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Increasing protein consumption

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Ok, I am nothing if not stubborn. But after four doctors, two physical therapists, and several fitness-freak friends have told me I need more protein, I am ready to comply. The consensus seems to be that I should have at least 60 g of protein, a day — YIKES — I am sure my “normal” intake is way less than half that.

I can’t get my act together to “count” the grams I eat every day, so I’m looking for a couple of daily go-to options that I can just easily incorporate into my diet. Any strategies or tips will be helpful.

For starters, I have seen that Greek yoghurt has about 17-18 g per 3/4 cup, so I will try for a cup a day to get about 20 grams. Protein bars are another obvious addition, but so many of them seem to be either tasteless or overly chocolatey and sweet. Canned tuna seems to be a good source, but too much of that and you’ll get mercury poisoning. Any other ideas?

I have tasted a few protein shakes and frankly am not a fan. I know they can be “improved” with the addition of fruit and other things, but that is more hassle than my limited attention span can tolerate.

One person suggested that I try to get 45-50 g every day with a few staples (like Greek yoghurt and protein bars), and that I then make sure to have fish, eggs, or chicken at least 3 times a week for the main meal. This will be a big change, because salads and pasta (like pesto or puttanesca) tend to be the kind of thing I eat for dinner.

I had a hamstring injury on the Salvador/Primitivo last fall, still not healed, but I am hoping that I can get my muscles strong enough to take up the slack for the partially torn hamstring if that makes sense. Lots of glute exercises, eccentric exercises, core exercises, but I have not made much progress on the protein.

If I were not so hard-headedly determined to get back to the camino, I might just sink into my 70s and forget about it, so I am very grateful to have this source of inspiration!
 
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70!??
Seriously?
There's a lot of hype out there, and this seems the newest fad. But it's probably true that if you want to build muscle, you will need more than usual.

Well, one simple thing is plain whey protein powder, frozen berries, and plain skyr in a blender, with enough juice or milk to allow it to blend into a shake. Nothing fiddly or fancy.

Pesto...has walnuts. Protein.
Hummus has chickpeas. Protein.
Feta. Protein.
Salad with a bit of all of that on top (with maybe a hard-boiled egg too) is a delicious way to do what you usually do but up the protein.

I'm really fond of haloumi, raw or sliced and browned on both sides. Protein.

A handful of nuts as a snack. Protein.

A lot of a little adds up, without needing to do much that's radically different. And if you eat meat several times a week that's already a lot.
 

J Willhaus

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2016, 2022
If you like milk shakes, you can make a high protein shake of your own in the blender with a scoop of protein powder some ice cream and milk. My step-dad had a lifethreatening illness and surgery which left him at about 135 lbs a few years ago. I had to cut my time short in Spain to come home to help care for him and the nutritionist recommended a homemade protein shake daily. Some powders are more tasty than others. The soy kind is not as tasty and does not mix as easily to try the whey first (water soluable). Homemade shakes are more palatable we found than the purchased ones. Other people find adding egg whites or egg white powder to some things you like too cook is also good solution. You can buy them at the story in a carton or you can buy the powder.
 
I'm not a vegetarian but my diet tends to lean towards mostly vegetable based meals with some fish or chicken. I very rarely eat red meat. At one point it wasn't enough protein and I was told a couple of years ago (due to low levels of B12) that I needed to get more protein into my diet. I try to have protein with every meal now. Breakfast: Greek yoghurt or skyr with some fruit and nuts (almonds or walnuts), a piece of toast with peanut butter. Lunch: Adding chickpeas / beans or eggs or cheese (feta is great) to a salad. Dinner: Chicken or fish - either in a pasta sauce or with vegetables or grains.
 
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SioCamino

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2015, CPo 2016, VDLP[Sev-Các] 2017, VDLP[Các-Sal] 2018
Hi @peregrina2000
I don't know if you eat red meat but personally i find that i benefit from having red meat at least once a week. Otherwise i get a bit low in iron etc.
I eat most things & cook a lot so don't consciously avoid red meat, it's just i might end up going a few weeks without it without thinking. I treat myself to a good quality fillet steak at least every couple of weeks - I'm lucky living in Ireland it is easy to get high quality beef (once you are prepared to pay!)
It is definitely a very enjoyable (for me) way of getting a good source of protein.

Otherwise i would agree with all the above contributions - i try to make sure i have a protein source in every meal - nuts/egg/beans/lentils/etc

Split Red lentils are a handy way of beefing (ha ha) up a tomato pasta sauce - the lentils sort of dissolve into the sauce.
Hope this helps!
 

Sheesh

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2009, 2013, (2022)
Getting adequate protein is so important especially as we age, to avoid sarcopenia. This has actually been a focus for me too in the past few years, a) because of my age and b) because of adopting a keto lifestyle. But getting enough protein is a challenge.

Along with the foods already mentioned (meats, nuts, yogurt, eggs), I find that edamame packs a big protein punch for just a small amount. And you can even get noodles made from edamame that aren't half bad. Also, along with nuts, dry roasted pumpkin seeds/pepitas are very protein rich (and portable too). Nutritional yeast is good for lightly sprinkling on foods and adding a kind of nutty flavour. Also a tablespoon of hemp hearts sprinkled on your salads adds protein, and is pretty tasty to boot.

Another thing I'm liking on top of my salads is a cooked salmon patty (the Costco type). Sounds funny to put a hot item on a salad, but it surprisingly works.
.
 

jeanineonthecamino

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2021, 2022
70!??
Seriously?
There's a lot of hype out there, and this seems the newest fad. But it's probably true that if you want to build muscle, you will need more than usual.
Not hype. Not a fad. It is what doctors are recommending for many reasons. That is how much I am supposed to be eating per day. And btw - it isn't about "building" muscle - but having the right nutrients.
 
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jeanineonthecamino

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2021, 2022
Ok, I am nothing if not stubborn. But after four doctors, two physical therapists, and several fitness-freak friends have told me I need more protein, I am ready to comply. The consensus seems to be that I should have at least 60 g of protein, a day — YIKES — I am sure my “normal” intake is way less than half that.
This is hard - but yes - that is what is recommended for most women! This is how much I am supposed to be eating every day.

Protein bars are another obvious addition, but so many of them seem to be either tasteless or overly chocolatey and sweet.
Really with protein bars - you have to keep trying them until you find ones that you like!
I have tasted a few protein shakes and frankly am not a fan. I know they can be “improved” with the addition of fruit and other things, but that is more hassle than my limited attention span can tolerate.
There are definitely some good protein shakes - but they MUST be cold or they are gross. I can usually tolerate the taste of Premier Protein which is one my docs recommend. They have different flavors - some are better than others. There are also protein waters. My friend LOVES them. I hate them. But give them a try. In the US I find them at Costco. My nutritionist also has me add collagen powder to my warm liquids or any foods you can mix it into - it is tasteless. Also - can be added to fruit smoothies like the other protein powders. The other protein shakes powders are better and offer more protein - but the collagen powder is good to help supplement and when you can't stand the protein shakes.
One person suggested that I try to get 45-50 g every day with a few staples (like Greek yoghurt and protein bars), and that I then make sure to have fish, eggs, or chicken at least 3 times a week for the main meal. This will be a big change, because salads and pasta (like pesto or puttanesca) tend to be the kind of thing I eat for dinner.
Eggs, Meat and Poultry, Fish, Soy milk and Tofu, Cottage Chees, Yogurt and Milk Products, Beans, Lentils, Chickpees, Nuts (and these are an easy snack on the trail. I do the tuna and chicken packets instead of cans. When I want pasta - I look for protein based pastas now (or spaghetti squash - but that isn't protein based)


Anyhow - I struggled on my Camino last summer to get my protein in, especially since I am picky about meats and cuts of meats. I did a LOT of eggs! Way too much egg. I also looked for meals wth beans, lentils, chickpeas instead of rice/pasta (can't eat rice and shouldn't eat pasta). I also end up doing a lot of cheese.
 
