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Inter-Metatarsil Bursitis

Martin.P

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Via Algarvinia (Sept 12)
Camino Frances (June 16)
Via de la Plata (May 19)
Finisterre (July 16)
Hi all,

Has anyone got any experience of the aforementioned? I have been experiencing discomfort with this since July 2019, finally saw a specialist in February 2020, MRI in March, Covid delayed follow up in August & now waiting for a slot to get a cortisone injection.

Main main question is - has anyone had a successful outcome from this procedure. Consultant told me that it might take a couple of injections or may not work at all.

Walks are now few & far between, running is non-existent since March, will I run again, will I have pain free hikes?

Sounds a bit silly worrying about being able to hike/run in the current climate when so many other people have so much more serious ailments/worries. So please forgive if I offend.

Thanking you all in advance,
M.
 
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C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Sounds a bit silly worrying about being able to hike/run in the current climate when so many other people have so much more serious ailments/worries. So please forgive if I offend.
Not at all silly. We need to do our best to stay fit and healthy, and our feet are very important to that.

I have had a few metatarsal problems and currently have a mild but nagging discomfort that is not quite bad enough to send me to the doctor yet. I was thinking in terms of Morton's neuroma, so your diagnosis interests me. How it was distinguished from Morton's neuroma? Are you able to walk at all, without pain?

I have had bursitis in my shoulder twice and it healed completely, each time for years. I expect that feet are more problematic because they are used so much and so hard, but has total rest for a few weeks been suggested? (I am just curious - I have no idea if this would be useful.)

Sorry I can only offer more questions, and no help!
 

Martin.P

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Via Algarvinia (Sept 12)
Camino Frances (June 16)
Via de la Plata (May 19)
Finisterre (July 16)
Hi C,

Thank you for your response.

So, morton's is also called an "intermetatarsal neuroma because it's located in the ball of the foot between your metatarsal bones. It happens when the tissue around a nerve that leads to a toe thickens from irritation or compression".

Inter metatarsil bursitis is an "inflammation of a small fluid filled sac that lies between the metatarsal heads.
The bursa becomes swollen and can cause pressure on the nerve in the web space."

So, maybe not much difference between both? Not sure exactly how yours feel but I suppose mine feels like a small little balloon under the ball of my foot, if I plant my foot a certain way it can give a very sudden shot of pain, feels as if the balloon is folding over & can feel like someone is plucking a guitar string from the ball of my foot to the toe, which I presume is the nerve.

While running I tended to run on the side of my foot or scrunch up my toes to protect the ball - this was not good for the rest of my foot or further up thru the Achilles, calf, knee & IT band.

I find I can walk most comfortable in my hiking boots, a good solid, less flexible soles. When walking/running in trail shoes/runners they are too flexible & when planting my foot - heel-ball-toe it hurts between ball & toe. Ergo the less flexible boots are better for me.

X-ray will not show, I had to get dye injected for the MRI to catch it.

I'm waiting for some sort of cortisone injection in between my toes. It's a day visit to hospital, I think radiologists may be involved & he says I'll need a couple of days off work.......
 

lindigo

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances April/May 2018
Camino Madrid April 2019
Camino Portuguese May 2019
Martin I have the same. I persevered for years until the pain put my gate off to the extent that I had pain right up to the knee. I also scrunched the toes under with the pain. Saw specialist and the suggestion was to see an podiatrist. I walked away with orthotics with a blimp under the ball of the foot so that on every step it opens up the metatarsals so that the cyst slides between and doesn't squash it. I can't have bare feet or shoes without the orthotics. It worked for me and have since done four caminos and waiting to do more. Hope you find some solution suitable for you.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
@Martin.P
I do not have this condition, but I have a deteriorated knee and am waiting for surgery. I can say that I have had cortisone injections in that knee twice and have had no effects from the injections. My health care paid for them, but it did not pay for an alternate injection: hyaluronic acid injection. This also had no effect, but cost me $450 CAN. If your doctor suggests this and your insurance will cover it, it might be a good idea. But I would think it through carefully if you had no effect from the cortisone injections and no insurance coverage for this.
 
