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If it hurts, stop.....

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
#1
So, on my 11th Camino you would think I had a bit of experience and good sense. But no, it seems I only learn by making mistakes. I post this in the hope that someone might read it and benefit.

On my first full day of walking, I started to feel pain under my right heel. Not too bad at first, so I ignored it. Walk through the pain, I thought. And continued to ignore it for about 15km. By which stage it was excruciating. I limped into the nearest village. Saw a doctor in a drop-in clinic whose recommendation was voltaren gel. Caught the bus. Had physiotherapy. Rested it for a couple of days. Tried walking again, after about 5km the pain just became too much; it felt like daggers were being thrust through my heel. Over the next month (not walking much, but still travelling the camino) it did not get better, in spite of further visits to physiotherapists, lots of stretching, icing, bandaging and orthotics. And three new pairs of shoes!

Now I'm home I've had it properly diagnosed, with an ultrasound. I have a 10cm tear in the fascia under my heel. If I had but stopped, when I first started to feel the pain, I could have limited the damage. And maybe, after a couple of days of rest, been able to finish my camino.

I'm also much more conscious of the need to keep my feet flexible and strong by doing some stretching exercises as a preventative measure - in fact I think it would be good for my whole body. I know from the past that I am strong and have endurance, but the lesson from this camino is that flexibility is also important. And more important as the body ages and loses its natural elasticity.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#4
Fascia takes a long time to heal. So sorry.

I suppose that once we fly over, and tell ourselves all we are doing is walking, we ignore the signs, forgetting we are asking our bodies to do 10 times as much while in the Camino than we do at home.

I did the same thing with my knee. Felt a lressure on day 1, almost as I left the albergue, so I ignored it. After all, it had not been caused by the Camino. Almost three months later I am still limping, MRI last Sunday, results in two weeks.

Oh what we do to ourselves when we "just walk" on those beautiful Caminos.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
#5
Anemone I do hope you get a result from the MRI. I was so relieved when the ultrasound came back showing something specific (although unexpected). The worst is not having an accurate diagnosis. At least I now understand what happened and why it did not respond to the usual plantar fasciitis stretching treatments.
 

onwayhome

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Ponferrada-Santiago,(c1986)
Frances SJPP-Santiago (2011)
Portuguese Porto- Finisterre (2016)
St Michaels Way (2016)
#7
Ouch! Glad you've got a diagnosis and are recovering.

As I suspect many of us have discovered, some pain indicates immediate stopping and resting to avoid further injury, while sometimes the same intensity of pain can be a transitory reaction to walking long distances with a pack.

I'd be interested to hear if anyone's figured out how to tell the difference, without walking on to see if it will change?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
#9
I have a 10cm tear in the fascia under my heel.
:eek:
10cm!? Eeeeeeeeeee. No wonder it hurt, Kanga. Take care and heal well! That's no small tear. I'm so sorry - but at least now you know what it is, and what to do. Your story really touches bottom, because while 'everyone knows' anything can happen at any time, it's only when something like this happens that we really know that, and hopefully learn from it.

@Wokabaut_Meri had a similar cautionary tale about a metatarsal fracture she got on day one and walked on the whole way to Santiago. But...well... "I'd never do that..." is a sneaky little story. I can safely assume I would probably do exactly that.

Your woeful tale is yet another reminder, though, so maybe one of us out here will actually learn from it. May it be so!
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) Scotland GGW (2017) Primitivo
#11
Kanga your post will be very helpful for others, especially first-timers. So pleased it finally was diagnosed. I learned early on (from this forum), that even when my feet were not burning or hurting, about every 5/6 kms, I stopped, removed my boots and socks, just to allow the air. I did the same on my recent walk in Scotland.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-18
#16
But no, it seems I only learn by making mistakes.
Because we've learned all the easy lessons already, by this stage of life. So it's only the hard lessons we have left to go. Ouch!

And "get-there-itis" is a disease that afflicts us all from time to time, I think.

Wishing you a fruitful convolescence
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#17
When people post here about being fit and being able to walk 30km without blinking an eye, I think we equate being fit with cardio and muscle capacity. As in I run 10km on the treadmill every morning in x minutes. But the Camino, with its repetitive movement is so much morw about mechanics than stamina. And mechanics, well ... tend to let us down here and there, no matter how much cardio and muscle endurance we may have.

