A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Luggage Transfer Correos

It Sucks that us Americans, Australians, Kiwis Etc. can't walk from our homes! Well actually we can. An Irish Camino

0 Euro Camino Bank Note
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(15,16,18)CheminduPuy(16) Portuguese(16 VDLP(17)Primitivo(17)Ireland-3000K(18) Norte18Vasco17
Many of us pilgrims were born in America or Australia or somewhere far from our ancestral homes in Europe. A fact that had depressed me a bit as my love for The Camino grew with each day since my first on the Camino when I walked over the Pyrenees from St. Jean Pied de Port(SJPP) to Roncevalles. That was 2015 and the following year I started in LePuy en Velay and continued on following the same route as before but ending in Porto, Portugal. In 2017 I started in Seville and walked the Via de la Plata and Primitivo.

In 2018 I knew that I would walk again but which one. Finally it came to me with the realization that i was one big eejit( idiot in Irish). Thinking of my Camino buddies that had walked from their homes; Falko from Berlin, Per from Sweden, and Tom from Austria, had been inspiring but also a bit saddening because walking from my home in Chicago was problematic. Well why not walk from my ancestral home in Ireland.

So May 15, 2018, I ended up setting out from Tipperary, Ireland to Santiago starting with two weeks walking through County Clare and getting to know and more importantly feel the land of my forefathers. I was welcomed into homes of some of my Irish cousins; Tommy and Lil Considine who now lived in Creegh on the farm where my grandfather Patrick was born in 1891. They provided not only a bed and food but shared family lore of years past. The same with The Scanlan’s and Hedderman’s who welcomed this pilgrim in Carrigaholt with similar Irish hospitality.

I will never forget stepping on the ferry crossing the River Shannon and slowly leaving Clare watching her in the distance as we sailed to County Kerry. Just two weeks into this Camino I knew that Clare had gotten deeply into my heart and soul. It was not only the hospitality of my many cousins, but the kindness of the Clare people, the beauty and history of the land. I had visited Clare and Ireland fairly often in the past 30 years, but that day leaving her I felt for the first time I was a “Clare Man”.

It took another 3 months to walk to Santiago and Muxia via Killarney, Inistioge, Clonegal, Dublin in Ireland. Then ferrying to Cherbourg in Normandy before walking on to Mt. St. Michel and south to St. Jean de Angely where I picked up the Camino de Tours(Paris to SJPP) to the Camino Frances.

So here I am a year later back in Clare. It did not come to me until writing these words why I chose Ireland again in between some long walks and a pilgrimage in Asia before walking another Camino from France.

Because I am a Clare Man!

The Camino teaches us that anything is possible. Walking from your home or ancestral home or country makes for a most special Pilgrimage.

Buen Camino!
 
Last edited:

Peadarmac

Irlandes Pedro
Camino(s) past & future
Astorga-Santiago '11 & '18
St Jean-Belorado '13 & '17
Belorado-Astorga '15
Fisterra-Muxia '11 & '18
Many of us pilgrims were born in America or Australia or somewhere far from our ancestral homes in Europe. A fact that had depressed me a bit as my love for The Camino grew with each day since my first on the Camino when I walked over the Pyrenees from St. Jean Pied de Port(SJPP) to Roncevalles. That was 2015 and I walked to Santiago and on to Finisterre and Muxia and then 4 more days backwards on the Portuguese Way to Valenca, Portugal. The following year I started in LePuy en Velay and continued on following the same route as before but ending in Porto, Portugal. In 2017 I started in Seville and walked the Via de la Plata. After a 10 day gig as a hospitalero in Hospital de Orbigo I walked to Santiago and Finisterre with the good fortune of being in Santiago for his Feast Day on July 25. Then walked the Primitivo to Muxia by the sea.

In 2018 I knew that I would walk again but which one. Finally it came to me with the realization that i was one big eejit( idiot in Irish). Thinking of my Camino buddies that had walked from their homes; Falko from Berlin, Per from Sweden, and Tom from Austria, had been inspiring but also a bit saddening because walking from my home in Chicago was problematic. Well why not walk from my ancestral home in Ireland.

