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If You have Walked the Camino - Do you prefer boots or trail runners?

Boots or trail runners? PLEASE DO NOT RESPOND IF YOU HAVE NOT WALKED THE CAMINO

  • Boots

    Votes: 126 32.5%
  • Trail runners

    Votes: 159 41.0%
  • Walking shoes

    Votes: 43 11.1%
  • Other

    Votes: 4 1.0%
  • Sandals

    Votes: 22 5.7%
  • Hokas

    Votes: 17 4.4%
  • Other hiking shoes

    Votes: 16 4.1%
  • Gortex

    Votes: 1 0.3%

  • Total voters
    388
2020 Camino Guides

Davey Boyd

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Again, soon as possible!
Boots. Because I have to (I'm an ex infantryman, and my ankles are buggered). I have to wear boots at home always too. Plus, on camino I carry 16 kilo's +, so boots again.

I think boots are not necessarily needed on most caminos unless you are like me. I would wear something lighter if I could get away with it.

I am astonished that so far in the poll that so many choose boots!

Davey
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
@Anniesantiago I'd love to click a button on your survey but, and isn't there always a "but", I wear boots in winter, trail runners/trainers("?") in summer, I've worn "walking shoes" (a pair of Loake's finest Brogues) to walk in once, though as Gran would have said "what else do you do in shoes"...

I'll hazard a guess or two though: given that most pilgs walk in the fair weather season they'll walk in a variation on the light-weight "training shoe" to "trail-runner" rather than a built leather boot. They'll prefer it 'cos its the only experience they'll have had and most of them will never have or will put on a pair of serious back-country boots in their lives and why should they.

I'll be back on the roads sometime in late November. I'll wear my Brasher's, probably for the last time as they're getting old like me, 'cos they'll be warm, waterproof and will guard my ankles against a sudden slip. Next Spring, gods willing, it'll be back in the lightweights even though I resent spending €100 on a bunch of fabric & plastic that is clapped after 500 miles.
 

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
Boots too..summer and winter. I love my Hanwag. Feels like my feet glide in butter.
I have arched feet and a bunion, custom made insoles.
Yes, my boots are heavy but I can't do without.

Buying new ones involves some crying : they are ridiculously expensive.... :)
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
I also cannot select an option. One, because I've worn something different on every camino and each has had merit, and two, I'm perversely obstinate about answering survey questions.

My shoe version of a hiking boot was the most supportive.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
Next Spring, gods willing, it'll be back in the lightweights even though I resent spending €100 on a bunch of fabric & plastic that is clapped after 500 miles.
I wear boots for all my long distance walking. And most of my daily strolling at home. The same ones. I discovered a few years ago that cheap leather or fabric builders' boots work fine for me. Especially if I replace the insoles with gel ones. So I buy a pair for about £25 or so and wear them more or less constantly until they fall apart. Life expectancy varies a lot but my best so far lasted for the Camino Ingles, a few months general wear at home, then the 1900km or so from Canterbury to Rome. Pretty tatty when I reached Rome though and one of the first things I did there was to find a hardware shop and buy a near-identical pair!
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
Boots on all my pilgrimage walks. Scarpa, Asolo and a CF using a mid-cut Keen Targhee that had worn through the sole outer layer before Najera and were ready for the bin by Santiago. Why I have been trying a pair of Hoka One One trail runners with that experience is still puzzling me, but my initial impressions are that this approach might work for me in the height of summer, but isn't going to be an option for walking in other seasons.

For the St Augustine Way later this year, I will be looking to do some minor repairs to the soles of the Asolo TP535s that I wore in Sweden and Norway last year or using a pair of Sportiva boots. The latter don't have quite the same expansion volume as the Asolos, so sock choice is more critical, and they might be a bit tight with a winter weight sock combination.

ps I have never found shoes that weigh 'next to nothing' that I would consider walking in any further than the local shopping centre, and even then I would want my wife to drop me in the carpark first!!
 
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ExiledSW

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Fraces starting August 15th - Finished September 11th
This really depends on where you start.

I'd go with trail runners if you start in Sarria. There's really no need for the extra weight or durability of hiking shoes from there.

I'd stick with my Merrill waterproof hiking boots if you're starting from St. Jean. There's some rocky sections and the weather can turn rainy at any time. Was well worth having them for some of the mud and cow poo.

The one item I can't sing enough praises about when it comes to shoes is a product called Speed Laces. I started using these while doing triathlon. They're basically stretchy laces that you do up once and can slip your foot in and out without having to do your laces each time. Need to stop and rest your feet? Slip 'em off. Slip 'em back on to keep going.
 

GettingThere

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Roncesvalles-SdC Apr-Jun 2015
Roncesvalles-Sarria Sep-Oct 2017
C. Frances sections Apr-Jun 2019
I've answered "trail runners" although in fact my shoes have really just been regular running shoes. Asics gel kayano on the last two caminos, Asics GT-5000 on the first. I was looking for trail runners but after a conversation with staff at a sports shoe store who were seasoned long-distance walkers, I went with those. They were great for me, good thick soles with excellent traction on slippery paths, great for the stony hard surfaces too. Drained and dried out super-quick after heavy rain due to the mesh exterior. Worn with thick merino hiking socks and body glide all over my feet. My feet felt very well-supported and cushioned, I wouldn't consider using anything else now, although having spent hours walking around sight-seeing in hiking sandals on "rest days" I would be interested to try those on the Camino (wasn't quite brave enough but am inspired by good reports from @trecile and other forum members!) I have never worn hiking boots and would not, on the Camino Frances at least. I once bought a pair of Keen Targhee hiking "shoes" which were really boots without the ankle part, and felt as though I was walking through treacle, they were so heavy and inflexible! Never took them on a Camino. Just my perspective, though - some people love them.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
I've answered "trail runners" although in fact my shoes have really just been regular running shoes
In the past I used light hiking boots, and hiking shoes. I just finished walking 12 days in road runners (Brooks Ghost 11 wide) which were great except that I got sore feet from rocks. I never had this problem on 100's of km training on smooth surfaces at home. Now I will be looking for trail runners with rock plate/protection on the bottom.
 

nycwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF: (2001, 2002, 2004, 2014). Hospitalera: 2002, Ponferrada. 2004, Rabanal del Camino.
I hit trail runners; but I wear Nike running shoes.