Learned this the hard way when developping plantar fasciitis on a C. and kept on walking. So now three months pre C. I visit my podiatrist and see if I need to adjust my insoles, look for a different kind of shoe, learn a new stretch.

Also, on the C., docs are so used to wear and tear due to tendonistis or muscle aches, and they know we are not hanging around for more in depth testing, so we get the usual "RICE" plus a few voltaren and off we go. Because really, unless we are really really really in pain, we are not really getting on a plane back home, are we? :rolleyes:

I dismissed the pressure I felt around my knee because it appeared before even setting foot on the C., so surely it was nothing. o_O But 20km of wear and tear on "nothing" means I am still limping, in fact after getting better for a few weeks, I am now getting worse with each day that goes by, waiting for a diagnosis... And I did use my travel insurance to come back home, but only after my knee completely popped and I was hardly able to put any weight on my leg for three days...

I think we check our brain out the instant we see the first yellow arrow. :cool: It just hurts too much to accept this walk is not for us this time.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
#21
No surgery planned. Some kind of magic machine that I haven't had explained yet. Probably a cortisone injection. And trying not to weight bear for a while - even though I stopped walking the camino, I followed it up with quite a bit of travelling and sightseeing so it has never really been rested properly.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
#23
I should also mention my friend Robyn, who was walking with me. She managed to trip and fall on her last day walking into Santiago, and badly injured her arm and had to be given opiates for the pain and transported to the Hospital by ambulance.... She was very lucky and had no breaks but severe nerve damage which took a month to heal.

Yes, it was a very eventful camino!
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
#25
Yes, I've been reading all I can find on it. I can't see the contents of that particular article @Viranani - it does not open up for me. There seem to be many different opinions on the best treatment.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
#26
Maybe try again, Kanga, I just unlinked and relinked it. And it worked.
And if it doesn't work for you, here's the punchline at the end:
"A simple rule of thumb for soft tissue healing, if not disrupted by re-injury, is 20% at 2 weeks, 80% at 6-8 weeks, and 100% at 12 or more weeks."
Edit...Patience is a gift that is obviously needed here. 12 weeks...3 months...it's a while. :(
 

jo webber

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 9th 2017
#29
I'd be interested to hear if anyone's figured out how to tell the difference, without walking on to see if it will change?
Having walked about 500 miles, with my pack on and the shoes I will wear, I have hurt myself a few times. I know I can walk through a couple of things and have to stop if it is my feet, lower back or sciatic nerve. And I do mean stop for 2 to 3 days. I also know that uphill is a real issue for me. Turtle, slow turtle. Be the turtle rather than the hare.
 
#30
"A simple rule of thumb for soft tissue healing, if not disrupted by re-injury, is 20% at 2 weeks, 80% at 6-8 weeks, and 100% at 12 or more weeks."

Bit dim on this, % of what, mileage ?

There is a pain scale, no pain 1 and 10 very severe pain. I have seen it somewhere not to exercise above pain level 6. Still a rough guide.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#32
I should also mention my friend Robyn, who was walking with me. She managed to trip and fall on her last day walking into Santiago, and badly injured her arm and had to be given opiates for the pain and transported to the Hospital by ambulance.... She was very lucky and had no breaks but severe nerve damage which took a month to heal.

Yes, it was a very eventful camino!
I am so sorry to hear about your 'eventful' camino :eek:
Glad you are safe back home and I wish both of you a speedy recovery. :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2012
England C2C 2015
Via Francigena 2016
Le Puy 2018
#33
So sorry to hear of your injury....

I had horrible heel pain a couple of months ago and couldn't quite get a handle on it (I have a medical background so it's kind of like the cobbler not having shoes.....I tend to "fix" things myself). Initially, I thought it was a plantar fasciitis but it didn't fit the trend of worse in the morning, better as the fascia stretches out. There was no mechanism for a fascial, ligament or tendon tear so it was likely a small stress fracture (from pounding city pavement in silly flats for 12 miles without padding). There was no need for scans or XRays, as they are costly here with high out of pocket deductibles and it wouldn't change the treatment. There was really nothing to do but stay off it until the heel healed.

But then I went on a business trip and had to dress like a "real" person rather than Patty Patagonia. Wearing medium height heels for a couple of weeks fixed the problem! The weight transferred to the ball of the foot, off the heel. Relief was immediate and has stayed that way. Heels also kept the mileage down so the rest likely helped, too.