So May 15, 2018, I ended up setting out from Tipperary, Ireland to Santiago starting with two weeks walking through County Clare and getting to know and more importantly feel the land of my forefathers. I was welcomed into homes of some of my Irish cousins; Tommy and Lil Considine who now lived in Creegh on the farm where my grandfather Patrick was born in 1891. They provided not only a bed and food but shared family lore of years past. The same with The Scanlan’s and Hedderman’s who welcomed this pilgrim in Carrigaholt with similar Irish hospitality.

I will never forget stepping on the ferry crossing the River Shannon and slowly leaving Clare watching her in the distance as we sailed to County Kerry. Just two weeks into this Camino I knew that Clare had gotten deeply into my heart and soul. It was not only the hospitality of my many cousins, but the kindness of the Clare people, the beauty and history of the land. I had visited Clare and Ireland fairly often in the past 30 years, but that day leaving her I felt for the first time I was a “Clare Man”.

It took another 3 months to walk to Santiago and Muxia via Killarney, Inistioge, Clonegal, Dublin in Ireland. Then ferrying to Cherbourg in Normandy before walking on to Mt. St. Michel and south to St. Jean de Angely where I picked up the Camino de Tours(Paris to SJPP) to the Camino Frances.

So here I am a year later back in Clare. It did not come to me until writing these words why I chose Ireland again in between some long walks and a pilgrimage in Asia before walking another Camino from France.

Because I am a Clare Man!

The Camino teaches us that anything is possible. Walking from your home or ancestral home or country makes for a most special Pilgrimage.

Buen Camino!

Fear as Clár gan doubt ! 👍
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
My ancestry is Irish and I spent a year studying in Ireland, but in recent years I have liked to confound the Canadian census officials by declaring that I am of Canadian origin on the national census forms. So I guess that I no longer qualify to begin my "from home" camino in Ireland. And a recent look into following a walking trail in Ireland has shown me that the walking infrastructure that I rely on in Spain is less developed in Ireland and much more expensive. So I shall have to pass on this option. Besides, there was one great, great grandmother from a German background, whose contribution to my ancestry I would not wish to deny.
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
The original pilgrims had no idea of a land across the pond until the 15th century, although some did arrive to the continent by boat from Ireland, England, etc. The modern equivalent would be walking from our homes to the nearest airport, then start walking again from the arrival airport in Spain, France or Portugal. For the purist, I think that would qualify as "walking from your front door." It would be at least a three-day walk across a metropolitan area of more than 2 million people from my home to the Denver airport, and I'm pretty sure that would be tougher than any three consecutive days on one of the established pilgrim routes.
 

Bodi

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Najera Sept. 2017; Najera to Astorga Oct. 2018; SJPP to Pamplona May 2019
Thanks for a great post @Kevin considine! I enjoyed following your camino last year. My grandfather was also from County Clare but I haven't researched our family tree yet. In 2020, I plan to finish the Camino Frances and then as time and funds allow, make a trip to Ireland to see the home of my ancestors. I must do more research though as the information I have so far is very sketchy. I think it was wonderful that you were able to walk from your ancestral home and that you found such a sense of belonging there. Buen Camino Clare Man!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(15,16,18)CheminduPuy(16) Portuguese(16 VDLP(17)Primitivo(17)Ireland-3000K(18) Norte18Vasco17
Thanks for a great post @Kevin considine! I enjoyed following your camino last year. My grandfather was also from County Clare but I haven't researched our family tree yet. In 2020, I plan to finish the Camino Frances and then as time and funds allow, make a trip to Ireland to see the home of my ancestors. I must do more research though as the information I have so far is very sketchy. I think it was wonderful that you were able to walk from your ancestral home and that you found such a sense of belonging there. Buen Camino Clare Man!
Thanks Bodi. Fyi there is a Clare Heritage Center in Corofin, Clare where they have all the County records. I had a report done on my grandmother’s family. Also there is a 1901 and 1911 Clare Census that can be gotten online.
 