I only wore boots once.

That was on winter camino. My Nike shoes couldn’t hold up to the mud, sleet, and ice.
 

Lindsay53

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances April / May 19
I am very pleased with my Salomon boots. I have worn them on walks in Australia, Scotland and on the Camino and intend wearing them on the Portugues next year.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2019
I walked in Merrell mid boots - but they are not really boots, just high sided walking shoes. They were very comfortable and their main advantage was that they fitted my huge feet, gave enough room to move, accepted my orthotics and lasted the distance. Their second advantage is that they are the shoes I wore to train in, so I was reasonably confident they would do the job.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
This time I wore sandals, last 2 times running shoes. Sandals win, but running shoes were a close second. I could vote for both. I have never loved boots, even when I have had to wear them as part of my job (steel capped safety boots), plus I was raised on a farm where boots are the norm - so I've had plenty of experience in them. My last pair perished before they wore out, whereas I wear out at last 3 pairs of running shoes a year.
My friend who was a staunch boot lover is now a convert to sandals as well now.
(however I always walk in warmer months - being in the Southern hemisphere, I choose to leave our winter behind and travel somewhere warmer)
 

Roland49

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2019 July
I had to choose boots (recommended by the sales-staff @ my hiking-store) due to an injured foot (torn all ligaments the year before walking).
So I changed between walking in Boots (Meindl Jersey Pro) and Sandals (Teva Hurricane) for all other parts of the day.
 

Heikki

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Burgos to Santiago 2008, Madrid to Sáhagun 2012, Primitivo 2012, VdlP 2014, Norte aborted 2018.
Boots. Because I have to (I'm an ex infantryman, and my ankles are buggered). I have to wear boots at home always too. Plus, on camino I carry 16 kilo's +, so boots again.

I think boots are not necessarily needed on most caminos unless you are like me. I would wear something lighter if I could get away with it.

I am astonished that so far in the poll that so many choose boots!

Davey
Same as Davey, because of the weight, I have to wear boots.
Heikki
 

martin1ws

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Somport to Finisterre Jul-Aug 2018
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Penny Kingma

M.S. Can't Stop Me !
Camino(s) past & future
May 29th to July 4th 2016
SJPDP to Santiago
And many, many more I pray
No matter what you choose to walk in the key to success is resting your feet.
You must remove your footwear and socks a few times a day to allow your feet to breathe. Cherish and care for them along the way....you can’t make it without them ❤👣
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues (Oct 2015), Camino Primitivo (Apr 2019)
I would love to see if there are different preferences for different caminos.

I wore trail runners on the Portuguese in October. They were waterproof. I wouldn't wear them again and go for a lighter variation instead.

On the Primitivo in April I had Salomon (low) hiking shoes. They were perfect. I watched my friend giving up on her boots and switching to sandals. If I walked there again, I'd wear the Salomons+sandals.

I feel like waterproof is too much for the Portuguese, but needed for Primitivo. There were both sunny and rainy days on both, there was much more mud on the Primitivo and less chance for the shoes to dry.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
You must remove your footwear and socks a few times a day to allow your feet to breathe. Cherish and care for them along the way....you can’t make it without them ❤👣
I would be reluctant to use the word "must" in any post related to footwear. It is very much a personal and individual matter. I rarely take my boots off during the day and very rarely have blisters or other foot troubles these days - even on the odd occasions when I walk a 40+km day. We are all different.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
@Anniesantiago I'd love to click a button on your survey but, and isn't there always a "but", I wear boots in winter, trail runners/trainers("?") in summer, I've worn "walking shoes" (a pair of Loake's finest Brogues) to walk in once, though as Gran would have said "what else do you do in shoes"...

I'll hazard a guess or two though: given that most pilgs walk in the fair weather season they'll walk in a variation on the light-weight "training shoe" to "trail-runner" rather than a built leather boot. They'll prefer it 'cos its the only experience they'll have had and most of them will never have or will put on a pair of serious back-country boots in their lives and why should they.

I'll be back on the roads sometime in late November. I'll wear my Brasher's, probably for the last time as they're getting old like me, 'cos they'll be warm, waterproof and will guard my ankles against a sudden slip. Next Spring, gods willing, it'll be back in the lightweights even though I resent spending €100 on a bunch of fabric & plastic that is clapped after 500 miles.
I have walked about 4K in Brooks Cascadia Trail Runners. I am sure you can add at least another 1K in training for 3 pairs of Cascadias. I walked the entire Norte last year in the same pair I will walk the CF starting on October 28th. This will be the first time I will not walk an entire route. I have to start in Pamplona as I have to meet my daughter in Porto on December 3rd. Every day with the kids now is a day you don't want to miss as we get older. I am 65 and need a little extra time. Also I know it may be a little dicey walking in Trail Runners getting to Galicia especially but I hate boots. The Cascadias are really light and really durable. I have them one size larger and wider and they feel great.
 

Dsavid Keyte

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de San Salavador (2015)
Camino de la Costa (2016)
Camino Lebaniego 2017
On my three caminos, always boots as i find the ankle support important, especially on the San Salvador
 

Rich1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (May 2015)
Camino Frances (2016-2018)
A complicated Camino from Madrid (Aug/Sep 18)
I walk and run in Salomon Speedcross both her in the Lake District and on the Camino - and that goes for all seasons
 

Nekodemus

Certified insane
Camino(s) past & future
Been there, done that. Keep coming back.
Most likely addicted.
Definitely boots.

