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COVID Is the mask required in the albergue and while sleeping?

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Jean Ti

Active Member
I am wondering if the mask is required inside the albergue and in bed for sleeping?

I suppose that the mask is required in the Albergue but I wonder in bed?

This question is for the people currently walking the Camino. Perhaps the rules are different in each Albergue?
 
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Jean Ti

Active Member
I am wondering if the mask is required inside the albergue and in bed for sleeping?

I suppose that the mask is required in the Albergue but I wonder in bed?

This question is for the people currently walking the Camino. Perhaps the rules are different in each Albergue?
?
 
Year of past OR future Camino
2014
I am wondering if the mask is required inside the albergue and in bed for sleeping?

I suppose that the mask is required in the Albergue but I wonder in bed?

This question is for the people currently walking the Camino. Perhaps the rules are different in each Albergue?
Good question. It’s middle of the night in Spain so everyone likely asleep. Hopefully you will get a reply in a few hours.
 

Nix

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Depends on albergue. When signing in usually yes. While in the albergue moving around some pilgrims wear one, some don't. I never saw anyone wear one to sleep but distancing and decreased capacity in albergues are still in place.
I am currently staying in albergues and can confirm that masks or buff above your nose are required inside but not in your bunk so you can sleep well.
 
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Nawhitlow

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Don't worry about it. Use it if you want, no one is gonna want to police that. As of Saturday, no masks in public in Spain unless it's crowded or you are indoors
You’re right that they are not required outdoors, but I flew into Madrid Saturday and am currently in Pamplona, and EVERYONE still masks outdoors. So probably you won’t get in trouble, but currently it’s outside the norm. In albergues, we haven’t been wearing them after checking in, and not to sleep.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Don't worry about it. Use it if you want, no one is gonna want to police that. As of Saturday, no masks in public in Spain unless it's crowded or you are indoors
The question was regarding inside albergues.

And who knows, some autonomous regions may decide to still enforce mask use depending on their infection rate.
 

BuenC_JamieG

Conscious Travel Coach
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Portugal (2020)
Camino del Norte (2020)
You’re right that they are not required outdoors, but I flew into Madrid Saturday and am currently in Pamplona, and EVERYONE still masks outdoors. So probably you won’t get in trouble, but currently it’s outside the norm. In albergues, we haven’t been wearing them after checking in, and not to sleep.
I think it will take some time...probably by next spring it will be more normalized to not wear masks.
 

lisaflora

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
You’re right that they are not required outdoors, but I flew into Madrid Saturday and am currently in Pamplona, and EVERYONE still masks outdoors. So probably you won’t get in trouble, but currently it’s outside the norm. In albergues, we haven’t been wearing them after checking in, and not to sleep.
Technically they ARE obligatory .... until tomorrow. Everyone here masked.
 
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Camino Frances , Pamplona Burgos august 2018 Burgos to Santiago 19 /04 to 20/05/2019
I am wondering if the mask is required inside the albergue and in bed for sleeping?

I suppose that the mask is required in the Albergue but I wonder in bed?

This question is for the people currently walking the Camino. Perhaps the rules are different in each Albergue?
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances , Pamplona Burgos august 2018 Burgos to Santiago 19 /04 to 20/05/2019
I am currently walking the Portuguese coastal . We need the mask inside the Albergue when we walk in the corridors etc but NOT for sleeping !
 

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Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances , Pamplona Burgos august 2018 Burgos to Santiago 19 /04 to 20/05/2019
This notice boards are from Albergue de Sao Tome in Marinhas
It was more or less the same everywhere since I left Porto Sunday the 20th
In towns you wear the masks but not when you walk except when you meet someone in a narrow path maybe , especially if a local for respect
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Year of past OR future Camino
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some autonomous regions may decide to still enforce mask use
None have done so.

As to the question, well, I guess they can just come and arrest me in my sleep.
 
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OzAnnie

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2020
Re the ‘sleeping with mask’ question? - what immediately comes to my mind is the hazard aspect with restless sleepers. Wouldn’t there be a possibility of getting caught up in cords ?
I mostly pull cover or sheet over my face when sleeping in albergues anyway (pre Covid that is) .. .