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Anamiri

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
Hi all,

Has anyone got any experience of the aforementioned? I have been experiencing discomfort with this since July 2019, finally saw a specialist in February 2020, MRI in March, Covid delayed follow up in August & now waiting for a slot to get a cortisone injection.

Main main question is - has anyone had a successful outcome from this procedure. Consultant told me that it might take a couple of injections or may not work at all.

Walks are now few & far between, running is non-existent since March, will I run again, will I have pain free hikes?

Sounds a bit silly worrying about being able to hike/run in the current climate when so many other people have so much more serious ailments/worries. So please forgive if I offend.

Thanking you all in advance,
M.
Yes I have this in my left foot. It has troubled me now for 3 years, but was aggravated by several incorrect diagnoses and inappropriate treatment, by doctors, physios, podiatrists and even the sports specialist. I spent literally thousands on orthotics and other treatments, none of which worked - and shoes that should have eased it (they didnt). And this year specialist appointments have been delayed hugely because of Covid. I had another MRI 4 months ago and have still not had the results back.
Last year I received a cortisone injection which I was assured would fix it, but in fact it aggravated it so much more that I was crippled. I went from being able to walk with pain, to constant pain - sharp pulsing electric shocks shooting down my toes. The reaction to cortisone was so severe I had to hire a knee scooter and existed on strong painkillers for over a month initially. Then crutches for a few more weeks. I could almost not think of anything else the reaction was so severe.
Now I can walk as long as I take continue to take anti-inflammatories. I walked the Camino from Leon to Santiago last September. Not my best speed, and I iced it every night, and slept with my foot up on my pack. Really annoying as I dont normally sleep on my back. I walked in loose sandals with a very stiff sole and straps that didn't press down on it. I sent my pack ahead to limit the weight on my foot. It was still sore but walking the Camino was worth it. Everyone thought I was nuts to go, but walking the Camino didnt make it any worse.
I walk each day up to 8 kms but usually about 6kms with my dogs again i wear running shoes with an orthotic to reduce the flexibility. It is the only thing that has worked..
Covid has meant more time at home - not wearing shoes, which has helped. The area is still so tender that it hurts when the sheets touch it, and I am very limited in footwear as I cant have anything that touches that area at all. I find that I cant stand, I either have to be moving, or sitting with my foot up, standing still or sitting with my foot down is painful.
When I was younger, 30 years ago, I remember that I had hip bursitis. I remember having physio treatment, which must have worked as I haven't been troubled with it since, so hopefully there is some treatment for this that will work
 
Last edited:

Penbaysail

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2017
Respectfully, I don’t recollect ever using the diagnosis of intermetatarsal bursitis (36 years of a hospital podiatry practice + just retired). My thoughts below are not an attempt to diagnose you from afar, but rather broad treatment suggestions.

Most instances of forefoot pain were either Morton’s Neuroma, Metatarsalgia, or a stress fracture. The first two were a clinical diagnosis that didn’t require x-rays or MRI. Treatment for both (Morton’s Neuroma and Metatarsalgia) were similar. Both benefited from plenty of forefoot cushioning, while a Morton’s Neuroma needs the widest shoe that you can find. An orthotic is helpful, both to shift weight away from the metatarsal heads and as a vehicle for applying a metatarsal pad. The orthotic can be a ready made one of moldable foam that that adapts to your foot with walking. I had consistently good results with XPE Half-Sole orthotics in the correct size from Alimed (Dedham, Massachusetts) combined with two Spenco Rx Comfort Insoles (a flat sheet of Neoprene rubber), underneath and over top of the orthotic. An oval metatarsal pad of 1/8” foam, glued to the bottom front edge of the orthotic can be cut out of a shoe insole, but I typically bought an extra Spenco Rx Comfort Insole that was consigned to having pieces cut out. The total bill for the orthotic + insoles will usually be less than $50 on Amazon or directly from Alimed (all U.S. prices).

