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If you're planning to walk the Invierno...

2020 Camino Guides

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Have a look at the threads below.
This year, 2019, a number of Forum members have walked the Invierno and posted their impressions as they walked.

It's of course quite possible to go to the Invierno list and pick the threads out, but for ease of access, here are forum threads posted live from the Invierno this year all in one place (by people who walked it in its entirety) in more or less chronological order as of early July (I'll try to update the list if other threads appear):
(@Athena Atterdag )
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/camino-mixto-mar-2019.60741/ (@Donna Sch)
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/camino-de-invierno.61690/ (@alaskadiver)
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/camino-invierno-semana-santa-2019.61632/ (@Betterisgood)
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/yoga-girl-on-the-invierno.62284/ (@Yoga Girl)
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/finally-the-invierno.62582/ (@VNwalking)
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/caryn-on-the-invierno.62700/ (@Theatregal)
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/my-not-so-evocative-invierno-comments.62959/ (@peregrina2000)
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/2-old-codgers-on-the-invierno.63044/ (@Annette london)
(@Bad Pilgrim)
(@timr)
(@Albertagirl)

And here are a few from last and previous years that are worth a look:
(@peregrina2000)
(@KinkyOne )

We've described a wide range of experiences, from joyful to horrific. If it is raining hard in Galicia, it is RAINING. And that can mean for days on end. But when the sun shines on the Invierno, it is magical.

@towanda1961 has put together a gorgeous video from her photos that's really worth having a look at. Even though it's now several years old, not a lot has changed:

@Charrito lives in Spain and has probably walked the Invierno more times than anyone other than local camino amigos. He also has recent accounts of parts of this camino.
(@Magwood , @Tincatinker and @alansykes, I know you've walked this way recently, but I don't think you posted as you went, right? In any case, I can't find the threads if they're there. Please correct me if I'm wrong.)

And of course, @peregrina2000's guide that's pinned to the top of the page is essential. But these 'in the moment' threads offer the feeling of being there, which is different from the practical 'nuts and bolts' directional advice of a guide.

This is a gorgeous camino, and a 'sleeper.' At some point the masses will discover it, but they have not yet.
 
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gollygolly

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2000, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
Have a look at the threads below.
This year a number of Forum members have walked the Invierno and posted their impressions here as they walked..... This is a gorgeous camino, and a 'sleeper.' At some point the masses will discover it, but they have not yet.

A beautiful Camino that is worth the effort of diverting at Ponferrada and having an experience away from the Camino Francais... can I please edge in and suggest that this post might also be worth a read :


Spoiler alert : it is a post that I contributed !
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
can I please edge in and suggest that this post might also be worth a read :
Sure! I'm sorry I had missed yours, and will enjoy reading it, as will others. My intent was mostly to put sll of this year's threads in one place, so I only included a few older ones that I knew about znd had slready read.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
Have a look at the threads below.
This year a number of Forum members have walked the Invierno and posted their impressions here as they walked.

It's of course quite possible to go to the Invierno list and pick the threads out, but there are many others, too, and you'd need to know what you're looking for. So for ease of access, here are forum threads posted live from the Invierno this year all in one place (by people who walked it in its entirety) in more or less chronological order as of early July (I'll try to update the list if other threads appear):

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/camino-mixto-mar-2019.60741/ (@Donna Sch)
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/camino-de-invierno.61690/ (@alaskadiver)
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/camino-invierno-semana-santa-2019.61632/ (@Betterisgood)
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/yoga-girl-on-the-invierno.62284/ (@Yoga Girl)
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/finally-the-invierno.62582/ (@VNwalking)
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/caryn-on-the-invierno.62700/ (@Theatregal)
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/my-not-so-evocative-invierno-comments.62959/ (@peregrina2000)
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/2-old-codgers-on-the-invierno.63044/ (@Annette london)

And here are a few from last and previous years that are worth a look:
(@peregrina2000)
(@KinkyOne )

@Charrito lives in Spain and has probably walked the Invierno more times than anyone other than local camino amigos. He also has recent accounts of parts of this camino.
(@Magwood , @Tincatinker and @alansykes, I know you've walked this way recently, but I don't think you posted as you went, right? In any case, I can't find the threads if they're there. Please correct me if I'm wrong.)

