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Indulgences

crhutch

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
(2010) March/April SJPP to Santiago and hence to Finisterre
(2016) Hospitalero Grañón 15-31 March
(2016) April Logroño to Santiago
(2017) Hospitalero Zamora 15-31 March
(2017) Hospilatero Emaus, Burgos 1-14 April
I am a bit confused about indulgences and Santiago.

I totally get it that during a Jubilee year a pilgrim can gain a plenary indulgences if they:
(1) Pass through the Holy Door to visit the Cathedral of Santiago/Tomb of St. James.
(2) Say a prayer: at least the Apostle’s Creed, the Our Father and a prayer for the intentions of the Pope.
(3) Receive the Sacrament of Reconciliation and
(4) Attend Mass and receive the Eucharist within 5 days before or after the visit to the Cathedral.

But what about non Jubilee years? Do you not still gain a plenary indulgence if you visit the Cathedral and do (2) -(4)?
 
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Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
From what I have read about this, Catholics who do all of the above (post#1) get an indulgence, but only in a Holy Year do they get a plenary indulgence. But I am certainly no specialist on such matters. You will have to ask a Catholic priest, preferably one familiar with the special aspects of the pilgrimage to Santiago.
 

PadreW

Bearded Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
You are in luck! Your resident priest is on it thanks to some help from EWTN:

In 1122 Pope Calixtus II gave Compostela the privilege of granting a plenary indulgence to those who visited the shrine of the Apostle in the years when the Saint’s day fell on a Sunday. This is recorded in the Bull, Regis Aeterni, issued by Pope Alexander III in 1179.

This is how an indulgence is defined in the Code of Canon Law (can. 992) and in the Catechism of the Catholic Church (n. 1471): "An indulgence is a remission before God of the temporal punishment due to sins whose guilt has already been forgiven, which the faithful Christian who is duly disposed gains under certain prescribed conditions through the action of the Church which, as the minister of redemption, dispenses and applies with authority the treasury of the satisfactions of Christ and the saints".

In general, the gaining of indulgences requires certain prescribed conditions (below), and the performance of certain prescribed works.

To gain indulgences, whether plenary or partial, it is necessary that the faithful be in the state of grace at least at the time the indulgenced work is completed. [i.e. one must be a Catholic, not excommunicated or in schism.]

A plenary indulgence can be gained only once a day. In order to obtain it, the faithful must, in addition to being in the state of grace: have the interior disposition of complete detachment from sin, even venial sin; have sacramentally confessed their sins; receive the Holy Eucharist (it is certainly better to receive it while participating in Holy Mass, but for the indulgence only Holy Communion is required); pray for the intentions of the Supreme Pontiff.

It is appropriate, but not necessary, that the sacramental Confession and especially Holy Communion and the prayer for the Pope's intentions take place on the same day that the indulgenced work is performed; but it is sufficient that these sacred rites and prayers be carried out within several days (about 20) before or after the indulgenced act. Prayer for the Pope's intentions is left to the choice of the faithful, but an "Our Father" and a "Hail Mary" are suggested. One sacramental Confession suffices for several plenary indulgences, but a separate Holy Communion and a separate prayer for the Holy Father's intentions are required for each plenary indulgence.

For the sake of those legitimately impeded, confessors can commute both the work prescribed and the conditions required (except, obviously, detachment from even venial sin).

Indulgences can always be applied either to oneself or to the souls of the deceased, but they cannot be applied to other persons living on earth.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
But what about non Jubilee years? Do you not still gain a plenary indulgence if you visit the Cathedral and do (2) -(4)?
(1) Pass through the Holy Door is not necessary for Catholics to gain the plenary indulgence connected to visiting the cathedral and the tomb of the apostle. It is merely a tradition in Compostela Julilee Years that is treasured by Catholics.

In a Compostela Jubilee Year, the Compostela plenary indulgence can be gained on every day of the year.

In ordinary years, the Compostela plenary indulgence can only be gained on special days, such as on the feast day of Saint James in July, and on less than a dozen other specific days of the year.

There are many other ways to gain a plenary indulgence every day everywhere. Consult your priest or the Enchiridion Indulgentiarum.

The Compostela plenary indulgence is a much treasured tradition or option from the past before reforms of the Catholic doctrine of indulgences in the 20th century.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
"In 1122 Pope Calixtus II gave Compostela the privilege of granting a plenary indulgence to those who visited the shrine of the Apostle in the years when the Saint’s day fell on a Sunday. This is recorded in the Bull, Regis Aeterni, issued by Pope Alexander III in 1179."

The alleged grant of a Jubilee to Compostela by Pope Callictus II in the year 1119 and supposedly ratified in 1179 by Pope Alexander III to confirm this as a perpetual bull by Regis Aeterni, is a claim that has been discarded by some historians. They propose a later origin suggesting that the Jubilee in Santiago did not start until the first half of the fifteenth century. They argue that this Jubilee Holy Year was born imitating the successful Roman Holy Year which was celebrated for first time in 1300 as a response to Pope Boniface VIII spontaneous demand that special thanks be given to the thousands and thousands of pilgrims who visited Rome in that landmark year at the change of the century.