Wide shoes from Altra are excellent. Hoka One shoes in wide width are also good. Haven’t tried them, but I have heard good things about the Topo line of shoes. Merrill and Keen also available in wide widths.

A single, well-placed cortisone injection was occasionally of benefit, though I rarely needed it after getting the patient into a wide shoe + double Spenco insoles + metatarsal pad + XPE orthotic. Repeated cortisone injections can cause soft tissue atrophy and, rarely, tendon or plantar plate rupture, so I avoided them.

Good luck.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
plucking a guitar string from the ball of my foot to the toe, which I presume is the nerve.
Good description. I occasionally have what I call a "twang."
I can't have bare feet or shoes without the orthotics.
I have started wearing croc-type shoes inside the house, for the cushioning
Wide shoes from Altra are excellent. Hoka One shoes in wide width are also good. Haven’t tried them, but I have heard good things about the Topo line of shoes. Merrill and Keen also available in wide widths.
Question about the heel drop: On a trial run of some otherwise super-comfy Topo shoes, I found the big joint at the base of my big toe got sore from having to roll over it more degrees, from the lower position. Does this make sense? Or is it possible that wasn't an issue of the heel drop?

I think another visit to the podiatrist is in my near future. I am going to try a new one because I don't feel that the guy I've been to several times is really terribly interested in my input.
 

OTH86

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés five times, Madrid two days, Ingles once.
Hi @Martin.P ~
I had this problem - ball of the right foot felt like a stone was in my boot, extremely painful, I could barely walk! Went in to a farmacia in Fromista. The pharmacist gave me an insert for my boot to try. It had a bit of a heel cup, a bit of an arch support and ended about an inch distally from the toes. There’s an oval-shaped pad a bit further back from where I feel the pain - all part of the insert. He tested several inserts, until he found the one that fit my foot best. My Spanish isn’t up to this sort of discussion, but he was very happy, and smiling, and apparently reassuring me it would be better now. And it was! All the way to Santiago - and beyond. 🥰

When I got home and went to a podiatrist, he said that pharmacist was exactly right — the insert was perfectly fitted with the pad so when I step on the foot, the insert pushes forward (towards the toes) - I don’t know why, but it works for me. He also recommended that I get boots with a larger toe box.

I still have the insert from Fromista, and use it in my old boots and some other shoes. I now have new Hoka boots, with a larger toe box, and have no more problems. Well, until yesterday, when I wore walking shoes I haven’t worn for a long time, and there was the stone. Discovered those shoes are narrower than I should be wearing! I had no idea!

Obviously, no guarantee this will work for you, but at minimal cost and no invasive procedures, maybe you can sort it yourself. And when you get to Fromista, cross the “bridge” over the canal and continue along that street until you see a small Santander bank on the left at a large intersection, turn left at the corner and see the green farmacia sign - that’s Juan Ramón Rodríguez Medina’s farmacia… thank him for me!

Good luck!! And Buen Camino to you and your feet!
 

Acoupar

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Via de la Plata (2017)
Sanabres (2017)
Mozarabe (2018)
Ingles (2018)
Portuguese (Lisbon) 2019
I too have experienced metatarsal issues. I could only describe it as feeling like all the bones were broken. No lumps just sharp, agonizing pain in the metatarsal area. Never diagnosed. It usually hits me around the 7 km mark. I have to sit down, remove my boots and sock to massage the joints. After a short rest, I could walk again. Sometimes I just powered through the pain.
I had custom orthotics made which sort of lifted the front of my arch, taking pressure off those bones. They helped. Also I wear hiking boots with a wide toe box with stiff soles.
Every night I rubbed Traumeel all over the ball of my foot and the top side. Some Advil too. It seemed to cure me, but still acts up from time to time.
Keeping ahead of the pain by taking regular breaks is paramount.
 
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Frances. September 2017
Hi C,

Thank you for your response.

So, morton's is also called an "intermetatarsal neuroma because it's located in the ball of the foot between your metatarsal bones. It happens when the tissue around a nerve that leads to a toe thickens from irritation or compression".