I have tried with trail runners and walking shoes, but my feet informed me that boots were the way forward - unless I wanted them to go on strike. They wanted a pair of Lowa Renegade LL Lo, period! After my feet had rejected on every other model available in two other shops, the Rebels were literally the last option they had for me to try in the third shop.

Edit: Not "Rebel", but "Renegade LL Lo". Those Renegades are very comfortable, by the way.
 
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RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
Except for one CF that I wore trail running shoes, I have always wore Merrell or Oboz hiking shoes. I do not consider them to be boots because they do not go higher than the ankle. There was no specific category for them. They do kind of fall in between trail runners and hiking boots.
 

tpmchugh

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Frances (2018}
Boots definitely. I like walking in early to mid spring when there is still snow on the mountains and mud on the meseta. I can plough on through without anything getting into my boots while others are struggling in shoes of some description. When I go walking at home in warmer weather, I wear hiking shoes and occasionally hiking sandals. I never use trainers. Tend to suffer from various muscle problems, particularly calfs when I wear them so binned the last pair I had
 

david marquez

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte ( Irun to Luarca), Camino Primitivo-Fisterra: April-May 2018
Via de la Plata 2019
I have done a great deal of walking and over the years I have gradually narrowed my selection of footwear to Sandals (bedrock brand) as much as possible and trailrunners if its below 8-10C
 

cher99840

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013, 2017 Camino Frances SJPP-Santiago
2015 St. Olav's Way Oslo-Trondheim
2017 VdlP Seville-Merida
Why do Hokas have their own category? I wear boots because I need the ankle support. Those boots are Hokas because I love the cushion that eliminates burning soles and bruises from stones.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Why do Hokas have their own category? I wear boots because I need the ankle support. Those boots are Hokas because I love the cushion that eliminates burning soles and bruises from stones.
I don't know. Because someone mentioned they wore Hokas. I have no idea what they even are. It's just a poll to see what most pilgrims prefer. You can have more than one vote, I believe. :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Boots definitely. I like walking in early to mid spring when there is still snow on the mountains and mud on the meseta. I can plough on through without anything getting into my boots while others are struggling in shoes of some description. When I go walking at home in warmer weather, I wear hiking shoes and occasionally hiking sandals. I never use trainers. Tend to suffer from various muscle problems, particularly calfs when I wear them so binned the last pair I had
Did you vote?
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06

jayree

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to SdC 2012
Irun to Fisterra 2013
Shikoku 2015
CP 2016
When in SJdPP, ready to start our Camino, we were talking with a pilgrim from Japan.
"Taki, you're wearing flip flops."
"Yes, I know."
"Are you going to walk the entire CF in flip flops?"
"I think so."
He did. Later we learned he had climbed Mt Kilimanjaro in flip flops.

I wore NB running shoes ("trainers"). Many of my companions wore boots. Whatever works for you.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I don't know. Because someone mentioned they wore Hokas. I have no idea what they even are. It's just a poll to see what most pilgrims prefer. You can have more than one vote, I believe. :)
Hokas are just a shoe brand. They are usually trail runners, but as @cher99840 mentioned, they also make boots.
 

JiminVa

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Aug/Sept 17; Frances Aug/Sept 18
Merrill Moab, WP for me. With custom orthos. Over 2500 miles over last 3 years, on two pair. As an old soldier with ankle problems and two neuromas on each foot they're about as light as I can go.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Merrill Moab, WP for me. With custom orthos. Over 2500 miles over last 3 years, on two pair. As an old soldier with ankle problems and two neuromas on each foot they're about as light as I can go.
Are those boots?
 

Walton

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 Sjpp to Sdc. 2018 Lisbon to Sdc to Finisterre. Next up hopefully VDP or Del Norte.
I wore boots on my first Camino and Asics gel walking shoes on our second - the portugeuse.

As someone pointed out the Portugeuse has billions of cobblestones to walk on, and whilst our first Camino on the Frances was blister free, I did have a blister issue on the Portugeuse in consequence of soft shoes soles, cobblestone attack and a very hot day, all combined.

You need decent soles on the portugeuse.

But what about the second part of the equation? Socks - These are really important in my opinion, except for those hardy thrifty barefoot walkers. May they stub their toes occasionally and cry out "Buen Camino" in response! :)

I think the reality is, there is no perfect shoe that suits everybody - You need to carefully choose the best shoe for you and if you wear socks, you need to choose the best sock for you also.

If I remember properly, Dave Bugg wrote an excellent article on this forum about choosing footwear. There may be other writers also. A search should find decades of wisdom on the topic.

Blisters and foot issues, like bed bugs are best avoided.

Cheers

Graham
 

Rex

Pilgrim Trekker
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Santiago (2013)
Lisboa to Santiago (2018)
Salomon trail shoes on both the CF and the CP. Never a problem from blisters or cobbles. It helps that I only weigh about 70 kg and keep my pack weight to 11 kg, which doesn't put so much stress on the lower legs and feet.


Buen Camino.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
There may be other writers also. A search should find decades of wisdom on the topic.
You are correct. I would observe that there is very little new that has been said about this in recent years. But a couple of new, sometimes quite strident voices, have attempted to dominate the discussion with very personal points of view. The rather more nuanced and balanced discussion that once was the norm on this topic has gone. One can only hope that this thread restores some balance, and we should thank @Anniesantiago for at least trying to put some facts back into the conversation.

That said, it is disappointing that there has already been one ad hominum attack on boot wearers in the thread. We might hope there will be no more, and we can continue the discussion without more unfortunate name-calling and other distractions.
 
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Bogong

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
First, March 2014
I'm just curious what the numbers are...

There are a few drop-offs from memory where ankles need some support in my view. The descent to Zubiri, the loose, rock-strewn path down from Alto de Perdon, the path down from Cruz de Ferro. On the way to Fisterre the drop down to Cee was bad in the heavy rain and wind when I did it, but I've been told this has been fixed up.

