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Interesting statistics

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trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
I found some interesting statistics about pilgrim numbers, which routes are being walked more and less, average distance walked by pilgrims, etc.

This page has the trends of the Camino, such as there are now more people starting from Porto than SJPdP

A snippet from the site (I used Google Chrome browser, which translated into English)

The main trends of the 2018 Santiago Camino reported by gronze.com
  • Porto is ahead of Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port for the first time as a starting point.
  • The number of people entering Sarria continues to increase (one point compared to 2017), with 27% of the total in 2018.
  • The number of pilgrims from Ponferrada, Astorga, León, Burgos or Pamplona is decreasing.
  • The most popular route is Caminho Portugués de la Costa, followed by Camino Inglés.
  • The attendance of Camino Francés continues to drop, and for the first time falls below the 60% mark (56.88% in 2018).

This page shows the statistics of how many pilgrims started from SJPdP each month, including this graph

Répartition-par-mois-Bureau-de-Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port-2018.png

 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
Very interesting report and conclusion........

First conclusions of the author pending final statistics
The trend seems clear. The millenarian and long distance international road is gradually becoming a short, easy, affordable Galician experience. And devoid of the character of adventure, spirituality and depth it once had. The market has attracted the camino in his nets. The balance has already been broken between the two ways of conceiving the pilgrimage. We are witnessing the victory of the vaporous, commercial, ephemeral vision of an experience that is no longer given the importance it deserves.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
Very interesting report and conclusion........

First conclusions of the author pending final statistics
The trend seems clear. The millenarian and long distance international road is gradually becoming a short, easy, affordable Galician experience. And devoid of the character of adventure, spirituality and depth it once had. The market has attracted the camino in his nets. The balance has already been broken between the two ways of conceiving the pilgrimage. We are witnessing the victory of the vaporous, commercial, ephemeral vision of an experience that is no longer given the importance it deserves.
I think that the "good news" of the statistics is that for the majority of the Camino Frances (before Sarria) it is not becoming too crowded. In fact, the new albergues that have been built in the last few years need us!

And I understand the appeal of the Portuguese route from Porto, since it can be done in less than two weeks, which makes it appealing for those who have 2 weeks of vacation(holiday) time to do the Camino, and want to arrive in Santiago
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
I think that the "good news" of the statistics is that for the majority of the Camino Frances (before Sarria) it is not becoming too crowded. In fact, the new albergues that have been built in the last few years need us!

And I understand the appeal of the Portuguese route from Porto, since it can be done in less than two weeks, which makes it appealing for those who have 2 weeks of vacation(holiday) time to do the Camino, and want to arrive in Santiago
Yes it was interesting to see the stats on the declining average distance for Pilgrims.........
Though I'm sure the CF is still the most popular route........... (might have been a typo or mis-translation)
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
Thanks @trecile for posting this. But the statement under "Main trends" that "the most popular route is Caminho Portugués de la Costa, followed by Camino Inglés" is clearly wrong - they must have meant something else. I couldn't easily track it back to the source.
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
"Le chemin dont la fréquentation a le plus augmenté est le Caminho Portugués de la Costa, suivi du Camino Inglés. "

It actually says that the route with the largest increase in numbers was the Coastal Portuguese, followed by the Ingles. So not the most popular route, but the one increasing fastest. :)
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
the statement under "Main trends" that "the most popular route is Caminho Portugués de la Costa, followed by Camino Inglés" is clearly wrong - they must have meant something else. I couldn't easily track it back to the source.
The Portugués de la Costa, followed by the Camino Inglés had the highest growth rates in 2018. Not the highest numbers of pilgrims.

Quotes:
Le chemin dont la fréquentation a le plus augmenté est le Caminho Portugués de la Costa, suivi du Camino Inglés (French translation of the original article).
El Camino que más crece en proporción es el Portugués de la Costa, seguido del Camino Inglés (original article).
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
The attendance of Camino Francés continues to drop, and for the first time falls below the 60% mark (56.88% in 2018).
This is not correct. The attendance of the Camino Francés continues to grow.

Camino Frances in 2017: 180,738 pilgrims. They represent 60,64% of the total number of pilgrims recorded.
Camino Frances in 2018: 186,199 pilgrims. They represent 56,88% of the total number of pilgrims recorded.