Inter metatarsil bursitis is an "inflammation of a small fluid filled sac that lies between the metatarsal heads.
The bursa becomes swollen and can cause pressure on the nerve in the web space."

So, maybe not much difference between both? Not sure exactly how yours feel but I suppose mine feels like a small little balloon under the ball of my foot, if I plant my foot a certain way it can give a very sudden shot of pain, feels as if the balloon is folding over & can feel like someone is plucking a guitar string from the ball of my foot to the toe, which I presume is the nerve.

While running I tended to run on the side of my foot or scrunch up my toes to protect the ball - this was not good for the rest of my foot or further up thru the Achilles, calf, knee & IT band.

I find I can walk most comfortable in my hiking boots, a good solid, less flexible soles. When walking/running in trail shoes/runners they are too flexible & when planting my foot - heel-ball-toe it hurts between ball & toe. Ergo the less flexible boots are better for me.

X-ray will not show, I had to get dye injected for the MRI to catch it.

I'm waiting for some sort of cortisone injection in between my toes. It's a day visit to hospital, I think radiologists may be involved & he says I'll need a couple of days off work.......
Hi there, I don’t have same problem, but thought I would share my experience with cortisone shot for foot problem. I had a ‘bursitis’ that involved fluid in sac on inside ankle area/where instep meets ankle. It caused me lots of discomfort and radiated to other area of foot, lower leg, calf etc. On camino I took ibuprofen to ease the pain. Back in Canada, the sac was identified through ultra sound. Doc removed the fluid using a syringe type instrument and followed with a cortisone injection, I had just the one injection and it worked. I subsequently walked another Camino with just a small amount of discomfort starting in the final days. Doc says I may in future experience same issue and can get another cortisone shot. I’m more diligent now about stretching the area, including calf and shin areas after running and walking. I’ll send good thoughts your cortisone treatment is as effective as mine.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I could only describe it as feeling like all the bones were broken. No lumps just sharp, agonizing pain in the metatarsal area. Never diagnosed. It usually hits me around the 7 km mark.
Have you considered that it might be a stress fracture? Since stress fractures are hard to diagnose definitively, it is hard to make the necessary commitment to the only treatment that will work - about 6 weeks of (almost) total rest for the foot. A few years back I had a stress fracture that was like that - I could walk about 8 km before it really bothered me. It was diagnosed with a bone scan, so I was forced to accept the treatment. It healed 100% after 6-7 weeks of virtually no walking. (Not 4 weeks, or 5 weeks)

I sometimes wonder if I have another one on my other foot now. However, I refuse to have another expensive bone scan (at public cost, but free to me) for something that should be cured by inexpensive common-sense treatment - 6 weeks of rest. The problem is that I don't want to take that rest unless I am certain that it is necessary. That is my quandary. I should at least talk to a podiatrist to get a better idea of the odds.
 

howardd5

New Member
Hi all,

Has anyone got any experience of the aforementioned? I have been experiencing discomfort with this since July 2019, finally saw a specialist in February 2020, MRI in March, Covid delayed follow up in August & now waiting for a slot to get a cortisone injection.

Main main question is - has anyone had a successful outcome from this procedure. Consultant told me that it might take a couple of injections or may not work at all.

Walks are now few & far between, running is non-existent since March, will I run again, will I have pain free hikes?

Sounds a bit silly worrying about being able to hike/run in the current climate when so many other people have so much more serious ailments/worries. So please forgive if I offend.

Thanking you all in advance,
M.
I have had a similar condition because of hiking on rough terrain in thin soled shoes . I thought it might get better by itself , but 3 months and it still was painful . I got one steroid shot between the bones in my foot( it was painful) but ina couple day I was fine . Dont wait get the shot , it’s the inflammation that keeps it going .
 