Now I'm not saying to break out the stilettos for physical therapy. Just found it interesting that something so simple worked so well. Wishing you happy and speedy healing!!
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
#34
Yes @Purple Backpack that's a thought. I am tending to walk on my toes when favouring the sore heeI. On the ship I wore some high heeled boots a few times, going out to dinner, and was surprised that they were certainly no worse than my orthotic friendly flat comfort shoes.
 

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
#36
@Kanga : I' m very sorry to hear about your injury. There does not seem much I can add what it is not already been said...

Hope it improves .

Glad to see you back here on the forum...I missed you.

I too heard from my specialist that I had to rethink future Camino plans ( well those that would include long etapas )...

Listening to our bodies : not always easy.

Take care.
 
#37
"I think we check our brain out the instant we see the first yellow arrow. :cool: It just hurts too much to accept this walk is not for us this time." Anemone

This so true, as if those yellow arrows mesmerize us! Back in 2011 I posted a similar "listen to your body" story. It was my second Camino (Vía de la Plata) and when I was taken in an ambulance from the hospital in Zamora to Barajas and on a stretcher to Schiphol airport in Amsterdam I knew that I had a pelvic fraction in three places. I was told by the trauma surgeon in Zamora that I would be on three months' bed rest. Unfortunately scans showed that I also had a tibial plateau fracture on the other side requiring surgery and a metalarsal fracture. All in all I was three months in a rehabilitation center and 9 months on sick leave!

This is not meant to overshadow your experience @Kanga, but rather to reinforce it. And go figure, I am a physiotherapist, I should know better!

If pain does not subside with the usual "RICE" techniques, an anti-inflammatory and a visit or two to a physiotherapist then stop! That's my preaching for the day.

And by the way the "6 week heal time" is a rule of thumb. IF you keep walking the body does not have time to heal.

Take care @Kanga and keep us informed - in my 30 years as a therapist I have not had a patient with this injury.

p.s. I am now doing my 15th Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
#38
Impressive story, Lee (I hope you don't mind me quoting it here); the power of the mind is astonishing so we need to use it wisely and well:
After 3 weeks walking the Vía de la Plata (10 days with pain) I was literally stopped in my tracks. There was no way that I could take another step. How I made it to the emergency ward of the hospital in Zamora is amazing. Outcome: 3 fractures (pelvis in 3 places on the left, tibial plateau on the right and a metatarsal fracture left foot). The trauma surgeon back home (evacuated by ambulance/plane) was dumbfounded to say the least. How was it possible to walk? You get the picture. Sometimes drastic events are required to change.

I look back at my surgery and 9 month rehabilitation process as a gift. In fact I remember the first 5 days in isolation (procedure from foreign hospital to avoid MRSA risk) was heaven. For the first time in a very long time I didn't (couldn't!) do anything but rest. I had time - and took the time - to reconnect with friends and family. People were amazed at how upbeat and relaxed I was despite being bedridden!

I have indeed learned to be 'milder' with myself and in turn with others. But I still sometimes need to be reminded.
Every painfree step for me is a gift. And every arrow I pass a reminder.

p.s. fractures were due to a combination of stress fractures and undiagnosed osteoporosis.
 
#40
How true @Viranani!
I had 2 aha moments: the first was when I was put for 4 days in a hospital isolation room (MRSA precautions). I was lying there in bed, alone and I didn't have to do anything, I could just be. It was heaven! My children and friends thought that I would go crazy, unable to get out of bed and do. Nope. I was fine just lying there. I must say I didn't recognize myself.

The second aha moment was in rehab when my physio asked, "do you have someone in your life who can give you limits? Because you don't have any!" He was right.

I try to be gentler with myself although I don't always succeed. My knee scar is a reminder of the power of the mind!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
#41
Maybe this is all part of a larger "curse on the moderators". I can think of a few forum members who might not be opposed to our demise, Kanga
Well, the rest of us would be heartbroken. And that's not a joke.:)
my physio asked, "do you have someone in your life who can give you limits? Because you don't have any!" He was right.
I wonder how many of us fit this description, because it sounds eerily familiar, and I'm sure I'm not the only one.
 
Camino(s) past & future
'03CF, '08VdlP, '12Porto, '14VdlP via Port '15CPI ‘17Levante to Toledo
#42
Wow Kanga, sorry to hear of your injury but glad you have a diagnosis.
It’s very frustrating when you have to stop due to an injury but you have no real answers on how to get going again or if that’s even possible.

