the tiring of the eyes, because of the need to watch foot placement continuously.
@C clearly
Hi
Can you or anyone else remember approx how many hours or percentage /portion of each day, you would be walking on this rocky base ?

I haven’t decided on my route yet but am looking at a few that could be warmer in the latter part of the year.
Annie
 

curanderoherido

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Mozárabe
@C clearly
Hi
Can you or anyone else remember approx how many hours or percentage /portion of each day, you would be walking on this rocky base ?

I haven’t decided on my route yet but am looking at a few that could be warmer in the latter part of the year.
Annie

As C Cleary wrote, a lot. They were the plurality of the scenery through Granada.
 
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curanderoherido

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Camino Mozárabe
Thank you for your photos, @curanderoherido . They are beautiful!


A former member of the Forum, knowing we're slow walkers and distance challenged, suggested we do short stages leaving Almería. It might sound ridiculous to some healthier pilgrims, on my planning we're averaging 14 km per day between Almería and Granada, precisely to allow for that slower pace.


In our plan, (I have to have one, otherwise I would be walking alone), I have found that I may have to rely on taxis for a number of stages after Granada. In fact, between Villaharta and Alcaracejos, we have to. And after Hinojosa del Duque, we're walking to the Ermita de la Virgen de la Alcantarilla, and calling a taxi from there.


And I'm guessing it will be the most difficult for us too. I'm glad I bought the UV reflecting umbrella to give my darling some shade as we walk.


We're celebrating a milestone in Guadix, and I wouldn't want getting lost to mar the experience, so I'll make sure I have my GPS tracks ready 😄
You seem to have your planning down pat. I left with only a list of suggested stages and a light pack.

The taxis are a good idea, too. I didn't walk the entirety of the Camino.

See, I kept mostly off technology while I was walking, so I had no clue about there being a heat wave coming. Then one day I got caught out in the heat. It was noonish and around 100 degrees. I decided to lie down in a ditch near the road I was traversing--a ditch that happened to be covered in shade--and cool off. Well, it kept getting hotter. And hotter. And hotter. And I had gotten out late that day due to sleeping poorly (long story). And I had drunk half my water!

I was bracing myself for a hard walk to the next town when I heard a large vehicle approaching from behind. To avoid worrying the driver, I popped into a sitting position to watch him go by. But, as if he saw me at the very last moment, he came to a hard stop about 10 feet past me and ushered me over. He insisted I get into his truck and let him drive me to the next town. He also gave me a picture of Jesus with the Nazareth prayer on its back, which I carried with me the rest of the way to Santiago. One thing that struck me about the interaction was that this was a working man--that is, he was a trucker who took a detour to help me to my next destination safely. But when I offered him a few euros at the end of our time together, he practically pushed me out of the passenger seat and onto the road. "Buen camino," he said.

A bit of a tangent there. But it's relevant for anyone else who might read this thread to know that kindness and generosity are everywhere on the Camino.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012
Sounds like weeks not days
I found that the hard part was only as far as Hueneja (4 days). Some of the terrain and scenery was so fascinating that I would consider doing it again, but maybe take the bus from Almeria to Rioja or Santa Fe de Mondujar. Of course that desert badlands scenery is more exotic to me than it would be to someone from Australia. :)
 

AJGuillaume

Pèlerin du monde
Time of past OR future Camino
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
You seem to have your planning down pat. I left with only a list of suggested stages and a light pack.

The taxis are a good idea, too. I didn't walk the entirety of the Camino.

See, I kept mostly off technology while I was walking, so I had no clue about there being a heat wave coming. Then one day I got caught out in the heat. It was noonish and around 100 degrees. I decided to lie down in a ditch near the road I was traversing--a ditch that happened to be covered in shade--and cool off. Well, it kept getting hotter. And hotter. And hotter. And I had gotten out late that day due to sleeping poorly (long story). And I had drunk half my water!