There are essentially two positions on the origin of Compostela Jubilee Years. They are summarized through the work of two of the few experts who have been trying to throw light on it, though from differing viewpoints.
  1. Jesus Precedo Lafuente is former Dean of the Cathedral of Santiago, and was responsible for leading the organization of several Holy Years in Compostela in the second half of the twentieth century. He argues that Aeterni Regis, following the Bull (1179) of Pope Alexander III, the first Jubilee was held in Santiago in 1182. He defends well, that which is maintained from the time this celebration in the years that in accordance with the bull, agreed that the Sunday celebrating the martyrdom in Palestine of St. James is 25 Julio, that usually happens every 6,5,6, 11 years (Precedo Lafuente, Jesus, "Origin and Significance of the Year Santae Compostela" pilgrim's Guide Calixtino Salamanca, Fundación Caixa Galicia, A Coruña, 1993, p.20).
  2. Compostela professor, Fernando López Alsina, the historian who has studied this question more thoroughly, suggests a later origin, suggesting that the first Compostela Holy Year was not held until 1428 or 1434. "Only since 1434, and throughout the rest of the fifteenth century, can we follow the regular celebration of the Compostela Holy Year at planned intervals of 6, 5, 6, 11 years." (Lopez Alsi, Fernando: "Romans and Holy Years Holy Years Compostela in Santiago, Rome, Jerusalem. Proceedings of the Third Congress Jacobean-International Studies Caucci, Paolo, ed. Xunta de Galicia, Santigo de Compostela, 1999, p. 235)
According to the Xacobeo Blog: The truth is that only since the fifteenth century can we follow the ceremony of the Jubilees regularly in Compostela. They have occurred since that period with characteristics closeness to the present when the festival the apostle James the Great falls on Sundays. In this case, reference to the Holy Year of 1434, the first of which there is a strong historical record, means that up to the year 2010 there have been a total of 84 Jubilees Compostela. Those who advocate a earlier dates, based on the bull Aetterni Regis, say at least 119 to 2004.

The dates have changed with each new change in calendars. In the early Middle Ages, based on the old Hispanic (Mozarabic) rite, the 30 December was St James’ Feast day.
In the 11th century King Alfonso VI abolished the Hispanic rite in favour of the Roman rite and the 25 July became the principal feast day to commemorate the martyrdom of St. James. December 30 was incorporated into the present liturgical calendar as the Feast of the Translation of his relics.
And, just to confuse matters more, although we celebrate his Feast Day on 25th July using the Roman Rite calendar, it was formerly on the 5th August on the Tridentine Rite calendar!
 
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stinmd

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances - May 2015; Camino del Norte/Primitivo - July/August 2016; Camino Portugues - Sept 2017
"In 1122 Pope Calixtus II gave Compostela the privilege of granting a plenary indulgence to those who visited the shrine of the Apostle in the years when the Saint’s day fell on a Sunday. This is recorded in the Bull, Regis Aeterni, issued by Pope Alexander III in 1179."

The alleged grant of a Jubilee to Compostela by Pope Callictus II in the year 1119 and supposedly ratified in 1179 by Pope Alexander III to confirm this as a perpetual bull by Regis Aeterni, is a claim that has been discarded by some historians. They propose a later origin suggesting that the Jubilee in Santiago did not start until the first half of the fifteenth century. They argue that this Jubilee Holy Year was born imitating the successful Roman Holy Year which was celebrated for first time in 1300 as a response to Pope Boniface VIII spontaneous demand that special thanks be given to the thousands and thousands of pilgrims who visited Rome in that landmark year at the change of the century.