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RJM

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino's Frances, Fisterre, Portuges. Over 180 day
I'm over fifty and try to consume more protein to combat muscle loss etc that comes with age.
I have increased my consumption of legumes. I particularly love black beans and lentils. Could eat them everyday. Organic peanut butter and the Greek style yogurt and whole milk and hard boiled eggs I've increased consumption of. Not a vegan but will sometimes take a week off from eating meat and just eat other protein sources but I find myself craving a steak or chicken the next week. Not even hard boiled eggs can curb the crave.
I used to drink a protein shake smoothie daily with fresh fruit added. That's not bad, but got a bit bored with it. Does have a lot of protein in it though.
 
Past OR future Camino
Aug 2019 CF
May 2022 CP Coastal
peregrina2000 - I feel your frustration. Medical issues have made me change my diet also. And quite frankly I feel better than ever. A few things I have learned: plain non fat greek yogurt; low fat cottage cheese; any cheese; very lean animal or fish protein; hummus; most beans; eggs; nuts. You can also use protein powder in puddings (sugar free); pancakes, muffins, etc. The protein powder I use is called Designer Whey. I add frozen banana and strawberry to it to make a smoothie. Yes, there are some good protein bars out there - the one I can stomach is called ONE, comes in a range of flavors. I'll be taking several of these on my upcoming camino.
 
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KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Past OR future Camino
2014, 2015, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2022
My family and friends call me a carnivore and though it isn't trendy or PC, I eat meat in shameful quantities for the protein and also to stave off persistent anemia. Everyone has a specific diet that suits their own physical/medical needs and I do find it most unhelpful for people to shame others into thinking you need to eat a specific way with specific items to follow some specific guidelines. ( and yes, I'm a licensed health professional ) I eat clean and lean red meat, chicken, tuna without oils or preservatives, eggs most every day and snack on cottage cheese, soft cheeses, and gluten free protein bars. I find it difficult to meet my needs while walking the camino but put it into context as I know the walks are temporary ( from 20 days to 65 days ) and simply add wine to sooth myself...lol
Do as you were recommended by your physician and disregard any comments that dont support that. It's neither hype nor fad if it's necessary is it?
 
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Latest: Rota Vicentina '19; Portuguese '19.
I am loving everyone's contributions on this thread and I adhere to many of the recommendations myself, but have also gleaned a few new tips.
I will add that quinoa is a plant grown primarily for its edible seeds. They are rich in protein, dietary fiber, B vitamins, and dietary minerals in amounts greater than in many grains.
I am not a fan of Plain Greek yogurt, so I buy a big tub of it, but combine it with a big tub of the Vanilla and mix them together; reducing the sugar content, while improving its flavor. Also, stirring in a dab of honey improves the flavor of plain yogurt.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012
It is not too hard to get 60g of protein, if you eat dairy and/or meat at all.

I find that it is easiest to make a conscious point of getting certain nutrients early in the day when my eating habits are more disciplined. So, the following breakfast provide 32 g of protein alone. Nuts are your friend, especially if you don't need to limit calories!

Capture1.JPG

(You might be surprised to see the nutrient content of the oat bran - that amount (1/3 c) has 7 g of protein.)

If you add an egg, 2 oz of cheese, some legumes, 1 c broccoli over the day, you will be over 50 g. If you add a meat dish every couple of days, you should be over 60g on average.

If you test out your favourite foods on a nutrient counter, you should be able to find the best way for you to meet the goal. Then you don't need to track every day.
 

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Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances; Aragones; VdlP; Madrid-Invierno; Levante
I have just heard a doctor, on Youtube, but I think that he is a doctor at the Mao Clinic, state that 3 eggs should be the maximum eaten per week for heart health. This discouraged me. As a vegetarian, I may be short of protein, and I like eggs. Fortunately, I eat lots of lentils and chickpeas. But I would have a hard time with major dietary changes (and sometimes do, on camino). Fortunately, my gp leaves me alone about my diet, so far.
 

Suzanne H

Camino Junkie
Past OR future Camino
CF'17; LePuy'18; Porto/Coastal'19; Portugal? '22
Yes to beans/legumes/lentils, eggs, nuts. Just checked in my cupboard and 1/2c of cooked beans is 8 grams of protein. There's a remarkable amount of hidden proteins in grains (wheat, oats, quinoa and wild rice), as well as brussels sprouts, broccoli, avocados. I use myfitnesspal (online calorie counter) because it counts my macros for me. I'm certain there are other free online counters if you're interested. I eat eggs nearly every day -- especially in my tortilla espanola. ;)
 

jeanineonthecamino

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2021, 2022
I have just heard a doctor, on Youtube, but I think that he is a doctor at the Mao Clinic, state that 3 eggs should be the maximum eaten per week for heart health. This discouraged me. As a vegetarian, I may be short of protein, and I like eggs. Fortunately, I eat lots of lentils and chickpeas. But I would have a hard time with major dietary changes (and sometimes do, on camino). Fortunately, my gp leaves me alone about my diet, so far.
If you have a cholesterol problem - watch the eggs. Me? I can't get my protein in without them! I get lots of labs done every single year - my medical team is happy if I get my protein in any way I can. But we also watch all the nutrition labs to see where I am at.
 
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RJM

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino's Frances, Fisterre, Portuges. Over 180 day
I have just heard a doctor, on Youtube, but I think that he is a doctor at the Mao Clinic, state that 3 eggs should be the maximum eaten per week for heart health. This discouraged me. As a vegetarian, I may be short of protein, and I like eggs. Fortunately, I eat lots of lentils and chickpeas. But I would have a hard time with major dietary changes (and sometimes do, on camino). Fortunately, my gp leaves me alone about my diet, so far.
Remove the yolks from the hard boiled eggs, save for 3-4 a week. Just consume the whites. Give the discarded boiled yolks to the pets
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012
Remove the yolks from the hard boiled eggs, save for 3-4 a week. Just consume the whites. Give the discarded boiled yolks to the pets
Yes. It seems that the white of an egg has 6g of protein, and the yolk adds only 1 more gram of protein. Mind you, the yolks have other good stuff, so one's cholesterol levels should probably be the determining factor for the doctor's advice.
 
Past OR future Camino
Next up 2022?
It's dessert, so not for everyday.
But if you need to make a birthday cake, nut torten are totally packed with protein - made just with shaved nut flour, eggs, and sugar.
Joy of Cooking has a number of varieties.
Delicious!!!
 

chinacat

Veteran Member
Ok, I am nothing if not stubborn. But after four doctors, two physical therapists, and several fitness-freak friends have told me I need more protein, I am ready to comply. The consensus seems to be that I should have at least 60 g of protein, a day — YIKES — I am sure my “normal” intake is way less than half that.

I can’t get my act together to “count” the grams I eat every day, so I’m looking for a couple of daily go-to options that I can just easily incorporate into my diet. Any strategies or tips will be helpful.

For starters, I have seen that Greek yoghurt has about 17-18 g per 3/4 cup, so I will try for a cup a day to get about 20 grams. Protein bars are another obvious addition, but so many of them seem to be either tasteless or overly chocolatey and sweet. Canned tuna seems to be a good source, but too much of that and you’ll get mercury poisoning. Any other ideas?

I have tasted a few protein shakes and frankly am not a fan. I know they can be “improved” with the addition of fruit and other things, but that is more hassle than my limited attention span can tolerate.

One person suggested that I try to get 45-50 g every day with a few staples (like Greek yoghurt and protein bars), and that I then make sure to have fish, eggs, or chicken at least 3 times a week for the main meal. This will be a big change, because salads and pasta (like pesto or puttanesca) tend to be the kind of thing I eat for dinner.

I had a hamstring injury on the Salvador/Primitivo last fall, still not healed, but I am hoping that I can get my muscles strong enough to take up the slack for the partially torn hamstring if that makes sense. Lots of glute exercises, eccentric exercises, core exercises, but I have not made much progress on the protein.

If I were not so hard-headedly determined to get back to the camino, I might just sink into my 70s and forget about it, so I am very grateful to have this source of inspiration!