I was bracing myself for a hard walk to the next town when I heard a large vehicle approaching from behind. To avoid worrying the driver, I popped into a sitting position to watch him go by. But, as if he saw me at the very last moment, he came to a hard stop about 10 feet past me and ushered me over. He insisted I get into his truck and let him drive me to the next town. He also gave me a picture of Jesus with the Nazareth prayer on its back, which I carried with me the rest of the way to Santiago. One thing that struck me about the interaction was that this was a working man--that is, he was a trucker who took a detour to help me to my next destination safely. But when I offered him a few euros at the end of our time together, he practically pushed me out of the passenger seat and onto the road. "Buen camino," he said.

A bit of a tangent there. But it's relevant for anyone else who might read this thread to know that kindness and generosity are everywhere on the Camino.
Thank you for that beautiful story, @curanderoherido . It's wonderful to hear about the Camino angels.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances, Finisterre & Muxia (2018)
Camino Portuguese - Lisbon (2019)
Did you connect to the VdlP at Merida or Banos de Montemayor (via Trujillo)? After Merida, did you connect to the Camino Sanabrés or the CF at Astorga? I'm thinking of doing the Mozarabe/VdlP/Astorga-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo in February.
That's a great combo. I did Cadiz to Astorga and then walked the Sanabres Apr/may and hadn't thought about continuing North until I was committed to my plan for various reasons. A part of me wishes I'd continued to Leon and done the Salvador and then continued one more day onto the Norte to complete the coast to coast before doing the primitivo. Astorga was a pilgrim culture shock and walking "backwards" to Leon would have been an interesting experience but love combining the Caminos and look forward to hearing how you get on.
 
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WisTom

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Via Francigena Torino-Rome Feb/Mar 22
That's a great combo. I did Cadiz to Astorga and then walked the Sanabres Apr/may and hadn't thought about continuing North until I was committed to my plan for various reasons. A part of me wishes I'd continued to Leon and done the Salvador and then continued one more day onto the Norte to complete the coast to coast before doing the primitivo. Astorga was a pilgrim culture shock and walking "backwards" to Leon would have been an interesting experience but love combining the Caminos and look forward to hearing how you get on.
Looking at the mileage (kilometraje), I'm now thinking that I may need to start in Granada to manage the distances in the time that I'll have. In the past, I've left some time after walking to visit non-Camino cities, but have found that it's generally anti-climactic. But even cutting out post-Camino travel, Almeria-Santiago on the route that I mentioned would be about 1700km - a bit too tight on my schedule. Starting in Granada would reduce the overall distance by about 200 km, which would be more manageable. Don't know how much I'd miss by cutting off that segment. I know that I do want time for some shorter days on the mountainous stages of the Salvador and Primitivo. Also haven't decided if I'll connect to the VdlP at Mérida or Baños de Montemayor. Appreciate any thoughts/suggestions on that.
 

OzAnnie

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Oct/Nov 2022_Mozarabe from Almeria
Also haven't decided if I'll connect to the VdlP at Mérida or Baños de Montemayor. Appreciate any thoughts/suggestions on that.
Hi WisTom
Please excuse my ignorance here … I think I could be missing something? What route are you walking to connect to VDLP at Baños de Montemayor?

Buen camino and all the best with planning.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
De La Plata, Norte, de la Lana, Madrid, Terisiana
As @peregrina2000 has mentioned, we're planning to walk from Almería, starting on 22 September, but only walking as far as Mérida (we'll do the rest when we walk the VdlP).


My wife and I are celebrating a milestone, so we might be looking for something a bit nice, and we're spending 2 nights in Guadix. Still, I'd be interested in hearing about where you stayed.

I have exactly the same question! We're hoping the river level will be low.

We're slow walkers and distance challenged, so your stages might have been different to those we're planning to do, but in case you stopped in Nacimiento, I'd love to know if you found accommodation.

Assuming you walked all the way from Villaharta to Alcaracejos, how was that stage?