De colores

Bogong
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature
I voted Hokas because they are now my favourite but I have no idea if they are called boots or shoes as they are ’mid’ height ... 🤔
They’re very light and feel as if you were walking on marshmallows 😁
The drawback is that the soles wear out fairly quickly - well, quicker than the other makes I have worn (Salomon, Meindl....)
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Salomon trail shoes on both the CF and the CP. Never a problem from blisters or cobbles. It helps that I only weigh about 70 kg and keep my pack weight to 11 kg, which doesn't put so much stress on the lower legs and feet.


Buen Camino.
DId you vote?
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
I wore boots on my first Camino and Asics gel walking shoes on our second - the portugeuse.

As someone pointed out the Portugeuse has billions of cobblestones to walk on, and whilst our first Camino on the Frances was blister free, I did have a blister issue on the Portugeuse in consequence of soft shoes soles, cobblestone attack and a very hot day, all combined.


Cheers

Graham
In this poll, I'm simply wondering what type of shoe each walker finds best for them and how boot-wearers compare to trainer and sandal wearers. That's all. I hope you voted.
 

Bob Howard

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2016
Frances 2018
My Bootasauras comment was just an attempt (feeble as it was) at humor. But footwear on the Camino is an important topic, especially for people who are new to long distance walking. This discussion board forum is not only enjoyable reading for Camino veterans—keeps us connected to the Camino between walks—but it is also a rather comprehensive how-to encyclopedia of all things Camino.

Virtually every one of us who chime in on these gear issues are veteran Pilgrims and/or experienced backpackers. When it comes to shoe wear, there are, of course, many points of view. Pretty much everyone responding to this thread already knows what works for them. And often the response to a newbie's query about boots vs non-boots is “to just wear what works for you." To me that comment might be a well-intended suggestion, but it is essentially just a well-worn homily. And that is the essence of my point—the newbie who asks the question about boots vs non-boots doesn’t know what works for them. That’s why they’re asking the question. So, what can we say to them. Well, we tend to tell them what works for us. Here’s what I think would be a good collective response: “Traditionally, long distance walking and backpacking was associated with hiking boots. Many veterans here wear full on hiking boots, but the trend towards lighter weight, more comfort and diminished blisters means that the majority of Pilgrims find that lightweight trail runners are best.”

I wore leather boots for many years, and a few thousand miles in the Sierra Nevada. Both Asolo and Danner, and, of course, a lot of moleskin.

Walking the Camino is neither mountaineering nor even conventional backpacking. Rather, it is very pleasant and relatively leisurely walk. There are a couple days where the terrain approaches the kind of trail surface we encounter in wilderness backpacking, but overall it’s a stroll over rolling countryside passing through assorted villages and towns. Are boots necessary. No they’re not. But if that’s what you’re used to and they work, then arguably they are necessary. But again back to the new long distance walker. How can we provide meaningful advice to that person?

Dougfitz and Davebugg and a few other of our more experienced and exalted veterans have posted a number of informative posts regarding boots vs non-boots. If you were brand new to the Camino and hiking, and read the entire thread you would probably conclude that both boots and low cut runners work. And they do. But what would be the best recommendation for someone who has likely never worn hiking boots, or thought about the difference.

Feel free to inundate me with darts, but it seems to me that a good reply to a soon to be Pilgrim would be something along the lines of: “Although footwear is a personal matter, absent a physiological issue requiring high top leather boots, most walkers would fare better with a lightweight trail runner or even a well cushioned trainer. While leather high top boots provide the most protection in wilderness terrain, they are far more likely to result in blisters, especially if not well worn in. Most trail runners/trainers can be worn right out of the box. While blisters night not keep you from completing the Camino, they will definitely diminish your enjoyment.” ‘

The technological advances in outdoor gear has made it all a lot easier and more pleasant. And that’s what’s happened with footwear. The development of lightweight comfortable out of the box shoes makes long distance hiking more accessible. There’s a reason we rarely see external frame packs. Technology. When internal frame packs were introduced in the mid 1960’s, I remember thinking what’s the point. My external frame Kelty performed beautifully so why change. At first internal frame packs were adopted by mountaineers, climbers and off-trail scramblers. But gradually, as the technology improved, internal frames came to dominate. The same thing has happened with footwear.

So, my point is not to debate lightweight trail shoes vs boots—everyone reading this already knows what they prefer. I make these comments and arguments only in connection with the first time pilgrim without previous hiking experience.
 

BeatriceKarjalainen

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Finished: See post signature.
Upcoming: Nothing planned
All my caminos had been summer/autumn so sandals all the way. (Well did 2 days in lightweight Salomon boots on my first. But they were taken off on my walk into Pamplona last 4-5 km in day 2 and never worn again).

For a winter camino I might used something else.
 

Walton

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 Sjpp to Sdc. 2018 Lisbon to Sdc to Finisterre. Next up hopefully VDP or Del Norte.
In this poll, I'm simply wondering what type of shoe each walker finds best for them and how boot-wearers compare to trainer and sandal wearers. That's all. I hope you voted.
Apologies to you Anniesantiago. I did vote but then realised that what I wear depends upon which Camino I’m lucky enough to be walking.

I misunderstood your original post and do apologise.

I will now go and hide in the cupboard for a while until it’s safe to emerge unnoticed. :)

Cheers
 
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dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
My Bootasauras comment was just an attempt (feeble as it was) at humor. But footwear on the Camino is an important topic, especially for people who are new to long distance walking. This discussion board forum is not only enjoyable reading for Camino veterans—keeps us connected to the Camino between walks—but it is also a rather comprehensive how-to encyclopedia of all things Camino.