I seem to remember that you really like eating chicken …
You could marinate some strips of breast in, for instance, Thai spices, Curry spices, or garlic, lemon juice and thyme, and roast them.
They’ll freeze and you can take some pieces out every day to snack on.
Just a thought …
 

witsendwv

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
(2015)
Also check your greek yogurt for added sugars. You may want to try the skyr which may have fewer sugars. Also check the label as some have more protein than others.
Some higher protein yogurts are sweetened with stevia. I find it awful tasting so I use greek yogurts and/or skyr (more expensive though) topped with berries and a mixture of sunflower, pepitas and pecans. I also add them to salads for more protein. I was in the same place as perigrina 2000. I am older and increased my exercise routine. My primary care provider went over my typical daily diet and told me, while it is healthy, I was not eating enough protein and should increase the daily amount. The goal wasn't a high protein diet, but to have enough to help repair and replace after exercise. I love peanut butter so I am taking advantage of the opportunity to eat it! :)
🥾🥩🍳
 
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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Wow, thank you all so much! I had no idea there would be so many helpful responses. I was relieved to see that I do eat a lot of the things that you have mentioned, and I appreciate a lot of the little “tricks” suggested. I like the idea of having a couple of things I will automatically eat every day and then just make a point of adding some of the things suggested on a more random basis. Luckily I love plain yoghurt and eggs, so I just need to bump those two up a bit for starters.
 

alhartman

2005-2017 Delightful 346 days in Spain and France.
Past OR future Camino
2017
Camino only: I eat a can of sardines for a second breakfast (yes, I have the courtesy to move away from the trail!!) I was finding that my body would crash around lunch from too much morning breads. Tried sardines and avoided the crash until dinner/tapas. You can get in oil, water, tomatoes. Downside is too much sodium.
Good luck.
 

Mycroft

Veteran Member
Ok, I am nothing if not stubborn. But after four doctors, two physical therapists, and several fitness-freak friends have told me I need more protein, I am ready to comply. The consensus seems to be that I should have at least 60 g of protein, a day — YIKES — I am sure my “normal” intake is way less than half that.

I can’t get my act together to “count” the grams I eat every day, so I’m looking for a couple of daily go-to options that I can just easily incorporate into my diet. Any strategies or tips will be helpful.

For starters, I have seen that Greek yoghurt has about 17-18 g per 3/4 cup, so I will try for a cup a day to get about 20 grams. Protein bars are another obvious addition, but so many of them seem to be either tasteless or overly chocolatey and sweet. Canned tuna seems to be a good source, but too much of that and you’ll get mercury poisoning. Any other ideas?

I have tasted a few protein shakes and frankly am not a fan. I know they can be “improved” with the addition of fruit and other things, but that is more hassle than my limited attention span can tolerate.

One person suggested that I try to get 45-50 g every day with a few staples (like Greek yoghurt and protein bars), and that I then make sure to have fish, eggs, or chicken at least 3 times a week for the main meal. This will be a big change, because salads and pasta (like pesto or puttanesca) tend to be the kind of thing I eat for dinner.

I had a hamstring injury on the Salvador/Primitivo last fall, still not healed, but I am hoping that I can get my muscles strong enough to take up the slack for the partially torn hamstring if that makes sense. Lots of glute exercises, eccentric exercises, core exercises, but I have not made much progress on the protein.

If I were not so hard-headedly determined to get back to the camino, I might just sink into my 70s and forget about it, so I am very grateful to have this source of inspiration!
beans/corn/rice, quinoa, tofu, tempeh
 
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Next up 2022?
About soy: be aware if you are at risk or have had estrogen-sensitive breast cancer to go easy on all processed (i.e., concentrated) soy - it's estrogenic. I am assured that fresh or frozen edamame are ok, as is tempeh (it's fermented), but not the concentrated forms like soymilk and soy protein powder. Even tofu needs moderation.
 
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First off, kudos for your determination to walk in spite of your still recovering injury. I’m sure it will make you a more careful, and therefore more successful, pilgrim.

Secondly, please be cautious about suddenly making a big change to your normal diet. I’m sure you’ve been around long enough to know the ramification of suddenly eating foods you are not used to. Enough said, right😛?

When I headed out on my first Camino, of course I had a physical before I left. The doctor found nothing particularly wrong, just a slight lack of calcium in my soon-to-be-old bones. He advised calcium pills or upping my calcium intake.
“Like how?“ I asked. “Milk, cream, etc.” “You mean, like ice cream?”
“Well, yes. “

Best doctor ever. One of my most cherished memories of Camino #1 is having ice cream for dinner on a bench in Burgos, at sunset, admiring the cathedral. For medicinal purposes, doctor’s orders, of course.

Buen Camino.
,
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Past OR future Camino
2014, 2015, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2022
The egg debate in 2022...while most think that eating egg whites is the healthy way to go, research has debunked this notion that sprung up in the 70's. Gram for gram, the yolk contains much more protein than the whites. If you need a diet to include protein, including both whites and yolks is the better option. As far as cholesterol, the more recent research has shown there is no correlation between consuming a bit of cholesterol and metabolizing it. In other words, eating it will not create it in your system. Nutritionists and cardiologists launched a giant war against eggs/egg yolks and found decades later it was not quite accurate. Perhaps they should have launched an equally robust campaign to reverse the message?
 
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Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Milk with some fat makes a good hydration drink; drink it instead of Gatorade or the like. Add a bit more milk to your coffee. Peanut butter has been mentioned; I have a fair bit of that but also have peanuts for snacks. Also other nuts. Some have a good bit of minerals that help prevent cramps.

Add walnuts to your nightly mustard intake?
 

LavanyaLea

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (May/June 2022)
Ok, I am nothing if not stubborn. But after four doctors, two physical therapists, and several fitness-freak friends have told me I need more protein, I am ready to comply. The consensus seems to be that I should have at least 60 g of protein, a day — YIKES — I am sure my “normal” intake is way less than half that.

I can’t get my act together to “count” the grams I eat every day, so I’m looking for a couple of daily go-to options that I can just easily incorporate into my diet. Any strategies or tips will be helpful.

For starters, I have seen that Greek yoghurt has about 17-18 g per 3/4 cup, so I will try for a cup a day to get about 20 grams. Protein bars are another obvious addition, but so many of them seem to be either tasteless or overly chocolatey and sweet. Canned tuna seems to be a good source, but too much of that and you’ll get mercury poisoning. Any other ideas?

I have tasted a few protein shakes and frankly am not a fan. I know they can be “improved” with the addition of fruit and other things, but that is more hassle than my limited attention span can tolerate.

One person suggested that I try to get 45-50 g every day with a few staples (like Greek yoghurt and protein bars), and that I then make sure to have fish, eggs, or chicken at least 3 times a week for the main meal. This will be a big change, because salads and pasta (like pesto or puttanesca) tend to be the kind of thing I eat for dinner.

I had a hamstring injury on the Salvador/Primitivo last fall, still not healed, but I am hoping that I can get my muscles strong enough to take up the slack for the partially torn hamstring if that makes sense. Lots of glute exercises, eccentric exercises, core exercises, but I have not made much progress on the protein.

If I were not so hard-headedly determined to get back to the camino, I might just sink into my 70s and forget about it, so I am very grateful to have this source of inspiration!
Your Camino journeys are inspiring, I hope you will recover from your injuries quickly!

There are some good advice already mentioned here, namely:
- Breakfast: eggs/egg white omelette (if you’re conscious about having too much egg yolk), add whey protein powder into your drink/shakes, Greek yogurt

- Lunch/dinner: cottage cheese is high in protein and low in fat so it’s a good option to add to your salad/pasta based lunch, or sandwiches.

I like a lot of one bowl meals with rice or pasta as base ingredients. Then I add some grilled veggies and always some meat. You can prepare breast/Turkey fillets in advance and then add them to your dish for speed.