@OzAnnie , you'll probably overtake us before we get to Mérida 😄
We walked the Mozarabe from Almeria to Granada in June 2016 and did not see another Peregrino in that time so I unless it has become more popular it might be a fairly solitary walk. It was a great Camino but quite difficult at times, probably the hardest we have done, partly because of the heat and the amount of water we had to carry. September would probably be a good time, certainly much better than June July when we did it. Below is the link to a short four minute youtube video of some of the country we passed through.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances, Finisterre & Muxia (2018)
Camino Portuguese - Lisbon (2019)
Tough call.
Looking at the mileage (kilometraje), I'm now thinking that I may need to start in Granada to manage the distances in the time that I'll have. In the past, I've left some time after walking to visit non-Camino cities, but have found that it's generally anti-climactic. But even cutting out post-Camino travel, Almeria-Santiago on the route that I mentioned would be about 1700km - a bit too tight on my schedule. Starting in Granada would reduce the overall distance by about 200 km, which would be more manageable. Don't know how much I'd miss by cutting off that segment. I know that I do want time for some shorter days on the mountainous stages of the Salvador and Primitivo. Also haven't decided if I'll connect to the VdlP at Mérida or Baños de Montemayor. Appreciate any thoughts/suggestions on that.
Tough call. I haven't done the Mozarab but not joining at Merida means you would also miss Caceres and some great walking in between especially on the way to Banos.

I personally would do the Mozarab in total. You also want to enjoy the time on the Salvador/Primitivo given they're at the end of your long journey Are you planning to walk to Leon ?

Tough call Maverick
 

WisTom

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Via Francigena Torino-Rome Feb/Mar 22
Hi WisTom
Please excuse my ignorance here … I think I could be missing something? What route are you walking to connect to VDLP at Baños de Montemayor?

Buen camino and all the best with planning.
Prior to reaching the town of Don Benito, there's a fork in the Mozarabe that goes north through Trujillo and Plasencia before connecting to the VdlP at Banos de Montemayor. I've already walked the VdlP/Sanabrés in 2019, so I don't mind missing the beautiful towns of Merida and Cáceres.
 
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Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances, Finisterre & Muxia (2018)
Camino Portuguese - Lisbon (2019)
We walked the Mozarabe from Almeria to Granada in June 2016 and did not see another Peregrino in that time so I unless it has become more popular it might be a fairly solitary walk. It was a great Camino but quite difficult at times, probably the hardest we have done, partly because of the heat and the amount of water we had to carry. September would probably be a good time, certainly much better than June July when we did it. Below is the link to a short four minute youtube video of some of the country we passed through.
Great video. Did I spot an Aarn pack in use ?? Personally I highly rate them and it is my camino pack but have only seen one other on the way amongst the "Duet" of osprey.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
De La Plata, Norte, de la Lana, Madrid, Terisiana
Great video. Did I spot an Aarn pack in use ?? Personally I highly rate them and it is my camino pack but have only seen one other on the way amongst the "Duet" of osprey.
Thanks Bill - yes great packs - I am currently on to my second one. Both my wife and I have one and the front pockets make life so much easier.
 

KathySG

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances, Portugues, Ingles
Mozarabe Next!
Hi! We are planning on starting October 2nd. My question is, do we need to carry sleep sacks or is bedding available at the albergues? Thanks so much for sharing all your insights!
 

curanderoherido

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Mozárabe
I am interested to know what other members have to say on this. There was none provided at many of the albergues where I stayed. It could be that this changes during the cooler months, though.

Hi! We are planning on starting October 2nd. My question is, do we need to carry sleep sacks or is bedding available at the albergues? Thanks so much for sharing all your insights!
 
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george.g

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
French way 10, 11
Norte 12
Vdlp 13
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Mozarabe/Malaga 15
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My advice would be to take a sleeping bag, some private albergues provide fresh laundered bedding, some municiple albergues may have blankets (wether you would want to use them is a different story) If you have a lightweight sleeping bag then no issues, can you imagine turning up somewhere and the only option is a plastic covered mattress!
Regards
George.G
 

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