Bodi

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Najera Sept. 2017; Najera to Astorga Oct. 2018; SJPP to Pamplona May 2019
Thanks for the information, Kevin. I'm going to start looking into it right away!
 

bbleasdale

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked from SJPdP to Puente la reine May 2018
Many of us pilgrims were born in America or Australia or somewhere far from our ancestral homes in Europe. A fact that had depressed me a bit as my love for The Camino grew with each day since my first on the Camino when I walked over the Pyrenees from St. Jean Pied de Port(SJPP) to Roncevalles. That was 2015 and I walked to Santiago and on to Finisterre and Muxia and then 4 more days backwards on the Portuguese Way to Valenca, Portugal. The following year I started in LePuy en Velay and continued on following the same route as before but ending in Porto, Portugal. In 2017 I started in Seville and walked the Via de la Plata. After a 10 day gig as a hospitalero in Hospital de Orbigo I walked to Santiago and Finisterre with the good fortune of being in Santiago for his Feast Day on July 25. Then walked the Primitivo to Muxia by the sea.

In 2018 I knew that I would walk again but which one. Finally it came to me with the realization that i was one big eejit( idiot in Irish). Thinking of my Camino buddies that had walked from their homes; Falko from Berlin, Per from Sweden, and Tom from Austria, had been inspiring but also a bit saddening because walking from my home in Chicago was problematic. Well why not walk from my ancestral home in Ireland.

So May 15, 2018, I ended up setting out from Tipperary, Ireland to Santiago starting with two weeks walking through County Clare and getting to know and more importantly feel the land of my forefathers. I was welcomed into homes of some of my Irish cousins; Tommy and Lil Considine who now lived in Creegh on the farm where my grandfather Patrick was born in 1891. They provided not only a bed and food but shared family lore of years past. The same with The Scanlan’s and Hedderman’s who welcomed this pilgrim in Carrigaholt with similar Irish hospitality.

I will never forget stepping on the ferry crossing the River Shannon and slowly leaving Clare watching her in the distance as we sailed to County Kerry. Just two weeks into this Camino I knew that Clare had gotten deeply into my heart and soul. It was not only the hospitality of my many cousins, but the kindness of the Clare people, the beauty and history of the land. I had visited Clare and Ireland fairly often in the past 30 years, but that day leaving her I felt for the first time I was a “Clare Man”.

It took another 3 months to walk to Santiago and Muxia via Killarney, Inistioge, Clonegal, Dublin in Ireland. Then ferrying to Cherbourg in Normandy before walking on to Mt. St. Michel and south to St. Jean de Angely where I picked up the Camino de Tours(Paris to SJPP) to the Camino Frances.

So here I am a year later back in Clare. It did not come to me until writing these words why I chose Ireland again in between some long walks and a pilgrimage in Asia before walking another Camino from France.

Because I am a Clare Man!

The Camino teaches us that anything is possible. Walking from your home or ancestral home or country makes for a most special Pilgrimage.

Buen Camino!
Come on the Banner! 😂💛💙💛 Great story Kevin and I admire your achievements...but sure you’re a Clareman! Both my husband and I are Clare people living in Connemara (spoilt we are with the best of both worlds) and we will be flying to Bilbao on Thursday to pick up where we left off in Beautiful Burgos and go as far as Fisterre. Can’t wait!
Slán go fóill agus go n-éirí an bóthar leat! Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(15,16,18)CheminduPuy(16) Portuguese(16 VDLP(17)Primitivo(17)Ireland-3000K(18) Norte18Vasco17
Come on the Banner! 😂💛💙💛 Great story Kevin and I admire your achievements...but sure you’re a Clareman! Both my husband and I are Clare people living in Connemara (spoilt we are with the best of both worlds) and we will be flying to Bilbao on Thursday to pick up where we left off in Beautiful Burgos and go as far as Fisterre. Can’t wait!
Slán go fóill agus go n-éirí an bóthar leat! Buen Camino!
Buen Camino.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
The modern equivalent would be walking from our homes to the nearest airport, then start walking again from the arrival airport in Spain, France or Portugal. For the purist, I think that would qualify as "walking from your front door."
I am something of an obsessive about walking "the whole way" from my starting point to my destination. Unfortunately I live in the UK and I have yet to find a way to walk on water and I lack the stamina to swim the Channel. So when walking from my home in Wales to Santiago I took a ferry from Portsmouth to St Malo. Although I had no practical alternatives to using public transport in this way I still feel slightly guilty about having done so and there is still a nagging feeling of an incomplete journey. For this particular "purist" the notion of walking to your nearest airport then flying to a distant starting point in Europe does not remotely qualify as "walking from your front door" :)
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
I am something of an obsessive about walking "the whole way" from my starting point to my destination. Unfortunately I live in the UK and I have yet to find a way to walk on water and I lack the stamina to swim the Channel. So when walking from my home in Wales to Santiago I took a ferry from Portsmouth to St Malo. Although I had no practical alternatives to using public transport in this way I still feel slightly guilty about having done so and there is still a nagging feeling of an incomplete journey. For this particular "purist" the notion of walking to your nearest airport then flying to a distant starting point in Europe does not remotely qualify as "walking from your front door" :)
@Bradypus
I share this obsession: you and I were two of the small number who walked every step to Almaden de la Plata on that 29km "stage from hell" near the beginning of the Via de la Plata two years ago. But, regardless of the reasons for doing so, for me there is the sense of completion and continuity, of being part of the geography of the place while I walk through it. It may not all be in my memory, but it is all in my body: in my joints and my breathing and my moving from here to there in a way that is somehow natural to my being human. This year, I must take a bus from Madrid airport to Najera to begin my service as a hospitalera, then back to Madrid to begin my walk on the camino de Madrid. It feels a bit strange. But I cannot see myself going back to the airport to walk from there. That would be even stranger.
 