One of the bloggers I followed online is Casey Ho/Blogilates, she recently completed a 90 day challenge to build muscles, so if you’re interested you can have a look at her meal plans if that suits your diet. She also does a lot of Pilates exercises and the leg/core ones should be good for you too!
 

zzotte

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2012 Camino Frances, 2014 Lourdes to SDC, 2016 Camino del Norte
Well first let me say I’m not a doctor or nutritionist but what I do know it’s what it’s good for my body no one else, I’m turning 70 this month and I’m also a vegetarian but I do eat eggs with moderation if you pm me I can give a ton of sources to check it out, so here it’s my two cents, you only need to do it’s one thing: Eat real food, no cartons, cans, or any thing packaged or try to have the very minimum, stay from dairy specialist yogurt, it does nothing for you whey in milk it’s a killer, stay way from gluten and soy too with the exception of fermented soy ( organic, non GMO) eat plaint of organic veggie cooked and raw, eat lots of organic fruits, one way to add more veggies and fruits are in a smoothie, eat veggies with every meal, complex carbs is a great source of protein, sprouted beans, brown rice, lentils chick peas all great sources, if must eat meat eat a small portion about 3oz ( organic grass fed meat) organic chicken or wild cut sardines or salmon. I guarantee you will have plaint of protein and a lot nutrients to say healthy and of course exercise.

zzotte
 
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ortemio

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Mozarabe,18
Norte,19
I use this product to increase my protein , you can make lots of goodies with it ::

 

Elle Bieling

Elle Bieling, PilgrimageTraveler
Past OR future Camino
Too many to count!
Sorry, I did not read each and every post carefully, so if this info is redundant, I apologize! Since you eat a lot of pasta, Laurie, perhaps merely changing out your pasta to a high protein one is a very simple solution. The protein comes from peas - so no meat needed. I am sure there are other brands, but this one I find consistently in my Colorado area. You can get it in various shapes!

ca996c11-3a9f-4391-bca3-14063b473206.0d8872590938c162ebb8ae3fdce545df.jpeg
 

JCarpenter

Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
Chick pea pasta! Barilla is good, banza is a bit better I think. It's delicious and adds 7grams above what normal pasta does -(13.) And fresh chick peas. They are also easy to grow, even on a balcony. When green they make a sugar snap type pea pod also delicious. Also, make your own nut butters in a blender..almond, walnut pecan.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
About soy: be aware if you are at risk or have had estrogen-sensitive breast cancer to go easy on all processed (i.e., concentrated) soy - it's estrogenic. I am assured that fresh or frozen edamame are ok, as is tempeh (it's fermented), but not the concentrated forms like soymilk and soy protein powder. Even tofu needs moderation.
Quite true. I rarely eat soy products except for the occasional tempeh.

As a vegan I use a combo of pea and hemp powder (whey is an animal product) to boost my intake. Apparently this combo works the best. Because I eat beans (mostly chick peas and lentils) almost daily as well as nuts, seeds and if I remember one protein shake (20 grams) a day I rarely worry whether I am getting enough.

According to all the research I've ever read it is recommended that one eat 1 gram of protein per 1 kg of body weight so 60 kg is definitely not an exaggeration. In fact those who exercise intensively need more.
 

nedjinski

New Member
Past OR future Camino
July 22 - SJDP - GR10 - Norte - Primitivo - Porto
One of the better tools to track your food input is My Fitness Pal - literally takes a couple of minutes per day.
On the Camino, or any other continually high output exercise, you burn food, particularly calories - protein is only one component of your daily food needs. If you want to lose weight walk the Camino for 35 days and see what happens. If you can't afford to lose weight (and strength) you really have to focus on calories - and you need a lot of them. Protein alone won't keep your weight up and stable - (although there are many keto advocates out there who eat nothing but steak and veggies - no carbs).
Good luck on your quest.
 
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CA_Pilgrim

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
El Camino Real de California
Camino Frances (2017)
Any strategies or tips will be helpful.
I can only relate what works for me. You have to figure out what works for your lifestyle and how much you are willing to alter that lifestyle.

I generally get (and need) much more protein than the average guy my age because I regularly do resistive weight training. I've been doing this for over 20 years (it was a year 2000 resolution that actually stuck). During that time, I've put on about 13+ pounds of muscle. Bodybuilders would scoff at this small gain, but I look at it more from a peer perspective. The average guy my age loses about a pound of muscle per year and I've managed to add about 3/4 pound per year, so I am about 1.75 pounds per year ahead of my peers.

I aim for a minimum of 0.8 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight. I eat 6 balanced meals per day that are smaller than the average (American) 3X meals per day. I aim to have a portion of protein (usually meat, chicken, egg, or fish) about the size of the palm of my hand (or about a cup) and the same for a portion of carbohydrate. The rest is made up of the natural fat content of the food and the healthy fats I cook with (mostly olive oil). I also supplement with fish oil.

This works out to about 50/30/20 percent of calories coming from carbohydrate/protein/fat but I don't count calories or grams of macro nutrients. It's a lifestyle.

I have also found that a couple tablespoons of unflavored whey protein (isolate) powder in each of my 3 coffees per day also helps to boost my protein intake. I don't generally don't consume protein bars because the protein they contain is usually of lower quality than the powder (or natural food). They also don't satisfy hunger as much as real food.

Good luck!
 

JCarpenter

Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
I will confess that protein along the camino was sometimes hard to find if meat isn't the favored go-to. I missed my eggs first thing in the morning and as a certain celiac, cereals of most kinds are out. Thank goodness for yogurt, beans, lentils, and salad mixta with tuna. Any other menu suggestions?
 

jeanineonthecamino

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2021, 2022

jeanineonthecamino

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2021, 2022
I will confess that protein along the camino was sometimes hard to find if meat isn't the favored go-to. I missed my eggs first thing in the morning and as a certain celiac, cereals of most kinds are out. Thank goodness for yogurt, beans, lentils, and salad mixta with tuna. Any other menu suggestions?
I ate a LOT of salad mixta with tuna because I didn't like a lot of the cuts of meats (yes - I am picky with my meats). I also asked if I could get huevos in a lot of places - even if it wasn't on the menu - and the answer was usually yes. I am talking at bars though - not at albergues. I really didn't pay for many albergue breakfasts because they are carb based and I am not supposed to eat most carb based foods. Certainly not in the amounts offered by albergue breakfasts. Most of the time, the answer was yes. I had always heard that you could buy already boiled eggs in the markets - that wasn't the case in 2021 - I didn't find any. That said - if kitchens are open (some are - many still are not- then you could boil a few eggs and keep them with you to eat for a couple days. I did find some protein bars in the bigger town markets - so I will be looking for those every chance I get. Don't know if protein bars are a problem for celiacs though. But buying nuts to keep in my bag was also important - because I really needed a protein based snack to attempt to get my protein intake to a decent level. And cheese - cheese was an easily accessible food with protein.
 

antepacem

Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances/Portugues/Norte/Primitivo
I'm not sure whether your question was for on-the-camino protein or before-you-go protein, so my apologies if this isn't helpful, but: definitely nut butters are super packed with protein and so easy - just a spoonful here and there! But also, if you eat a lot of salads, making a tahini-based dressing (rather than an oil & vinegar based dressing, for example) can pack a ton of extra protein in your salad without adding a ton of fullness. So too with sprinkling any seeds (sesame, pumpkin, sunflower) or nuts on a salad or a pasta. And, as others have mentioned, finding a whey protein powder you don't hate would be good. Good luck!!
 
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Gringazolana

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Francés
I will confess that protein along the camino was sometimes hard to find if meat isn't the favored go-to. I missed my eggs first thing in the morning and as a certain celiac, cereals of most kinds are out. Thank goodness for yogurt, beans, lentils, and salad mixta with tuna. Any other menu suggestions?
In Costa Rica the breakfast of champions is gallo pinto: white rice mixed with black beans, eaten with corn tortillas and fresh salsa. In Venezuela we eat arepas with cheese, black beans, and scrambled eggs (there are so many Venezuelans in Spain that you can probably find arepas somewhere, they are gluten-free corn discs that you stuff). Can you eat oatmeal? 1/2 c rolled oats has 6 g. Add a sliced banana on top: 1-2 g of protein. 1 oz of walnuts adds another 4 g. I also add peanut butter or almond powder to Greek yogurt. Fried plantains have protein. Even corn and leafy greens have protein. I’m mostly vegetarian and find the 55-60 g per day a constant challenge! (I also take iron and B-12 supplements.)
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Past OR future Camino
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
One person suggested that I try to get 45-50 g every day with a few staples (like Greek yoghurt and protein bars), and that I then make sure to have fish, eggs, or chicken at least 3 times a week for the main meal. This will be a big change, because salads and pasta (like pesto or puttanesca) tend to be the kind of thing I eat for dinner.

The amount of daily protein being suggested won't be reached by a half and half measure like that, as it corresponds more or less to a fairly large steak every day plus extras. Personally, every day it's bacon & eggs in the morning (well, a slice of pork belly), and a large steak for lunch.

Nevertheless, salads made with eggs, cheese, and ham, or pasta dishes made with eggs, ham, and/or cheese, might help, given your habits.

