Search over 55.000 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it


Advertisement
Holy Year Credential
Get the HOLY YEAR Camino Credential (Passport) here.
Peaceable Projects Inc.
Peaceable Projects Inc. is a U.S.-based non-profit group that brings the vast resources of the wide world together with the ongoing needs of the people who live, work, and travel on the Camino de Santiago pilgrim trail network in Spain.

Is Something Missing?

Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2017); Camino a Muxia (2017)
While the topics discussed on the Camino Forum are myriad it appears, given the history of the Camino through the centuries, that something is missing from the Forum.

There are discussions about the many different Camino routes; the best time to walk them; recommendations for albergues; discussions about the best shoes or rain gear to wear; what to pack and what to leave at home; how to travel to and from the Camino; medical issues; etc, etc, etc.

What doesn't appear to be discussed centers around ways a pilgrim might reflectively engage with the Camino. It seems like this would be an important topic for discussion, especially for those who set out to walk the Camino as a pilgrim, rather than a tourist.

Now I can imagine someone might suggest that how a pilgrim reflectively engages with the Camino is going to be different for each person. I would counter that whether a Camino pilgrim should wear a poncho or a rain jacket and pants, or carry an umbrella is going to be different for each pilgrim. And yet there are lengthy discussions where members recommend one form of protection from the elements over another.

I'm advocating that pilgrims who are curious about different ways they might reflectively engage with the Camino could benefit from the experiences of pilgrims who have found effective ways of engaging with the Camino and who are willing to share their experiences.

Just a thought.

Buen Camino.
 
Camino Cups
Browse our selection of Camino Cups on the forum store
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.

SabineP

Camino = Gratitude + Compassion.
Year of past OR future Camino
some and then more. see my signature.
While the topics discussed on the Camino Forum are myriad it appears, given the history of the Camino through the centuries, that something is missing from the Forum.

There are discussions about the many different Camino routes; the best time to walk them; recommendations for albergues; discussions about the best shoes or rain gear to wear; what to pack and what to leave at home; how to travel to and from the Camino; medical issues; etc, etc, etc.

What doesn't appear to be discussed centers around ways a pilgrim might reflectively engage with the Camino. It seems like this would be an important topic for discussion, especially for those who set out to walk the Camino as a pilgrim, rather than a tourist.

Now I can imagine someone might suggest that how a pilgrim reflectively engages with the Camino is going to be different for each person. I would counter that whether a Camino pilgrim should wear a poncho or a rain jacket and pants, or carry an umbrella is going to be different for each pilgrim. And yet there are lengthy discussions where members recommend one form of protection from the elements over another.

I'm advocating that pilgrims who are curious about different ways they might reflectively engage with the Camino could benefit from the experiences of pilgrims who have found effective ways of engaging with the Camino and who are willing to share their experiences.

Just a thought.

Buen Camino.


If you type in some keywords ( for example spiritual preparation ) in the right upper searchbox of this forum you will find lots of threads regarding your question.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Tags are also useful for certain popular topics. On the main forum page here, scroll down to see Popular Camino Topics in a sort of "cloud." If you click on one of those topics, you will get a list of threads that have been tagged with one of the set topics.

I have now tagged this thread with "pilgrims & pilgrimage" and "why the camino?" You can see the tags at the top of this thread under the title. Click on them, and happy reading!
 
Silver Oxide Camino de Santiago pendent
Camino de Santiago pendant that has a shell on the front, and "Camino de Santiago" engraved on the back. Comes with a black cord. Pendent is slightly larger than a 50 euro cent coin, about 25mm.
how to successfully prepare for your Camino
This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.

Mónica_Cribe

Mónica
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Portugués 1993,1994 ... 2016
Camino del Norte 2000
Camino a Fisterra 2009
While the topics discussed on the Camino Forum are myriad it appears, given the history of the Camino through the centuries, that something is missing from the Forum.

There are discussions about the many different Camino routes; the best time to walk them; recommendations for albergues; discussions about the best shoes or rain gear to wear; what to pack and what to leave at home; how to travel to and from the Camino; medical issues; etc, etc, etc.

What doesn't appear to be discussed centers around ways a pilgrim might reflectively engage with the Camino. It seems like this would be an important topic for discussion, especially for those who set out to walk the Camino as a pilgrim, rather than a tourist.