Helen O'Shaughnessy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via dela plata, via Francigena
Many of us pilgrims were born in America or Australia or somewhere far from our ancestral homes in Europe. A fact that had depressed me a bit as my love for The Camino grew with each day since my first on the Camino when I walked over the Pyrenees from St. Jean Pied de Port(SJPP) to Roncevalles. That was 2015 and the following year I started in LePuy en Velay and continued on following the same route as before but ending in Porto, Portugal. In 2017 I started in Seville and walked the Via de la Plata and Primitivo.

In 2018 I knew that I would walk again but which one. Finally it came to me with the realization that i was one big eejit( idiot in Irish). Thinking of my Camino buddies that had walked from their homes; Falko from Berlin, Per from Sweden, and Tom from Austria, had been inspiring but also a bit saddening because walking from my home in Chicago was problematic. Well why not walk from my ancestral home in Ireland.

So May 15, 2018, I ended up setting out from Tipperary, Ireland to Santiago starting with two weeks walking through County Clare and getting to know and more importantly feel the land of my forefathers. I was welcomed into homes of some of my Irish cousins; Tommy and Lil Considine who now lived in Creegh on the farm where my grandfather Patrick was born in 1891. They provided not only a bed and food but shared family lore of years past. The same with The Scanlan’s and Hedderman’s who welcomed this pilgrim in Carrigaholt with similar Irish hospitality.

I will never forget stepping on the ferry crossing the River Shannon and slowly leaving Clare watching her in the distance as we sailed to County Kerry. Just two weeks into this Camino I knew that Clare had gotten deeply into my heart and soul. It was not only the hospitality of my many cousins, but the kindness of the Clare people, the beauty and history of the land. I had visited Clare and Ireland fairly often in the past 30 years, but that day leaving her I felt for the first time I was a “Clare Man”.

It took another 3 months to walk to Santiago and Muxia via Killarney, Inistioge, Clonegal, Dublin in Ireland. Then ferrying to Cherbourg in Normandy before walking on to Mt. St. Michel and south to St. Jean de Angely where I picked up the Camino de Tours(Paris to SJPP) to the Camino Frances.

So here I am a year later back in Clare. It did not come to me until writing these words why I chose Ireland again in between some long walks and a pilgrimage in Asia before walking another Camino from France.

Because I am a Clare Man!

The Camino teaches us that anything is possible. Walking from your home or ancestral home or country makes for a most special Pilgrimage.

Buen Camino!
Great stuff..good idea !. Helen. My family are Considines from Kilshanny...you may have been to Kilshanny House, near Ennistymon, it used to be my grandparents home. Not so long ago, I cycled the Royal canal, from the Shannon to Dublin, dubbed the Famine Way for tragic historical reasons...but so peaceful and quiet...recommended.
 

Tommy Barr

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances ,Le Puy, Norte,Primitivo, VDLP,Ingles,Portuguese, Mozarabe
Many of us pilgrims were born in America or Australia or somewhere far from our ancestral homes in Europe. A fact that had depressed me a bit as my love for The Camino grew with each day since my first on the Camino when I walked over the Pyrenees from St. Jean Pied de Port(SJPP) to Roncevalles. That was 2015 and the following year I started in LePuy en Velay and continued on following the same route as before but ending in Porto, Portugal. In 2017 I started in Seville and walked the Via de la Plata and Primitivo.