Eggs anyway should become a daily staple, as they will seriously help offset the nutrients shift that will result from changing to a higher protein diet. Ideally, fresh ones that have never been refrigerated, if possible.

As to veg, the only really good source of protein is lentils, preferably the green Le Puy type, and best prepared in the traditional French manner with some tomato, garlic, herbs, and a decent quantity of lard cubes or other fatty meat. Chick peas are OK though. The thing about the protein in these is that it's far easier to metabolise than other sources of veg protein.

The greek yoghurt suggestion is a good one. As to protein bars, I'd avoid them honestly, as any other industrially produced cereal-based foodstuffs. And avoid nasty stuff like protein drinks -- though the occasional milk shake, drinking yoghurt, or ice cream can't hurt.

There's also cottage cheese.

When I switched to a mainly carnivore diet, it was hard psychologically to make that shift, but one of the more difficult parts of it is finding a small butcher combining good quality with low prices. You probably don't need to go as far as I do (I have actual food restrictions for a couple of reasons), but a meat/poultry/fish based diet supplemented with veg would be a big change, and it's hard to make that sort of shift.

Really, the basic diet of that sort that is recommendable to most people is the Mediterranean diet. Which involves lots of things like meat stew, meat-based sauce dishes, sausages, ham, and various meat preserves like pâté or confit. And still a good deal of veg, and yes, some salads and pasta dishes. And perhaps quite a bit less bread than you may be eating now. Avoid cereals generally, really.
 
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JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Past OR future Camino
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
Remove the yolks from the hard boiled eggs, save for 3-4 a week. Just consume the whites. Give the discarded boiled yolks to the pets
That is really bad advice -- the yolks are where the most valuable nutrients are found.
 

good_old_shoes

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Francés ('15, '19)
Via Coloniensis ('16)
Trier-Nancy + Le Puy-Fisterra ('17)
Aragonés ('18)
When thinking about protein most people tend to think 'meat, eggs, milk, lentils, soy' ect. But protein is in lots of things where many wouldn't expect it. Even in leafy greens, as was mentioned before.

If you eat a healthy, varied diet, you already eat a lot of protein 'accidentally' everyday. Kale has almost as much protein per 100g as milk for example. Oats have lots of protein. Even broccoli and potatoes have some.

Yes, not all protein sources have all the essential amino acids. But the more you mix sources, the more likely it is that you get what you need.
 
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peregrino_tom

Member
Past OR future Camino
.
Something I have learned - if there’s an area where people have beliefs as strong as their political and religious ones, it’s food and nutrition.
But they are beliefs, typically quoting (and getting energised by) the science/studies that support theirs and largely discounting the rest. And the science changes - in my lifetime we’ve gone back and forward on protein and dairy products time and again.
My belief: we don’t tend to make longer term progress in our lives when we perceive nutrition as medication - when we think that if we tip a little bit more of one food/chemical type in and add a little bit less of something else that the human machine will right itself and mend our lives. Certainly this can happen in cases of malnutrition and sadly, with all those millions and millions of people we have left to experience under-nutrition.

But for you - I’d say: start with the foods you enjoy, that bring value and meaning to your meals (and ideally) the ones you share, that make life worth living. Keep going with pasta and salad based dishes and just think about adding a few things to make it more of a ‘whole' Mediterranean style of cuisine - like a ‘tapas' of big beans or sardines (with tomato sauce), a little hard cheese on your pasta or afters. Some milk-based desserts - ideally with fresh fruit.
Get inspired with more great cooking ideas by someone like Rachel Roddy

Then after a few weeks, if you still feel obliged to, you can do a little nutritional analysis of your intake and see whether anything has changed. But importantly, look at it holistically, don’t just count the protein gram numbers - look at the quality and complementarity of the protein, the quality of the oils, the range of vitamins and minerals. And most importantly, think about how you feel!
 
Past OR future Camino
Camino del Norte (2020)
Hi @peregrina2000
I don't know if you eat red meat but personally i find that i benefit from having red meat at least once a week. Otherwise i get a bit low in iron etc.
I eat most things & cook a lot so don't consciously avoid red meat, it's just i might end up going a few weeks without it without thinking. I treat myself to a good quality fillet steak at least every couple of weeks - I'm lucky living in Ireland it is easy to get high quality beef (once you are prepared to pay!)
It is definitely a very enjoyable (for me) way of getting a good source of protein.

Otherwise i would agree with all the above contributions - i try to make sure i have a protein source in every meal - nuts/egg/beans/lentils/etc

Split Red lentils are a handy way of beefing (ha ha) up a tomato pasta sauce - the lentils sort of dissolve into the sauce.
Hope this helps!
Dia duit! I’m spending six weeks in Ireland after my Camino and looking forward at least one meal with a steak. I don’t generally eat that way but still plan to do that. And I’m trying to wrap my head around oysters, which I’ve never tried anywhere.
 

chinacat

Veteran Member
Something I have learned - if there’s an area where people have beliefs as strong as their political and religious ones, it’s food and nutrition.
But they are beliefs, typically quoting (and getting energised by) the science/studies that support theirs and largely discounting the rest. And the science changes - in my lifetime we’ve gone back and forward on protein and dairy products time and again.
My belief: we don’t tend to make longer term progress in our lives when we perceive nutrition as medication - when we think that if we tip a little bit more of one food/chemical type in and add a little bit less of something else that the human machine will right itself and mend our lives. Certainly this can happen in cases of malnutrition and sadly, with all those millions and millions of people we have left to experience under-nutrition.

But for you - I’d say: start with the foods you enjoy, that bring value and meaning to your meals (and ideally) the ones you share, that make life worth living. Keep going with pasta and salad based dishes and just think about adding a few things to make it more of a ‘whole' Mediterranean style of cuisine - like a ‘tapas' of big beans or sardines (with tomato sauce), a little hard cheese on your pasta or afters. Some milk-based desserts - ideally with fresh fruit.
Get inspired with more great cooking ideas by someone like Rachel Roddy

Then after a few weeks, if you still feel obliged to, you can do a little nutritional analysis of your intake and see whether anything has changed. But importantly, look at it holistically, don’t just count the protein gram numbers - look at the quality and complementarity of the protein, the quality of the oils, the range of vitamins and minerals. And most importantly, think about how you feel!

Love Rachel Roddy!!! ❤️

I received two of her books for Christmas 😊
 
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Just saw and read this article. Even though there could be a dispute on some of the things in it the article at least lists jigh protein fruit.

Well+Good: What a Dietitian Says You Need To Know About Using Fruit as a Source of Plant-Based Protein.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Past OR future Camino
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
Fruit is super important, and most carnivores are fruit-eaters too.

But the only truly excellent sources of easily metabolised plant proteins are (properly prepared) lentils and chick peas.

One thing I did forget to mention -- lashings of olive oil are absolutely brilliant in all cases, notwithstanding the low protein content.
 
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J Willhaus

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2016, 2022
Hummus made from garbanzos or white beans is also tasty as a snack or as part of a meal with raw vegetables to dip or some kind of bread or pita chips. When we serve it at the albergues, I help the pilgrims help make a big batch which can be served as either a side dish or part of a main course. We put various toppings on it per pilgrim preferences. The non-vegetarians eat as much as vegans and vegetarians. Telling them it is "bean dip" usually makes it seem less exotic to those who think they might not like hummus. The beans and tahini have good protein.

If you like salads Laurie, we also make a marinated lentil salad dressed up with fresh herbs or greens. Again it is a hit with the pilgrims, but has lots of protein for a salad or side dish.
 