What I learnt from my ‘tendonitis’ issue this time is that there is actually not much ’scientific fact' about the real causes and effective cures. While resting up for a week (having a lovely camino-break in Sevilla) I spent literally hours reading everything I could on shins and the term ‘tendonitis’ and gleaned that there has been no concrete research. Most of what is recommended is anecdotal. Super frustrating.

You mentioned that your 'high heeled boots’ gave you no further pain.
On these lines I’ve been considering the extra preparation I’ll do before I head off again to walk.
Even though my Levante training included a lot of water-walking (in not on!) to strengthen my shins for the flat terrain, I needed somethig more.
Maybe what would have helped is specific lower leg training like a program of calf training (calf raises and lowers) and even maybe using of a wobble board. I’m not sure if this would have prevented the pain but worth a try.
I’ll be watching your progress and hope you have a full recovery and can get planning for the next camino.
 

Peter Fransiscus

Do good and good will come to you.
Camino(s) past & future
All that we are is the result of what we have thought.
#43
Kanga your post will be very helpful for others, especially first-timers. So pleased it finally was diagnosed. I learned early on (from this forum), that even when my feet were not burning or hurting, about every 5/6 kms, I stopped, removed my boots and socks, just to allow the air. I did the same on my recent walk in Scotland.
Since my first walk about 45 years ago I do the same, remove the boots and insoles and when it's hot the socks go aswell.

Wish you well , Peter.
 

Glenn Rowe

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
#44
As you stated the body ages.
We think that we still can conquer the world but we have to listen to our body.

Hope you will be better soon.
Wish you well,Peter.
A personal lesson goes something like, "In my younger years I thought I was ten feet tall and bulletproof. Now I know that I'm neither." To be sure, Pain is a four-letter word. So is Life.

Be well.
 

Silverton

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2003-2004, 2006-2011, 2013-2016), Portugués from Porto (2012), from Tui (2014), Sanabres (2010), Aragon (2007) Carríon de los Condes to ?? (April 2016)
#50
SO many responses, Kanga, in so few hours! That shows how much we luv you! It's much easier for us Euro-residents (ok, I'll include those Brexit-people) who can get cheap flights to be back home in an hour or two, if something unforeseen and unfortunate happens. For Aussies, it's a different ballgame--but it sounds as if you found other ways to spend your European time, and that's great. Your optimism admirable, and I join in the chorus of hopes that you'll soon be back on your favoured next-camino route! Happy healing!
At 77 next month, I realise that I'm very spoiled in never having had more than a twinge, and not a thought of stretching or any yoga stuff. But you've given me fair warning--as has a slightly-gammy lurking in the past week. Hopefully, I'll be back to my sprightly, much-blessed self by camino-time next spring. All fingers crossed, even the arthritic ones!
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
#51
Oh, and we had a lovely time doing a "car camino" along the South Downs Way, and a cruise on the Baltic....
You did the South Downs Way (in England?) and didn't stop by for a nice cup of tea and a piece of cake? Was it something I said? ;)
Hope you heal quickly, tread gently for a while.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#53
You did the South Downs Way (in England?) and didn't stop by for a nice cup of tea and a piece of cake? Was it something I said? ;)
Hope you heal quickly, tread gently for a while.
I'm with @Jeff Crawley. I thought 'South Downs? England???'
Really???
Was it something we said? ;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean 2017.
#55
So, on my 11th Camino you would think I had a bit of experience and good sense. But no, it seems I only learn by making mistakes. I post this in the hope that someone might read it and benefit.

On my first full day of walking, I started to feel pain under my right heel. Not too bad at first, so I ignored it. Walk through the pain, I thought. .....s!

Now I'm home I've had it properly diagnosed, with an ultrasound. I have a 10cm tear in the fascia under my heel. If I had but stopped, when I first started to feel the pain, I could have limited the damage. And maybe, after a couple of days of rest, been able to finish my camino.