Virtually every one of us who chime in on these gear issues are veteran Pilgrims and/or experienced backpackers. When it comes to shoe wear, there are, of course, many points of view. Pretty much everyone responding to this thread already knows what works for them. And often the response to a newbie's query about boots vs non-boots is “to just wear what works for you." To me that comment might be a well-intended suggestion, but it is essentially just a well-worn homily. And that is the essence of my point—the newbie who asks the question about boots vs non-boots doesn’t know what works for them. That’s why they’re asking the question. So, what can we say to them. Well, we tend to tell them what works for us. Here’s what I think would be a good collective response: “Traditionally, long distance walking and backpacking was associated with hiking boots. Many veterans here wear full on hiking boots, but the trend towards lighter weight, more comfort and diminished blisters means that the majority of Pilgrims find that lightweight trail runners are best.”

I wore leather boots for many years, and a few thousand miles in the Sierra Nevada. Both Asolo and Danner, and, of course, a lot of moleskin.

Walking the Camino is neither mountaineering nor even conventional backpacking. Rather, it is very pleasant and relatively leisurely walk. There are a couple days where the terrain approaches the kind of trail surface we encounter in wilderness backpacking, but overall it’s a stroll over rolling countryside passing through assorted villages and towns. Are boots necessary. No they’re not. But if that’s what you’re used to and they work, then arguably they are necessary. But again back to the new long distance walker. How can we provide meaningful advice to that person?

Dougfitz and Davebugg and a few other of our more experienced and exalted veterans have posted a number of informative posts regarding boots vs non-boots. If you were brand new to the Camino and hiking, and read the entire thread you would probably conclude that both boots and low cut runners work. And they do. But what would be the best recommendation for someone who has likely never worn hiking boots, or thought about the difference.

Feel free to inundate me with darts, but it seems to me that a good reply to a soon to be Pilgrim would be something along the lines of: “Although footwear is a personal matter, absent a physiological issue requiring high top leather boots, most walkers would fare better with a lightweight trail runner or even a well cushioned trainer. While leather high top boots provide the most protection in wilderness terrain, they are far more likely to result in blisters, especially if not well worn in. Most trail runners/trainers can be worn right out of the box. While blisters night not keep you from completing the Camino, they will definitely diminish your enjoyment.” ‘

The technological advances in outdoor gear has made it all a lot easier and more pleasant. And that’s what’s happened with footwear. The development of lightweight comfortable out of the box shoes makes long distance hiking more accessible. There’s a reason we rarely see external frame packs. Technology. When internal frame packs were introduced in the mid 1960’s, I remember thinking what’s the point. My external frame Kelty performed beautifully so why change. At first internal frame packs were adopted by mountaineers, climbers and off-trail scramblers. But gradually, as the technology improved, internal frames came to dominate. The same thing has happened with footwear.

So, my point is not to debate lightweight trail shoes vs boots—everyone reading this already knows what they prefer. I make these comments and arguments only in connection with the first time pilgrim without previous hiking experience.
In thinking about how I might usefully respond to this, I was acutely aware that there was a risk of committing a fallacy fallacy - suggesting the conclusions are wrong because of the fallacies present in the argument. So let me state up front that any pilgrim is well advised to walk in comfortable, well fitting footwear that is reasonably light, whether their preference is boots, shoes, sandals or even crocs. That is not at issue here.

What I would take issue with is that the author engaged in a name-calling ad hominum attack in an earlier post, and the response here is in the form of what I consider to be one of the bully's defences - that their remarks were meant to be funny. I'm not sure that there is anything humourous about appearing to denigrate those of us who prefer boots by calling us names. I would worry if others thought it was.

But even suggesting this defence says two things to me. This first is that the author does not understand the offensive nature of the remark, and isn't sorry that they made it. The second thing is that they want anyone who was offended by their name calling to take the blame for taking offence and for calling out the matter. Let me suggest that isn't going to happen.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Apologies to you Anniesantiago. I did vote but then realised that what I wear depends upon which Camino I’m lucky enough to be walking.

i misunderstood your original post and do apologise.

I will now go and hide in the cupboard for a while until it’s safe to emerge unnoticed. :)

Cheers
:::peeking into the cupboard:::
It's ok.. you can come out.
Do you often hide in cupboards?
 

gerip

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
CF, Burgos to Santiago, May 2019
Ingles, Sep - Oct 2019
“Although footwear is a personal matter, absent a physiological issue requiring high top leather boots, most walkers would fare better with a lightweight trail runner or even a well cushioned trainer. While leather high top boots provide the most protection in wilderness terrain, they are far more likely to result in blisters, especially if not well worn in. Most trail runners/trainers can be worn right out of the box. While blisters night not keep you from completing the Camino, they will definitely diminish your enjoyment.”
I also took note from several Camino vloggers who were walking in boots who began to complain about problems with their Achilles. I've had problems with torn Achilles walking even in lightweight full ankle boots, so stick with mid height trail runners.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
In thinking about how I might usefully respond to this, I was acutely aware that there was a risk of committing a fallacy fallacy - suggesting the conclusions are wrong because of the fallacies present in the argument. So let me state up front that any pilgrim is well advised to walk in comfortable, well fitting footwear that is reasonably light, whether their preference is boots, shoes, sandals or even crocs. That is not at issue here.

What I would take issue with is that the author engaged in a name-calling ad hominum attack in an earlier post, and the response here is in the form of what I consider to be one of the bully's defences - that their remarks were meant to be funny. I'm not sure that there is anything humourous about appearing to denigrate those of us who prefer boots by calling us names. I would worry if others thought it was.