Martin.P

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Via Algarvinia (Sept 12)
Camino Frances (June 16)
Via de la Plata (May 19)
Finisterre (July 16)
Martin I have the same. I persevered for years until the pain put my gate off to the extent that I had pain right up to the knee. I also scrunched the toes under with the pain. Saw specialist and the suggestion was to see an podiatrist. I walked away with orthotics with a blimp under the ball of the foot so that on every step it opens up the metatarsals so that the cyst slides between and doesn't squash it. I can't have bare feet or shoes without the orthotics. It worked for me and have since done four caminos and waiting to do more. Hope you find some solution suitable for you.
Martin I have the same. I persevered for years until the pain put my gate off to the extent that I had pain right up to the knee. I also scrunched the toes under with the pain. Saw specialist and the suggestion was to see an podiatrist. I walked away with orthotics with a blimp under the ball of the foot so that on every step it opens up the metatarsals so that the cyst slides between and doesn't squash it. I can't have bare feet or shoes without the orthotics. It worked for me and have since done four caminos and waiting to do more. Hope you find some solution suitable for you.
Thank you lindigo,
Yes, before being sent for the MRI my consultant sent me for physio, she inserted a pad in my shoes, yes it prevented the "pinch" for the most part (walking) but not the cure I long for, I need to know if I can run long distance again. At the moment I cannot manage 2 miles. If not, then I'll move on, use orthotics & be happy & grateful for what I still have.
Thanks again,
M
 

Martin.P

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Via Algarvinia (Sept 12)
Camino Frances (June 16)
Via de la Plata (May 19)
Finisterre (July 16)
@Martin.P
I do not have this condition, but I have a deteriorated knee and am waiting for surgery. I can say that I have had cortisone injections in that knee twice and have had no effects from the injections. My health care paid for them, but it did not pay for an alternate injection: hyaluronic acid injection. This also had no effect, but cost me $450 CAN. If your doctor suggests this and your insurance will cover it, it might be a good idea. But I would think it through carefully if you had no effect from the cortisone injections and no insurance coverage for this.
Thank you Albertagirl,
I have never heard of a hyaluronic acid injection, you learn something new everyday, I'll keep that in my back pocket just in case.
Thanks again,
M
 
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Martin.P

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Via Algarvinia (Sept 12)
Camino Frances (June 16)
Via de la Plata (May 19)
Finisterre (July 16)
Yes I have this in my left foot. It has troubled me now for 3 years, but was aggravated by several incorrect diagnoses and inappropriate treatment, by doctors, physios, podiatrists and even the sports specialist. I spent literally thousands on orthotics and other treatments, none of which worked - and shoes that should have eased it (they didnt). And this year specialist appointments have been delayed hugely because of Covid. I had another MRI 4 months ago and have still not had the results back.
Last year I received a cortisone injection which I was assured would fix it, but in fact it aggravated it so much more that I was crippled. I went from being able to walk with pain, to constant pain - sharp pulsing electric shocks shooting down my toes. The reaction to cortisone was so severe I had to hire a knee scooter and existed on strong painkillers for over a month initially. Then crutches for a few more weeks. I could almost not think of anything else the reaction was so severe.
Now I can walk as long as I take continue to take anti-inflammatories. I walked the Camino from Leon to Santiago last September. Not my best speed, and I iced it every night, and slept with my foot up on my pack. Really annoying as I dont normally sleep on my back. I walked in loose sandals with a very stiff sole and straps that didn't press down on it. I sent my pack ahead to limit the weight on my foot. It was still sore but walking the Camino was worth it. Everyone thought I was nuts to go, but walking the Camino didnt make it any worse.
I walk each day up to 8 kms but usually about 6kms with my dogs again i wear running shoes with an orthotic to reduce the flexibility. It is the only thing that has worked..
Covid has meant more time at home - not wearing shoes, which has helped. The area is still so tender that it hurts when the sheets touch it, and I am very limited in footwear as I cant have anything that touches that area at all. I find that I cant stand, I either have to be moving, or sitting with my foot up, standing still or sitting with my foot down is painful.
When I was younger, 30 years ago, I remember that I had hip bursitis. I remember having physio treatment, which must have worked as I haven't been troubled with it since, so hopefully there is some treatment for this that will work
Hi Anamiri,
Yes, same here I had my "Contrast" MRI March 13th & my follow up appointment & results mid August. I'm very sorry to hear about the reaction to the cortisone injection, sounds awful. I have to agree with your friends, a camino with your difficulties is mad! But fair play to your dedication & persistence, you must be either very stubborn or have great will power. I do hope you had an answer/solution soon. You have but my pain/discomfort into better perspective. You must have the patience if a saint.....
Thank you,
M
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
Thank you Albertagirl,
I have never heard of a hyaluronic acid injection, you learn something new everyday, I'll keep that in my back pocket just in case.
Thanks again,
M
This word "hyaluronic acid" I found online while looking for specific details on the alternative injection which I had after cortisone injections failed. I was told that it was intended to replace the liquid in my damaged knee. I do not think that this is the market name for this product, as various alternative product names were given.
 

