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If you dug a tunnel through the planet from Santiago

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Hi - this is a fun app - shows you where you would surface if you dug a tunnel through the planet - Santiago de Compostela would come up in New Zealand, West coast/Canterbury border.

I would drown, coming up in the Pacific from Oxford UK!

https://www.antipodesmap.com/

Oh dear, the things we come up with to pass the time when there is no Camino ............
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
It just proves that Kiwis have the have the farthest to travel to get to the Camino — this from a list of antipodes on that site:
Christchurch (New Zealand) — A Coruna (Spain)
Madrid (Spain) — Weber (New Zealand)
Wellington (New Zealand) — Alaejos (Spain)
Nelson (New Zealand) — Mogadouro (Portugal)
Whangarei (New Zealand) — Tangier (Morocco)
Tauranga (New Zealand) — Jaen (Spain)
Hamilton (New Zealand) — Cordoba (Spain)
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean May/June 2017. Plans to walk Porto 2020
Well David you would need a small boat and row east to the town of Hokitika - it rains a lot. An interesting experiment,.
There is antipodean story about one Royal Navy Lieutenant (later Captain) James Cook, who asked is officers to remove their hats as they sailed through Cook Straight. Cook reasoned that they were sailing under Westminister Abby. Cheers
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
Hi - this is a fun app - shows you where you would surface if you dug a tunnel through the planet - Santiago de Compostela would come up in New Zealand, West coast/Canterbury border.

I would drown, coming up in the Pacific from Oxford UK!

https://www.antipodesmap.com/

Oh dear, the things we come up with to pass the time when there is no Camino ............
I'd also be all wet, David. I'd find myself 245km WSW of the nearest solid ground, Saint Paul Island, a tiny remnant of a volcanic crater in the middle of the Indian Ocean which Wikipedia tells me is all of 6.2 sq km in area. Actually, now that I think about it, I think may have talked to someone on Saint Paul Island many years ago when I was an active ham radio enthusiast. It's a small world, after all.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Hi - this is a fun app - shows you where you would surface if you dug a tunnel through the planet - Santiago de Compostela would come up in New Zealand, West coast/Canterbury border.

I would drown, coming up in the Pacific from Oxford UK!

https://www.antipodesmap.com/

Oh dear, the things we come up with to pass the time when there is no Camino ............
I'm swimming, too. It looks like I'm about halfway between Perth and the Island of Grande Terre southwest of Australia.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
I am swimming in the Pacific Ocean some distance north from the ice brim of Antarctica, far west of Cape Horn...
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
I’d be swimming too. One of my sons told me years ago that the closest land would be the Kerguelen Islands, “one of the most isolated places on earth” according to the net, of the French Southern Territories, in the southern Indian Ocean. My son did want to go there at one point, but he’s since managed to get to Stewart Island, NZ, which I now see is almost at the same latitude as the Kerguelens. (Thanks, @David, I’m learning new things with this tread.)
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
Based on the number of swimmers responding to this thread, I guess that just proves that 2/3 (or perhaps a bit more) of the earth's surface is water.
 

Bert45

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2003) Francés, (2014) Francés, (2016) Portugués , (2016) Aragonés, (2018) del Norte to Primitivo,
An "interesting" fact is that it would take about 40 minutes to fall through the tube and come out the other side, assuming no air resistance. Almost as interesting is that it would take about 40 minutes to fall through any tunnel dug in a straight line between any two points on the Earth's surface, assuming no air resistance or friction with the sides of the tunnel.
Another peculiar notion, seemingly held by many Americans, is that if they were to dig straight down from anywhere in the USA, they would come out in China, whereas there is no point in the USA that is opposite to any point in China.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
An "interesting" fact is that it would take about 40 minutes to fall through the tube and come out the other side, assuming no air resistance. Almost as interesting is that it would take about 40 minutes to fall through any tunnel dug in a straight line between any two points on the Earth's surface, assuming no air resistance or friction with the sides of the tunnel.
Another peculiar notion, seemingly held by many Americans, is that if they were to dig straight down from anywhere in the USA, they would come out in China, whereas there is no point in the USA that is opposite to any point in China.

Would there not be a diminishing of gravity as the core was approached, slowing the speed of travel?

so glad that the US and China are not opposite each other, if they were there would already be freight train lines transferring goods!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Isn’t the inside of the earth supposed to be molten rock? Steps would have to be taken to skirt that; that would increase the distance and the time required. No? 🙃

Too many variables.
Might depend on whether you are using boots or shoes, poncho or rain jacket and of course poles or not! ;)
 

Old Kiwi

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016
Camino Frances 2019
SdC to Muxia and Fisterra 2019
Camino Portuguese "2021"
If I traveled through the middle of the earth from my house, I would end up in Riano, about 60 kilometres north east of Leon in Spain. I looked it up on Google Earth and it looks like a lovely little place beside a large lake. It would suit me just fine as all Kiwis like being close to water and I would not have to travel for 28 hours to get to the Camino.
 

Bert45

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2003) Francés, (2014) Francés, (2016) Portugués , (2016) Aragonés, (2018) del Norte to Primitivo,
Would there not be a diminishing of gravity as the core was approached, slowing the speed of travel?

so glad that the US and China are not opposite each other, if they were there would already be freight train lines transferring goods!
Yes, gravity diminishes as you approach the centre of the Earth, zero at the centre, to be exact. But gravity diminishing does not slow your speed, it only slows the rate of acceleration. By the time you get to the centre (20 minutes or so) you have been accelerating for 20 minutes, so you are going very fast. You then start to slow down (due to gravity pulling you back), and your speed will be zero as you come out the other side. It is the same principle as a pendulum. There is no net force acting on the pendulum as it passes through the centre of its arc.
 

Bert45

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2003) Francés, (2014) Francés, (2016) Portugués , (2016) Aragonés, (2018) del Norte to Primitivo,
Isn’t the inside of the earth supposed to be molten rock? Steps would have to be taken to skirt that; that would increase the distance and the time required. No? 🙃
It's very much a theoretical calculation. Nobody (in their right mind) dreams of making a tunnel through the centre of the Earth. But it's a bit surprising that the time would be the same for a (theoretical) tunnel going in a straight line from London to New York, or from Moscow to Cape Town, avoiding the centre of the Earth, and assuming no friction or air resistance.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Isn’t the inside of the earth supposed to be molten rock? Steps would have to be taken to skirt that; that would increase the distance and the time required. No? 🙃
I think the idea is that the tunnel goes right through it but is, somehow, perhaps through advanced technology, shielded from it by heat-proof walls.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
It's very much a theoretical calculation. Nobody (in their right mind) dreams of making a tunnel through the centre of the Earth. But it's a bit surprising that the time would be the same for a (theoretical) tunnel going in a straight line from London to New York, or from Moscow to Cape Town, avoiding the centre of the Earth, and assuming no friction or air resistance.
I was thinking about that. I suspect the idea is that, from London to New York you are not going straight "down" (the direction that gravity is pulling) but just a bit down with a lot of lateral movement. So that might slow down your acceleration and it may all even out in the end.
 

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