@Rozenn thanks for the pics from CP current Albergue …. It is so sad to see such a large room with so few ‘available ‘ places to sleep. I realise it is the current restrictions being adhered to but such a knock on effect to the kind and hardworking people providing for us.
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
2022
This notice boards are from Albergue de Sao Tome in Marinhas
It was more or less the same everywhere since I left Porto Sunday the 20th
In towns you wear the masks but not when you walk except when you meet someone in a narrow path maybe , especially if a local for respect
Hi Rozenn, Lynne from our weekly Forum Zoom chats. Thank you for taking the time from your Camino walk to share information.
 

Paul J W

Paul J
Year of past OR future Camino
Miscellaneous camino routes since 2000.
Why ask here?
Have you thought that, perhaps, as you will obviously have a mask with you, your question would be answered as you arrived at an Albergue?
 

Scott Fraser

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2017, 2018
Le Puy - SJPdP 2019
I am wondering if the mask is required inside the albergue and in bed for sleeping?

I suppose that the mask is required in the Albergue but I wonder in bed?

This question is for the people currently walking the Camino. Perhaps the rules are different in each Albergue?
Call me a fun sponge, but let’s think about this for a moment. Does it make sense to wear a mask indoors but not while you are sleeping in a room with other people?

What are the factors we might consider:

1.) Inhalation of airborne droplets and fine aerosol particles containing the virus are a primary source of spreading CoVid. (See https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/201...text=The risk of SARS-,increasing time after% )

2.) Risk of infection increases with the degree of exposure to the virus. The setting (indoor vs outdoor), proximity and length of exposure all seem to matter.

3.) People infected with CoVid can be asymptotic, and odds seem high asymptotic carriers can spread the disease. (See https://www.uchicagomedicine.org/fo...tions-contribute-to-over-50-percent-of-spread ).

4.) The efficacy of masks in preventing the spread of CoVid depends on the type of mask, but it is generally believed that something covering the face is better than nothing.

5.) Albergue dormitories are settings of high human density, close proximity, long duration of possible exposure (overnight) and are often poorly ventilated spaces. Common areas - showers, wash rooms, toilets, kitchens, etc - are areas of possible contact exposure. A year ago albergues would have been considered prime venues for super-spreader events.

6.) Health authorities and government policy makers (aka, the “experts”) have made mistakes during the pandemic, so they may make additional mistakes as they relax the social restrictions. They also set policy based on what’s in the common good, broadly defined. They are not interested in keeping you, as an individual person, safe from all harm. That’s your responsibility.

7.) Vaccination has clearly been shown to dramatically lessen the risks of infection (and therefore personal risk of spreading the disease), but how do you know if the people sleeping in the bunk room with you have been vaccinated?

8.) The CoVid variants now in circulation are thought to be more infectious that the original virus.

9.) Thank God, the situation now is vastly improved since last year. But the facts listed above remain.

So, to sleep with a mask, or not? The answer seems to be a matter of how much risk are you comfortable taking?

If you want to lower the risks involved on Camino in the Age of CoVid, you probably should wear a mask while you are in the confined spaces of the albergue.

Alternatively, you could consider more private forms of accommodation - single or double rooms in private albergues, guest houses, or small hotels. You could think of the additional cost as an health insurance policy.

As always, it’s up to you.

Buen Camino!
 

Gerard Hazelebach

Gerard Hazelebach
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (SJPdP - Santiago) September 2014
"The Peace Walk” (Vienna - Venice) August 2015
I am wondering if the mask is required inside the albergue and in bed for sleeping?

I suppose that the mask is required in the Albergue but I wonder in bed?

This question is for the people currently walking the Camino. Perhaps the rules are different in each Albergue?
Depends if you’re snoring 😂😂
 
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Jean Ti

Active Member
Call me a fun sponge, but let’s think about this for a moment. Does it make sense to wear a mask indoors but not while you are sleeping in a room with other people?

What are the factors we might consider:

1.) Inhalation of airborne droplets and fine aerosol particles containing the virus are a primary source of spreading CoVid. (See https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/201...text=The risk of SARS-,increasing time after% )

2.) Risk of infection increases with the degree of exposure to the virus. The setting (indoor vs outdoor), proximity and length of exposure all seem to matter.