Optimistic Traveler

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2018
I ate a LOT of salad mixta with tuna because I didn't like a lot of the cuts of meats (yes - I am picky with my meats). I also asked if I could get huevos in a lot of places - even if it wasn't on the menu - and the answer was usually yes. I am talking at bars though - not at albergues. I really didn't pay for many albergue breakfasts because they are carb based and I am not supposed to eat most carb based foods. Certainly not in the amounts offered by albergue breakfasts. Most of the time, the answer was yes. I had always heard that you could buy already boiled eggs in the markets - that wasn't the case in 2021 - I didn't find any. That said - if kitchens are open (some are - many still are not- then you could boil a few eggs and keep them with you to eat for a couple days. I did find some protein bars in the bigger town markets - so I will be looking for those every chance I get. Don't know if protein bars are a problem for celiacs though. But buying nuts to keep in my bag was also important - because I really needed a protein based snack to attempt to get my protein intake to a decent level. And cheese - cheese was an easily accessible food with protein.
Quest bars are gluten-free, so OK for celiacs. Not sure about other brands. And Spanish almonds are great!
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
I apologise in advance if I’m repeating advice above - I’m walking a Camino and on a mobile with limited data - Laurie I’ve lost weight and gained muscle since increasing my protein intake. My “go to” list includes daily Greek yoghurt, lots and lots of nuts, eggs, tinned sardines, fresh fish. I also make a quick breakfast shake of silken tofu, raw cashew nuts, Greek yoghurt, a few frozen berries or a dried fig, vanilla,m and cinnamon.
 
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MFord

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
I haven’t found greek yogurt in the small towns but canned sardines are an easy find with plenty of protein and good fat. I can’t start walking without a good protein.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Past OR future Camino
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
I haven’t found greek yogurt in the small towns but canned sardines are an easy find with plenty of protein and good fat. I can’t start walking without a good protein.
Cannot eat sardines myself, but yes -- good advice. And not just the fat, but also the oil.

If walking in France, there is also tinned mackerel for variety. (can't eat that either grrrrr)
 

Canche

Volcano Climber
Past OR future Camino
Norte/Frances 2016, San Salvador & Primitivo 2021
Ok, I am nothing if not stubborn. But after four doctors, two physical therapists, and several fitness-freak friends have told me I need more protein, I am ready to comply. The consensus seems to be that I should have at least 60 g of protein, a day — YIKES — I am sure my “normal” intake is way less than half that.

I can’t get my act together to “count” the grams I eat every day, so I’m looking for a couple of daily go-to options that I can just easily incorporate into my diet. Any strategies or tips will be helpful.

For starters, I have seen that Greek yoghurt has about 17-18 g per 3/4 cup, so I will try for a cup a day to get about 20 grams. Protein bars are another obvious addition, but so many of them seem to be either tasteless or overly chocolatey and sweet. Canned tuna seems to be a good source, but too much of that and you’ll get mercury poisoning. Any other ideas?

I have tasted a few protein shakes and frankly am not a fan. I know they can be “improved” with the addition of fruit and other things, but that is more hassle than my limited attention span can tolerate.

One person suggested that I try to get 45-50 g every day with a few staples (like Greek yoghurt and protein bars), and that I then make sure to have fish, eggs, or chicken at least 3 times a week for the main meal. This will be a big change, because salads and pasta (like pesto or puttanesca) tend to be the kind of thing I eat for dinner.

I had a hamstring injury on the Salvador/Primitivo last fall, still not healed, but I am hoping that I can get my muscles strong enough to take up the slack for the partially torn hamstring if that makes sense. Lots of glute exercises, eccentric exercises, core exercises, but I have not made much progress on the protein.

If I were not so hard-headedly determined to get back to the camino, I might just sink into my 70s and forget about it, so I am very grateful to have this source of inspiration!
I saw a great documentary on Netflix called "The Game Changer" where many successful athletes are interviewed including Olympians and all on a vegan diet that gave them lots of energy. It's an idea. I am going to try to cut back on meat and chicken as I don't need it every day. It's a good movie. It might help.
 
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Camino future
I saw a great documentary on Netflix called "The Game Changer" where many successful athletes are interviewed including Olympians and all on a vegan diet that gave them lots of energy. It's an idea. I am going to try to cut back on meat and chicken as I don't need it every day. It's a good movie. It might help.
It is one of our favorite movies. It gave them lots of energy, increased blood flow, the female athlete said, "I became a machine!", faster muscle recovery, and imagine if just one of those things happens to you. Good luck Canche, I hope you are pleasantly surprised, the way my husband and I were with that.
 
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Past OR future Camino
2018
Ok, I am nothing if not stubborn. But after four doctors, two physical therapists, and several fitness-freak friends have told me I need more protein, I am ready to comply. The consensus seems to be that I should have at least 60 g of protein, a day — YIKES — I am sure my “normal” intake is way less than half that.

I can’t get my act together to “count” the grams I eat every day, so I’m looking for a couple of daily go-to options that I can just easily incorporate into my diet. Any strategies or tips will be helpful.

For starters, I have seen that Greek yoghurt has about 17-18 g per 3/4 cup, so I will try for a cup a day to get about 20 grams. Protein bars are another obvious addition, but so many of them seem to be either tasteless or overly chocolatey and sweet. Canned tuna seems to be a good source, but too much of that and you’ll get mercury poisoning. Any other ideas?

I have tasted a few protein shakes and frankly am not a fan. I know they can be “improved” with the addition of fruit and other things, but that is more hassle than my limited attention span can tolerate.

One person suggested that I try to get 45-50 g every day with a few staples (like Greek yoghurt and protein bars), and that I then make sure to have fish, eggs, or chicken at least 3 times a week for the main meal. This will be a big change, because salads and pasta (like pesto or puttanesca) tend to be the kind of thing I eat for dinner.

I had a hamstring injury on the Salvador/Primitivo last fall, still not healed, but I am hoping that I can get my muscles strong enough to take up the slack for the partially torn hamstring if that makes sense. Lots of glute exercises, eccentric exercises, core exercises, but I have not made much progress on the protein.

If I were not so hard-headedly determined to get back to the camino, I might just sink into my 70s and forget about it, so I am very grateful to have this source of inspiration!
1. To track your protein intake, try using Carb Manager, an app available for Android or Apple. I got a recommendation for a much larger daily intake of protein, and carb manager help me gain a sense of what I had to eat everyday, at which point I quit using it A big plus is that the he app allows you to track foods by brand. I ignored the data on grams of fat and carbs.
2. You might want to look into the bioavailability of the sources of protein you choose to eat. Just because something contains protein doesn't mean your body can do anything with it.
3. You also might want to consider whether you want to eat a processed protein product like a protein bar because it might contain a bunch of stuff you don't want to eat and the processing can affect the quality of the protein in the product. You might want to consider sticking with real food rather than processed food.
 

howardd5

Active Member
I apologise in advance if I’m repeating advice above - I’m walking a Camino and on a mobile with limited data - Laurie I’ve lost weight and gained muscle since increasing my protein intake. My “go to” list includes daily Greek yoghurt, lots and lots of nuts, eggs, tinned sardines, fresh fish. I also make a quick breakfast shake of silken tofu, raw cashew nuts, Greek yoghurt, a few frozen berries or a dried fig, vanilla,m and cinnamon.
One item I need and enjoy is good quality “trail mix” . It give you protein and good fats . Walmart has a new trail mix Omega 3 . It’s got excellent walnuts , almonds& pecans plus dry fruit and seeds. It’s concentrated but heavy . A couple handfuls and water is enough all day . Try it at home and see how you like it.
 

walkinglover

Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, '16 and '18; Portuguese '17; Ingles - 19
Ok, I am nothing if not stubborn. But after four doctors, two physical therapists, and several fitness-freak friends have told me I need more protein, I am ready to comply. The consensus seems to be that I should have at least 60 g of protein, a day — YIKES — I am sure my “normal” intake is way less than half that.

I can’t get my act together to “count” the grams I eat every day, so I’m looking for a couple of daily go-to options that I can just easily incorporate into my diet. Any strategies or tips will be helpful.

For starters, I have seen that Greek yoghurt has about 17-18 g per 3/4 cup, so I will try for a cup a day to get about 20 grams. Protein bars are another obvious addition, but so many of them seem to be either tasteless or overly chocolatey and sweet. Canned tuna seems to be a good source, but too much of that and you’ll get mercury poisoning. Any other ideas?

I have tasted a few protein shakes and frankly am not a fan. I know they can be “improved” with the addition of fruit and other things, but that is more hassle than my limited attention span can tolerate.

One person suggested that I try to get 45-50 g every day with a few staples (like Greek yoghurt and protein bars), and that I then make sure to have fish, eggs, or chicken at least 3 times a week for the main meal. This will be a big change, because salads and pasta (like pesto or puttanesca) tend to be the kind of thing I eat for dinner.