I'm also much more conscious of the need to keep my feet flexible and strong by doing some stretching exercises as a preventative measure - in fact I think it would be good for my whole body. I know from the past that I am strong and have endurance, but the lesson from this camino is that flexibility is also important. And more important as the body ages and loses its natural elasticity.
Hola Jill - real bad luck especially for your walking companion! I can relate to your experience - what is it about the Via De La Plata and the totally unexpected injuries?? Glad to hear that recovery is now well in hand. See you at Sydney Pilgrims soon. M
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
#57
@domigee and @Jeff Crawley I had no way of communicating with anyone at that stage, at least not easily. After the foot fiasco, Robyn falling and being carted off to hospital in an ambulance, and being stuck in Madrid during the BA fiasco (it really, really was an eventful camino!) I was happy to be led by the nose by my husband, who met me in the UK with a very gorgeous hired little SmartCar and a Plan.

I thought the South Downs (and about) was absolutely stunning and walking there would be magnificent.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Northern Way (2017)
#59
So sorry to hear of your injury....

Wearing medium height heels for a couple of weeks fixed the problem! The weight transferred to the ball of the foot, off the heel. Relief was immediate and has stayed that way. Heels also kept the mileage down so the rest likely helped, too.

Now I'm not saying to break out the stilettos for physical therapy. Just found it interesting that something so simple worked so well. Wishing you happy and speedy healing!!
I love this. I will disregard your last paragraph and start searching for the perfect camino stilettos - your suggestion is currently placing first for the ankle support. (You made my night)
 

Mike Savage

So many friends to meet . . . so little time
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés,Inglés
Muxia/Finisterre
Português Coastal
Português Central
Sanabrés
#62
Oh my, Kanga that sounds painful. I'm glad you are home and on the mend. I know it sounds horrible to say "I'm glad you are home" maybe it is better to say I'm glad you are in a comfortable environment, with family support, that will allow for continued and complete healing and recovery so you may return to the Camino.

Mike
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
April 2019-Camino de Invierno
#64
I was on the Primitivo in May when I got hit with plantar fasciitis for the first time in my long history of distance hiking. I pushed through it. Jumped 2 stages. My saving grace was a prescription for a Cox-2 inhibitor ( a type of NSAID). Regular NSAIDs like Ibuprofen weren't making a dent in the excruciating pain. I limped, literally, into Santiago. Now 1 month later, cortisone shot in each heel, and no hiking have me finally feeling only minor heel pain.
Unfortunately, one of my "clients" made me run after her for an extensive distance this week and my pain flared up.
My podiatrist gave me a prescription for voltaren 3% which is much stronger than what I bought in Spain. That along with one Celebrex (the COX-2 inhibitors) a day have me ready to go for a very light, no weight, flat wilderness terrain hike this weekend.
I'm buying new hiking boots too. Those Merrel hiking shoes were a mistake, in hindsight.
I feel your pain. Literally. But I'm already planning for another Camino next April or May.
 

cherrys

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept/Oct (2013), Finisterre/Muxia Oct (2013), Camino Frances and on to Finisterre Sept/Oct (2016)
#67
Similar story to Kanga's. Noticed pain on and off in my heel before my second camino, not too much, and "figured it would go away" after I started walking. Which it did on and off, until coming into Leon I was literally stopped dead in my tracks. The pain subsided enough to make it there and the following morning visited the hospital behind the catedral. A wonderful doctor there diagnosed it as PF, gave me a cortisone shot just down from my heel towards the arch, and told me to rest for three days, but also to see Leon's sights, both of which we did. I did have quite a bit of relief after being a good patient, and made it to Fisterre, although not always carrying a full pack. It has bothered me on and off since, but Voltaren twice a day let me walk the Norte and Primativo with no real problems this spring, carrying my pack the entire way. And Kanga, I did this spring's trip the entire way in sandals with an inner sole! For only a few hours I wished I'd had something heavier, but the other 99.999% of the time my feet were very happy indeed. I know the accepted idea is that you need orthotics and stiffer shoes to deal with this, but my experience was quite the opposite - I feel the freedom to loosen/tighten the velcro straps at will really helped me tremendously. Since they were really flexible, maybe rocking up onto my toes frequently helped as well?? Although pretty worn out, I'm still wearing them for walks around town, and will think/observe more about getting more weight towards the front of my foot (I do own a pair of heels, but am not sure I can fit into them anymore!). I do hope everyone above with foot issues is recovering and will be out walking again soon. Buen camino, Cherry
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
#68
it couldn't have happened to a nicer person.

Go easy, friend.
Oh Rebekah!