3.) People infected with CoVid can be asymptotic, and odds seem high asymptotic carriers can spread the disease. (See https://www.uchicagomedicine.org/fo...tions-contribute-to-over-50-percent-of-spread ).

4.) The efficacy of masks in preventing the spread of CoVid depends on the type of mask, but it is generally believed that something covering the face is better than nothing.

5.) Albergue dormitories are settings of high human density, close proximity, long duration of possible exposure (overnight) and are often poorly ventilated spaces. Common areas - showers, wash rooms, toilets, kitchens, etc - are areas of possible contact exposure. A year ago albergues would have been considered prime venues for super-spreader events.

6.) Health authorities and government policy makers (aka, the “experts”) have made mistakes during the pandemic, so they may make additional mistakes as they relax the social restrictions. They also set policy based on what’s in the common good, broadly defined. They are not interested in keeping you, as an individual person, safe from all harm. That’s your responsibility.

7.) Vaccination has clearly been shown to dramatically lessen the risks of infection (and therefore personal risk of spreading the disease), but how do you know if the people sleeping in the bunk room with you have been vaccinated?

8.) The CoVid variants now in circulation are thought to be more infectious that the original virus.

9.) Thank God, the situation now is vastly improved since last year. But the facts listed above remain.

So, to sleep with a mask, or not? The answer seems to be a matter of how much risk are you comfortable taking?

If you want to lower the risks involved on Camino in the Age of CoVid, you probably should wear a mask while you are in the confined spaces of the albergue.

Alternatively, you could consider more private forms of accommodation - single or double rooms in private albergues, guest houses, or small hotels. You could think of the additional cost as an health insurance policy.

As always, it’s up to you.

Buen Camino!

If you read my question.

I am asking if you are currently walking the Camino is the mask required in the albergue or while sleeping?
 
Year of past OR future Camino
To Santiago and back (roads & paths; Tours; Francés; sea; roads & paths)
If you want to lower the risks involved on Camino in the Age of CoVid, you probably should wear a mask while you are in the confined spaces of the albergue.

As always, it’s up to you.
No, it is not up to you. It is up to the Covid-19 Safety protocol that the albergue had to implement and that you have to follow if you want to stay there.

And no, you do not "probably wear a mask while you are in the confined spaces of the albergue". You follow the Covid-19 Safety protocol and wear a mask in those circumstances in the albergue where you have to wear a mask and you can take it off in those circumstances in the albergue where you don't have to wear a mask.

Galicia has even translated the Covid-19 Safety protocol for their albergues into English. I recommend their FAQ:

https://www.caminodesantiago.gal/en/safecamino/frequently-asked-questions-on-the-public-network
 
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Roby

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Call me a fun sponge, but let’s think about this for a moment. Does it make sense to wear a mask indoors but not while you are sleeping in a room with other people?

What are the factors we might consider:

1.) Inhalation of airborne droplets and fine aerosol particles containing the virus are a primary source of spreading CoVid. (See https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/science/science-briefs/sars-cov-2-transmission.html#:~:text=The risk of SARS-,increasing time after% )

2.) Risk of infection increases with the degree of exposure to the virus. The setting (indoor vs outdoor), proximity and length of exposure all seem to matter.

3.) People infected with CoVid can be asymptotic, and odds seem high asymptotic carriers can spread the disease. (See https://www.uchicagomedicine.org/fo...tions-contribute-to-over-50-percent-of-spread ).

4.) The efficacy of masks in preventing the spread of CoVid depends on the type of mask, but it is generally believed that something covering the face is better than nothing.

5.) Albergue dormitories are settings of high human density, close proximity, long duration of possible exposure (overnight) and are often poorly ventilated spaces. Common areas - showers, wash rooms, toilets, kitchens, etc - are areas of possible contact exposure. A year ago albergues would have been considered prime venues for super-spreader events.

6.) Health authorities and government policy makers (aka, the “experts”) have made mistakes during the pandemic, so they may make additional mistakes as they relax the social restrictions. They also set policy based on what’s in the common good, broadly defined. They are not interested in keeping you, as an individual person, safe from all harm. That’s your responsibility.