Martin.P

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Via Algarvinia (Sept 12)
Camino Frances (June 16)
Via de la Plata (May 19)
Finisterre (July 16)
Respectfully, I don’t recollect ever using the diagnosis of intermetatarsal bursitis (36 years of a hospital podiatry practice + just retired). My thoughts below are not an attempt to diagnose you from afar, but rather broad treatment suggestions.

Most instances of forefoot pain were either Morton’s Neuroma, Metatarsalgia, or a stress fracture. The first two were a clinical diagnosis that didn’t require x-rays or MRI. Treatment for both (Morton’s Neuroma and Metatarsalgia) were similar. Both benefited from plenty of forefoot cushioning, while a Morton’s Neuroma needs the widest shoe that you can find. An orthotic is helpful, both to shift weight away from the metatarsal heads and as a vehicle for applying a metatarsal pad. The orthotic can be a ready made one of moldable foam that that adapts to your foot with walking. I had consistently good results with XPE Half-Sole orthotics in the correct size from Alimed (Dedham, Massachusetts) combined with two Spenco Rx Comfort Insoles (a flat sheet of Neoprene rubber), underneath and over top of the orthotic. An oval metatarsal pad of 1/8” foam, glued to the bottom front edge of the orthotic can be cut out of a shoe insole, but I typically bought an extra Spenco Rx Comfort Insole that was consigned to having pieces cut out. The total bill for the orthotic + insoles will usually be less than $50 on Amazon or directly from Alimed (all U.S. prices).

Wide shoes from Altra are excellent. Hoka One shoes in wide width are also good. Haven’t tried them, but I have heard good things about the Topo line of shoes. Merrill and Keen also available in wide widths.

A single, well-placed cortisone injection was occasionally of benefit, though I rarely needed it after getting the patient into a wide shoe + double Spenco insoles + metatarsal pad + XPE orthotic. Repeated cortisone injections can cause soft tissue atrophy and, rarely, tendon or plantar plate rupture, so I avoided them.

Good luck.
Hi Penbaysail,
Thank you for the advice,
Yes, before seeing the consultant GP's & Physio's diagnosed it as probable Morton's Neuroma. I believe very similar to the Bursitis. Morton's Neuroma being inflammation of the nerve? Bursitis being a rip or tear in a sack which prevents rubbing of the metatarsils? (My definition is probably way off).
I have always found that I've needed wide shoes, boots or runners. Last pair of runners were Mizuno's, I felt my gait was changed dramatically by the Hokas but if I can get back running again I think I'll be going down that line, or perhaps try the Altra as I've heard a lot about them in the last couple of years.
Thanks for the info,
M.
 