Have you ever heard the expression "England and America are two countries separated by the same language"? (variously attributed to Wilde or Shaw both, of course, Irish).

In the UK "it couldn't have happened to a nicer person." can be taken in one of two ways:

Something bad happens to a terrible person . . . it couldn't have happened to a nicer person! (they deserved all they got! :mad:)

Something good happens to a lovely person . . . it couldn't have happened to a nicer person! (they deserved all they got! :))

Not sure we'd ever use it in the sense of something bad happening to a lovely person . . . it couldn't have happened to a nicer person (oh, she didn't deserve that!)

Good job we know what you meant! ;)
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
#71
@domigee and @Jeff Crawley I had no way of communicating with anyone at that stage, at least not easily. After the foot fiasco, Robyn falling and being carted off to hospital in an ambulance, and being stuck in Madrid during the BA fiasco (it really, really was an eventful camino!) I was happy to be led by the nose by my husband, who met me in the UK with a very gorgeous hired little SmartCar and a Plan.

I thought the South Downs (and about) was absolutely stunning and walking there would be magnificent.
Forgiven!
It is lovely walking and, in some parts, very Camino-ish.
A slice of fruit cake will be consumed in your honour after today's walk (only 8km but through wild open wheat fields on a lovely day).
Get well soon!
 

jerbear

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de madrid, camino francis, camino inverino (2012, 2013,2014)
CdM, Francis, San salvador, primativo june 2015 CDM , francis, inverino 2016
Camino madrid, via de Plata. Santiago.
Coast of the dead malpica to muxia
#72
No surgery planned. Some kind of magic machine that I haven't had explained yet. Probably a cortisone injection. And trying not to weight bear for a while - even though I stopped walking the camino, I followed it up with quite a bit of travelling and sightseeing so it has never really been rested properly.
 

jerbear

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de madrid, camino francis, camino inverino (2012, 2013,2014)
CdM, Francis, San salvador, primativo june 2015 CDM , francis, inverino 2016
Camino madrid, via de Plata. Santiago.
Coast of the dead malpica to muxia
#73
So sorry. And an ouch from this man. I have been dealing with of for several years. One doctor in Virginia believes its an infection of the tendons connecting
Maybe this is all part of a larger "curse on the moderators". I can think of a few forum members who might not be opposed to our demise, Kanga. o_O Seriously, I am glad you are home safe and sound and now healing. Will you be using a walking cast or one of those little rollerboard scooter thing-ies that you kneel on with the injured leg?
point. People who were planters of rice , corn, beans were her patients thus plantar. She sent me cream. I would try anything. Now I am using magniesum, fish oil. B5 (500mg) vitaman c 1000mg. And stretching. Oh yes I am on the camino. Mad, now inverino. In roderio as I text. Streching my tendons. So its not gender specific.
My question do they have you wearing a boot at night for stablazion? I have one in the states. Thinking of ordering one from Amazon delivered to vigo. Good luck and gods speed healing
Laurrie. Lol Mod's. karma revenge. Not.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#74

jerbear

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de madrid, camino francis, camino inverino (2012, 2013,2014)
CdM, Francis, San salvador, primativo june 2015 CDM , francis, inverino 2016
Camino madrid, via de Plata. Santiago.
Coast of the dead malpica to muxia
#75

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#77
Forgiven!
It is lovely walking and, in some parts, very Camino-ish.
A slice of fruit cake will be consumed in your honour after today's walk (only 8km but through wild open wheat fields on a lovely day).
Get well soon!
Yes, you're forgiven @Kanga but just this once, mind ;):D
Glad you enjoyed England. :)
 

jerbear

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de madrid, camino francis, camino inverino (2012, 2013,2014)
CdM, Francis, San salvador, primativo june 2015 CDM , francis, inverino 2016
Camino madrid, via de Plata. Santiago.
Coast of the dead malpica to muxia
#78
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#80

jerbear

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de madrid, camino francis, camino inverino (2012, 2013,2014)
CdM, Francis, San salvador, primativo june 2015 CDM , francis, inverino 2016
Camino madrid, via de Plata. Santiago.
Coast of the dead malpica to muxia
#81

jerbear

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de madrid, camino francis, camino inverino (2012, 2013,2014)
CdM, Francis, San salvador, primativo june 2015 CDM , francis, inverino 2016
Camino madrid, via de Plata. Santiago.
Coast of the dead malpica to muxia
#83

