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If you want to take 4 rest days on the CF, where would you stop?

Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
#4
It depends on your interests and on your walk. By the latter, I mean where the wear and tear of walking every day gets to you and makes a rest and recuperation day advisable. But all that aside and pandering to my own interests, I'd say: Atapuerca (if you can arrange to see the site), Burgos, Leon, Astorga. Another option would be Logrono (if you like wine and tapas). And if you are budgeting extra days, Santiago de Compostela is a good place to budget them as well.
 
Camino(s) past & future
January 2019, French Camino
#5
It depends on your interests and on your walk. By the latter, I mean where the wear and tear of walking every day gets to you and makes a rest and recuperation day advisable. But all that aside and pandering to my own interests, I'd say: Atapuerca (if you can arrange to see the site), Burgos, Leon, Astorga. Another option would be Logrono (if you like wine and tapas). And if you are budgeting extra days, Santiago de Compostela is a good place to budget them as well.
Thanks! I'll definitely spend a couple of days in Santiago. Setting unexpected rest days aside, I'm interested in places that have great nature and/or have historical or architectural stuff to see. I love history, so castles, old monasteries, etc are all stuff I like.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
#6
Thanks! I'll definitely spend a couple of days in Santiago. Setting unexpected rest days aside, I'm interested in places that have great nature and/or have historical or architectural stuff to see. I love history, so castles, old monasteries, etc are all stuff I like.
Burgos, Leon, and Astorga all have great architecture. Atapuerca is well known for its prehistoric cave art. Ponferrada has the best castle on the CF route. If you can fit that into your day's walk (as we did), I'm not sure that it merits an extra rest day, though. Similarly, the monastery at Samos is worth a visit but may not require a rest day. For a completely different type of architecture, along with great views, you may find O Cebreiro attractive. In my experience, however, the great nature tended to be something you walked through rather than rested at.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Camino Inglés 2018

Now: http://egeria.house/
#7
Pamplona (but not on a weekend - too much party ;-), Grañón (just to relax), Atapuerca (to see the excavations) and some of the little places in between there and Santiago - but then, I am not a big city peregrinsa ;-) In short, rest where you feel called to rest and walk when you feel called to walk.

Buen Camino, SY
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
#9
Peg had to take about three days for rest/recovery in both Sahagun (at about the halfway point of the CF) and Astorga. I enjoyed the stay at both. They were big enough to have a number of sights yet small enough to feel like they might be the "real Spain." We also had a sightseeing day each in Burgos and Leon. I liked Leon better. We just passed through Pamplona on the way but spent a few days there on our way back. Loved our stay but probably to close to the start of your camino to spend rest days there.

[Edit: If you don't know at least some Spanish you may not want to spend too many days in Sahagun. If you can mingle a bit then it is worth more time.]
 
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Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean 2017.
#10
Hola @Samarkand, well I suppose it depends on your interest and whether its just rest you really need. If you have an "historical bent" then Burgos and Leon both have places that will grab your interest. I cycled the camino in 2015 and was able to visit the "ancient man" museum at Atapuerca. But if you plan your days you can start from Villambista or Villafranca Montes de Oca and still have time to walk down the 2 km (or so) and back. Astorga would also be a good stop if you bypassed the stop in Leon. Hope this helps,. Cheers
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
#11
If you want to take 4 rest days during the CF, where would they be? Which sections are historical or beautiful enough to make you stop and take a 0km day? Why would you stop there?
@Samarkand
I would recommend taking the bus from Burgos to Santo Domingo de Silos, where there is a wonderful monastery where the monks sing the Divine Office in a traditional style. Spend a couple of days there to see the monastery and hear the monks sing their worship: a wonderful experience. But be sure to book accommodation ahead of time if you plan to be there on a weekend, as it is a popular place for a weekend away for residents of Burgos, and can be booked up.
 

rappahannock_rev

Anglican Catholic Priest
Camino(s) past & future
Lourdes, Burgos, SdeC 77 (train); Frances 12,15,17; Finisterre 17; Lourdes, Aragones 18; Meseta 19
#13
Pamplona (my favorite place on earth!), Burgos, Leon and Astorga.... Logrono and Sahagun would be acceptable runners-ups.... As you might guess, I like exploring churches....