Natcats

Veteran | author | graphic designer | walker
Year of past OR future Camino
Chemin des Outaouais (2014)
Le Puy 1 of 2 (2015)
Le Puy 2 of 2 (2022)?
Camino Francés (2022)?
As with many others here (hi fellow metatarsal bobos sufferers!), I use small pads that I stick on my insoles. I get these metatarsal pads online, for about 25$/dozen pairs. I have Morton's neuromas in both feet, and have suffered for almost a decade. A lasting gift from the army. Absolutely nothing else worked for me (custom orthotics, injections, laser, and taping). I didn't want to try surgery as I was unconvinced it would fix anything. The first long-distance hike I did with my met pads was GLORIOUS. I didn't have that feeling of walking on broken feet or having an eternal pebble in my shoe. In a crunch, I have fashioned them myself with layers of felt and k-tape!

I used that video to help guide me (sorry, can't do the fancy link thing on my phone):

Good luck! 🦶🏻
 

howardd5

New Member
This word "hyaluronic acid" I found online while looking for specific details on the alternative injection which I had after cortisone injections failed. I was told that it was intended to replace the liquid in my damaged knee. I do not think that this is the market name for this product, as various alternative product names were given.
I have taken this as a supplement off and on in pill form ,it is supposed to help rebuild the cartlidge in the joint . I did not notice any re!ief but since i have a BIG bottle i take one now and again .
 
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howardd5

New Member
@Martin.P
I do not have this condition, but I have a deteriorated knee and am waiting for surgery. I can say that I have had cortisone injections in that knee twice and have had no effects from the injections. My health care paid for them, but it did not pay for an alternate injection: hyaluronic acid injection. This also had no effect, but cost me $450 CAN. If your doctor suggests this and your insurance will cover it, it might be a good idea. But I would think it through carefully if you had no effect from the cortisone injections and no insurance coverage for this.
I had a painful knee after last may's west highland way hike in Scotland .it would not go away .anti inflammatory pills was only of little help . I went to an orthipedic who said you are getting old and live with it . I went to a sports ortho who immediately said ,i can fix it arthoscoptly . Three little incissions and he trimed a torn meniscus and flushwd out a lifetime of cartlidge fibers and i was back to my normal in 3 weeks ,best thing i ever had a doctor do , get the right guy who does this every week and get references first .But do it .
 

Martin.P

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As with many others here (hi fellow metatarsal bobos sufferers!), I use small pads that I stick on my insoles. I get these metatarsal pads online, for about 25$/dozen pairs. I have Morton's neuromas in both feet, and have suffered for almost a decade. A lasting gift from the army. Absolutely nothing else worked for me (custom orthotics, injections, laser, and taping). I didn't want to try surgery as I was unconvinced it would fix anything. The first long-distance hike I did with my met pads was GLORIOUS. I didn't have that feeling of walking on broken feet or having an eternal pebble in my shoe. In a crunch, I have fashioned them myself with layers of felt and k-tape!

I used that video to help guide me (sorry, can't do the fancy link thing on my phone):

Good luck! 🦶🏻
Hi Natcats,
Very good video, simple, clear explanation in the use of orthotics. I have been using an insert given by Physio's & if all else fails (which by reading a lot of posts - it may well) I will resign myself to permanent use of orthotics. I know they can help me keep the pressure off the Bursitis/Neuroma while walking but my running is still suffering. Having said that, after watching this video I may play around with positioning & thickness of inserts while I'm waiting for procedure.
Thank you again,
M
 

Martin.P

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Via Algarvinia (Sept 12)
Camino Frances (June 16)
Via de la Plata (May 19)
Finisterre (July 16)
I had a painful knee after last may's west highland way hike in Scotland .it would not go away .anti inflammatory pills was only of little help . I went to an orthipedic who said you are getting old and live with it . I went to a sports ortho who immediately said ,i can fix it arthoscoptly . Three little incissions and he trimed a torn meniscus and flushwd out a lifetime of cartlidge fibers and i was back to my normal in 3 weeks ,best thing i ever had a doctor do , get the right guy who does this every week and get references first .But do it .
Hi Howardd5,
Yes I also had cartlidge scraped out in me right knee many years ago, a great relief. The guy I'm seeing is a specialist in foot injuries, so hopefully 🤞.
Go raibh math agat,
M.
 