And of course, @peregrina2000's guide that's pinned to the top of the page is essential. But these 'in the moment' threads offer the feeling of being there, which is different from the practical 'nuts and bolts' directional advice of a guide.

This is a gorgeous camino, and a 'sleeper.' At some point the masses will discover it, but they have not yet.
@VNwalking
alansykes posted on the thread Are you planning to walk the Invierno? as well as in a number of threads on the Invierno forum posted in November 2018. I found the above post especially useful, as I plan my Camino Invierno for October-November this fall. He states that the information in the Invierno Guide about staying in Hotel O Ruso in Escairon is from his experience, and I plan on doing the same when I pass through there in November.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
I had remembered some things that @alansykes had posted and looked for them in vain. So thanks, albertagirl, for that information.
 

gollygolly

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2000, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
I had remembered some things that @alansykes had posted and looked for them in vain. So thanks, albertagirl, for that information.
No personal offence taken at all, as I know that there are several good posts on this site for the Invierno, as there are for most routes. Will always hold tremendously positive memories of walking the Camino Invierno and hope that some of the enthusiasm of others and myself is felt by those reading our personal accounts
 

Theatregal

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
So far...
2012 ~ 2019

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
I am off to Toronto for a family celebration this morning, but I look forward to enjoying the photos on a screen larger than my iPhone’s when I return, then off to Spain soon after. I really enjoy the camino photos shared on the forum. Thanks to the many talented photographers.
 

Charrito

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés
Portugués
Portugués Var. Esp.
Port. Cost
Fisterra
Inglés
Invierno
Norte
Sanabrés
Primitivo
@VNwalking
alansykes posted on the thread Are you planning to walk the Invierno? as well as in a number of threads on the Invierno forum posted in November 2018. I found the above post especially useful, as I plan my Camino Invierno for October-November this fall. He states that the information in the Invierno Guide about staying in Hotel O Ruso in Escairon is from his experience, and I plan on doing the same when I pass through there in November.
Not true. I was the first one to stay there (in the Hotel O Ruso) and it's my 'alternative' in the forum guide!
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
Not true. I was the first one to stay there (in the Hotel O Ruso) and it's my 'alternative' in the forum guide!
Hi, Charrito,
You are quite right that I first read about Hotel O Ruso in the Invierno guide, as a possible detour. But it didn't seem relevant to me, or a place where I might possibly stay, until three things came together in my mind. I would be going through there in November, when Casa Rural Torre Vilariño, the best option midway on that long stretch would be closed; @alansykes had found it closed last November and had them walked directly to Hotel O Ruso; and he had found it to be a satisfactory hotel at a reasonable price. At present I am still hoping to find Torre Vilariño open when I pass by on November 3rd. But if not I shall take the nearby road directly to Escairon. I am very grateful to you and to all others who have shared their knowledge of the Invierno to assist those of us who come after them.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
I have just updated the list at the top of this thread to include @timr and @Albertagirl's October caminos (or rather, their long-distance swims!), and @Bad Pilgrim 's later post. There is a ton of good information there to give a sense of what this camino is like in all weather and at different times of year.

@peregrina2000, heartfelt thanks for the initial inspiration! It was your account that sparked my interest. And a heads-up, @wisepilgrim , if you're updating the guide.
Thank you everyone...it's such a joy to read your posts!
 

Charrito

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés
Portugués
Portugués Var. Esp.
Port. Cost
Fisterra
Inglés
Invierno
Norte
Sanabrés
Primitivo
I want to get off my fat backside, drive up to Ponferrada and walk the Invierno again. And again, and again, and again!

Invierno, I miss you!
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
One of the original ideas, a couple of years ago, to start using the Invierno, was to determine if this route was a viable alternative to shunt traffic off the Frances after Ponferrada.

The primary concern was the coming 2021 Holy Year and the expected surge in demand, especially on the final segment from Sarria to Santiago.

The secondary concern was that the Xacobeo only accepted the designation of the Invierno as an historic Camino route in 2016 (IIRC).