But even suggesting this defence says two things to me. This first is that the author does not understand the offensive nature of the remark, and isn't sorry that they made it. The second thing is that they want anyone who was offended by their name calling to take the blame for taking offence and for calling out the matter. Let me suggest that isn't going to happen.
Did I miss something?
attack? bully?
My goodness people, it's a simple poll.
It doesn't even call for comments, just a vote.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
I've changed over time. Started in leather boots migrated to GT boots then Merrell walking shoes now happiest in Trail Runners (with spare in-soles).
If I ever managed to do another Camino I doubt if I'd go back to boots.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
There are too many sub-plots and too much targeted innuendo going on here. As someone who has gotten a LOT of excellent advice on the forum about footwear, I have become increasingly distressed at the ways in which several forum members just can’t seem to avoid the personal barbs. I have not been reading this thread carefully, because as Annie says it is just a poll!

I personally am unwilling to reconstruct the sequence of posts in this thread to understand how a comment made three comments earlier was really intended to be a personal barb and now someone is offended. Maybe that makes me a bad moderator. But I saw @Bob Howard’s comment as a more sophisticated and intelligent way of saying what I now frequently say — if you are inexperienced in the ways of the outdoor world, you may automatically think — the Camino is a hike, for a hike we need hiking boots. Today, you should consider the full range of options. I saw the same light that Bob is trying to shed because of an earlier thread on the forum. I think his comment about the shift from external to internal frame backpacks is a good analogy to what is going on in the shoe world.

But back to the personal attacks. This is a ridiculous way for adults to spend their time, and I encourage everyone to lighten up and develop a less pronounced radar for ferreting out supposed hidden insults.
 

Brandy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
19th Sep 2018 will start Camino de Sant Jaume
I prefer and use sandals all the times. :)
Cheers
Brandy
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ),Via San Francesco, Italy (2017 )Camino Portugese (2018 )Camino Ingles(
I'm just curious what the numbers are...
For me, it all depends on the specific route and length of the walk. I had full blown hikers on the CF, but thought them to be overkill on the Portuguese. I switched to trail runners with vionic innersoles for the Portuguese and Ingles and was quite comfortable, but the thought often occurred to me on those treks that the runners would NOT have been sufficient on the CF.
 
Camino(s) past & future
SF 2014
Fin\Mux 14 & 18
Portuguese 2017
Aragones 2018
Plan primitivo 2020
im older walk slow need orthotics. im one for a light weight compsite _goretex boot. great on uneven terrain
 

wcsjms

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2016) ; 1st Camino Frances September 2016-November 2016 ; Camino Frances August 2017-October 2017
I'm just curious what the numbers are...
If you're up in years, boots are more stable, as there many craggy places on the Frances where ankle support is needed. I've also worn Solomon trail shoes on the flatter areas. If you're young to middle age trail shoes are good for fair weather Camino's...doing winter Camino in December and its boots all the way. It's a personal preference..our friend James has done two caminos barefoot. He never got a blister, not once. 🤣
 

Womanontheway

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012) Portugues (2014), Primitivo (2017)
I am very pleased with my Salomon boots. I have worn them on walks in Australia, Scotland and on the Camino and intend wearing them on the Portugues next year.
Friend, you will need good boots on the Camino Portugues, with ankle support and tough soles; those square, sharp-sided cobbles can cause havoc on your feet.
I always wear boots, with ankle support and made-to-measure insoles to protect my 75 yr old feet. With Vaseline to prevent rubbing, in 3 Caminos (including Primitivo) I have never had a blister! There is protection from the rain, sleet and snow, with good balance over difficult terrain. Any serious long-distance walker knows the truth of this.
A Woman on the Way.
 

JillinGermany

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago to Finisterre (2018)
Porto to Santiago (2019)
I voted for trail runners but the shoes I actually wear for hiking, running and pilgramages are minimalist trail running and hiking shoes from Xerox Shoes. They're called TerraFlex. They just work for me. No blisters and no back problems.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2017), Primitivo (2019)
I also cannot select an option. One, because I've worn something different on every camino and each has had merit, and two, I'm perversely obstinate about answering survey questions.

My shoe version of a hiking boot was the most supportive.
Boots on the first Camino (Francés) and switched to shoe version of hiking boots on the Primitivo, recently. It was a happy conversion, and I wear them daily in my work now!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2017), Primitivo (2019)
And I notice more abandoned boots. 😊
Isn’t interesting to note how people see things. Reminds me of something I recently missed....we had planted a tree for a beloved minister who had died recently. I went to check that the leaves looked healthy and to water it etc. The same day my cousin sent me a photo of bark having been rubbed off, which I had completely missed. Of course, I went back and wrapped the trunk to protect it, but laughed at my myopia. It takes a village! (For me, at least)
 

Robi Diaz De Vivar

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2016), Norte (2017), Portuges (2018), Mozarabe (2019), Primitivo (2019), Via de La Plata (2
I'm just curious what the numbers are...
In 2016 before my first Camino with some doubts (because I did not know what I was doing or what I would need the shoes to do) I bought a pair of Colombia Canyon Point walking shoes (they were in a sale at Decathlon). It was the perfect decision. I have now walked 5 Camino (not from start to finish but at least a week each) and all of the training over very demanding walking trails here in Andalucia and I have not suffered from a single day of discomfort. If in any doubt at all buy these shoes.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2017), Primitivo (2019)
I
Isn’t interesting to note how people see things. Reminds me of something I recently missed....we had planted a tree for a beloved minister who had died recently. I went to check that the leaves looked healthy and to water it etc. The same day my cousin sent me a photo of bark having been rubbed off, which I had completely missed. Of course, I went back and wrapped the trunk to protect it, but laughed at my myopia. It takes a village! (For me, at least)
am going to find a replacement word for “recently”
 

SMBHNL

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF: 2016, 2017. CP: April 2018
Three Caminos. Running shoes with orthotic insoles. Never seen any need for boots.
 

Attachments

Tony Hutt

Love a good walk!
Camino(s) past & future
Saint Jean to Santiago - 09/10 2017
Santiago to Finisterre - 05 2019
I used Asolo Zen approach shoes. Theses were great although I did have to purchase thinner socks after 500km!
 