I had a hamstring injury on the Salvador/Primitivo last fall, still not healed, but I am hoping that I can get my muscles strong enough to take up the slack for the partially torn hamstring if that makes sense. Lots of glute exercises, eccentric exercises, core exercises, but I have not made much progress on the protein.

If I were not so hard-headedly determined to get back to the camino, I might just sink into my 70s and forget about it, so I am very grateful to have this source of inspiration!
Kefir, Fairlife milk, multiple egg whites with one whole egg, chicken breast (3 oz has about 30 g), Greek yogurt ; eat the chicken as part of your salad - you can grill multiple ones ahead of time
 

Karl Oz

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances
Portuguese
Aragones
Sanabres
Piamonte
Elizabethpfad
Ok, I am nothing if not stubborn. But after four doctors, two physical therapists, and several fitness-freak friends have told me I need more protein, I am ready to comply. The consensus seems to be that I should have at least 60 g of protein, a day — YIKES — I am sure my “normal” intake is way less than half that.

I can’t get my act together to “count” the grams I eat every day, so I’m looking for a couple of daily go-to options that I can just easily incorporate into my diet. Any strategies or tips will be helpful.

For starters, I have seen that Greek yoghurt has about 17-18 g per 3/4 cup, so I will try for a cup a day to get about 20 grams. Protein bars are another obvious addition, but so many of them seem to be either tasteless or overly chocolatey and sweet. Canned tuna seems to be a good source, but too much of that and you’ll get mercury poisoning. Any other ideas?

I have tasted a few protein shakes and frankly am not a fan. I know they can be “improved” with the addition of fruit and other things, but that is more hassle than my limited attention span can tolerate.

One person suggested that I try to get 45-50 g every day with a few staples (like Greek yoghurt and protein bars), and that I then make sure to have fish, eggs, or chicken at least 3 times a week for the main meal. This will be a big change, because salads and pasta (like pesto or puttanesca) tend to be the kind of thing I eat for dinner.

I had a hamstring injury on the Salvador/Primitivo last fall, still not healed, but I am hoping that I can get my muscles strong enough to take up the slack for the partially torn hamstring if that makes sense. Lots of glute exercises, eccentric exercises, core exercises, but I have not made much progress on the protein.

If I were not so hard-headedly determined to get back to the camino, I might just sink into my 70s and forget about it, so I am very grateful to have this source of inspiration!
Western diets include a much higher percentage of protein than was historically the case. Witness the promise of the French king Henry IV centuries ago to provide the peasantry with a weekly 'chicken in every pot' . Even then there was a desire for and the recognition of the need for more protein, but just as clearly people had been living without a reliable supply of it. I know you mentioned four doctors but the opinions of physical therapists and fitness freaks may be less reliable (no offence intended). Have you considered consulting a dietician? They are specialists in this area after all, and will almost certainly be able to inform the optimal level of protein consumption for you and how to adjust your diet if required.

I'm a meat-eater, by the way, so I offer these thoughts without prejudice.
 
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JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Past OR future Camino
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I saw a great documentary on Netflix called "The Game Changer" where many successful athletes are interviewed including Olympians and all on a vegan diet that gave them lots of energy. It's an idea. I am going to try to cut back on meat and chicken as I don't need it every day. It's a good movie. It might help.
It's a complex matter.

As a species, we are primarily carnivorous, as our anatomy suggests -- although our modern teeth have developed in this way from hundreds of thousands of years of eating cooked foods rather than raw. Some researchers actually describe us as "coquivores" -- eaters of cooked/prepared foods.

BUT -- we are descended from species that were herbivorous.

And so as a species, we retain an ability to metabolise plant foods. (a relatively small ability, as our second plant-digestion stomachs have regressed into the non-functional appendix).

Individually though, this ability varies to a smaller or greater degree from one individual to the next.

And there are extremes ; my own ability to properly metabolise plant foods is vanishingly small (they make me ill, except in cases when I need them) -- and yet there are others who seem to thrive on pretty much nothing else.

There is no one-size-fits-all diet, for several reasons, but this variable capability to eat plant foods is a major one.

Our bodies are continually telling us what they want and need -- best listen to the body, instead of to the ideological claims of strangers as to what's best for it.

I would certainly NOT recommend my own diet to anyone else, except perhaps as a temporary elimination diet.

The diet that I would recommend to Westerners as a base one to vary from, according to need and taste, would be the Mediterranean one -- regardless that it's no good for me personally except on my occasional "cheat days".

Really though, just eat what's good for you personally, and avoid what isn't.
 
Past OR future Camino
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All I want to know is how much protein there is in a pasteis de nata. Please tell me that 2 - 4 meet my daily protein requirements. I think that I could work that into my daily diet in Portugal. 😅
Okay math I like math.
I used this recipe for 40 of them.
I put it in cronometer.com to figure out how many you would need for 60 grams of protein.
40 of them gives you 56.1 grams of protein. 🤣 So then, eat 41 just to be sure you get 60 grams.
🤣🤣
 
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witsendwv

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
(2015)
I saw an ad for this on YouTube this morning, 100% plant protein and 10 grams of protein per serving.
I had not looked into plant based meat substitutes until now.

The following ingredients are found in the Beyond Meat Burger (3):
Water, Pea Protein Isolate*, Expeller-Pressed Canola Oil, Refined Coconut Oil, Rice Protein, Natural Flavors, Cocoa Butter, Mung Bean Protein, Methylcellulose, Potato Starch, Apple Extract, Salt, Potassium Chloride, Vinegar, Lemon Juice Concentrate, Sunflower Lecithin, Pomegranate Fruit Powder, Beet Juice Extract (for color)
This is from: https://sciencemeetsfood.org/plant-based-burgers/

I think I'll stick with less processed products, both plant and animal! :)

🥾
 
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As a species, we are primarily carnivorous
Says?

I thought we were omnivores, but find I was wrong. From
So a human can be classified as a cucinivore, rather than an omnivore. Humans also initiate food breakdown through storage, such as by hanging meat, drying, or prolonged marination (e.g., civet de lièvre), and by pounding and grinding. Cooking changes the palatability, digestibility, and texture of food and removes toxins. This history may have influenced hu - mans to have alimentary tracts that are quite different from that expected in an anthropoid primate. In humans, the colon represents only 20% of the total volume of the digestive tract, whereas in apes it is about 50% (Fig. 2; Milton and Demment, 1988; Milton, 2003). The sizeable colons of most large-bodied primates permit fermentation of low-quality plant fibers, allowing for extraction of energy in the form of short-chain fatty acids (Leonard et al., 2007). Thus, humans are relatively poor among autoenzyme-dependent omnivores in digesting uncooked plant fiber. The human large intestine lies somewhere between that of the pig, a similar omnivore, and the dog, a carnivore capable of consuming an omnivore diet that has a reduced cecum and short colon.
'Cucinavore' meaning someone who cooks their food. Note: NOT carnivore.

And so as a species, we retain an ability to metabolise plant foods. (a relatively small ability, as our second plant-digestion stomachs have regressed into the non-functional appendix).
This disregards the effect of cooking.

Our bodies are continually telling us what they want and need -- best listen to the body, instead of to the ideological claims of strangers as to what's best for it.
IOW, maybe ignore all the science, and the advice of people who have expertise, and go with what I want? Haha, forget it @JabbaPapa, because half the time I'd be subsisting on all sorts of junk. 🙃

If I listen to my head and not my tongue and empty stomach, I'm much better off.

And what comes from reliable sources (as well as decades of experience) is that a balanced vegetarian diet sustains the human body perfectly well.
 

Friend from Barquinha

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
None yet; perhaps the Portugese (2021?)
Okay math I like math.

40 of them gives you 56.1 grams of protein. 🤣 So then, eat 41 just to be sure you get 60 grams.
🤣🤣
I like math too, but also like to practice my really bad Portuguese.

The table on this is decipherable. THEY say 2.9 grams?!

1652060083574.png

From this website; a bodybuilder's blog, I think!


They're saying, Is it a myth or not? Is the pastel (plural = pasteis) de nata the least caloric cake?

PS According to the Portuguese specs, you'd only need 20.7 to get your 60 g of protein...unfortunately, you'd also be getting 6,169 calories, which might be a bit of an issue...
 