So, we (collectively) had to first develop route guides and advice for using this route, determine the viability of the route as a Camino Frances "detour" or bypass, and assess the validity of the Invierno on its own right.

As a matter of fact, the Inverno is about 38-40 km longer than the direct Camino Frances route. That adds about two extra walking days. But the scenery is well worth it.

My trip on the Invierno was planned for 10 days, but 12-13 would have been more comfortable for me, provided there was lodging conveniently available... there wasn't... Then (2018) it was necessary to go 'off piste' on a couple of occasions to find commercial lodging. But, like all pilgrims, we assess, adapt and overcome.

This thread suggests we have succeeded on all counts. Things are improving.

The invierno has been acclaimed as one of the most scenic, historic and "fun" routes out there. It is all that and more. For pilgrims with limited time, starting in Ponferrada gives you from 10 -14 days of walking. I advise IMHO opting for a minimum of 12 days and up to 14. There are quite a few up and down walks. None are very high (or low) - just a few hundred meters - but the route does undulate a lot.

The sole, remaining oopsie IMHO, is the relative lack of infrastructure. Not enough and we are talking about tenting or Cowboy Camping along the way. Too much convenience, and we are talking about a Camino Frances level of commercialisation. Then come the crowds...

But, and again as the thread above depicts. we are finding workarounds to address the accommodation and dining issues. Each month, the situation improves.

My personal hope is that within a couple of years, the Invierno becomes at least as convenient to all pilgrims as, say the central route from Porto to Santiago on the Portuguese. Poco a poco...

We are getting there.

Thanks to all who contributed so far, and who continue to contribute.
 
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VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
I want to get off my fat backside, drive up to Ponferrada and walk the Invierno again.
🤣
Well?? Go! And please walk for the rest of us who are more than a wee drive away, while you're at it. ;););)
(But maybe wait til the rain stops. It sounds like a biblical flood is happening out there!)
 

Charrito

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés
Portugués
Portugués Var. Esp.
Port. Cost
Fisterra
Inglés
Invierno
Norte
Sanabrés
Primitivo
🤣
Well?? Go! And please walk for the rest of us who are more than a wee drive away, while you're at it. ;););)
(But maybe wait til the rain stops. It sounds like a biblical flood is happening out there!)
Not so easy, as I‘m really busy. Pero ganas tengo, y muchas.
 

Charrito

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés
Portugués
Portugués Var. Esp.
Port. Cost
Fisterra
Inglés
Invierno
Norte
Sanabrés
Primitivo
One of the original ideas, a couple of years ago, to start using the Invierno, was to determine if this route was a viable alternative to shunt traffic off the Frances after Ponferrada.

The primary concern was the coming 2021 Holy Year and the expected surge in demand, especially on the final segment from Sarria to Santiago.

The secondary concern was that the Xacobeo only accepted the designation of the Invierno as an historic Camino route in 2016 (IIRC).

So, we (collectively) had to first develop route guides and advice for using this route, determine the viability of the route as a Camino Frances "detour" or bypass, and assess the validity of the Invierno on its own right.

As a matter of fact, the Inverno is about 38-40 km longer than the direct Camino Frances route. That adds about two extra walking days. But the scenery is well worth it.

My trip on the Invierno was planned for 10 days, but 12-13 would have been more comfortable for me, provided there was lodging conveniently available... there wasn't... Then (2018) it was necessary to go 'off piste' on a couple of occasions to find commercial lodging. But, like all pilgrims, we assess, adapt and overcome.

This thread suggests we have succeeded on all counts. Things are improving.

The invierno has been acclaimed as one of the most scenic, historic and "fun" routes out there. It is all that and more. For pilgrims with limited time, starting in Ponferrada gives you from 10 -14 days of walking. I advise IMHO opting for a minimum of 12 days and up to 14. There are quite a few up and down walks. None are very high (or low) - just a few hundred meters - but the route does undulate a lot.

The sole, remaining oopsie IMHO, is the relative lack of infrastructure. Not enough and we are talking about tenting or Cowboy Camping along the way. Too much convenience, and we are talking about a Camino Frances level of commercialisation. Then come the crowds...