Helen O'Shaughnessy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via dela plata, via Francigena
Boots. Because I have to (I'm an ex infantryman, and my ankles are buggered). I have to wear boots at home always too. Plus, on camino I carry 16 kilo's +, so boots again.

I think boots are not necessarily needed on most caminos unless you are like me. I would wear something lighter if I could get away with it.

I am astonished that so far in the poll that so many choose boots!

Davey
I’m astonished you carry 16kg ! Is that an infantry thing too ? I carry about six. I wear off road runners, with really good tread so no slipping.
 

Davey Boyd

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Again, soon as possible!
I’m astonished you carry 16kg ! Is that an infantry thing too ? I carry about six. I wear off road runners, with really good tread so no slipping.
No not so much an infantry thing. So far when I have walked it has been between 5-6 months walk at a time. And I like to sleep outside often so extra for that. Then when I know I am staying outside I carry wine or beer and an evening picnic. It all adds up.

Really, it is because I like to be independent at all times. Albergue full? Who cares there is a forest or church porch up the road, and I have dinner!

But I find 16kilo's comfortable (with good pre-training). But I don't recomend carrying this amount if you sleep indoors all the time or for traveling a few weeks or so. It is not needed. 6 kilo's is great, well done!

Davey
 

PDX Bucky

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
First Camino -- April/May 2017
We walked from SJPdP to SdC in April/May 2017, and I wore waterproof Keens Targee II. We just rewalked from Fromista to León at the end of last month, and I wore Columbia/Montrail trail runners.

My 2017 experience resulted in lots of blisters between my toes. My 2019 experience resulted in pure comfort. The difference? Breathable materials. If you have hot feet, I’d highly recommend trail runners. If you want to wear boots, avoid waterproof materials. The dust from the Camino quickly stops the breathable materials, and feet can quickly become overheated resulting in blisters. Buen Camino.
 

Micah26

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France's (2018)
Teva optimum sandals closed toe so rocks stayed out. Wore wool socks not one blister! Also brought New Balance trainers wore them 2x on the trail... sandals were the best!
 

zrexer

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014, 15,16 & 19 Camino Frances
2017 Camino Portuguese
2018 Camino Primitivo
No two people are equipped with identical feet, so there are no wrong options, except when your chosen food wear causes you blisters and other assorted grief.
Camino's are way more fun when your feet are not killing you! Have experienced both extremes!

Personally after two walks with boots and four with trail shoes, there is no going back to boots for me. I will state that in very wet muddy conditions boots are good or on very rocky trail sections. But trail shoes are ideal for 80% of conditions you usually face so I will choose the 80% solution.

My observation is simply that I have seen way more people with major foot problems that have chosen boots versus any of the other options. Keep in mind I have seen people wear steel toed construction boots and calf high hunting boots.

As important as you foot wear choice, sock choice is just as important. Again, everyone has a favorite. Wright Sock brand of lined socks have worked well for me on my last four walks.
 

pajoe

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Ingles (2009-11), Portuguese (2015-16)
Boots. Because I have to (I'm an ex infantryman, and my ankles are buggered). I have to wear boots at home always too. Plus, on camino I carry 16 kilo's +, so boots again.

I think boots are not necessarily needed on most caminos unless you are like me. I would wear something lighter if I could get away with it.

I am astonished that so far in the poll that so many choose boots!

Davey
I'm just curious what the numbers are...
Had to Google the difference between "Trail runners" & "Walking shoes" just to be sure....so I discovered that the North Face Hedgehogs I use are "Walking Shoes". I walked the Camino Ingles & Camino Portugeuese in Summer & these walking shoes felt just right for the warm weather. Tried a pair of running shoes on one day & found that the soles of my feet were sore from the stones on the trail - the soles of the running running shoes were not rigid enough for me, though I am heavy. In the winter I wear a pair of Meindl boots to keep my feet nice and toasty...so its horses for course,,,,
 

NYSE

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances & Camino Finisterre/Muxia April 2019
I'm just curious what the numbers are...
I bought a pair of Salomon Ultra X boots for my Camino. 1200 miles later, I bought a second pair. I've described these boots as a sock with a tire tread on the bottom. You can literally take them out of the box and walk from SJPP to Santiago with zero break in time.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
Clearly @peregrina2000 and I have approached our analysis of @Bob Howard's earlier post quite differently.
I was acutely aware that there was a risk of committing a fallacy fallacy - suggesting the conclusions are wrong because of the fallacies present in the argument.
But I saw @Bob Howard’s comment as a more sophisticated and intelligent way of saying what I now frequently say — if you are inexperienced in the ways of the outdoor world, you may automatically think — the Camino is a hike, for a hike we need hiking boots. Today, you should consider the full range of options.
So what is Bob proposing, and why do I consider the argument that he makes for it weak. Here is part of what he has, as in individual, proposed as some collective statement:
“Traditionally, long distance walking and backpacking was associated with hiking boots. Many veterans here wear full on hiking boots, but the trend towards lighter weight, more comfort and diminished blisters means that the majority of Pilgrims find that lightweight trail runners are best.”
Only his first point has any reasonable chance of being considered correct, provided you think that tradition here is decades old. Anything more recent, and this view of the world is just outdated when it comes to long distance walking and back packing (depending on how one thinks of these) although it might still be true of hiking.

His second point here appears to infer that people will get less blisters with lightweight trail runners than they would with 'full on hiking boots'. A dubious claim. There are likely to be factors such as footwear fit, sock selection and the use of lubricants or taping that will make a difference, irrespective of footwear type.

Finally, he claims that 'the majority of Pilgrims find that lightweight trail runners are best'. Based on this survey alone, that cannot be true, because there is no majority preference. And if it weren't for surveys like this, I am not sure that we would really know. I don't undertake the camino to be some sort of census collector, and I also know that were I to try and recollect such matters afterwards, I might be prone to confirmation bias. So I don't pretend that I have any clear idea about this at all.