In 2018 I knew that I would walk again but which one. Finally it came to me with the realization that i was one big eejit( idiot in Irish). Thinking of my Camino buddies that had walked from their homes; Falko from Berlin, Per from Sweden, and Tom from Austria, had been inspiring but also a bit saddening because walking from my home in Chicago was problematic. Well why not walk from my ancestral home in Ireland.

So May 15, 2018, I ended up setting out from Tipperary, Ireland to Santiago starting with two weeks walking through County Clare and getting to know and more importantly feel the land of my forefathers. I was welcomed into homes of some of my Irish cousins; Tommy and Lil Considine who now lived in Creegh on the farm where my grandfather Patrick was born in 1891. They provided not only a bed and food but shared family lore of years past. The same with The Scanlan’s and Hedderman’s who welcomed this pilgrim in Carrigaholt with similar Irish hospitality.

I will never forget stepping on the ferry crossing the River Shannon and slowly leaving Clare watching her in the distance as we sailed to County Kerry. Just two weeks into this Camino I knew that Clare had gotten deeply into my heart and soul. It was not only the hospitality of my many cousins, but the kindness of the Clare people, the beauty and history of the land. I had visited Clare and Ireland fairly often in the past 30 years, but that day leaving her I felt for the first time I was a “Clare Man”.

It took another 3 months to walk to Santiago and Muxia via Killarney, Inistioge, Clonegal, Dublin in Ireland. Then ferrying to Cherbourg in Normandy before walking on to Mt. St. Michel and south to St. Jean de Angely where I picked up the Camino de Tours(Paris to SJPP) to the Camino Frances.

So here I am a year later back in Clare. It did not come to me until writing these words why I chose Ireland again in between some long walks and a pilgrimage in Asia before walking another Camino from France.

Because I am a Clare Man!

The Camino teaches us that anything is possible. Walking from your home or ancestral home or country makes for a most special Pilgrimage.

Buen Camino!
Many of us pilgrims were born in America or Australia or somewhere far from our ancestral homes in Europe. A fact that had depressed me a bit as my love for The Camino grew with each day since my first on the Camino when I walked over the Pyrenees from St. Jean Pied de Port(SJPP) to Roncevalles. That was 2015 and the following year I started in LePuy en Velay and continued on following the same route as before but ending in Porto, Portugal. In 2017 I started in Seville and walked the Via de la Plata and Primitivo.

In 2018 I knew that I would walk again but which one. Finally it came to me with the realization that i was one big eejit( idiot in Irish). Thinking of my Camino buddies that had walked from their homes; Falko from Berlin, Per from Sweden, and Tom from Austria, had been inspiring but also a bit saddening because walking from my home in Chicago was problematic. Well why not walk from my ancestral home in Ireland.

So May 15, 2018, I ended up setting out from Tipperary, Ireland to Santiago starting with two weeks walking through County Clare and getting to know and more importantly feel the land of my forefathers. I was welcomed into homes of some of my Irish cousins; Tommy and Lil Considine who now lived in Creegh on the farm where my grandfather Patrick was born in 1891. They provided not only a bed and food but shared family lore of years past. The same with The Scanlan’s and Hedderman’s who welcomed this pilgrim in Carrigaholt with similar Irish hospitality.

I will never forget stepping on the ferry crossing the River Shannon and slowly leaving Clare watching her in the distance as we sailed to County Kerry. Just two weeks into this Camino I knew that Clare had gotten deeply into my heart and soul. It was not only the hospitality of my many cousins, but the kindness of the Clare people, the beauty and history of the land. I had visited Clare and Ireland fairly often in the past 30 years, but that day leaving her I felt for the first time I was a “Clare Man”.

It took another 3 months to walk to Santiago and Muxia via Killarney, Inistioge, Clonegal, Dublin in Ireland. Then ferrying to Cherbourg in Normandy before walking on to Mt. St. Michel and south to St. Jean de Angely where I picked up the Camino de Tours(Paris to SJPP) to the Camino Frances.

So here I am a year later back in Clare. It did not come to me until writing these words why I chose Ireland again in between some long walks and a pilgrimage in Asia before walking another Camino from France.