I'm surprized to see Atapuerca popping up on several lists! Not on mine!
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago 2017
#14
Assuming by “rest day” you mean dont walk far but still see stuff days, I recommend Pamplona old town, Burgos & Leon where both Cathedrals and downtowns are vibrant, Astorga smaller but still stuff to do, Ponferada templar castle and area is fun. Lots of others I know liked Logrono, but it was too noisy for my taste and not as strong historic sites. Viana outside of Logrono was better in my opinion. If you want pure rest and quiet Los Arcos, Navarette (lovely little town with over the top church, Castrojeriz (La Posada Meson nice), El Acebo or Molinaseca. My small town recommendations are based on they have lots of modest places you can stay for multiple days, plenty of places to get food and supplies, and enough to see that they would interesting if you go out for a walk.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
#15
Other than the obvious big cities - Leon, Burgos - I like Villafranca del Bierzo a lot. There is a church of St Francis there that is very special.
And an extra quiet night in Rabinal is very special too.

There are off-camino places really worth seeing and staying in as well:
Santo Domingo de Silos, off the CF about an hour's bus ride south of Burgos (there is a direct bus morning and evening, or you can taxi) - For the amazing cloister and gregorian chant
Yuso/Suso/Cañas, South of the CF near Afroza - for the history. You can walk there as a detour, stay the night, and return to the Frances in Cirueña
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, (2013)
Camino Frances, (2014)
Camino Frances, (2015)
#18
I stop when my body tells me it’s time to stop. Many pilgrims aggravate minor injuries by walking three or four more days to take a day off in a pre-planned location in order “to stay on schedule.”
 
Camino(s) past & future
January 2019, French Camino
#19
Thanks for all the great suggestions!

I'll be in Spain for about 40 days, which hopefully will give me enough time to take both planned and unplanned breaks. But, of course, plans can change on the fly and that's OK for me.

I'll be doing the Camino in January and February, so my itinerary is also based on where there might be open albergues. I'll be starting from Pamplona (so I might take a day there or not) and tentatively plan to take 0-days in Leon and Ponferrada, and short 10km-days starting or terminating in Viana, Logrono, Burgos and Samos. Of course, I'll be staying at least 1 day extra in Santiago too.
 

Via2010

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
06/07 & 12 Camino Francés, 08-10 Via de la Plata, 13/14 & 17 Camino Portugués, 18 Camino Primitivo
#20
Hi Samarkand,

I would not plan rest days in advance but calculate some additional days. So you can take a rest day or walk a short day if you feel that you should do so or if your body demands it. Much will depend on the company you find on your way. I found it particularily hard do give up my "camino familiy". If you have three or four days left at the end of the journey, you may consider to walk to Muxía or Finisterre or both.

BC
Alexandra
 

Oravasaari

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJpdP to Fistera, 2016 Leon to Fistera, 2017 CF-Salvadore-Primitivo, 2018 CF run/walk
#21
Walking the whole CF with 4 rest days I'd take one each in Pamplona (to sort out early niggles and buy stuff you may need), Burgos ( to get ready for the Meseta) Leon (great evening plaza life) and Sarria/Portomarin (recover from the climbing/decending and get set for the last push).
 

Meggins

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - One complete St.J.P.P to Santiago plus twice more for 500km each time.
#24
My favourites: Burgos, Leon, Astorga plus one in a place that strikes you as especially appealing as you walk along.
 

Gerard Hazelebach

Gerard and Paulien
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPdP - Santiago) September 2014
"The Peace Walk” (Vienna - Venice) August 2015
#26
If you want to take 4 rest days during the CF, where would they be? Which sections are historical or beautiful enough to make you stop and take a 0km day? Why would you stop there?
We stayed an extra day in Pamplona, Burgos and Leon. Mainly because there is lot to see/visit in these big cities. And I would certainly advise to stay a couple of extra days in Santiago after you finished! You need to slowly get used to idea that you have done it! YTou don't want to rush back into your "normal" life Buen Camino
 

notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
#27
The Spanish opening hours mean that you can very often see 'the sights' in the late afternoon or early evening. I have been known to arrive in a place and fit in a trip to a museum and a swimming pool! I have almost never taken an actual day off, and haven't felt deprived of seeing the things I wanted to see. I even saw Atapuerca on an afternoon, and that's a bus ride away from the camino.