There are at least two fallacies present in the line of reasoning presented. The first starts here:
I wore leather boots for many years, and a few thousand miles in the Sierra Nevada. Both Asolo and Danner, and, of course, a lot of moleskin.
This sets up a logical fallacy that the particular implies the general. In this case for a conclusion he has already used that boots cause more blisters than shoes, and appears to justify his use of that statement.

The second is a rhetorical fallacy sometimes called the black and white fallacy, where the option you want to support is compared to the least favourable of all the alternatives, in this case lightweight trail runners being compared to leather boots (he uses 'full on boots' in one place and 'leather boots' in another. This avoids the inconvenience of having to admit that the same advances in technology have been applied to both boots and shoes, and have brought with that similar advantages to both. Two in particular that are germane to this discussion are dramatic weight decreases and having little if any requirement to break the footwear in gradually. I have bought both boots (Sportiva) and shoes (Hoka One One) this year, and both were wearable out of the box. The shoes are still not right, but that might be a fitting issue rather than anything else.

I really don't think that shoe advocates need to present such weak cases, and overstating the case doesn't help convince anyone capable of simple critical reasoning. I think that there are shoe advocates that present far stronger arguments for them than I think have been presented here. They are also more likely to to admit that this is a difficult discussion to have. A lot of material in the public domain would suggest that some of the advantages claimed for one type of footwear or another are not well established. More than that, I have seen no research conducted on a demographic profile that I would expect to find on the Camino - we are just not a community of interest, whereas young atheletes, basketball and soccer players seem to be much more lucrative research targets. I wonder why?
 
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Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
Annie, I use low trail shoes (voted) from Vasque. I have worn them on the CF in winter, Spring and Fall. If the snow on the trails is too high..as it occasionally has been going over the mountains, then we stay on the streets. I tried gortex on my first camino and my feet sweat too much. Since then no gortex. Two years ago We walked on the CF in late February and March from Pamplona to SdC. During those days we had only 3 dry days. We faced many downpours, icy streets, snow over mountain passes ( blizzard conditions on one day with 75 km headwinds) Each night we put paper in our shoes (heated rooms) and the non gortex shoes dryed!

Another category...gortex or not?
 
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Nekodemus

Certified insane
Camino(s) past & future
Been there, done that. Keep coming back.
Most likely addicted.
But I find 16kilo's comfortable
Ouch! A wee bit heavy, if you ask me, Davey. What on earth are you dragging around in your bag to get as high as 16 kg?

Lessee, here's my setup for a 'Campmino'.

Item
Actual weight​
Tarptent Notch, including lines and pegs
770 g​
Sleeping pad, cheap foam
224 g​
Sleeping bag, Cumulus Lite Line 200, 9*C
520 g​
Silk mummy liner
119 g​
Cutlery ( Lexan knife, spoon, fork)
33 g​
Complete cooking kit: Evernew 1300, spirit burner, 125 ml spirits, windshield, DIY cozy, bag
368 g​
Ferrocerium, LMF Scout
30 g​
Total
2.064 g​

Yes, you'd most likely need a few additional small items, like a mug, my beloved tomato knife, etc.. Those I personally deem relevant are in my 5.244 'Spring loadout' pack. As the sleeping bag and the liner are included in that, that would give me a total base weight of 6.669 g.

Excepting the pad, everything mentioned can be carried within my trusty 34 l pack (855 g), together with (trail) food for several days. Wine and additional food would need to join the pad and my Crocs, strapped to the pack, or in a separate pouch/bag.

I have not included my walking poles in the weight, but they are needed for setting up the tent. Nor the weight of wine, food, and water.

Bear in mind that I don't carry super expensive, lightweight gear. In fact, the only moderately expensive items among those I have mentioned, are the tent (a loaner from a friend), the sleeping bag, the cooking pot, and the boots. My pack cost me a whopping £30 on amazon, while a lot of the other stuff is from places like Aldi and Lidl.
 

Jackie Robinson

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
First Time this year
Boots. Because I have to (I'm an ex infantryman, and my ankles are buggered). I have to wear boots at home always too. Plus, on camino I carry 16 kilo's +, so boots again.

I think boots are not necessarily needed on most caminos unless you are like me. I would wear something lighter if I could get away with it.

I am astonished that so far in the poll that so many choose boots!

Davey
I’m the same as you - a knackered (osteoarthritic) ankle so dependant on the support they provide. I wore my trusty old leather boots the whole way and swapped to flip flops once I arrived at whichever albergue I was staying at..
 

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camino.ninja

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (5 6,16,17,18,19)
Primiti+Salvador (19)
Portug. (17,18)
Catalan (17)
Norte (17)
Plata (18)
I always have Sandals and Waterproof Trail Runners
 

Old Kiwi

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances "2016"
Camino Frances "2019"
I wore my favourite boots on my first Camino 2016. I wore trail runners on my second 2019. Trail runners win, hands down, as they handled all surfaces and wet and dry. They are lighter, dry faster and more comfortable.
 

Pilgy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Francés April 06, C. Fisterre May 06, C. Frances Oct 17, C. Portuguese Oct 18, C. Inglese Nov 18
Should I add other shoe types?
Yes, Annie. Perhaps expand on the term Boots. There's a huge variety of boots i.e. high top leather boots versus mid height light hikers.
 
Camino(s) past & future
"Del Norte 2020"
September 2018 CP /
Sept 2016 CF
Boots. Because I have to (I'm an ex infantryman, and my ankles are buggered). I have to wear boots at home always too. Plus, on camino I carry 16 kilo's +, so boots again.

I think boots are not necessarily needed on most caminos unless you are like me. I would wear something lighter if I could get away with it.

I am astonished that so far in the poll that so many choose boots!

Davey
Why so much? 😂
 

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