But, and again as the thread above depicts. we are finding workarounds to address the accommodation and dining issues. Each month, the situation improves.

My personal hope is that within a couple of years, the Invierno becomes at least as convenient to all pilgrims as, say the central route from Porto to Santiago on the Portuguese. Poco a poco...

We are getting there.

Thanks to all who contributed so far, and who continue to contribute.
As someone who (in VNwalking's words) has almost certainly walked the Imvierno more than anyone else on this forum, I would not necessarily agree with what you say about the relative lack of infrastructure.

If by 'infrastructure' we are referring to places to spend the night, places to have a drink/snack, or places to have a meal, then there are more than enough on all the stages. If you are referring to the amount of albergues then it's true that you won't find one in every town or village. Yet.

At my age I tend to opt for a cheap hostal or pensión, and even at times I'll go for a bit of a splurge on more expensive accommodation, but that doesn't make me (or others like me) a worse pilgrim.

I've been lucky enough to walk other routes, such as the Camino Inglés or the Variante Espiritual of the Camino Portugués, before they started to become very popular. I'm more than happy to walk without seeing vast numbers of pilgrims in front of or behind me, or in every town or village that I stay in. Some prefer crowds; I don't.

If/when the Invierno finally 'takes off' I really hope it doesn't end up with more walkers than the London or New York Marathon! If it does, I'll be going for the Olvidado or Torres!

For those of you who are still toying with the idea, my advice is to walk this marvellous Camino as soon as you can. You definitely won't regret it.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
My use of the term “relative” implies that the adequateness of available lodging, dining and resupply options was “relative” to that found on other, more developed routes that have been hosting pilgrims for more time.

Each pilgrim defines the relative adequacy of the infrastructure that may be available. What is good, adequate and sufficient for you, may not be equally good to me or another pilgrim. That is why it is all relative...

The good thing is that, according to written accounts here, things are getting better and quickly.

In no way was I intending to criticize any place on the Camino de Invierno. I suspect this is a classic case of “what comes first, the chicken...or the egg?“

As more pilgrims choose the Invierno, more people will make the significant investments to create more albergues, hostals, cafes, and tiendas that are directly on the Camino route.

This will all sort itself out over a couple more years.
 

MikeJS

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis (2011), Norte (12), VdlP (16). Sureste/Invierno (17). Olvidado/San Salvador/Primitivo (19)
I had no trouble finding suitable accommodation when I walked the Invierno in May 17. However, I did struggle to find somewhere to eat in some places in the evening. There were definitely a few Dia picnic nights!
 

Charrito

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés
Portugués
Portugués Var. Esp.
Port. Cost
Fisterra
Inglés
Invierno
Norte
Sanabrés
Primitivo
I had no trouble finding suitable accommodation when I walked the Invierno in May 17. However, I did struggle to find somewhere to eat in some places in the evening. There were definitely a few Dia picnic nights!
In which places did you find it difficult to have a meal?
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Ditto for me, @MikeJS , but only in As Medulas. And I know I'm not the only one. It was Tuesday, and absolutely everything was shut, except one bar. Even the huge hotel. So I has a Kas, and there were vending machines, but it sure wasn't a meal.

Everywhere else was fine, or more than fine. But it is not the Francés, and you have to be prepared to eat late. So I tended to order a menú del dia at lunch and chose to forgo anything later.
 
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MikeJS

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis (2011), Norte (12), VdlP (16). Sureste/Invierno (17). Olvidado/San Salvador/Primitivo (19)
What days are you talking about? And what time?
I walked from Ponferrada to Silleda in 7 days and on 2 of those days I could not find anywhere to eat in the evening.
 

Charrito

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés
Portugués
Portugués Var. Esp.
Port. Cost
Fisterra
Inglés
Invierno
Norte
Sanabrés
Primitivo
You still haven't said what days of the week you are talking about, and what time of the day you are talking about.