On the subject of Atapuerca, be sure to join an English speaking tour - it's very interesting but a rather technical and difficult to understand site and a tour is essential.

The other thing to remember is that walking in the winter, you are likely to get into a small and close knit group of people. Every day off means you will lose them. Is that worth it?
 

lt56ny

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013-Frances SJP-Finisterre, 2015 Camino Le Puy-Santiago, 2017 Portugues Lisbon-Santiago 2018 Norte
#28
Pamplona (but not on a weekend - too much party ;-), Grañón (just to relax), Atapuerca (to see the excavations) and some of the little places in between there and Santiago - but then, I am not a big city peregrinsa ;-) In short, rest where you feel called to rest and walk when you feel called to walk.

Buen Camino, SY
I agree with you. The most imprrhing you can do is listen to your body. Walk when it tells you to go and rest when it tells you to stop. If you are walking as a pilgrim it will be the best way to insure your health and spirit.
 

Meggins

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - One complete St.J.P.P to Santiago plus twice more for 500km each time.
#29
Have to that 3 times I stopped in Burgos for a day and sat in the cafe opposite the Cathedral for a glass of wine. Outside it being September! Each time I saw and rejoined with people who were ahead of me and also saw many pals who were arriving. Loved it!
 

Jim

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006- Camino Portuguese
2008- Camino Frances
2009- Sanabres extension of the VDLP
2010- Camino Frances
2011- Camino Potuguese
2014- Camino Frances
2017- Camino Finisterre
#30
I would agree with Logrono, Burgos (gorgeous cathedral-- El Cid and his wife, Ximena, are buried there; also see the Museum of Human Evolution on the other side of the river from the cathedral), Leon (another gorgeous city with several cathedrals/churches worth a visit; great food in its restaurants) and Villafranca del Bierzo. However, Atapuerca is also worth an extra day because of the opportunity to see the archealogical dig sites if that interests you (check in advance as to which days it is open)-it's one day out before Burgos. I plan on stopping there on my next pass through that area.
 
Camino(s) past & future
St. Francis Route 2017
#33
My Camino journey (Frances Route) was 45 days. I took one rest day in Leon, yet became antsy even with that brief pause. After acquiring my "Camino Legs" I got into a Camino rhythm, and the overwhelming urge to keep moving. I was on the trail between 0630 and 0700 every morning and tried to reach the day's destination around 1400. After showering I found ample time to roam around the town or city in which I was staying. But, I was on a mission to prove to myself I could start and finish the entire Camino, so my sight-seeing was self-limited. On nice days I would remove my pack and lie in a field and watch the clouds or pause to listen for the Cuckoo. I was fortunate not to be in a hurry, and I looked at the Camino a bit like a tasting menu. For sure on my next trek, I'll be spending more time in Logroño, Burgos, Sahagun, Leon, Molinaseca, Pamplona, Nájera, Santo Domingo de la Calzada, and Santiago (where I spent 5 days at the end of this journey.) Next time, I may even go into the church in Los Arcos and listen to its world famous organ...
 