Because I am a Clare Man!

The Camino teaches us that anything is possible. Walking from your home or ancestral home or country makes for a most special Pilgrimage.

Buen Camino!
Hi Kevin
well done. I'm from Tyrone and plan to walk from my home town Strabane next year. Walking to Dublin and the ferry to Cherbourg and then walk to Santiago is the closest i can get to walking from home. I would also like to visit Mont Saint Michel. From there I'm undecided. I know the quickest and easiest route would be down the West Coast but I'v camped all along there with the family when the kids were small and think it might be a bit boring as compared to the central/Eastern part of France. My Camino experience is similar to yours, Frances, LePuy to Muxia via the Frances, Le Puy to Muxia via Norte/Primitivo, VDLP, Mozarabe,Portuguese, Ingles, Norte. I would be grateful for information of your experience of routes, waymarking and accommodation(budget) in France before Le Puy. Also the possibility of wild camping.
Thanks a lot
Tommy
 

Lydia Gillen

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007/8/9 2011 (C.F 2015)
To Bodi and those interested in their Irish family roots the webpage irishgenealogy.ie is free and gives birth marriage and death details. Irish census.ie also free gives the census of 1901 and 1911. It is absolutely amazing to us nowadays how many children were in families and how small their living area. the 1911 census also asks the question 'how many children were born in this family' which can solve the question 'how come no further details of auntie x, etc.

I have just come back from the Munster Fleadh Ceoil in Ennis. I love County Clare
 

Bodi

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Najera Sept. 2017; Najera to Astorga Oct. 2018; SJPP to Pamplona May 2019
Thank you for the great information Lydia. I was able to find my grandfather, his mother and two siblings on the 1901 Census. I will have a look at the other websites. Thanks so much for your post!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(15,16,18)CheminduPuy(16) Portuguese(16 VDLP(17)Primitivo(17)Ireland-3000K(18) Norte18Vasco17
Great stuff..good idea !. Helen. My family are Considines from Kilshanny...you may have been to Kilshanny House, near Ennistymon, it used to be my grandparents home. Not so long ago, I cycled the Royal canal, from the Shannon to Dublin, dubbed the Famine Way for tragic historical reasons...but so peaceful and quiet...recommended.
I walked through Ennistymon on my pilgrimage last year. Don’t know Kilshanny House but looks nice. I’ll check it out next time.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(15,16,18)CheminduPuy(16) Portuguese(16 VDLP(17)Primitivo(17)Ireland-3000K(18) Norte18Vasco17
Come on the Banner! 😂💛💙💛 Great story Kevin and I admire your achievements...but sure you’re a Clareman! Both my husband and I are Clare people living in Connemara (spoilt we are with the best of both worlds) and we will be flying to Bilbao on Thursday to pick up where we left off in Beautiful Burgos and go as far as Fisterre. Can’t wait!
Slán go fóill agus go n-éirí an bóthar leat! Buen Camino!
Buen Camino and keep cool. If it flows there is a wonderful Donativo Albergue, Reposo del Andayón, in Cuerres. Sandra and Katrine are hosts at a fabulous eco Albergue.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(15,16,18)CheminduPuy(16) Portuguese(16 VDLP(17)Primitivo(17)Ireland-3000K(18) Norte18Vasco17
Buen Camino and keep cool. If it flows there is a wonderful Donativo Albergue, Reposo del Andayón, in Cuerres. Sandra and Katrine are hosts at a fabulous eco Albergue.
Sandra is a good friend and I have visited her and Katrine and I could not agree more that Reposo del Andayon is a must stop on Camino Norte.
 
Thread starter OLDER threads on this topic Forum Replies Date
H Camino Frances 255
OLDER threads on this topic
Where are all the Americans???

Book your lodging here

Get e-mail updates from Casa Ivar (Forum + Forum Store content)




Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 15 1.4%
  • February

    Votes: 6 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 43 4.0%
  • April

    Votes: 165 15.2%
  • May

    Votes: 265 24.4%
  • June

    Votes: 83 7.6%
  • July

    Votes: 22 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 23 2.1%
  • September

    Votes: 312 28.7%
  • October

    Votes: 134 12.3%
  • November

    Votes: 13 1.2%
  • December

    Votes: 6 0.6%
Top