7.) Vaccination has clearly been shown to dramatically lessen the risks of infection (and therefore personal risk of spreading the disease), but how do you know if the people sleeping in the bunk room with you have been vaccinated?

8.) The CoVid variants now in circulation are thought to be more infectious that the original virus.

9.) Thank God, the situation now is vastly improved since last year. But the facts listed above remain.

So, to sleep with a mask, or not? The answer seems to be a matter of how much risk are you comfortable taking?

If you want to lower the risks involved on Camino in the Age of CoVid, you probably should wear a mask while you are in the confined spaces of the albergue.

Alternatively, you could consider more private forms of accommodation - single or double rooms in private albergues, guest houses, or small hotels. You could think of the additional cost as an health insurance policy.

As always, it’s up to you.

Buen Camino!
If the measures are followed and there is a prescribed distance between the beds, there is no danger of the virus spreading due to a longer stay in the room during sleep.
Open windows could even make the situation worse because they could create an air current by which the virus could spread over a greater distance.
If these people in bed are foreigners, there is a high possibility that they were vaccinated because it is a requirement of the Spanish government, at the very least they have proven that they were not infected when entering the country.
Nothing is one hundred percent certain but if we follow the instructions and use a little common sense, there is little chance that we will get sick.
I don’t feel any need to sleep with a mask on.
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Pelgrimspad I, Via Monastica, Via Podiensis, Via de la Plata, Camino Francés, Camino del Norte...
Open windows could even make the situation worse because they could create an air current by which the virus could spread over a greater distance.

I don't think that is true. Ventilation is advertised everywhere as being very important when staying indoors.
 

Faye Walker

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF 2014, CF 2018, CP 2019 from Coimbra
I don't think that is true. Ventilation is advertised everywhere as being very important when staying indoors.

Indeed. Public health requires that any indoor space have open windows with cross-currents, or fantastic ventilation (NYC subway cars were studies as example of exceptionally good ventilation).
Aerosolized viral particles in still air, linger more easily and are inhaled more easily with more frequency. In spaces with exceptional ventilation the particles dissipate too rapidly to cause spread.
Colder air is rather more efficient for holding aerosol particles in the air; hot and humid is better for forcing particles to the ground (where COV dies quite quickly).

What I’m really not sure about is airports. Planes have fantastic air renewal and ventilation when in flight. But airports do not, and waiting planes do not. Queues are long, spaces are frequently crowded, and there’s the obvious vector for international viral mutations…

We do think I picked up a mild COV on a plane that was a wide-body lay-over from the UK picking me and other health researchers up in Ottawa en route to Toronto. The international travellers just stayed aboard, and all the ventilation systems are off while waiting for boarding. Those of us who had been at a large PHAC policy gathering all ended up sick about 4-5 days after the flight (which is a very short 40-minute hop).
 

Marbe2

Active member
Year of past OR future Camino
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
As a vaccinated person, I would not stay in The Fall in a common room…even with distancing. Have been to enough albergues with almost no ventilation in bathrooms and limited if any windows in some sleeping quarters. These places may be incubators for The Delta variance. I hope I am wrong!
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
If the measures are followed and there is a prescribed distance between the beds, there is no danger of the virus spreading due to a longer stay in the room during sleep.

If there isn't adequate ventilation there definitely is danger of the virus spreading over the many hours of sleep.
Open windows could even make the situation worse because they could create an air current by which the virus could spread over a greater distance.

Nope.

 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Year of past OR future Camino
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
Aerosols disperse far more quickly when windows to the outside are open ; it's indoor ventilation that can cause greater concentrations of aerosol fragments in living spaces.

I disagree with several claims that have been made in this thread about masking, though what local laws have to say on the question is another matter.

No polemic though.

FWIW, and as a bit of an off-topic aside, the French rules on outdoor masking could not be simpler -- no need for outdoor masks except in large crowds. I do wish that the Spanish had been equally simple ; there would be far less confusion among pilgrims if they had been.

As to the general attitudes I have seen in Spain, for the most part it's live and let live ; although in those worst hit areas of Catalonia and Aragón, the social pressure is much stronger.