There are plenty of places to eat in both A Rúa and Quiroga. I should know: I've been in practically all of them!
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
I’m the sort of person who always carries some nuts and cheese so don’t get caught out. Supermercado picnics are my first choice - eating out is only if necessary....quite the reverse of most pilgrims I think! I would rather eat more simply and do more Caminos - but I need to balance that with my desire to give to local economies too.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
His experience is his experience, @Charrito . ;)🙃
Agree, but I also can't understand someone couldn't get a decent meal in A Rua and Quiroga (or not even a tapas). So many places to choose from and hardly all of them closed ;)

And if this is his experience it is just that. Mine is from 2014 - 5 years and a half ago and there were plenty of options! That's why I find @Charrito 's question good. What time of year, which day and what time of day?!
 

Charrito

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés
Portugués
Portugués Var. Esp.
Port. Cost
Fisterra
Inglés
Invierno
Norte
Sanabrés
Primitivo
Agree, but I also can't understand someone couldn't get a decent meal in A Rua and Quiroga (or not even a tapas). So many places to choose from and hardly all of them closed ;)

And if this is his experience it is just that. Mine is from 2014 - 5 years and a half ago and there were plenty of options! That's why I find @Charrito 's question good. What time of year, which day and what time of day?!
And my experience is my experience! You simply cannot come out with broad sweeping statements claiming or implying that there is nowhere to eat in the evenings in A Rúa or Quiroga. Neither town is the size of London or New York, but we are not talking about tiny hamlets either.

I will gladly accompany any of you to the two towns in question on any day of the week, and I can assure you that you will not go hungry!

I know that you (Vnwalking) and others have found that most places are closed in Las Médulas on Tuesdays. In Spain many establishments work hard over the weekend and then close on Mondays, but there is always somewhere open. And that's not just 'my experience'.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Well, it cuts both ways. Because
You simply cannot come out with broad sweeping statements claiming
there is always somewhere open
Everyone's experience is different. So none of us can claim our experience is universal.

Yup. I have gone hungry in As Medulas.
Others as well. "There is always somewhere open." did not apply.
 

Charrito

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés
Portugués
Portugués Var. Esp.
Port. Cost
Fisterra
Inglés
Invierno
Norte
Sanabrés
Primitivo
Well, it cuts both ways. Because


Everyone's experience is different. So none of us can claim our experience is universal.

Yup. I have gone hungry in As Medulas.
Others as well. "There is always somewhere open." did not apply.
I acknowledged that in Las Médulas it may well be difficult to find places open on a Tuesday (although I know that the hotel is definitely open), but my statements about there always being somewhere open in A Rúa and Quiroga are FACTS, not spurious claims.

Let's leave it at that, shall we?
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
I know that the hotel is definitely open
Sometimes. It was completely closed when I was there. No guests, no bar, no signs of life at all.

Bottom line is that just because we have certain experiences, that doesn't mean others will have the same ones. I'm sorry to be testy, @Charrito , please forgive me. 🙏

It's just that my feathers got a bit ruffled seeing someone's experiences being questioned from a place of 'knowing better' ...If their experience of a place doesn't jive with ours, it's still valid.
 

Charrito

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés
Portugués
Portugués Var. Esp.
Port. Cost
Fisterra
Inglés
Invierno
Norte
Sanabrés
Primitivo
Sometimes. It was completely closed when I was there. No guests, no bar, no signs of life at all.

Bottom line is that just because we have certain experiences, that doesn't mean others will have the same ones. I'm sorry to be testy, @Charrito , please forgive me. 🙏

It's just that my feathers got a bit ruffled seeing someone's experiences being questioned from a place of 'knowing better' ...If their experience of a place doesn't jive with ours, it's still valid.
What ‘ruffles my feathers’ is when people make comments that are not 100% true. It’s not a case of questioning other people’s experiences, but rather a question of getting facts right. Please look at the following:

EATING IN LAS MÉDULAS:

You need to realise that Las Médulas is a tourist site, but not many people actually spend the night there. Finding a place to eat on a Sunday lunchtime in summer is difficult, due to the masses of people who make their way up there and want to have lunch before going home. In the evenings, Las Médulas becomes a bit of a ghost town (village), with few people about. Therefore, it might be complicated to find too many places open for food, especially outside the summer period.