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
April 2019-Camino de Invierno
#84
So sorry. And an ouch from this man. I have been dealing with of for several years. One doctor in Virginia believes its an infection of the tendons connecting

point. People who were planters of rice , corn, beans were her patients thus plantar. She sent me cream. I would try anything. Now I am using magniesum, fish oil. B5 (500mg) vitaman c 1000mg. And stretching. Oh yes I am on the camino. Mad, now inverino. In roderio as I text. Streching my tendons. So its not gender specific.
My question do they have you wearing a boot at night for stablazion? I have one in the states. Thinking of ordering one from Amazon delivered to vigo. Good luck and gods speed healing
Laurrie. Lol Mod's. karma revenge. Not.
It's an inflammation of the tissues. That's why oral anti-inflammatory medicines help to heal the problem. Nothing in that cream you mentioned is going to reduce the swelling. Stretching will help tremendously as will will Voltaren gel which is an anti-inflammatory.
Hope you aren't wearing sandals or light trail runners. Those will make things worse. Good luck to you. I know how painful this condition is. I hope you find a reduction in pain soon. Because healing won't start until you stop walking. Keep up the good fight!
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
April 2019-Camino de Invierno
#85
Well, they do market socks for PF that are supposed to help keep the arch up, but am skeptical about what a piece of material can do to move such heavy tissue that much.

Here is a link that may be of interest.

http://www.plantarfasciitisresource.com/best-plantar-fasciitis-socks/
It's supposed to provide massaging pressure. I was given a roller thingy to exercise with in order to massage the fascia. I will ask my podiatrist about this sock thing. She never mentioned it and so I too am skeptical.
 

jerbear

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de madrid, camino francis, camino inverino (2012, 2013,2014)
CdM, Francis, San salvador, primativo june 2015 CDM , francis, inverino 2016
Camino madrid, via de Plata. Santiago.
Coast of the dead malpica to muxia
#86
Thanks.Alaska. I've walked a bit in my day across the US. Ohio to San Diego.At. cost john Muir.Tahoe rim. Lost coast.Ohio to novascocia. Fla trail .long trail. Been dealing with feet a long time. The cream she made was an anti inflam. I also use oil of Oregon for anti. Walk in keen voyagers with prosteps, Berkinstock blues, with additional wedge arches. My prob is I wear flip flops 6 mints a year( live in virgin islands 6 months a year) then I walk spain for 3 months. Kick out some miles for an old geezer. Onion in sojcos at night most effective for me. I made me a sock. Some times I wear the flip taped to foot. Now if I could only spell. Kep on truck in. Light house trail for me again this year. Oh yes I carry 29 lbs. Tent stove the works.
 

alaskadiver

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017-Camino Primitivo
April 2019-Camino de Invierno
#87
Thanks.Alaska. I've walked a bit in my day across the US. Ohio to San Diego.At. cost john Muir.Tahoe rim. Lost coast.Ohio to novascocia. Fla trail .long trail. Been dealing with feet a long time. The cream she made was an anti inflam. I also use oil of Oregon for anti. Walk in keen voyagers with prosteps, Berkinstock blues, with additional wedge arches. My prob is I wear flip flops 6 mints a year( live in virgin islands 6 months a year) then I walk spain for 3 months. Kick out some miles for an old geezer. Onion in sojcos at night most effective for me. I made me a sock. Some times I wear the flip taped to foot. Now if I could only spell. Kep on truck in. Light house trail for me again this year. Oh yes I carry 29 lbs. Tent stove the works.
Dude, you are hard core. More power to you buddy.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#88
It's supposed to provide massaging pressure. I was given a roller thingy to exercise with in order to massage the fascia. I will ask my podiatrist about this sock thing. She never mentioned it and so I too am skeptical.
I also have a ball with spikes that I take with me on C. What my podiatrist also recommended, is freezing a 500ml bottle of water and rolling the foot on it for 15 minutes or so. Difficult to do on Camino as water takes time to freeze, andnot all albergues have freezers. But they do have super cold tile floors, so I would brace myself and keep my poor foot on the cold floor for a few minutes during the afternoon/evening.