#34
If you want to take 4 rest days during the CF, where would they be? Which sections are historical or beautiful enough to make you stop and take a 0km day? Why would you stop there?
Well, you got a lot of info here. Here is some more: I chose the larger places to take a rest day or at least have a shorter day before or after. I really loved Pamplona, lively, colorful, made it to the amazing museum in the Cathedral. Wished I would have spent the night, but went on. Burgos is charming. Wouldn’t miss it. Loved León! Amazing things to see and great food. Little places I loved and thought how nice it would be to stop a day: Rabanal del Camino, Samos (!!), Molinaseca, Villafranca del Bierzo. And that may be just scratching the surface!
Just a note about rest days. I didn’t take a rest day until Leon because I felt like I was fine. In Leon actually got a hotel and planned the next day to see the whole city. Left the hotel about nine for coffee and after about 100 meters realized that my body was exhausted. Returned to the hotel and slept until 2:30 that afternoon. Lesson learned: you need rest even if your body full of adrenaline says no!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Casino Portugues (parts) 2015: CF 2016; Le Puy thru Moissac 2017.
#35
I would suggest taking more than one day of rest in Burgos- it is not that far from the midpoint of the CF and it is a treasure chest. One can see three great monastic sites, Charterhouse Miraflores, Monasterio Santa Maria de Las Huelgas, and a short trip to Santo Domingo de los Silos. The cathedral is great and if one is lucky to be visiting there on a sunny day look up in the chapel of the Condestables de Castille, you won’t forget that view. The Museum of Human Evolution, and the small but very interesting book museum, and the Museum of Burgos. At least a half dozen artistically significant “minor” churches in town. The intact medieval core of the city. I would also recommend time in Estella, perhaps too early in the trip, but lots to see and if you like to be challenged you can play the game “try to find the church open”, Leon with another long list of sites (don’t miss the cathedral cloister and the attached undervisited cathedral museum).
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Plan to cycle. I don't know if I'll do the French one or the Norte yet.
#37
Thanks! I'll definitely spend a couple of days in Santiago. Setting unexpected rest days aside, I'm interested in places that have great nature and/or have historical or architectural stuff to see. I love history, so castles, old monasteries, etc are all stuff I like.
Burgos is a lovely town with an beautiful historic center. It also has an excellent Museum of Human evolution that runs tours to Atapuerca. There' a river running through the town and a large park on the NE side to provide some nature.
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Santiago de Compestela in May(2016)
#38
Logroño, just so that you can have two nights sampling the joys of Calle Laurel! This place is an absolute joy. I missed it on my Camino but caught up with it this week. The street is just Tapas bars. One of them specializes in just selling mushrooms grilled with olive oil, absolutely delicious. Try the vino del año, (this years wine at a about 1€ a glass) and then compare it with a crianza ( one that has been aged in oak casks) for about 2.50€. Try the caldo, a thin broth, served hot with bread. If you're walking in winter you'll appreciate it. If you see a sign saying "Hay Caldo" it means, "we've got Caldo". Give it a go!
Go online and look up the Campo Viejo website. Email them and book a tour. Share a taxi with other pilgrims that you can rope in. Costs 12€, takes a couple of hours and it is worth every penny! Your guide will speak excellent English.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF September (2018)
#39
If you want to take 4 rest days during the CF, where would they be? Which sections are historical or beautiful enough to make you stop and take a 0km day? Why would you stop there?
If you are starting in st Jean, you may want to rest by Pamplona, a fabulous city. I also recommend Najera, Astorga, again, great cities with plenty to see and do. I wished i had taken the time to stay over at Leon, and in the interesting city of Villagranca de Bierzo. Buen Camino!
 

Espee84

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés right now!!
#40
Burgos, Leon, Astorga (really interesting cities with lots to see and places to chill out with a coffee) and Rabanal del Camino (where you can stay two nights+ on a 'silent' retreat at the monastery with the Benedictine monks).
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#41
Logroño, just so that you can have two nights sampling the joys of Calle Laurel! This place is an absolute joy. I missed it on my Camino but caught up with it this week. The street is just Tapas bars. One of them specializes in just selling mushrooms grilled with olive oil, absolutely delicious. Try the vino del año, (this years wine at a about 1€ a glass) and then compare it with a crianza ( one that has been aged in oak casks) for about 2.50€. Try the caldo, a thin broth, served hot with bread. If you're walking in winter you'll appreciate it. If you see a sign saying "Hay Caldo" it means, "we've got Caldo". Give it a go!
Go online and look up the Campo Viejo website. Email them and book a tour. Share a taxi with other pilgrims that you can rope in. Costs 12€, takes a couple of hours and it is worth every penny! Your guide will speak excellent English.
Last year my friend joined me for the first part of the Camino and we spent her last day in Logroño. Together with another pilgrim we had a great tapas crawl!
We stayed in a pensión near Calle Laurel and didn't have to worry about a curfew. 😉
 

Vince Lee

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017), Planning Portugues (2019)
#44
We stayed extra days in Logrono, Burgos, Leon and Vilafranca del Bierzo. Reasons were:
- Desire to schedule rest days every 7-8 days through the work
- At least in the case of the first 3, to stay in larger towns/cities with more infrastructure, e.g. nice to get away from the standard Camino food on offer etc.
 