I sympathise to some extent but A. Pombo's article is basically a lament that nowadays too many people can afford - time wise, money wise (they don't have to work during the time they spend on the camino) - to be away from home. Many more people than before can afford to spend time away from home and from work to go on a camino year after year. Many more people than before can afford to spend time away from home and from work several times per year. Instead of these summary comments based on mere numbers - "they are all vain consumers and I despise them for not knowing better" - I'd be interested in a comprehensive survey of the actual motives and views of the short distance walkers.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013) San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
Statistics easily dazzle me. I extracted 2006 to compare, and it is roughly double for 2018. I say, roughly. That does not say that there are twice as many walking from A to B on a given day, just that the average (a makey-uppy piece of fake news) pans out at twice as many. I hope to have a real experience of that for myself soon on a part of the CF, so can make a comparison based on those days I will walk, and the numbers who will pass me out. They will all pass me out!
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Camino Frances in 2017: 180,738 pilgrims. They represent 60,64% of the total number of pilgrims recorded.
Camino Frances in 2018: 186,199 pilgrims. They represent 56,88% of the total number of pilgrims recorded.

The attendance of the Camino Francés continues to grow.
I noticed that the writer (A. Pombo) characterises this as a "continuation of the accelerated agony" of the Camino Frances (Prosigue la acelerada agonía del Camino Francés, que por vez primera baja del 60% del total de peregrinos (56,88%)). As I said, I find these statistics interesting and I sympathise with the concerns about high numbers of pilgrims on the road at the same time and with the concerns about their potential lack of the right attitude which might affect those with the right attitude but this kind of polemics puts me off.

And it always amuses me a little that Anton Pombo is apparently, among other things, a successful author of camino guidebooks ... that provide toda la información de interés para el peregrino organizada en torno a mapas del máximo detalle: calidad del suelo en cada tramo (pedregoso, tierra pisada, asfaltado...), gradiente de cuestas, perfiles altimétricos, zonas en sombra, fuentes, albergues... aiudades, pueblos y aldeas: su atmósfera jacobea, los vestigios históricos y artísticos de la peregrinación... albergues, hostales, restaurantes y todos los servicios para el peregrino disponibles en cada punto de las etapas. To quote Goethe: Die ich rief, die Geister, werd ich nun nicht los. ☺
 
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lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
Once again the question arises of what is pilgrimage. Is it losing its meaning?
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
the average (a makey-uppy piece of fake news)
Come on, Kirkie! :p The "average" is as good an indicator as many words are (e.g. "about double, if you consider the grand total over all the days in the year") and better than other words ("many more") .

It is too bad that the various reports and summaries have made it so hard for us to understand the non-fakey facts that have been gathered.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
Heavens no.
Being diluted in places, perhaps, but there are still plenty of pilgrims out there.
I believe that is very true on less traveled caminos. I have not walked the CF since 2014 but from what I have read and what I have heard from other pilgrims there are more and more of the "touragrino" people and the numbers are growing. I hope you are alot more correct than I am. I will walk the CF starting in November so I doubt that will be a good indicator of my theory.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
but from what I have read and what I have heard from other pilgrims there are more and more of the "touragrino" people and the numbers are growing.
That's what dilution means, and what I meant.

Sure, on parts of the Francés there are plenty of people having an inexpensive holiday - but if you don't act like a tourigrino, you won't have to deal with so many. Basic places (like San Anton and San Nicholas, both without electricity), don't attract so many 'tourigrinos.'
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
That's what dilution means, and what I meant.

Sure, on parts of the Francés there are plenty of people having an inexpensive holiday - but if you don't act like a tourigrino, you won't have to deal with so many. Basic places (like San Anton and San Nicholas, both without electricity), don't attract so many 'tourigrinos.'
I am not sure about San Nicolas but I was just watching a short documentary and they stayed at San Anton and it looked like a wonderful place to be. Unfortunately it closes in September and according to Gronze and Wise Pilgrim San Nicholas (it is in Larrasoána, correct?) closes in October. I don't start from SJPP on October 29th. I may be in Larrasoaña by the 30th so maybe I will get in under the wire.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
San Nicholas (it is in Larrasoána, correct?)
The one I was thinking of is near Itero de la Vega. I'm not sure when it closes, but hopefully you're lucky, @It56ny.
Both these places are really special.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013) San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
Come on, Kirkie! :p The "average" is as good an indicator as many words are (e.g. "about double, if you consider the grand total over all the days in the year") and better than other words ("many more") .