Now I can imagine someone might suggest that how a pilgrim reflectively engages with the Camino is going to be different for each person. I would counter that whether a Camino pilgrim should wear a poncho or a rain jacket and pants, or carry an umbrella is going to be different for each pilgrim. And yet there are lengthy discussions where members recommend one form of protection from the elements over another.

I'm advocating that pilgrims who are curious about different ways they might reflectively engage with the Camino could benefit from the experiences of pilgrims who have found effective ways of engaging with the Camino and who are willing to share their experiences.

Just a thought.

Buen Camino.
I also like to know about experiences, because in technical matters there isn´t the same rule for everything and a conversation about poles could be infinite! but we are multi-diferents- pilgrims!
 

Frank Wortley

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
French Caminos - April/May 2013, March/April 2017 and (Sept/Oct 2018)
While the topics discussed on the Camino Forum are myriad it appears, given the history of the Camino through the centuries, that something is missing from the Forum.

There are discussions about the many different Camino routes; the best time to walk them; recommendations for albergues; discussions about the best shoes or rain gear to wear; what to pack and what to leave at home; how to travel to and from the Camino; medical issues; etc, etc, etc.

What doesn't appear to be discussed centers around ways a pilgrim might reflectively engage with the Camino. It seems like this would be an important topic for discussion, especially for those who set out to walk the Camino as a pilgrim, rather than a tourist.

Now I can imagine someone might suggest that how a pilgrim reflectively engages with the Camino is going to be different for each person. I would counter that whether a Camino pilgrim should wear a poncho or a rain jacket and pants, or carry an umbrella is going to be different for each pilgrim. And yet there are lengthy discussions where members recommend one form of protection from the elements over another.

I'm advocating that pilgrims who are curious about different ways they might reflectively engage with the Camino could benefit from the experiences of pilgrims who have found effective ways of engaging with the Camino and who are willing to share their experiences.

Just a thought.

Buen Camino.
Thank you hfenton for raising this question as I believe that it has something to offer everyone.

I have walked the French Camino on three occasions and each one has been a deeply moving and revelatory experience.

My first Camino was in 2013 and I started after a lengthy preparation that included the physical, spiritual, emotional, and psychological. It came at a time when I was moving out of a 40 year vocation and shifting into a related but very different vocational space. I tried to be open to what would happen but could not free myself from expectations of what I might explore during this time. As it turned out nothing I thought would happen, happened.

I was keen to engage with others and sought the adventure of combined intent and fellowship. What happened was that I became confused, uncertain and managed to alienate several people who just wanted to do their Camino. It wasn’t till about day 10 that the penny dropped. While sitting at the airport in Sydney, Australia I had written out a Camino prayer. It contained the line “Lord help me be tentative to the moment.” As I read it on my 10th day was drawn to ask what was capturing my attention in the moment and what came forth was a memory of when I was 14 – a memory I had had twice already on this Camino and one that was familiar to me throughout my life. It was not a flattering memory and as I began to consider it, there emerged from that contemplation a number of things I was challenged to do/resolve. I was startled by the sense of relief I experienced spending time with this past event and during the remainder of the walk. There were a number of other thoughts/memories/situations that came into my awareness. One brought the expression of heartrending grief and another the profound conviction I needed to make right a damaged relationship. These were moving and transformative encounters for me and I see and feel their effects in my life today.

On my second Camino I found myself meeting nightly with a group of 20 to 30-year-olds (I was 66). This was an entirely different Camino and yet the principle of attending to what was happening in the moment made it an enriching and fulfilling time - again with effects that walk with me today.

My last Camino was lonely there being few other pilgrims who are not walking as couples, groups or at significantly different places to me. In many ways it was disappointing. I damaged my left foot on the descent on Napoleon route on the third day and it was my companion to Santiago. That foot spoke to me raising issues of my mortality and ageing. What did I want as I moved into the senior years of my life? Who did I want to become? How do I want to grow as a spiritual person and how did I want to do this with my wife, Brenda? What might we want together in these years and how could I continue to live a contributing life?

Little did I know how these questions prepared us for our future? Brenda and I began discussing these things upon my return and eight months later she received a five year cancer prognosis. And we were prepared for many of the issues raised by that event helping us to negotiate the upheaval linked to such things. Please do not read too much into this. It is simply what happened.