These are some of the places that you will find in the village:

Bar Tapería O Camiño Real (closed on Wednesdays)​
Mesón Durandarte (closed on Tuesdays)​
Cafetería Restaurante Mari Fe (closed on Thursdays)​
Casa de Comidas Arcadio Travieso (no information)​
Restaurante Agoga (no information)​
Hotel Medulio (open daily)​

I won’t even bother talking about the number of places that you can find in A Rúa or Quiroga at any time of the day or any day of the week. There are loads! KinkyOne agrees with me, and, as the saying goes in Spanish, lo que dice el gran KInkyOne va a misa.

I rest my case.



.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
That's fine but it was not my experience. Empirical reality was different than what's on paper, on the day I was there. And I know better than to draw general conclusions based on a sliver of experience.
😊
 

Charrito

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés
Portugués
Portugués Var. Esp.
Port. Cost
Fisterra
Inglés
Invierno
Norte
Sanabrés
Primitivo
That's fine but it was not my experience. Empirical reality was different than what's on paper, on the day I was there. And I know better than to draw general conclusions based on a sliver of experience.
😊
Two things:

In the first place, as a linguist, I am not at all sure that you can use 'sliver' with an abstract noun like 'experience'.

Secondly, it doesn't matter what partitive you care to use. I have been to Las Médulas more times than most of you on here have had hot dinners (pun intended), so I am not making anything up. Facts are facts, however 'empirical' you want to paint them.

Let's leave this matter now. Good luck to anyone who walks the Invierno in the future. It's pretty clear that you'll end up losing lots of weight!

Over and out!
 

MikeJS

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis (2011), Norte (12), VdlP (16). Sureste/Invierno (17). Olvidado/San Salvador/Primitivo (19)
You still haven't said what days of the week you are talking about, and what time of the day you are talking about.

There are plenty of places to eat in both A Rúa and Quiroga. I should know: I've been in practically all of them!
Sorry I was not precise enough for you!
I said - in the evening - I was probably looking for somewhere between about 2000 and 2130. Day of the week were fri and sat. (Glad I kept good records!). I am well used to searching for places to eat and asking for help but I was unlucky in these 2 places. In fact in my blog for A Rua I wrote - Bar Taxi had food but not until after 2200 and were unclear about what would be available and they were not very welcoming. Meson O Tono is shut down and bar Pepa has changed hands. I ate in O Retorno at the bottom of the road from the albergue they only had raciones but they were good.
 

emmanuel

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2011)
Norte (2014)
Norte (2016)
Salvador (2017)
Frances (2018)
Madrid-Salvador-Primitivo 19
And my experience is my experience! You simply cannot come out with broad sweeping statements claiming or implying that there is nowhere to eat in the evenings in A Rúa or Quiroga. Neither town is the size of London or New York, but we are not talking about tiny hamlets either.

I will gladly accompany any of you to the two towns in question on any day of the week, and I can assure you that you will not go hungry!

I know that you (Vnwalking) and others have found that most places are closed in Las Médulas on Tuesdays. In Spain many establishments work hard over the weekend and then close on Mondays, but there is always somewhere open. And that's not just 'my experience'.
Maybe he arrived in A Rua past midnight?
 

Theatregal

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
So far...
2012 ~ 2019
The beauty of all of our individual experiences on any given camino is just that. Individual Experiences. Each one different because of so many factors – time of year, day of week, time of day, weather, health, social/ economic conditions in towns / villages / cities, restaurant closing and opening times affected by many different factors – staffing / festivals / family events. Reading through all of the Invierno posts compiled by @VNwalking in this important helpful thread supports that - each journey so unique.

I’ve walked enough now on different caminos, met and talked with many pilgrims and read enough on this wonderful forum to understand and appreciate how special all of our different experiences are. Sure, there are times I'll read something and think "that wasn't my experience" but it would never even occur to me to question or try to disprove that individual experience based on my own. Why? To what purpose?

Let it be. Let the purpose of this thread continue as the original post intended - a brilliant resource for future (and returning :)) Invierno walkers to use and build their own research on.
 
Thread starter OLDER threads on this topic Forum Replies Date
VNwalking Camino de Invierno 84
Ribeirasacra Camino de Invierno 10

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