Also, asking for a few ice cubes you can put in a ziplock back in each bar you pass by amd order a cafe con leche or freshly squeezed orange juice will also help. 10 minutes a few times during the day. Just don't put that ziplock on the cafe bar or table. :confused:
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#89
My prob is I wear flip flops 6 mints a year( live in virgin islands 6 months a year) then I walk spain for 3 months.
Yeah, flipflops don't help. But Birkenstock makes plastic Madrids and Arizonas, with the arch it's known for. 35C$. A great deal.
 

jerbear

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de madrid, camino francis, camino inverino (2012, 2013,2014)
CdM, Francis, San salvador, primativo june 2015 CDM , francis, inverino 2016
Camino madrid, via de Plata. Santiago.
Coast of the dead malpica to muxia
#91
Well something is working. I use a 2.5 in dia piece of plastic. Pipe. To roll under my foot S-t-r-e-a-c-h my tendon. Foot up against a wall at 15 degree stretch. B5 manganese 500 mg. 1000 mg fish oil. 1000 mg c. Water. Tookk zero day today. Well 4.2 miles. And ace bandage my foot ttto stab. Wow I did not need to limp into per. Thank you God.
 

jerbear

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de madrid, camino francis, camino inverino (2012, 2013,2014)
CdM, Francis, San salvador, primativo june 2015 CDM , francis, inverino 2016
Camino madrid, via de Plata. Santiago.
Coast of the dead malpica to muxia
#92
It's supposed to provide massaging pressure. I was given a roller thingy to exercise with in order to massage the fascia. I will ask my podiatrist about this sock thing. She never mentioned it and so I too am skeptical.
At night you wear a boot or Strasburg sock keep your tendon strechin. Then when you first stand you don't agrevate. The inflamed area. What I. Have been told. I have a sock. Very tight. Prosteps makes it. Thanks
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
#93
Wah @Kanga? I thought I saw you striding confidently through Santiago in your aarn backpack and red shorts with Tigger not far behind with her tick bot-ters. You or your doppleganger has been in my memory ever since and I have been walking taller and stronger because of it. So sorry to hear of your injury. Hope it heals quickly.
 
#95
I must agree. Actually, it is 10 months since damaging one of my IT Bands and to date, even after an ultrasound, cortical steroid shot and several other medical professionals checking it over, I still do not have a proper diagnosis, and therefore, still need efective treatment.

As to getting old, "Wha chu talkin' bout Willis?" I look around and see some of the kids I was in high school with and they look so old. What the heck happened? We all find a bit of rejuvenation on the Camino. Some do not realize it, but we do. It may cause us a few aches and pains but this heart will never need a cane.
 

adricor44

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
1
#97
So, on my 11th Camino you would think I had a bit of experience and good sense. But no, it seems I only learn by making mistakes. I post this in the hope that someone might read it and benefit.

On my first full day of walking, I started to feel pain under my right heel. Not too bad at first, so I ignored it. Walk through the pain, I thought. And continued to ignore it for about 15km. By which stage it was excruciating. I limped into the nearest village. Saw a doctor in a drop-in clinic whose recommendation was voltaren gel. Caught the bus. Had physiotherapy. Rested it for a couple of days. Tried walking again, after about 5km the pain just became too much; it felt like daggers were being thrust through my heel. Over the next month (not walking much, but still travelling the camino) it did not get better, in spite of further visits to physiotherapists, lots of stretching, icing, bandaging and orthotics. And three new pairs of shoes!

Now I'm home I've had it properly diagnosed, with an ultrasound. I have a 10cm tear in the fascia under my heel. If I had but stopped, when I first started to feel the pain, I could have limited the damage. And maybe, after a couple of days of rest, been able to finish my camino.

I'm also much more conscious of the need to keep my feet flexible and strong by doing some stretching exercises as a preventative measure - in fact I think it would be good for my whole body. I know from the past that I am strong and have endurance, but the lesson from this camino is that flexibility is also important. And more important as the body ages and loses its natural elasticity.
Thanks for your post, I also had a similar problem while doing it last year. I have done it not 11, but 3 times already being in my 60s. And the number 1 learning I took from it was the footwear. That is the most important investment. I strongly recommend wearing running shoes with gel and proper cushioning so you can prevent the problem you had.

I had always used Brooks and Asics but in the list below they outlined a few good shoes to prevent heel tears and plantar fascia problems...

https://treatplantarfasciitis.com/b...sport-shoes-to-treat-plantar-fasciits-in-2019

Hope it helped. This year I am going for my 4th camino de Santiago and I am already 71!
 
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