What I've seen though is groups of friends, four masked one unmasked ; couples, one masked the other not ; and so on with little fuss. Broadly, people seem to respect the personal choices of others, and the professional obligations of others too.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I note that I am not an expert but please still listen what I have to say.
We have two options, in one the windows are closed and the beds are at least two meters apart. We know it’s a safe distance and a sick man on one of the beds won’t transmit the disease because we know viruses don’t travel that far. The 8 hours we are spending in that room does not play a role because the virus cannot reach the adjacent beds.
In another situation, one window is open and a light or stronger current of air reaches through it. Thanks to this air current, the virus can "travel" over longer distances and will infect people in adjacent beds. Here 8 hours of sleep plays a role because longer exposure to the virus will increase the chance of getting sick.
If there are more open windows on opposite sides of the room, drafts can take the viruses even further.

I remember one case from the beginning of a pandemic, when epidemiologists were still investigating where someone got sick and to whom they could transmit the virus.
At a restaurant in China, one group celebrated a birthday. Above them was an air conditioner blowing from the wall across their table toward the adjoining tables. The tables were arranged next to each other in a regular line.
At the table where the celebrants were, six people got sick (I'm not entirely sure about the number of people, I'm talking from memory), three people at the next table, one man at the third, no one got sick at the other tables.
The air current created by the air condition device contributed to the spread of the disease.
Of course, we don’t know how hard the air conditioner blew, what the distance was between the tables and some other factors but you understand what it’s all about.
If there is a minimum required gap between the beds, there is a 99.99 percent chance that will not transmit the disease.
If you cause an air current to spread the virus around the room, the distance may no longer be enough and you will spend a lot of time in the room, more than enough to inhale a larger amount of the virus.
There is indeed a recommendation that the rooms be ventilated more often, but this recommendation is for rooms that a large number of people pass through during the day, it serves to get the virus out of the room, so that not all people who pass through that room during the day come into contact with a virus.
This does not apply to a room where one sleeps and where an infected person will be present at all times.

I repeat once again, I am not an expert and I cannot claim that everything I have written is correct, but I truly believe that my claim is correct and I base it on the basis of various studies I have read.
Let everyone decide for themselves, which seems to him to be a more likely outcome.
Since all foreigners will have to be vaccinated and with the hope that the Spaniards themselves, if they sleep in the Albergue, will be responsible, ie vaccinated, there is a high probability that ther will not be infected persone in your room.
In case someone gets infected after all, since we will be vaccinated, there is still a very high chance that we will be immune to the virus.
In the event that an infection does occur, there is very little chance that hospitalization will be required.
Two doses of Pfizer vaccine, at least two weeks after the last vaccine, protect against Delta strain by about 79% and from hospitalization by about 91-98% according to British data.
These are the latest data I have, not yet confirmed by the study but very likely accurate.
If there will be conversations in the Albergue room about open or closed windows, I will pass on this same information to them and I hope most will choose to keep them closed if possible.
If they outvote me or it's too hot and people decide to leave the windows open, I'll still stay asleep in that room because there's a very small chance of getting sick, and if it happens by accident, I know the symptoms will be mild and not life-threatening.
You make the decision for yourself, depending on your beliefs, health and age.
I'm afraid that aerosol scientists who study these things will disagree with your hypothesis. Exchanging fresh air from outside with air inside is a good way to dilute any virus particles that could be in the air.
Had a window been open in the Chinese restaurant then the indoor air would have been exchanged with fresh air, and the amount of virus in the air would have been greatly diminished. In this case though it was a closed system, without exchange of fresh air for stale air.
Whether one becomes infected isn't just about the minimum recommended distance, it's about the amount of tune that you are exposed to the virus. 8 hours in a closed room with no air exchange? Not the safest environment.

 

Marbe2

Active member
Year of past OR future Camino
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
I'm afraid that aerosol scientists who study these things will disagree with your hypothesis. Exchanging fresh air from outside with air inside is a good way to dilute any virus particles that could be in the air.
Had a window been open in the Chinese restaurant then the indoor air would have been exchanged with fresh air, and the amount of virus in the air would have been greatly diminished. In this case though it was a closed system, without exchange of fresh air for stale air.
Whether one becomes infected isn't just about the minimum recommended distance, it's about the amount of tune that you are exposed to the virus. 8 hours in a closed room with no air exchange? Not the safest environment.