Whether one wishes to self-designate as a “pilgrim” or “tourist” does not seem to matter much because the Camino, as said to me many times is “not about walking from one place to another but what happens on the journey” and as one person wrote, “We may finish walking the Camino but the Camino continues to walking us”.

These are reflections on my pilgrimages and I hope you find them helpful.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2017); Camino a Muxia (2017)
Thank you hfenton for raising this question as I believe that it has something to offer everyone.

I have walked the French Camino on three occasions and each one has been a deeply moving and revelatory experience.

My first Camino was in 2013 and I started after a lengthy preparation that included the physical, spiritual, emotional, and psychological. It came at a time when I was moving out of a 40 year vocation and shifting into a related but very different vocational space. I tried to be open to what would happen but could not free myself from expectations of what I might explore during this time. As it turned out nothing I thought would happen, happened.

I was keen to engage with others and sought the adventure of combined intent and fellowship. What happened was that I became confused, uncertain and managed to alienate several people who just wanted to do their Camino. It wasn’t till about day 10 that the penny dropped. While sitting at the airport in Sydney, Australia I had written out a Camino prayer. It contained the line “Lord help me be tentative to the moment.” As I read it on my 10th day was drawn to ask what was capturing my attention in the moment and what came forth was a memory of when I was 14 – a memory I had had twice already on this Camino and one that was familiar to me throughout my life. It was not a flattering memory and as I began to consider it, there emerged from that contemplation a number of things I was challenged to do/resolve. I was startled by the sense of relief I experienced spending time with this past event and during the remainder of the walk. There were a number of other thoughts/memories/situations that came into my awareness. One brought the expression of heartrending grief and another the profound conviction I needed to make right a damaged relationship. These were moving and transformative encounters for me and I see and feel their effects in my life today.

On my second Camino I found myself meeting nightly with a group of 20 to 30-year-olds (I was 66). This was an entirely different Camino and yet the principle of attending to what was happening in the moment made it an enriching and fulfilling time - again with effects that walk with me today.

My last Camino was lonely there being few other pilgrims who are not walking as couples, groups or at significantly different places to me. In many ways it was disappointing. I damaged my left foot on the descent on Napoleon route on the third day and it was my companion to Santiago. That foot spoke to me raising issues of my mortality and ageing. What did I want as I moved into the senior years of my life? Who did I want to become? How do I want to grow as a spiritual person and how did I want to do this with my wife, Brenda? What might we want together in these years and how could I continue to live a contributing life?

Little did I know how these questions prepared us for our future? Brenda and I began discussing these things upon my return and eight months later she received a five year cancer prognosis. And we were prepared for many of the issues raised by that event helping us to negotiate the upheaval linked to such things. Please do not read too much into this. It is simply what happened.

Whether one wishes to self-designate as a “pilgrim” or “tourist” does not seem to matter much because the Camino, as said to me many times is “not about walking from one place to another but what happens on the journey” and as one person wrote, “We may finish walking the Camino but the Camino continues to walking us”.

These are reflections on my pilgrimages and I hope you find them helpful.
Frank, it sounds like your three Caminos gave you the option to reflect back on the past (1st Camino), concentrate on the present (2nd Camino), and look ahead towards the future (3rd Camino). Each difficult in their own ways, and yet each equally important. Thanks for sharing your experiences. Buen Camino.
 

Did not find what you were looking for? Search here

Popular Resources

“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf ivar
  • Featured
“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf
4.95 star(s) 100 ratings
Downloads
14,999
Updated
A selection of favorite albergues on the Camino Francés Ton van Tilburg
Favorite Albergues along the Camino Frances
4.83 star(s) 35 ratings
Downloads
7,659
Updated
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances ivar
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances
4.88 star(s) 24 ratings
Downloads
7,515
Updated

Similar threads

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Updates on YouTube

Camino Conversations

Most downloaded Resources

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.1%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.7%
  • March

    Votes: 62 4.3%
  • April

    Votes: 212 14.9%
  • May

    Votes: 348 24.4%
  • June

    Votes: 104 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 27 1.9%
  • August

    Votes: 31 2.2%
  • September

    Votes: 414 29.0%
  • October

    Votes: 173 12.1%
  • November

    Votes: 19 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 11 0.8%

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store
Top