It is too bad that the various reports and summaries have made it so hard for us to understand the non-fakey facts that have been gathered.
Average. The average person. Show me that person! Please. When I went to school, last century, that person did not ever appear at any event...
Edit: C clearly, don’t mind me. I should just have minded my own business and let the thread get on with its own business.
 
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jimmyc

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015
Interesting that Porto has become the Sarria of the Portuguese camino. This is a shame as Portugal is a beautiful country and it is seen at it best when walking from Lisbon.
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
Interesting that Porto has become the Sarria of the Portuguese camino. This is a shame as Portugal is a beautiful country and it is seen at it best when walking from Lisbon.
In that sense, I'd say Tui is much more "Sarrian" than Porto. That's where you find most pilgrims that are pressed for time or are just getting a 'taste' of what the Camino in like, still within the boundaries to get a Compostela.
In Porto there were no crowds, it probably became a popular starting point because it fits in a 2-week holiday and it is very practical to get to, finding accommodation, etc. Starting from Lisbon would require a much longer amount of leave.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Interesting article by Antón Plombhttps://www.gronze.com/articulos/tendencias-camino-santiago-records-y-otras-medias-verdades-17039 (original article in Spanish written in January 2019).

As we have seen, Google translate is not ideal so thanks to the contributors who corrected the misinformation and incorrect conclusions.

I just want to come to the defence of Antón Plomb. I had the opportunity to meet him in Ponferrada several years ago when a hospitalera there. Yes, he may be a writer of guides, actually since the early 1990's, but he is also a very respected Camino historian and investigator (has a doctorate in contemporary history). He is a staunch defender of all things Camino related which is evidenced by his work and passion for the Camino.

One may not agree with his conclusions and opinions but he is clearly concerned about the explosive growth and concomitant problems, also the ever increasing promotion of the Camino by the Galician Office of Tourism. As we say in Dutch, he puts his finger on the sore spot. personally hope that he continues to do just that.
 
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Walking Lover

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CdS from Leon to Santiago, June 16, 2016 to June 30, 2016.
I found some interesting statistics about pilgrim numbers, which routes are being walked more and less, average distance walked by pilgrims, etc.

This page has the trends of the Camino, such as there are now more people starting from Porto than SJPdP

A snippet from the site (I used Google Chrome browser, which translated into English)

The main trends of the 2018 Santiago Camino reported by gronze.com
  • Porto is ahead of Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port for the first time as a starting point.
  • The number of people entering Sarria continues to increase (one point compared to 2017), with 27% of the total in 2018.
  • The number of pilgrims from Ponferrada, Astorga, León, Burgos or Pamplona is decreasing.
  • The most popular route is Caminho Portugués de la Costa, followed by Camino Inglés.
  • The attendance of Camino Francés continues to drop, and for the first time falls below the 60% mark (56.88% in 2018).

This page shows the statistics of how many pilgrims started from SJPdP each month, including this graph

View attachment 60990

Interesting! We did the P in '17 and finished the Ingles last week. We saw few pilgrims on any day while walking.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Interesting that Porto has become the Sarria of the Portuguese camino. This is a shame as Portugal is a beautiful country and it is seen at it best when walking from Lisbon.
I tend to think of Tui as the Sarria of the Portuguese Camino. I think of Porto as the SJPP, where most pilgrims start (who aren't starting in Tui). Then Lisbon becomes like the Le Puy of the Portuguese Camino and pilgrims starting south of Lisbon become like pilgrims starting in Switzerland or Poland or the like on the Frances.
 
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Karl G

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 2019 - Somport to Santiago de Compostela
Very interesting report and conclusion........

First conclusions of the author pending final statistics
The trend seems clear. The millenarian and long distance international road is gradually becoming a short, easy, affordable Galician experience. And devoid of the character of adventure, spirituality and depth it once had. The market has attracted the camino in his nets. The balance has already been broken between the two ways of conceiving the pilgrimage. We are witnessing the victory of the vaporous, commercial, ephemeral vision of an experience that is no longer given the importance it deserves.
How can any activity that brings people outdoors, provides excellent exercise, connects people personally with strangers, gives them a new appreciation for the environment, time for reflection, and a new perspective on the world possibly be seen as a bad thing?
 
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Thread starter OLDER threads on this topic Forum Replies Date
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