#45
You may find some nice places to stop from all the other descriptions of places along the CF but there is an overriding reason for rest days, to rest, give the body a chance to reconstitute. Regardless of whether the trip is a pilgrimage or you are just taking an extraordinarily long walk, if the body does not receive respect, it will revolt and the results are usually not pretty. 😎
 

robertt

Active Member
#46
I can only speak with authority on how and where to spend 40 rest days. Someone had better tell me where to spend 4 active days. The guy on the road publicising the best-ever albergue in Villafranca got sick of giving me leaflets. It was all the churros in Ponferrada. Seven years on, and I still can't look at a churro. Maybe the Templars put something in the grease.

Seriously, all the regional centres from Pamplona to Santiago were great. Here in Oz our urban centres are either very much cities or very much towns, with some exceptions. Spanish cities of the second rank are a perfect size for me. However my fave was not on the CF. That was Pontevedra on the Portugues. Anyone looking for a coastal getaway at the finish might well consider scooting south to Pontevedra.

So, Samarkand, if Burgos or Logrono or Leon takes your eye, you won't be disappointed if you linger. As mentioned above, your body might tell you when it's time. (Mine tells me too often.)

Buen camino

Rob
 

antjie

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
may 2013
#47
@Samarkand
I would recommend taking the bus from Burgos to Santo Domingo de Silos, where there is a wonderful monastery where the monks sing the Divine Office in a traditional style. Spend a couple of days there to see the monastery and hear the monks sing their worship: a wonderful experience. But be sure to book accommodation ahead of time if you plan to be there on a weekend, as it is a popular place for a weekend away for residents of Burgos, and can be booked up.
I spent two nights there - it was amazing. I was probably the only pilgrim there. During the day I stolled the hills and farms and rested. Attended three mass services... The two days spent there was a turning point on my Camino...it was as if all the emotions just settled...I cried , I laughed, was in awe of life....and then continued my Camino with a skip in my walk :)
 
D

Deleted member 12253

Guest
#48
Any hilltop village rest and get fresh air into lungs and good bottle or 2 of vino buen camino 👣👣👣👣👣👣
 
Camino(s) past & future
2019 Camino Frances
#50
Peg had to take about three days for rest/recovery in both Sahagun (at about the halfway point of the CF) and Astorga. I enjoyed the stay at both. They were big enough to have a number of sights yet small enough to feel like they might be the "real Spain." We also had a sightseeing day each in Burgos and Leon. I liked Leon better. We just passed through Pamplona on the way but spent a few days there on our way back. Loved our stay but probably to close to the start of your camino to spend rest days there.

[Edit: If you don't know at least some Spanish you may not want to spend too many days in Sahagun. If you can mingle a bit then it is worth more time.]
Rick, how many days did you take to complete your Camino, including rest days?
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
#51
If you want to take 4 rest days during the CF, where would they be? Which sections are historical or beautiful enough to make you stop and take a 0km day? Why would you stop there?
Simple. Where I felt I need a rest ;);)

Sorry I'm not try to be a Smart Ass :oops:

But you might need to think about rest days from 2 perspectives.
'Nice' places to stop. That have sight seeing opportunities, places to eat, whatever your thing is.
Great suggestions above.
And places you might 'have' to stop, as your body says stop. It happens.

All the suggested places above are great.

But one of the best stops we had was an enforced one.
Our Camino almost ended at Fromista due to injury.
My wife Pat needed a to see a physio and he told her to take a rest day.
He was a real Camino Angel.
Her Plantar Fasciitis was just too bad and needed a break.
We were in Carrion on the CF,

And quite by luck, we had booked into San Zoilo as a treat,
It was magical.
We asked at reception if we could stay an extra night and they had one room left, we grabbed it.
The food was great, and we fitted in another physio session. but it was the 'in-house' church and cloisters that were the icing on the cake.

We were meant to stay there for a rest day I think.
http://sanzoilo.com/

Blog Post: https://robscamino.com/2018/day-22-the-camino-provides/
Videos: https://robscamino.com/2018/hotel-real-monasterio-de-san-zoilo-videos/
and: https://robscamino.com/2018/a-day-off-in-carrion-videos/
Note: The music on the cloister videos is piped! We sat there for hours..........