Martin.P

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Via Algarvinia (Sept 12)
Camino Frances (June 16)
Via de la Plata (May 19)
Finisterre (July 16)
Hi there, I don’t have same problem, but thought I would share my experience with cortisone shot for foot problem. I had a ‘bursitis’ that involved fluid in sac on inside ankle area/where instep meets ankle. It caused me lots of discomfort and radiated to other area of foot, lower leg, calf etc. On camino I took ibuprofen to ease the pain. Back in Canada, the sac was identified through ultra sound. Doc removed the fluid using a syringe type instrument and followed with a cortisone injection, I had just the one injection and it worked. I subsequently walked another Camino with just a small amount of discomfort starting in the final days. Doc says I may in future experience same issue and can get another cortisone shot. I’m more diligent now about stretching the area, including calf and shin areas after running and walking. I’ll send good thoughts your cortisone treatment is as effective as mine.
Thank you Madamjoy - gives me hope!
 

Martin.P

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Via Algarvinia (Sept 12)
Camino Frances (June 16)
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Finisterre (July 16)
I too have experienced metatarsal issues. I could only describe it as feeling like all the bones were broken. No lumps just sharp, agonizing pain in the metatarsal area. Never diagnosed. It usually hits me around the 7 km mark. I have to sit down, remove my boots and sock to massage the joints. After a short rest, I could walk again. Sometimes I just powered through the pain.
I had custom orthotics made which sort of lifted the front of my arch, taking pressure off those bones. They helped. Also I wear hiking boots with a wide toe box with stiff soles.
Every night I rubbed Traumeel all over the ball of my foot and the top side. Some Advil too. It seemed to cure me, but still acts up from time to time.
Keeping ahead of the pain by taking regular breaks is paramount.
Hi Acoupar,
My God that's sounds hellish. I'm not that bad thankfully but yes totally agree with the use of stiff soled hiking boots with a wide toe, make a huge difference to me while walking. Unfortunately stiff soled runners are not that favourable to long distance running & that's where I want to get back to.
Thank you & I hope your pain eases.
M.
 
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Martin.P

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
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Hi @Martin.P ~
I had this problem - ball of the right foot felt like a stone was in my boot, extremely painful, I could barely walk! Went in to a farmacia in Fromista. The pharmacist gave me an insert for my boot to try. It had a bit of a heel cup, a bit of an arch support and ended about an inch distally from the toes. There’s an oval-shaped pad a bit further back from where I feel the pain - all part of the insert. He tested several inserts, until he found the one that fit my foot best. My Spanish isn’t up to this sort of discussion, but he was very happy, and smiling, and apparently reassuring me it would be better now. And it was! All the way to Santiago - and beyond. 🥰

When I got home and went to a podiatrist, he said that pharmacist was exactly right — the insert was perfectly fitted with the pad so when I step on the foot, the insert pushes forward (towards the toes) - I don’t know why, but it works for me. He also recommended that I get boots with a larger toe box.

I still have the insert from Fromista, and use it in my old boots and some other shoes. I now have new Hoka boots, with a larger toe box, and have no more problems. Well, until yesterday, when I wore walking shoes I haven’t worn for a long time, and there was the stone. Discovered those shoes are narrower than I should be wearing! I had no idea!

Obviously, no guarantee this will work for you, but at minimal cost and no invasive procedures, maybe you can sort it yourself. And when you get to Fromista, cross the “bridge” over the canal and continue along that street until you see a small Santander bank on the left at a large intersection, turn left at the corner and see the green farmacia sign - that’s Juan Ramón Rodríguez Medina’s farmacia… thank him for me!

Good luck!! And Buen Camino to you and your feet!
Thank you OTH86,
That's a great story, fair play to that pharmacist, such care, such dedication to care but then it's an experience that you meet again & again from locals on a Camino.
Thanks for the advice, I'll be going ahead with the procedure, but will definitely now be looking more closely at an insert while waiting for the call & perhaps afterwards also for extra comfort while walking. I'm also going to look into ortho inserts more closely for long distance running.
Thanks,
M
 

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