What about airflow in common small bathrooms with folks taking showers one after the other and little airflow.

My suggestion to as many as possible is to find other vaccinated walkers.
Share a room with private bath and split the cost. You don’t have to walk with them all day, but plan on accommodations together.
 
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Roby

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Maybe I'm really wrong, but this article is not a confirmation of that.
It is said here that the particles stay in the air for a long time
(The particles can be suspended in the air for hours) but in this way there will be no transmission of the virus because we sleep on beds that are at least two meters away and in this way we are protected from the transmission of the virus.
It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been in the room if you’re at a safe distance and there’s no air movement to bring the virus to you.
The example given in the article I mentioned in my answer, in which case ventilating the room has a beneficial effect because people move through the room and alternate the people staying in the room.

English is my second language so I probably can’t explain it well.
Anyway, no need for further explanations, I wrote everything I knew and wanted to say.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Year of past OR future Camino
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
Maybe I'm really wrong, but this article is not a confirmation of that.
It is said here that the particles stay in the air for a long time
(The particles can be suspended in the air for hours) but in this way there will be no transmission of the virus because we sleep on beds that are at least two meters away and in this way we are protected from the transmission of the virus.
It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been in the room if you’re at a safe distance and there’s no air movement to bring the virus to you.
The example given in the article I mentioned in my answer, in which case ventilating the room has a beneficial effect because people move through the room and alternate the people staying in the room.

English is my second language so I probably can’t explain it well.
Anyway, no need for further explanations, I wrote everything I knew and wanted to say.
People getup at night and go to the bathroom.
 
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Raggy

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Here is a helpful article with some animations to illustrate how the concentration and spread of viral particles occurs in different scenarios:


Since I am not an epidemiologist or an aerosol expert, I won't interpret this article. I will note, however, that it dates from October 29th, 2020, before the emergence of Delta variant which is more transmissible than previously circulating variants.

With regard to the actual situation in albergues- i.e. whether masks are being worn in dormitories and shared spaces during the night, I think that regardless of whatever rules may exist, you should expect to encounter some people who can't or won't wear masks while sleeping. You should also expect to encounter people who can't keep their masks above their noses. You should also expect to encounter people whose standards and tolerance of risk differ from yours. How close you want to get with these people, and for how long, is up to you.

As tinker explained with his colorful metaphor, it is each individual's responsibility to assess the risk associated with any situation, and to take personal responsibility for their own decisions. When it comes to directly interacting in a physical space with other human beings, there is no "safe interaction," only "safer interactions"

I think this thread is in danger of going off the rails, so I have alerted a moderator.
 
Last edited:

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Maybe I'm really wrong, but this article is not a confirmation of that.
It is said here that the particles stay in the air for a long time
(The particles can be suspended in the air for hours) but in this way there will be no transmission of the virus because we sleep on beds that are at least two meters away and in this way we are protected from the transmission of the virus.
It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been in the room if you’re at a safe distance and there’s no air movement to bring the virus to you.
The example given in the article I mentioned in my answer, in which case ventilating the room has a beneficial effect because people move through the room and alternate the people staying in the room.

English is my second language so I probably can’t explain it well.
Anyway, no need for further explanations, I wrote everything I knew and wanted to say.
There is always going to be air movement. The air that we breathe out doesn't automatically stop 2 meters away from us. That has just been determined to be the safe distance for short term contact - not for 8 hours in a room with no ventilation. Every time, every time someone someone gets out of bed to use the bathroom, or even just turns over in bed the air is going to move.

My suggestion to as many as possible is to find other vaccinated walkers.
Share a room with private bath and split the cost. You don’t have to walk with them all day, but plan on accommodations together.
This is a good idea.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
With regard to the actual situation in albergues- i.e. whether masks are being worn in dormitories and shared spaces during the night, I think that regardless of whatever rules may exist, you should expect to encounter some people who can't or won't wear masks while sleeping. You should also expect to encounter people who can't keep their masks above their noses. You should also expect to encounter people whose standards and tolerance of risk differs from yours. How intimate you want to be with these people is up to you.
And, as the article that you posted illustrates, masks are no where near 100% protective. They help in short term situations, but not for hours and hours in an enclosed unventilated space.
 
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