Just be prepared that a rest day might come up unexpectedly, in an unexpected place. ;)

Or you'll just arrive at a place with a great 'vibe' or whatever...........and you want to stay another night.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
#52
Rick, how many days did you take to complete your Camino, including rest days?
Actually I have a terse synopsis on hand and here it is:

From St. Jean Pied de Port to arrival in Santiago de Compostela:
Guide had 33 days
We took 58 days
48 walking days
2 tourist days (Burgos, day 18 and Leon, day 34)
1 sick day (Villalcaza de Sirga, day 24)
7 recovery days (2 Sahagun, days 29 & 30, 1 Villar de Mazarife, day 36, 4 Astorga, days 37-40)

From St. Jean Pied de Port to arrival in Finisterre:
We took 63 days (additional 2 tourist days in Santiago and additional 3 walking days)
(Peg stayed 2 more days in Santiago and took bus to Finisterre the next day.)

From St. Jean Pied de Port to arrival in Muxia:
We took 66 days (additional 1 tourist day in Finisterre and additional 2 walking days)

8 weeks, 2 days to get to Santiago (58 days)
9 weeks, 3 days to get to Muxia (66 days)

Total trip: 66 days
Hiking days: (Rick: 53, Peg: 50)
Days of no hiking: (Rick: 13, Peg: 16)

The average distance each walking day was about 10 miles (16 km)
 
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annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
#54
If you take a rest day in Ponferrada, you could visit Las Médulas. An enormous ex-Roman gold mining site. Check it out on Google! I don't know about public transport to get there, as my brother met up with us and took us there in the car. About half an hour drive from Ponferrada.
Another interesting site, which has been mentioned here, is the UNESCO World Heritage pre-historic site near Atapuerca. You go to the site office in the village and book the bus tour which takes you to the excavations, also about half an hour from the village. The bus also goes through Ages and picks up passengers there too.
Actually both sites are UNESCO World Heritage sites.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
#55
Actually I have a terse synopsis on hand and here it is:

From St. Jean Pied de Port to arrival in Santiago de Compostela:
Guide had 33 days
We took 58 days
48 walking days
2 tourist days (Burgos, day 18 and Leon, day 34)
1 sick day (Villalcaza de Sirga, day 24)
7 recovery days (2 Sahagun, days 29 & 30, 1 Villar de Mazarife, day 36, 4 Astorga, days 37-40)

From St. Jean Pied de Port to arrival in Finisterre:
We took 63 days (additional 2 tourist days in Santiago and additional 3 walking days)
(Peg stayed 2 more days in Santiago and took bus to Finisterre the next day.)

From St. Jean Pied de Port to arrival in Muxia:
We took 66 days (additional 1 tourist day in Finisterre and additional 2 walking days)

8 weeks, 2 days to get to Santiago (58 days)
9 weeks, 3 days to get to Muxia (66 days)

Total trip: 66 days
Hiking days: (Rick: 53, Peg: 50)
Days of no hiking: (Rick: 13, Peg: 16)

The average distance each walking day was about 10 miles (16 km)
Now THAT's a Camino :):)
 

adam lapp

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances June 2015
Frances July 2016
Frances May 2017
Portugues March 2018
Frances April 2018
#56
If you want to take 4 rest days during the CF, where would they be? Which sections are historical or beautiful enough to make you stop and take a 0km day? Why would you stop there?
Ok. So there is the where question as far as timing. But what towns/cities are most awesome is another question. My favorite of all time is logrono. I’ve done frances 4 times and always is the best. Plus it is so active for locals. 3 year old kids are out at 10 pm. True Spain. If you like good wines and good tapas. Pamplona is cool because it is Pamplona. They have a tapas street too. Leon is a great historic and party town. Great bars and restaurants. You can go to this one ham bar - forget the name - bit you get a full meal with a 2$ glass of wine. Smaller towns - Estrella and Astorga are great. But then you have super small towns with great experiences like bar Elvis in reliegos and many more. What makes a stop over the best is the people and albergue. Places like hospital orbigo you would not necessarily stay a full day, but they have amazing albergues like Verde.
 

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