There are essentially two positions on the origin of Compostela Jubilee Years. They are summarized through the work of two of the few experts who have been trying to throw light on it, though from differing viewpoints.
  1. Jesus Precedo Lafuente is former Dean of the Cathedral of Santiago, and was responsible for leading the organization of several Holy Years in Compostela in the second half of the twentieth century. He argues that Aeterni Regis, following the Bull (1179) of Pope Alexander III, the first Jubilee was held in Santiago in 1182. He defends well, that which is maintained from the time this celebration in the years that in accordance with the bull, agreed that the Sunday celebrating the martyrdom in Palestine of St. James is 25 Julio, that usually happens every 6,5,6, 11 years (Precedo Lafuente, Jesus, "Origin and Significance of the Year Santae Compostela" pilgrim's Guide Calixtino Salamanca, Fundación Caixa Galicia, A Coruña, 1993, p.20).
  2. Compostela professor, Fernando López Alsina, the historian who has studied this question more thoroughly, suggests a later origin, suggesting that the first Compostela Holy Year was not held until 1428 or 1434. "Only since 1434, and throughout the rest of the fifteenth century, can we follow the regular celebration of the Compostela Holy Year at planned intervals of 6, 5, 6, 11 years." (Lopez Alsi, Fernando: "Romans and Holy Years Holy Years Compostela in Santiago, Rome, Jerusalem. Proceedings of the Third Congress Jacobean-International Studies Caucci, Paolo, ed. Xunta de Galicia, Santigo de Compostela, 1999, p. 235)
According to the Xacobeo Blog: The truth is that only since the fifteenth century can we follow the ceremony of the Jubilees regularly in Compostela. They have occurred since that period with characteristics closeness to the present when the festival the apostle James the Great falls on Sundays. In this case, reference to the Holy Year of 1434, the first of which there is a strong historical record, means that up to the year 2010 there have been a total of 84 Jubilees Compostela. Those who advocate a earlier dates, based on the bull Aetterni Regis, say at least 119 to 2004.

The dates have changed with each new change in calendars. In the early Middle Ages, based on the old Hispanic (Mozarabic) rite, the 30 December was St James’ Feast day.
In the 11th century King Alfonso VI abolished the Hispanic rite in favour of the Roman rite and the 25 July became the principal feast day to commemorate the martyrdom of St. James. December 30 was incorporated into the present liturgical calendar as the Feast of the Translation of his relics.
And, just to confuse matters more, although we celebrate his Feast Day on 25th July using the Roman Rite calendar, it was formerly on the 5th August on the Tridentine Rite calendar!
Wow, and I thought the Camino was just a long walk in Spain ...
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Year of past OR future Camino
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
I am not a Catholic, but I hope that my many (including future) walks, will make Him being observant of my attempts of being recognized as a deserving person :cool: . If not, it will be Hell, I fear. But at least, then I will meet friends, I suppose.
 
Last edited:
Year of past OR future Camino
2012
Wow, and I thought the Camino was just a long walk in Spain ...
So did others: who now find themselves on one long walk in Spain after another. Who spend inordinate hours on this forum trying to understand why they are drawn back.
It is indeed a long walk in Spain, the journey takes longer
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Year of past OR future Camino
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
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Mycroft

Active Member
You are in luck! Your resident priest is on it thanks to some help from EWTN:

In 1122 Pope Calixtus II gave Compostela the privilege of granting a plenary indulgence to those who visited the shrine of the Apostle in the years when the Saint’s day fell on a Sunday. This is recorded in the Bull, Regis Aeterni, issued by Pope Alexander III in 1179.

This is how an indulgence is defined in the Code of Canon Law (can. 992) and in the Catechism of the Catholic Church (n. 1471): "An indulgence is a remission before God of the temporal punishment due to sins whose guilt has already been forgiven, which the faithful Christian who is duly disposed gains under certain prescribed conditions through the action of the Church which, as the minister of redemption, dispenses and applies with authority the treasury of the satisfactions of Christ and the saints".

In general, the gaining of indulgences requires certain prescribed conditions (below), and the performance of certain prescribed works.

To gain indulgences, whether plenary or partial, it is necessary that the faithful be in the state of grace at least at the time the indulgenced work is completed. [i.e. one must be a Catholic, not excommunicated or in schism.]

A plenary indulgence can be gained only once a day. In order to obtain it, the faithful must, in addition to being in the state of grace: have the interior disposition of complete detachment from sin, even venial sin; have sacramentally confessed their sins; receive the Holy Eucharist (it is certainly better to receive it while participating in Holy Mass, but for the indulgence only Holy Communion is required); pray for the intentions of the Supreme Pontiff.

It is appropriate, but not necessary, that the sacramental Confession and especially Holy Communion and the prayer for the Pope's intentions take place on the same day that the indulgenced work is performed; but it is sufficient that these sacred rites and prayers be carried out within several days (about 20) before or after the indulgenced act. Prayer for the Pope's intentions is left to the choice of the faithful, but an "Our Father" and a "Hail Mary" are suggested. One sacramental Confession suffices for several plenary indulgences, but a separate Holy Communion and a separate prayer for the Holy Father's intentions are required for each plenary indulgence.

For the sake of those legitimately impeded, confessors can commute both the work prescribed and the conditions required (except, obviously, detachment from even venial sin).

Indulgences can always be applied either to oneself or to the souls of the deceased, but they cannot be applied to other persons living on earth.
I do not know what the Pope's intentions are so could not pray generally for them. Is there a list?
 

CalgaryLynn

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I do not know what the Pope's intentions are so could not pray generally for them. Is there a list?
Yes, just go to the Pope's network and every month he has a prayer that states his intentions. This month, we Catholics are supposed to prayer for all the young men and women who are contemplating marriage. The website is called "The Pope's Network".
 

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