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C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012
Okay math I like math...
I put it in cronometer.com to figure out how many you would need for 60 grams of protein.
40 of them gives you 56.1 grams of protein. 🤣 So then, eat 41 just to be sure you get 60 grams.
Sorry, but 41 won't be enough. You would need to eat 42.8 of them. Round that up to 43 to be sure.
 
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Camino future
I like math too, but also like to practice my really bad Portuguese.

The table on this is decipherable. THEY say 2.9 grams?!

View attachment 124780

From this website; a bodybuilder's blog, I think!


They're saying, Is it a myth or not? Is the pastel (plural = pasteis) de nata the least caloric cake?

PS According to the Portuguese specs, you'd only need 20.7 to get your 60 g of protein...unfortunately, you'd also be getting 6,169 calories, which might be a bit of an issue...

In the recipe above, the one with 40 of them, for the 56.1 grams protein, the full calories are 4149. These must be very small ones.
 

NualaOC

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
A few and hopefully lots more. See signature.
Something I have learned - if there’s an area where people have beliefs as strong as their political and religious ones, it’s food and nutrition.
But they are beliefs, typically quoting (and getting energised by) the science/studies that support theirs and largely discounting the rest. And the science changes - in my lifetime we’ve gone back and forward on protein and dairy products time and again.
My belief: we don’t tend to make longer term progress in our lives when we perceive nutrition as medication - when we think that if we tip a little bit more of one food/chemical type in and add a little bit less of something else that the human machine will right itself and mend our lives. Certainly this can happen in cases of malnutrition and sadly, with all those millions and millions of people we have left to experience under-nutrition.

But for you - I’d say: start with the foods you enjoy, that bring value and meaning to your meals (and ideally) the ones you share, that make life worth living. Keep going with pasta and salad based dishes and just think about adding a few things to make it more of a ‘whole' Mediterranean style of cuisine - like a ‘tapas' of big beans or sardines (with tomato sauce), a little hard cheese on your pasta or afters. Some milk-based desserts - ideally with fresh fruit.
Get inspired with more great cooking ideas by someone like Rachel Roddy

Then after a few weeks, if you still feel obliged to, you can do a little nutritional analysis of your intake and see whether anything has changed. But importantly, look at it holistically, don’t just count the protein gram numbers - look at the quality and complementarity of the protein, the quality of the oils, the range of vitamins and minerals. And most importantly, think about how you feel!
Thank you Tom for this great perspective.
 

JCarpenter

Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
I ate a LOT of salad mixta with tuna because I didn't like a lot of the cuts of meats (yes - I am picky with my meats). I also asked if I could get huevos in a lot of places - even if it wasn't on the menu - and the answer was usually yes. I am talking at bars though - not at albergues. I really didn't pay for many albergue breakfasts because they are carb based and I am not supposed to eat most carb based foods. Certainly not in the amounts offered by albergue breakfasts. Most of the time, the answer was yes. I had always heard that you could buy already boiled eggs in the markets - that wasn't the case in 2021 - I didn't find any. That said - if kitchens are open (some are - many still are not- then you could boil a few eggs and keep them with you to eat for a couple days. I did find some protein bars in the bigger town markets - so I will be looking for those every chance I get. Don't know if protein bars are a problem for celiacs though. But buying nuts to keep in my bag was also important - because I really needed a protein based snack to attempt to get my protein intake to a decent level. And cheese - cheese was an easily accessible food with protein.
My rule with meats is this: if I can hold it up and read through it, I don't eat it. He he
 
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witsendwv

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
(2015)
My rule with meats is this: if I can hold it up and read through it, I don't eat it. He he
I must be missing something here. Don't you want your jamon iberico sliced really really thin? I know I do, it just melts on your tongue!🙂
 

Gringazolana

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Francés
I like math too, but also like to practice my really bad Portuguese.

The table on this is decipherable. THEY say 2.9 grams?!

View attachment 124780

From this website; a bodybuilder's blog, I think!


They're saying, Is it a myth or not? Is the pastel (plural = pasteis) de nata the least caloric cake?

PS According to the Portuguese specs, you'd only need 20.7 to get your 60 g of protein...unfortunately, you'd also be getting 6,169 calories, which might be a bit of an issue...
They say apple cake is better. Hmmmm now I want to bake! Maybe I should make both custard and apple?
 
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K_Lynn

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
I always had nuts with me for when I needed a bit of extra protein or a snack. In some of the larger towns I lucked out and found Danon YoPro, a yogurt beverage with 25g of protein! It was very tasty, not a lot of sugar and would have that and a banana for breakfast. None of my rooms were too hot so I felt perfectly comfortable having it out of the fridge overnight.
*found in grocery stores in the dairy section
 

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patgreen

Member
Ok, I am nothing if not stubborn. But after four doctors, two physical therapists, and several fitness-freak friends have told me I need more protein, I am ready to comply. The consensus seems to be that I should have at least 60 g of protein, a day — YIKES — I am sure my “normal” intake is way less than half that.

I can’t get my act together to “count” the grams I eat every day, so I’m looking for a couple of daily go-to options that I can just easily incorporate into my diet. Any strategies or tips will be helpful.

For starters, I have seen that Greek yoghurt has about 17-18 g per 3/4 cup, so I will try for a cup a day to get about 20 grams. Protein bars are another obvious addition, but so many of them seem to be either tasteless or overly chocolatey and sweet. Canned tuna seems to be a good source, but too much of that and you’ll get mercury poisoning. Any other ideas?

I have tasted a few protein shakes and frankly am not a fan. I know they can be “improved” with the addition of fruit and other things, but that is more hassle than my limited attention span can tolerate.

One person suggested that I try to get 45-50 g every day with a few staples (like Greek yoghurt and protein bars), and that I then make sure to have fish, eggs, or chicken at least 3 times a week for the main meal. This will be a big change, because salads and pasta (like pesto or puttanesca) tend to be the kind of thing I eat for dinner.

I had a hamstring injury on the Salvador/Primitivo last fall, still not healed, but I am hoping that I can get my muscles strong enough to take up the slack for the partially torn hamstring if that makes sense. Lots of glute exercises, eccentric exercises, core exercises, but I have not made much progress on the protein.

If I were not so hard-headedly determined to get back to the camino, I might just sink into my 70s and forget about it, so I am very grateful to have this source of inspiration!
SPAM.
I say Spam as something of a joke but a lot of people eat in on the long US trails.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I should have realized when I posted the original question that I was not going to have a lot of time to respond to the responses — moving out of a house of 40 years to a condo, dealing with a minor medical procedure, dealing with some medical issues for my husband, and the list goes on. But I have been paying attention and have just gone back through the entire thread - THANKS!

I will do some more experimenting, but so far this is what I have come up with. I jettisoned my daily blueberry scone habit — just empty calories — and added a breakfast recommended by a forum member. Plain Greek yoghurt, oat bran, sunflower seeds, flax seeds, chia seeds, walnuts, one half sliced banana and a little milk to make is creamy enough to eat. It is very filling and it has about 36 g of protein. I find it much easier and tastier than a protein shake (although I got a recommendation from a friend for what I will admit is a good tasting protein powder). So I will do that every now and then, but I really like the yoghurt concoction. My diet already has 5 or more servings of fruits and veggies per day so I didn’t need to change that. I just needed to take out some of the snacking to make room for the high calorie breakfast!

A neighbor gave me a few protein shakes to try — one had 160 calories and 30 g of protein supposedly — but it was filled with ingredients I couldn’t pronounce and tasted gross, so I have put prepared protein shakes on hold. I did buy a few boxes of recommended protein bars for when I need something quick, but I really don’t need much for lunch and have done things like carrots and celery with hummus, etc.

Then for dinner, I’ve made a point of adding some of the things you guys suggested to salads, and I have started with the protein pasta, so thanks for those tips.

Each person is so different in terms of taste and relationship to food, so I’m not giving any advice here. Just to say that for me, I enjoy a good meal with friends as much as anyone, but I am not interested in spending a lot of time on a daily basis putting together complicated meals, so I have picked out some of the many easy suggestions I got here. I also don’t mind at all eating the same thing for breakfast every day — for some of you that will sound boring, but for me it means I get up and don’t think about it.

It sounds like a radical transformation, but really the only big change was the breakfast and that was easy.

So there you have it! Thanks one and all.
 

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